Date   

Re: Washing Machine Replacement for SM #160

Davi Rozgonyi
 

Yes, that's our machine too, except it's called Kenwood Mini 1150 Rapid around these parts. Fits perfectly, works great, gonna cry when she breaks.... 


Re: Howes fuel treatment

James Alton
 

Matt,

   If you are reading on the H2Out site under the section titled maintenance instructions,  read the last paragraph where they state the annual change out frequency.    I suspect that the change out frequency will depend on a lot of different factors.   Yes, it looks a little pricey to me too,  there could be a better solution.

James


On Feb 9, 2020, at 9:50 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

I took a look online at the H2Out. Looks OK. A bit pricey. Refills aren’t so bad, and they recommend them at your oil change frequency. Likely more than every 12 months?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 9:07 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

   They seem to rightfully be concerned about pressurized,  flammable or items that are dangerous in some way.    I don’t see how this item should be a concern.  Please keep in mind that I do not have any experience thus far with the H2Out system so do your own research!  Best of luck.

James
 
On Feb 9, 2020, at 8:30 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

I wonder if the TSA will pull it out of checked baggage?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 7:21 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Sorry the image is hard to read-
This is the write-up from Howes. It is used most of the time in fuel depots where the diesel is stored over the summer for home heating oil.
At Howes we understand the science and importance of year round lubricity and protection and our Meaner Power Kleaner is the proof. Safely eliminating water and removing the environment that creates bacteria, Meaner Power Kleaner contains no alcohol or harmful solvents and eliminates injector deposits. The end result is a performance enhancing product that protects your engine and boosts MPGs…guaranteed!
 
We then add Howes fuel treatment, This stuff is incredible. Please read the label. It also guaranteed 5% better fuel economy. PHOTO IS BELOW
 
Fair Winds
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376
 
 
 
 

Sent: Sun
<image001.png>day, February 09, 2020 6:37 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug
 
All good points, James.
Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 

I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,
 
  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.
 
Best,
 
James
  
On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:
 

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.
 
James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
 
On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  
So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.
 
 
So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  
 
So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  
 
I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.
 
And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  
 
I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.
 
Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110
 
 
 
 
 
 
On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:
 
Hi Scott and Porter,
 
I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.
 
In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.
 
The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.
 
I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.
 
Nick
 
Amelia AML 54-019
Kilada Greece
On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
 
I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  
 
I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”
 
Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.
 
Porter A54-152
 
On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
 
Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com
 
 
 
 
 




Re: Amel 55 Steering Cable Information and Supplier

 

Every 55 I have seen has hydraulic steering...no cables...Like other things maybe some of the first 55s had cables, but I don't think so.

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
View My Training Calendar
cloudHQPowered by
cloudHQ


On Sun, Feb 9, 2020 at 11:47 AM Paul Stascavage via Groups.Io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good day all. 

A friend of ours and non forum member has an Amel 55 and needs to replace their steering cables. Amel told them the suppler is no longer available. I remember reading that owners were having trouble getting steering parts from Amel but I thought that was for older boats and I also thought Amel resolved that issue?  Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. They are currently in either the Grenadines or Grenada. 

All the best.

Paul Stascavage 
SM 466.
S/V Rita Kathryn 

RitaKathryn.com

Currently Cruising The Bahamas 


Re: Howes fuel treatment

Matt Salatino
 

I took a look online at the H2Out. Looks OK. A bit pricey. Refills aren’t so bad, and they recommend them at your oil change frequency. Likely more than every 12 months?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 9:07 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

   They seem to rightfully be concerned about pressurized,  flammable or items that are dangerous in some way.    I don’t see how this item should be a concern.  Please keep in mind that I do not have any experience thus far with the H2Out system so do your own research!  Best of luck.

James
 
On Feb 9, 2020, at 8:30 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

I wonder if the TSA will pull it out of checked baggage?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 7:21 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Sorry the image is hard to read-
This is the write-up from Howes. It is used most of the time in fuel depots where the diesel is stored over the summer for home heating oil.
At Howes we understand the science and importance of year round lubricity and protection and our Meaner Power Kleaner is the proof. Safely eliminating water and removing the environment that creates bacteria, Meaner Power Kleaner contains no alcohol or harmful solvents and eliminates injector deposits. The end result is a performance enhancing product that protects your engine and boosts MPGs…guaranteed!
 
