Date   

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

 

Mike,

I think you will discover that SM 23 has been modified by previous owners.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 8:14 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Thanks James! I've looked into all of those things except the internals of the injection elbow. I'll definitely check that as soon as I can. I'll give the muffler a double check while I'm at it. I'll let you know if I find anything... seems like I'm swallowing more seawater than most here.

Now something I overlooked earlier... at the through hull there is a little over a foot of extra wide pipe/hose. I'll attach a photo and hope it comes through. Looking up the exhaust from the outside, it appears to be totally hollow. This must be where the non-return rubber flap should be installed as referenced by Oliver and others.

Does anyone have any experience in replacing this? Probably best to source this part from Amel? Although given my SM is 1990, so this specific modification might be non-Amel for me. Is it just held in place with some marine adhesive?

Any advice is welcome here. Haulout is scheduled soon so it would be an ideal time to fit something.

Cheers,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:30 PM James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mike,

   A few things that you might check on your exhaust system that could be the cause:

1.  Check to be sure that the exhaust hose is looped as high as possible between the muffler and the discharge.  Perhaps a previous owner used less hose and lowered the loop from the original design?  In order for seawater to enter from the exhaust port it has to climb over this loop so the higher is better.

2.  Insure that your muffler is working properly.  Run the engine, shut down and then remove the exhaust hose to the muffler.  I like to see the muffler less than 1/3 full due to the drain back from the exhaust hose.  In order for the engine to flood from the exhaust port the muffler first has to fill with water.  If the muffler has more water than this, you could have a problem inside the muffler that does not allow the engine to properly clear the muffler usually due to corrosion. 

3.  Engines can also flood from the seawater intake side of things.  The line should be looped as high above the WL as practical and there should be a vent at the top of the loop that must function or seawater can be siphoned over the loop and into the engine.   Insure that the vent is working properly. 

4.  Ensure that the seawater injection elbow normally located at the connection between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust hose is not corroded through.

My boat is a Maramu so our systems are probably somewhat different.  I have removed the exhaust hose a few times after a rough passage and before starting the engine to see how much water had accumulated in the muffler and so far the level has always been nominal, or about the same as after shutting down the engine while dockside.  I have therefore not been too concerned about running my engine on passage and have not had any water in the engine to date.  

There are a number of low pressure check valves that you can install in the exhaust system to help prevent seawater from being driven in the exhaust port that you could look into but I suspect your problem is due to a faulty component or some change that has been made in the design of the exhaust system.  Best of luck to you, seawater can sure do a lot of damage to your engine so I hope that you can find the cause and rectify it.

Best,

James

SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Jan 25, 2020, at 4:56 PM, Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:

Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 






--


Re: Generator monitoring

 

Two things:

Onan sells the instrument add-on. It is plug and play.

The Onan sensors and pcb control are designed to shut down the generator before damage. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 6:35 PM william reynolds <sail23692@...> wrote:
Being new to my SM2000 I was surprised at the lack of instrumentation
for the generator. Having had 2 generator equipped boats that had oil pressure, temp. and 
A/C load I am curious if all SM are missing these vital instruments. They give advance warning of an oil leak, bad impeller
or A/C overload. I'm also a commercial pilot and would not fly without this instrumentation. Is this the norm for these boats?
Bill Reynolds
Cloudstreet SM #331


Re: Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

David Kurtz
 

I’m following this topic with interest.  First, the seacocks need to be bonded and protected by the sacrificial anode.  I’m a new Amel owner and learning about its electrical system right now.  I’m a retired electrical contractor and engineer and I will say that I’ve not been a fan of floating ground systems.  However, Matt Salatino has it right... if it’s not broke....  I’m not about to change anything until I have a full understanding of the systems.
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Re: Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Thanks guys! Glad to hear the arch and panels were set up properly. I think I'll remove the MPPT grounding to the generator and call it a day. I was unsure of making that connection in the first place.

On a side note, and likely covered in a seperate topic... are all your seacocks/through hulls bonded or isolated? Some of mine look like they were connected at one point but now I find cut grounding wires in some places... no signs of corrosion but obviously I can't see the whole picture.

