Date   
Re: Crossing Pirate Waters

David Cummane
 

My small efforts to reduce spam type messages, unsigned,  were clearly futile.

During one period of my life I wore diapers.  I wasn’t o member of this forum then either.

David
Ker Marie
SM#101


On 26 Jan 2020, at 00:14, Orion Martin <poonz1@...> wrote:

Respectfully, I totally disagree with this comment. You were once a non-Amel owner...

I’m glad Bill has the good sense to find a solution i.e a subgroup for commercial postings. Thank you Bill for your work in keeping the Amel owners group going and keeping it inclusive for all interested participants.

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

James Alton
 

Mike,

   A few things that you might check on your exhaust system that could be the cause:

1.  Check to be sure that the exhaust hose is looped as high as possible between the muffler and the discharge.  Perhaps a previous owner used less hose and lowered the loop from the original design?  In order for seawater to enter from the exhaust port it has to climb over this loop so the higher is better.

2.  Insure that your muffler is working properly.  Run the engine, shut down and then remove the exhaust hose to the muffler.  I like to see the muffler less than 1/3 full due to the drain back from the exhaust hose.  In order for the engine to flood from the exhaust port the muffler first has to fill with water.  If the muffler has more water than this, you could have a problem inside the muffler that does not allow the engine to properly clear the muffler usually due to corrosion. 

3.  Engines can also flood from the seawater intake side of things.  The line should be looped as high above the WL as practical and there should be a vent at the top of the loop that must function or seawater can be siphoned over the loop and into the engine.   Insure that the vent is working properly. 

4.  Ensure that the seawater injection elbow normally located at the connection between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust hose is not corroded through.

My boat is a Maramu so our systems are probably somewhat different.  I have removed the exhaust hose a few times after a rough passage and before starting the engine to see how much water had accumulated in the muffler and so far the level has always been nominal, or about the same as after shutting down the engine while dockside.  I have therefore not been too concerned about running my engine on passage and have not had any water in the engine to date.  

There are a number of low pressure check valves that you can install in the exhaust system to help prevent seawater from being driven in the exhaust port that you could look into but I suspect your problem is due to a faulty component or some change that has been made in the design of the exhaust system.  Best of luck to you, seawater can sure do a lot of damage to your engine so I hope that you can find the cause and rectify it.

Best,

James

SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Jan 25, 2020, at 4:56 PM, Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:

Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 






--

Re: Crossing Pirate Waters

Orion Martin
 

Respectfully, I totally disagree with this comment. You were once a non-Amel owner...

I’m glad Bill has the good sense to find a solution i.e a subgroup for commercial postings. Thank you Bill for your work in keeping the Amel owners group going and keeping it inclusive for all interested participants.

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

Ruslan Osmonov
 

Thank you Bill. Agree about thought through, one of the big reasons why I’m looking at Amels. 

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 5:41 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Ruslan Osmonov,

Some of the most frustrating issues experienced by some Amel owners are the failure of systems or modifications made by previous owners. 

Valves fail in saltwater environments. Electrical sensors and switches fail.

I think that you should seriously reconsider the solution suggested by Charles Doane, who BTW, is not an Amel owner. Also, keep in mind that it is very possible that a 2nd, 3rd, or 4th owner of an Amel has no idea whether the mechanicals, including the exhaust system, are Amel OEM.

I recommend that you should be very cautious in designing a change to an Amel designed system, device, or procedure. Amel is not totally infallible, but in my experience, Amel has usually thought things out correctly and reached the best conclusion.

--

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 3:56 PM Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:
Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 

--

--

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

 

Ruslan Osmonov,

Some of the most frustrating issues experienced by some Amel owners are the failure of systems or modifications made by previous owners. 

Valves fail in saltwater environments. Electrical sensors and switches fail.

I think that you should seriously reconsider the solution suggested by Charles Doane, who BTW, is not an Amel owner. Also, keep in mind that it is very possible that a 2nd, 3rd, or 4th owner of an Amel has no idea whether the mechanicals, including the exhaust system, are Amel OEM.