We then add Howes fuel treatment, This stuff is incredible. Please read the label. It also guaranteed 5% better fuel economy. PHOTO IS BELOW
 
Fair Winds
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376
 
 
 
 

Sent: Sun
<image001.png>day, February 09, 2020 6:37 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug
 
All good points, James.
Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 

I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,
 
  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.
 
Best,
 
James
  
On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:
 

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.
 
James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
 
On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  
So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.
 
 
So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  
 
So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  
 
I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.
 
And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  
 
I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.
 
Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110
 
 
 
 
 
 
On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:
 
Hi Scott and Porter,
 
I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.
 
In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.
 
The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.
 
I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.
 
Nick
 
Amelia AML 54-019
Kilada Greece
On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
 
I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  
 
I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”
 
Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.
 
Porter A54-152
 
On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
 
Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com
 
 
 
 
 



Re: Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

Matt Salatino
 

Annual change  wouldn’t be bad at all....

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 7:50 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

   I came across a company called H2Out that sells driers for vent lines that suggests an annual change of the desiccant with a properly sized unit.   I would think that unless the boat is in motion that air movement through the vent should be pretty minimal so quite different from the continuous forced flow through an air compressor intake.  Definitely more research needed before I add this to my boat but I like the concept.  

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Feb 9, 2020, at 6:37 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

All good points, James.
Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 
I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.

Best,

James
  
On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  
So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.


So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  

So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  

I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.

And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  

I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.

Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110






On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Hi Scott and Porter,

I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.

In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.

The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.

I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.

Nick

Amelia AML 54-019
Kilada Greece
On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  

I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”

Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.

Porter A54-152

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com







Re: Howes fuel treatment

Matt Salatino
 

I wonder if the TSA will pull it out of checked baggage?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 7:21 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Sorry the image is hard to read-

This is the write-up from Howes. It is used most of the time in fuel depots where the diesel is stored over the summer for home heating oil.

At Howes we understand the science and importance of year round lubricity and protection and our Meaner Power Kleaner is the proof. Safely eliminating water and removing the environment that creates bacteria, Meaner Power Kleaner contains no alcohol or harmful solvents and eliminates injector deposits. The end result is a performance enhancing product that protects your engine and boosts MPGs…guaranteed!

 

We then add Howes fuel treatment, This stuff is incredible. Please read the label. It also guaranteed 5% better fuel economy. PHOTO IS BELOW

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 


Sent: Sun
<image001.png>day, February 09, 2020 6:37 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

 

All good points, James.

Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 

I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

 

  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.

 

Best,

 

James

  

On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

 

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  

So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.

 

 

So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  

 

So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  

 

I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.

 

And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  

 

I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.

 

Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

 

Hi Scott and Porter,

 

I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.

 

In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.

 

The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.

 

I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.

 

Nick

 

Amelia AML 54-019

Kilada Greece

On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

 

I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  

 

I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”

 

Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.

 

Porter A54-152

 

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

 

Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

James Alton
 

Matt,

   I came across a company called H2Out that sells driers for vent lines that suggests an annual change of the desiccant with a properly sized unit.   I would think that unless the boat is in motion that air movement through the vent should be pretty minimal so quite different from the continuous forced flow through an air compressor intake.  Definitely more research needed before I add this to my boat but I like the concept.  

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Feb 9, 2020, at 6:37 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

All good points, James.
Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 
I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.

Best,

James
  
On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  
So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.


So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  

So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  

I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.

And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  

I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.

Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110






On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Hi Scott and Porter,

I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.

In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.

The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.

I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.

Nick

Amelia AML 54-019
Kilada Greece
On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  

I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”

Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.

Porter A54-152

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com







Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

eric freedman
 

Hi Steve,

We had a similar sail a 110 % Yankee cut headsail . It is made from 10.5 Oz material.

It is bulletproof and we have had it up in 40-45 knots.

It’s a great sail.

When we go offshore we always start with that sail and change it out if we have a forecast of extended light winds.

The shape when it is furled is not perfect however I would not want to drill a hole through my deck to mount a track.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Sunday, February 09, 2020 7:14 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

 

Hi Steve,

we have a 90% built for us by Super Sailmakers in Ft Lauderdale. We wanted a heavy weather sail. They made it with a high cut Yankee type foot to allow room for breaking seas over the deck. At the head they put a tape probably 2 meters long because the sail would have been too tall and narrow if it went to the top of the mast head fore stay. It looked incredibly small compared to the 155% and I commented to him it would only be of use in strong winds. He disagreed and was right. Over 10 knots true wind speed going to windward would be very close to the big sail performance. 15 knots and more as good or better and a whole lot easier to handle. So certainly the 90% could be rigged if you anticipate extended windward sailing.And if the wind gets too much it is furlable. We use the same outboard track as the big genoa

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 10 February 2020 at 12:39 Steve Bode <Whatsup@...> wrote:

This is a very interesting thread! I love the way Intention sails in all wind conditions! Last summer, we were punching into 30+ knots apparent with two reefs in the genoa, no main and one reef in the mizzen and she was ever so happy to do so. I was very pleased. 