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 27, 2020, 1:18 PM Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Jan 26, 2020, at 4:32 PM, SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I've done some searching but haven't found a definitive answer. I'm curious for those of you with solar panels mounted on an aft arch (mine is aluminum)... do you have any grounding in place? My panels and arch have been in place for roughly two years and I haven't noticed any problems. No other equipment on the arch at this point. Does grounding just protect in the event of a panel failure/short/leak?

The MPPT controller is grounded to the generator. Is this OK?

Can anyone recommend some tests I could perform with the voltmeter to make sure everything is OK?

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


Super Maramu Main Mast Furling foil Sheered

Graham Boyd
 

SM Main mast furler foil sheered at base just above the gear box (see pictures).

This metal fatigue event rather spoilt our Chinese NY cruise yesterday. The actual sheer occurred when furling the sail head to wind in 15 kts of wind. 

Has anyone else suffered this failure? If so what was the fix?

I understand from this site that the top of the foil in the mast is unsupported. This makes me wonder if there is sufficient "extra" length of foil in the mast to just drill new holes in the foil above the sheer line and drop it back into the gear box. Would the swivel then "fall off the top" of the foil when the sail is hoisted? Failing that extending the foil at the top to support the swivel with the sail up could be the answer.

Any thoughts/experiences welcome!

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong

jj


Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Thanks James! I've looked into all of those things except the internals of the injection elbow. I'll definitely check that as soon as I can. I'll give the muffler a double check while I'm at it. I'll let you know if I find anything... seems like I'm swallowing more seawater than most here.

Now something I overlooked earlier... at the through hull there is a little over a foot of extra wide pipe/hose. I'll attach a photo and hope it comes through. Looking up the exhaust from the outside, it appears to be totally hollow. This must be where the non-return rubber flap should be installed as referenced by Oliver and others.

Does anyone have any experience in replacing this? Probably best to source this part from Amel? Although given my SM is 1990, so this specific modification might be non-Amel for me. Is it just held in place with some marine adhesive?

Any advice is welcome here. Haulout is scheduled soon so it would be an ideal time to fit something.

Cheers,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:30 PM James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mike,

   A few things that you might check on your exhaust system that could be the cause:

1.  Check to be sure that the exhaust hose is looped as high as possible between the muffler and the discharge.  Perhaps a previous owner used less hose and lowered the loop from the original design?  In order for seawater to enter from the exhaust port it has to climb over this loop so the higher is better.

2.  Insure that your muffler is working properly.  Run the engine, shut down and then remove the exhaust hose to the muffler.  I like to see the muffler less than 1/3 full due to the drain back from the exhaust hose.  In order for the engine to flood from the exhaust port the muffler first has to fill with water.  If the muffler has more water than this, you could have a problem inside the muffler that does not allow the engine to properly clear the muffler usually due to corrosion. 

3.  Engines can also flood from the seawater intake side of things.  The line should be looped as high above the WL as practical and there should be a vent at the top of the loop that must function or seawater can be siphoned over the loop and into the engine.   Insure that the vent is working properly. 

4.  Ensure that the seawater injection elbow normally located at the connection between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust hose is not corroded through.

My boat is a Maramu so our systems are probably somewhat different.  I have removed the exhaust hose a few times after a rough passage and before starting the engine to see how much water had accumulated in the muffler and so far the level has always been nominal, or about the same as after shutting down the engine while dockside.  I have therefore not been too concerned about running my engine on passage and have not had any water in the engine to date.  

There are a number of low pressure check valves that you can install in the exhaust system to help prevent seawater from being driven in the exhaust port that you could look into but I suspect your problem is due to a faulty component or some change that has been made in the design of the exhaust system.  Best of luck to you, seawater can sure do a lot of damage to your engine so I hope that you can find the cause and rectify it.

Best,

James

SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Jan 25, 2020, at 4:56 PM, Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:

Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 






--


Re: Saint Maarten

Matt Salatino
 

Terrible!
We went in there for fuel. It seemed like a great hurricane hole! I guess the best protection from a CAT 4 or 5 hurricane is about 100 NM............

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Jan 26, 2020, at 8:24 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...> wrote:

Not sure the attachment will show, here are a few pictures post Irma.  
You can see how destroyed what this marina.  
Reminder: Irma was a Category 5 and it was a direct hit.  