I recommend that you should be very cautious in designing a change to an Amel designed system, device, or procedure. Amel is not totally infallible, but in my experience, Amel has usually thought things out correctly and reached the best conclusion.

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
View My Training Calendar

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 3:56 PM Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:
Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 

--

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

Ruslan Osmonov
 

Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 

--

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ


On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely


--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 

Re: SM leaking ATF fluid #solution

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hello,

I'm having the same issue with my HBW250. I'm guessing the repair will be similar. Just wondering if anyone has changed this seal before and has any tips/suggestions? Also, can anyone confirm the seal dimensions? I found online it might be SD 20x26x4 radial. Would be nice to have the correct replacement on hand and do the job in one go.

Cheers,
Mike

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020, 5:13 AM Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:
Bill
Many thanks for your speedy reply. I believe it's the seal that has gone as that is where it is leaking from. I will have a go at changing it. 

Many thanks for your help. 

Rob

FORESIGHT SM #152

On Tue, 14 Jan 2020, 16:25 CW Bill Rouse, <brouse@...> wrote:
Rob,

I have not personally experienced this issue. Your ZF 25 holds 0.75 liters of fluid. Is it possibly overfilled? You do not screw in the dipstick to check the level.

If not, it probably is a worn sealing ring. If so, maybe this will help you:

image.png
5.2 Removing and disassembling the
actuating lever cover plate

5.2.1 Always set actuating lever to neutral
position.
5.2.2 Remove hex nuts (22) from cover
plate (9), using 13 mm spanner (wrench),
and take off spring washers (4).
5.2.3 Remove cover plate assembly (12),
lever (6) and actuating cam (11).
5.2.4 Remove screw (7) from lever (6).
Pull off lever (6). Remove actuating cam
(11) and needle bearing (70) only in
models ZF 12 M - 15 M - 25 M - 30 M.
Remove actuating cam sealing ring (8).

==========================

6.3 Assembling the shifting fork in
gearbox section side shifting cover

6.3.1 Insert shifting fork (15) into gearbox
section (1) side the actuating lever
in such a way that the long arm of the
fork points downwards.
6.3.2 Insert shifting rod (16) through
bores in gearbox and shifting fork.
6.3.3 Fit screw plug (17) to gearbox,
making certain that the clearance between
shifting rod (16) and screw plug
(17) is min. 0.5 mm (0.02 in).
Seal screw plug with Loctite 242 (ZF 3
M - 5 M only O-Ring).
6.3.4 Check shifting fork for easy
movability.
6.4 Pre-assembling the actuating
lever cover plate

Use punch tool to press sealing ring (8)
into cover plate (9). Spread antifriction
bearing grease between sealing lips.

6.4.1 Insert actuating cam assembly (11)
into cover plate (9).
6.4.2 Fit actuating lever (6).
IMPORTANT:
Clearance between actuating lever and
cover plate 0.5 mm (0.02 in).
6.4.3 Clamp actuating lever by means
of retaining screw (7), using a 13 mm
spanner (wrench). Screw in with torque
of 20 Nm.

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
View My Training Calendar
cloudHQPowered by
cloudHQ


On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 8:28 AM Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:
Hello I have ATF fluid leaking from the gear lever on my gearbox.
Any suggestions?

Rob smith
Foresight
SM#152

Re: Limiting group members to Amel Owners

Jarek Zemlo
 

Hello to All,
before I decided to go for Amel I joined the Group. The Group an quality of Amel convinced me to purchase my fantastic NOA BLUE hull 201. Lets continue the way it was always done

cheers
--
Jarek Zemlo
NOA BLUE SM201

Re: Limiting group members to Amel Owners

Nicolas Klene
 

Orion I couldn’t agree more with you !
i have been allowed on this site a good year before becoming a proud owner a few month back !
I had the opportunity to have an invaluable insight  that only re unforced my decision making.
excluding potential owners would be a mistake .
Nicolas Klene
DarNico
SM2K # 471
In Marseille

Re: Limiting group members to Amel Owners

Stefano Silvestri <stefano.silvestri.51@...>
 

100% agree with Martin. This site has to be left open to anyone interested in Amels, I had a big help on finding "the right one" I'll very probably purchase in march!
Thanks

Re: Masthead Tri Colour LOPOLIGHT A54

luvkante
 

Teun, 

gladly awaiting your pics.