Sorry if this is not the right thread for this question, but I see several people in this thread mention a 90% jib. That's what I'd like because sailing in the med, we often need to punch into the wind for days and a 90 would be built for the task. The issue is when we reef the genoa, while the sail shape is okay, the leads are so far outboard that we can't point. Again, I am NOT interested in rigging a staysail stay. I would drop the genoa and raise the 'blade' instead of the Genoa.
So, here are my questions;

1. Would buying a new 90 and laying a new track on the deck that was more inboard be a good idea or not?

2. Has anyone out there actually done something like this on their SM and what was your experience? I saw pictures of a SM with a self-tacking track setup (SV Nomad) and a staysail. Mind you, I am NOT interested in a staysail, I would drop the jib and rig the 90 on days when I know I'm headed upwind all day...or all week.

Many thanks for your input.

THIS IS SV NOMAD 


--
Steve Bode
Capt. SV Intention
Amel SM #117 (1994)
+1 415 710-6659 Mobile/Text/WhatsApp
facebook.com/stevebodesanfrancisco
svintention.com


Howes fuel treatment

eric freedman
 

Sorry the image is hard to read-

This is the write-up from Howes. It is used most of the time in fuel depots where the diesel is stored over the summer for home heating oil.

At Howes we understand the science and importance of year round lubricity and protection and our Meaner Power Kleaner is the proof. Safely eliminating water and removing the environment that creates bacteria, Meaner Power Kleaner contains no alcohol or harmful solvents and eliminates injector deposits. The end result is a performance enhancing product that protects your engine and boosts MPGs…guaranteed!

 

We then add Howes fuel treatment, This stuff is incredible. Please read the label. It also guaranteed 5% better fuel economy. PHOTO IS BELOW

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 


Sent: Sun
Howes Lubricator Meaner Power Diesel Kleaner HL306712day, February 09, 2020 6:37 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

 

All good points, James.

Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 

I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

 

  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.

 

Best,

 

James

  

On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

 

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  

So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.

 

 

So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  

 

So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  

 

I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.

 

And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  

 

I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.

 

Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

 

Hi Scott and Porter,

 

I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.

 

In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.

 

The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.

 

I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.

 

Nick

 

Amelia AML 54-019

Kilada Greece

On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

 

I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  

 

I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”

 

Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.

 

Porter A54-152

 

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

 

Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Steve,

we have a 90% built for us by Super Sailmakers in Ft Lauderdale. We wanted a heavy weather sail. They made it with a high cut Yankee type foot to allow room for breaking seas over the deck. At the head they put a tape probably 2 meters long because the sail would have been too tall and narrow if it went to the top of the mast head fore stay. It looked incredibly small compared to the 155% and I commented to him it would only be of use in strong winds. He disagreed and was right. Over 10 knots true wind speed going to windward would be very close to the big sail performance. 15 knots and more as good or better and a whole lot easier to handle. So certainly the 90% could be rigged if you anticipate extended windward sailing.And if the wind gets too much it is furlable. We use the same outboard track as the big genoa

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 10 February 2020 at 12:39 Steve Bode <Whatsup@...> wrote:

This is a very interesting thread! I love the way Intention sails in all wind conditions! Last summer, we were punching into 30+ knots apparent with two reefs in the genoa, no main and one reef in the mizzen and she was ever so happy to do so. I was very pleased. 

Sorry if this is not the right thread for this question, but I see several people in this thread mention a 90% jib. That's what I'd like because sailing in the med, we often need to punch into the wind for days and a 90 would be built for the task. The issue is when we reef the genoa, while the sail shape is okay, the leads are so far outboard that we can't point. Again, I am NOT interested in rigging a staysail stay. I would drop the genoa and raise the 'blade' instead of the Genoa.
So, here are my questions;

1. Would buying a new 90 and laying a new track on the deck that was more inboard be a good idea or not?

2. Has anyone out there actually done something like this on their SM and what was your experience? I saw pictures of a SM with a self-tacking track setup (SV Nomad) and a staysail. Mind you, I am NOT interested in a staysail, I would drop the jib and rig the 90 on days when I know I'm headed upwind all day...or all week.