On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 08:49:39 PM UTC, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:


Good to know. I’m surprised they had much damage. The place is down a long canal, and completely surrounded.....

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

<P1130756.JPG>
<P1130763.JPG>
<P1130819.JPG>
<P1130888.JPG>


Re: Hi Alexandre,

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

will do!  
Haven't decided how long I will stay... minimum 1 week, but if I find a reasonable place, longer to sell the rest of the boat parts...  


On Monday, January 27, 2020, 12:41:57 AM UTC, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:


Please drop by Kimberlite, possibly Betty and I  will be on island at that time.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 4:14 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Saint Maarten

 

Thanks so much for the information 

Alexandre I will be there near the end of March 

Cheers 

Courtney 



On Jan 26, 2020, at 3:27 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...> wrote:



I was just there a 6 weeks ago.  

I would NOT recommend the French side.  

On the Dutch side, I recommend first: Island Water World, they have the best price, I stayed there 3 months in 2017 and there was several other SM2K.  Just when you go to the dock, stay in the middle of the channel.  

The other options are Simpson Bay Marina, but it is quite more expensive and unjustified in my opinion if just storing the boat.

 

I should back Mid-Fev, may be we meet.  

 

Sincerely, Alexandre

 

 

 

On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 07:50:15 PM UTC, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <itsfun1@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Hi All I  would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)

Cheers

Courtney

svTrippin

54 #101

Secret Harbour

 

 


Re: Saint Maarten

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Not sure the attachment will show, here are a few pictures post Irma.  
You can see how destroyed what this marina.  
Reminder: Irma was a Category 5 and it was a direct hit.  




On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 08:49:39 PM UTC, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:


Good to know. I’m surprised they had much damage. The place is down a long canal, and completely surrounded.....

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

_._,_._,_


Hi Alexandre,

eric freedman
 

Please drop by Kimberlite, possibly Betty and I  will be on island at that time.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 4:14 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Saint Maarten

 

Thanks so much for the information 

Alexandre I will be there near the end of March 

Cheers 

Courtney 



On Jan 26, 2020, at 3:27 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...> wrote:



I was just there a 6 weeks ago.  

I would NOT recommend the French side.  

On the Dutch side, I recommend first: Island Water World, they have the best price, I stayed there 3 months in 2017 and there was several other SM2K.  Just when you go to the dock, stay in the middle of the channel.  

The other options are Simpson Bay Marina, but it is quite more expensive and unjustified in my opinion if just storing the boat.

 

I should back Mid-Fev, may be we meet.  

 

Sincerely, Alexandre

 

 

 

On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 07:50:15 PM UTC, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <itsfun1@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Hi All I  would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)

Cheers

Courtney

svTrippin

54 #101

Secret Harbour

 

 


Re: Saint Maarten

eric freedman
 

Hi,
I am very happy leaving Kimberlite at Island Water World marina. It is
inexpensive compared to other marinas,
Currently there are 2 Amel's there.
Fair Winds
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376

-----Original Message-----
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io]
On Behalf Of Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:50 PM
To: Amel Yacht Owners
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Saint Maarten


Hi All I would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month
in Saint Martin (Dockage)
Cheers
Courtney
svTrippin
54 #101
Secret Harbour


Generator monitoring

william reynolds
 

Being new to my SM2000 I was surprised at the lack of instrumentation
for the generator. Having had 2 generator equipped boats that had oil pressure, temp. and 
A/C load I am curious if all SM are missing these vital instruments. They give advance warning of an oil leak, bad impeller
or A/C overload. I'm also a commercial pilot and would not fly without this instrumentation. Is this the norm for these boats?
Bill Reynolds
Cloudstreet SM #331


Re: From Polynesia west: Fiji-Vanuatu-Solomons_PNG-Indonesia-Singapore: A request for information and advice.

Jean-Pierre Massicotte
 

Hello, excuse my poor spelling in English! We took the Indonesian rally but didn't really follow since we where 60 boats register and for safety reasons seperate from the group since many many anchorages can't accomodate so many yachts at the same time securely!

All Vanuatu and Fidji is great, a must!