My masthead situation should be similar to yours, Kaj had the same FLIR masthead camera as I.

Martin

Re: Masthead Tri Colour LOPOLIGHT A54

Teun BAAS
 

My LOPOLIGHT was replaced Q3 2018 in NEW CALEDONIA with an all integrated  LOPOLIGHT LED light - original OEM LOPOLIGHT no longer available. Replaced with current production all integrated LED LOPOLIGHT. Kind of expensive like around USD900 just for the unit?

Marine electrician had to go up the mast at least twice (if not more) as he had to modify the special AMEL installed bracket. Should have pics. Skiing now in CO - will check when I return in PHX in 10 days.

Overall an expensive exercise as labor (2 people) added another USD1500 - USD2000 as it was hard to get old bracket off.

Teun BAAS
A 54. SV AMELIT

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: "luvkante via Groups.Io" <luvkante@...>
Date: 1/25/20 03:17 (GMT-07:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Masthead Tri Colour LOPOLIGHT A54

When I bought our new AMEL 54 CHIARA a couple of years ago, I ordered LED positionlights including a Tricolor masthead light. Now it expired and I have to order a new one.

I am not on the boat, so I can not check, whether it is a combined one with anchorlight.
- can anybody provide me the information, whether the originally installed AMEL tricolor light is a integrated one  with anchorlight ?
- does anybody possibly have a photo of the masttop installation?
- can anybody possibly provide informations about installing and connecting the cable of the new LOPOLIGHT?

Your help is highly appreciated with great relief!

Martin
Amel 54 #149 CHIARA
Varazze/Italy

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Randall
 

Woody, I believe you are correct. Wireless everything on a boat seems to be where the world is headed. I have more wires going everywhere, with many left from previous applications. The mizzen has a few wires that bang around during passage, a sleep disrupter. I will be doing a major electronics change this year. And I believe that the side benefit to wireless is you wont need to do so much wire pulling.
Passed your location in Spain a month ago. Fair winds on your crossing to the Caribbean.

Randall
A-54 #56
Gibraltar 

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 7:18 AM Alan "Woody" Wood <woody@...> wrote:
We have been sailing the med for the last few years, home educate our kids, run a YouTube channel as well as stream films etc., so are heavy users of wifi! We did instal digital yacht gear but never got it to work properly and gave up in the end.. an expensive white elephant!  What we discovered is phone coverage in 90% of the Med is excellent (4G) even in places like Turkey and Tunisia with (mostly) uniterupted on-the-go coverage coastal sailing even between countries. So we just use our I-phone as a hotspot onboard with a UK Vodaphone deal which covers all of the med and some parts of the Caribbean. (about €30/100gig - Sim only per month). Only caveat is you need a UK address. We have two iPhones on this deal so that’s 200gigs at €60 which we never get through even with our heavy usage. Things may change once we leave the Med but mobile tech will always be ahead of the curve and coverage expanding and improving (5G) all the time. I know many people have invested a lot in Wi-Fi routers etc onboard (us too!) but tbh I think mobile technology is the way to go if simplicity and convenience is your priority. Just my t’pence worth!

Re: Masthead Tri Colour LOPOLIGHT A54

Courtney Gorman
 

Hi Martin mine are separate 
Trippin 
54 #101


On Jan 25, 2020, at 6:17 AM, luvkante via Groups.Io <luvkante@...> wrote:

When I bought our new AMEL 54 CHIARA a couple of years ago, I ordered LED positionlights including a Tricolor masthead light. Now it expired and I have to order a new one.