We skip PNG for the lack of clearing facility.

Grand Barrier sailing in Australia is fantastic. Contrary to many reports clearing in Australia is not any harder than in New Zealand.

You will have wind from Thursday Island to Bali than expect to motor a LOT from there to Singapour and Malaysia.

Be sure all your system's are all in good shape, very little assistances before Malaysia and Singapour.

Indonesian are nice people and helpfull. Keep your eye open for fishing net near PNG and first third of Indonesia, there a lot of them and not always light properly.

Fantastic culture, beautiful places, nice foods you will encounter. For Indonesia stock well before if you enjoy whines or any specific, supply are basic.

Security wise we never felt treaten . The only deception we had was the lack of wind  from Bali to Thailand, since we had to motor most of the time...... More than 60 percent!  You will need light air sails...... And diesel!

Have a great time

Regards, 

jean-Pierre Massicotte
S/V Vanille, Santorin #51



On Sun., Jan. 26, 2020, 19:02 Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io, <portermcroberts=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I write as IBIS is on the hard in Opua, we’re back in the USA for a spell and then back to Opua and to Fiji then west in May-June.

My principle request to other Amelians is were looking for any resources re the next leg of our voyage as stated in the subject line, and for suggestions re: our route

Were getting ready, in every way but also downloading GE Kap files for openCE, getting visas and talking to the local guy Raymond who runs the Indonesia rally etc.


Questions if any of you might be so kind:

1. PNG.  Enticing! and dangerous.  Any suggestions for a safe route?  We've read the US and UK state dept advisories, We know Totem fairly well and have read a fair amount of blogs, the noonsite articles etc.  There appears to be no cruising guide.  Anyone know of Amelians or others who have recently sailed this way?

2. Great spots, suggestions  in Vanuatu?

3. Great spots, suggestions, places to avoid in Solomons? 

4. To head through the Torres strait or north of Guinea island? South route would include Darwin before heading north up to Raja Ampat, Going north seems quite a bit more direct to Raja Ampat, but then with some check-in difficulties and possible unrest near PNG main island:guinea. Trades likely stronger south route?

5. Well be running late for the typical July start dates for the indonesia rallies.  Ive communicated with Raymond Lesmana, seems like a great guy and assures me he can handle any needed paperwork.  Any security concerns for Indonesia to singapore for sailing yachts.  He says “none.”

6. What are we missing?


As always, were so indebted to this group and the Gurus we find here!  You know who you are!!

Thanks for any intel.

Porter and Helen McRoberts

S/V IBIS A54-152







Re: Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

Matt Salatino
 

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Jan 26, 2020, at 4:32 PM, SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I've done some searching but haven't found a definitive answer. I'm curious for those of you with solar panels mounted on an aft arch (mine is aluminum)... do you have any grounding in place? My panels and arch have been in place for roughly two years and I haven't noticed any problems. No other equipment on the arch at this point. Does grounding just protect in the event of a panel failure/short/leak?

The MPPT controller is grounded to the generator. Is this OK?

Can anyone recommend some tests I could perform with the voltmeter to make sure everything is OK?

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


Re: Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

Mark Erdos
 

Hi Mike,

 

We too have an aluminum arch. It is not bonded since it is not in constant contact with saltwater.

 

IMO – the MPPT should not be connected to anything other than the solar panels and the batteries. This is consistent with the “floating ground” design of Amel.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Vista Mar, Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of SV Trilogy
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 5:33 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

 

Hi Everyone,

I've done some searching but haven't found a definitive answer. I'm curious for those of you with solar panels mounted on an aft arch (mine is aluminum)... do you have any grounding in place? My panels and arch have been in place for roughly two years and I haven't noticed any problems. No other equipment on the arch at this point. Does grounding just protect in the event of a panel failure/short/leak?

The MPPT controller is grounded to the generator. Is this OK?

Can anyone recommend some tests I could perform with the voltmeter to make sure everything is OK?

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


From Polynesia west: Fiji-Vanuatu-Solomons_PNG-Indonesia-Singapore: A request for information and advice.

Porter McRoberts
 

I write as IBIS is on the hard in Opua, we’re back in the USA for a spell and then back to Opua and to Fiji then west in May-June.