I am not on the boat, so I can not check, whether it is a combined one with anchorlight.
- can anybody provide me the information, whether the originally installed AMEL tricolor light is a integrated one  with anchorlight ?
- does anybody possibly have a photo of the masttop installation?
- can anybody possibly provide informations about installing and connecting the cable of the new LOPOLIGHT?

Your help is highly appreciated with great relief!

Martin
Amel 54 #149 CHIARA
Varazze/Italy

Re: Masthead Tri Colour LOPOLIGHT A54

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Martin,

 

As far as I recall it is a combined mooring and tricolour light. We had ours replaced in Majorca several years ago. It took the engineer about half an hour so I guess pretty straightforward, although I did not go up the mast at that time.

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of luvkante via Groups.Io
Sent: 25 January 2020 06:17
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Masthead Tri Colour LOPOLIGHT A54

 

When I bought our new AMEL 54 CHIARA a couple of years ago, I ordered LED positionlights including a Tricolor masthead light. Now it expired and I have to order a new one.

I am not on the boat, so I can not check, whether it is a combined one with anchorlight.
- can anybody provide me the information, whether the originally installed AMEL tricolor light is a integrated one  with anchorlight ?
- does anybody possibly have a photo of the masttop installation?
- can anybody possibly provide informations about installing and connecting the cable of the new LOPOLIGHT?

Your help is highly appreciated with great relief!

Martin
Amel 54 #149 CHIARA
Varazze/Italy


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Masthead Tri Colour LOPOLIGHT A54

luvkante
 

When I bought our new AMEL 54 CHIARA a couple of years ago, I ordered LED positionlights including a Tricolor masthead light. Now it expired and I have to order a new one.

I am not on the boat, so I can not check, whether it is a combined one with anchorlight.
- can anybody provide me the information, whether the originally installed AMEL tricolor light is a integrated one  with anchorlight ?
- does anybody possibly have a photo of the masttop installation?
- can anybody possibly provide informations about installing and connecting the cable of the new LOPOLIGHT?

Your help is highly appreciated with great relief!

Martin
Amel 54 #149 CHIARA
Varazze/Italy

Re: New owners

Ian Park
 

Bill and Joanna,
Congratulations on your Amel!
We met in St Anne’s when you had engine problems and were setting a second anchor next to us!
So glad you’ve got your Amel - I guess it will soon be in as beautiful condition as Baidarka! Look forward to some pictures when you’ve done all your refit!

Ian and Linda

Ocean Hobo

Santorin 96

Re: Limiting group members to Amel Owners

Alan Leslie
 

I agree.
I joined the Yahoo group before I bought my Amel, and it was a major contributor to my decision to buy one.
I would not want prospective owners to be unable to access this resource, it was, and is, so valuable to me.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Alan "Woody" Wood
 

We have been sailing the med for the last few years, home educate our kids, run a YouTube channel as well as stream films etc., so are heavy users of wifi! We did instal digital yacht gear but never got it to work properly and gave up in the end.. an expensive white elephant!  What we discovered is phone coverage in 90% of the Med is excellent (4G) even in places like Turkey and Tunisia with (mostly) uniterupted on-the-go coverage coastal sailing even between countries. So we just use our I-phone as a hotspot onboard with a UK Vodaphone deal which covers all of the med and some parts of the Caribbean. (about €30/100gig - Sim only per month). Only caveat is you need a UK address. We have two iPhones on this deal so that’s 200gigs at €60 which we never get through even with our heavy usage. Things may change once we leave the Med but mobile tech will always be ahead of the curve and coverage expanding and improving (5G) all the time. I know many people have invested a lot in Wi-Fi routers etc onboard (us too!) but tbh I think mobile technology is the way to go if simplicity and convenience is your priority. Just my t’pence worth!