My principle request to other Amelians is were looking for any resources re the next leg of our voyage as stated in the subject line, and for suggestions re: our route

Were getting ready, in every way but also downloading GE Kap files for openCE, getting visas and talking to the local guy Raymond who runs the Indonesia rally etc.


Questions if any of you might be so kind:

1. PNG. Enticing! and dangerous. Any suggestions for a safe route? We've read the US and UK state dept advisories, We know Totem fairly well and have read a fair amount of blogs, the noonsite articles etc. There appears to be no cruising guide. Anyone know of Amelians or others who have recently sailed this way?

2. Great spots, suggestions in Vanuatu?

3. Great spots, suggestions, places to avoid in Solomons?

4. To head through the Torres strait or north of Guinea island? South route would include Darwin before heading north up to Raja Ampat, Going north seems quite a bit more direct to Raja Ampat, but then with some check-in difficulties and possible unrest near PNG main island:guinea. Trades likely stronger south route?

5. Well be running late for the typical July start dates for the indonesia rallies. Ive communicated with Raymond Lesmana, seems like a great guy and assures me he can handle any needed paperwork. Any security concerns for Indonesia to singapore for sailing yachts. He says “none.”

6. What are we missing?


As always, were so indebted to this group and the Gurus we find here! You know who you are!!

Thanks for any intel.

Porter and Helen McRoberts

S/V IBIS A54-152


Re: Saint Maarten

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Courtney,

We have been living in the marina of Fort Louis, Marigot for several months now. Last year we lived for 8 months here as well. Although the marina is a bit of a mess, as location it is the best. They did start renovations since a few months now but the speed is amazingly slow. If you are talking about unattended docking I don’t recommend Fort Louis. Island water world is to be preferred. Do make reservations!

We are currently St Maarten residents living aboard our Amel during the boating season. Alex Ramseyer with his Amel is in Island waterworld at least until February.

Anse Marcel is still a dump, nobody knows when they will start repairs there. Oyster Pond the same. Bobby’s Marina is a complicated story (don’t ask). IGY marina is  expensive, just like Port the Plaisance. Be aware the Heineken regatta is early March so berths are difficult/expensive to get.

Let me know if you need more info.

Regards,

Arno Luijten,
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Mike,

We have a stainless arch with 3 solar panels on it and none of it is grounded. You may know also that the masts and rigging on an SM are not grounded either.
The only ground (Bonding) connections on our boat are metal items that are in continuous contact with salt water i.e. the main engine, generator, head pumps, salt water manifold. The reason for this is corrosion prevention, nothing to do with electrical protection. I don't think it's necessary to "ground" the solar controller; it's not in contact with salt water and therefore bonding is unnecessary.
Remember this "ground" is only for corrosion protection, it's not like the ground you have in hour home electrical supply...which really is ground (stake in the earth).
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
G21 Opua NZ


Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Everyone,

I've done some searching but haven't found a definitive answer. I'm curious for those of you with solar panels mounted on an aft arch (mine is aluminum)... do you have any grounding in place? My panels and arch have been in place for roughly two years and I haven't noticed any problems. No other equipment on the arch at this point. Does grounding just protect in the event of a panel failure/short/leak?

The MPPT controller is grounded to the generator. Is this OK?

Can anyone recommend some tests I could perform with the voltmeter to make sure everything is OK?

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


Re: Saint Maarten

Courtney Gorman
 

Thanks so much for the information 
Alexandre I will be there near the end of March 
Cheers 
Courtney 


On Jan 26, 2020, at 3:27 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...> wrote:



I was just there a 6 weeks ago.  

I would NOT recommend the French side.  

On the Dutch side, I recommend first: Island Water World, they have the best price, I stayed there 3 months in 2017 and there was several other SM2K.  Just when you go to the dock, stay in the middle of the channel.  

The other options are Simpson Bay Marina, but it is quite more expensive and unjustified in my opinion if just storing the boat.


I should back Mid-Fev, may be we meet.  


Sincerely, Alexandre



On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 07:50:15 PM UTC, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <itsfun1@...> wrote:



Hi All I  would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)
Cheers
Courtney
svTrippin
54 #101
Secret Harbour