Many thanks for your input.

THIS IS SV NOMAD 


--
Steve Bode
Capt. SV Intention
Amel SM #117 (1994)
+1 415 710-6659 Mobile/Text/WhatsApp
facebook.com/stevebodesanfrancisco
svintention.com


Re: How to totally Eliminate the problem--Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

eric freedman
 

 

 

On Kimberlite we use a number of steps to remove crud and bugs from our fuel.

After over 6000 engine hours and layups in the Caribbean with ½ full tanks we have never had a problem.

 

First we filter the incoming fuel before it gets into the tank through a hi volume fuel pump and then through a huge racor filter that you see on fuel pumps. I had this installed by Amel when I had her built with a Y valve. One way into the tank the other through a fuel pump and filter and then into the tank . Photos attached.- Thank You Ian and Judy,

 

We then add Howes fuel treatment, This stuff is incredible. Please read the label. It also guaranteed 5% better fuel economy. PHOTO IS BELOW

 

Lastly we have the dual Racor filter and we use a 2 micron filter and change it every 300 hours. It comes out almost clean every time.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 


Sent: Sun
Howes Lubricator Meaner Power Diesel Kleaner HL306712day, February 09, 2020 6:37 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

 

All good points, James.

Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 

I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

 

  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.

 

Best,

 

James

  

On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

 

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  

So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.

 

 

So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  

 

So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  

 

I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.

 

And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  

 

I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.

 

Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

 

Hi Scott and Porter,

 

I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.

 

In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.

 

The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.

 

I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.

 

Nick

 

Amelia AML 54-019

Kilada Greece

On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

 

I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  

 

I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”

 

Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.

 

Porter A54-152

 

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

 

Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

 

 

 

 

 


How to totally Eliminate the problem--Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

eric freedman
 

On Kimberlite we use a number of steps to remove crud and bugs from our fuel.

After over 6000 engine hours and layups in the Caribbean with ½ full tanks we have never had a problem.

 

First we filter the incoming fuel before it gets into the tank through a hi volume fuel pump and then through a huge racor filter that you see on fuel pumps. I had this installed by Amel when I had her built with a Y valve. One way into the tank the other through a fuel pump and filter and then into the tank . Photos attached.- Thank You Ian and Judy,

 

We then add Howes fuel treatment, This stuff is incredible. Please read the label. It also guaranteed 5% better fuel economy.

 

Lastly we have the dual Racor filter and we use a 2 micron filter and change it every 300 hours. It comes out almost clean every time.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 


Sent: Sun
Howes Lubricator Meaner Power Diesel Kleaner HL306712day, February 09, 2020 6:37 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

 

All good points, James.

Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 

I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

 

  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.

 

Best,

 

James

  

On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

 

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  

So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.

 

 

So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  

 

So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  

 

I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.

 

And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  

 

I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.

 

Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

 

Hi Scott and Porter,

 

I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.

 

In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.

 

The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.

 

I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.

 

Nick

 

Amelia AML 54-019

Kilada Greece

On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

 

I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  

 

I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”

 

Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.

 

Porter A54-152

 

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

 

Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

 

 

 

 

 


Re: rub rail insert

Steve Bode
 
Edited

Okay, because several people asked for it, I posted this short, silly video of me installing the toe rail. Mind you, it was June in Bodrum, 100 degrees and we were cursing and swearing when we were doing this, but afterward we realized, "that wasn't so hard". I could do this again in under an hour.

https://youtu.be/Ol9BhJ5HVls

From the description in the video:

Replacing the rubber between the deck and the freeboard is not an easy procedure for one person, however, with knowledge of how it's done, can be accomplished without much loss of life. I struggled and struggled and finally got a system using copious amounts of dishsoap, two people and a 'pre-loading and press-in" procedure that works quite nicely. Tricks learned:  1. We did this while the boat was at the dock. We snugged the boat up close. Heaven help you if you have to do this on the hard. 2. wash and clean the rubber first. 3. Have a new bottle of dishsoap handy 4. plan on two people for the job. One to insert the rubber onto the edge of the fiberglass from the hull (what I call the protrusion) and the other person to press it into place against the gunwale about a half meter behind the first person. 5. Make sure you have the right rubber for the right side of the boat. 6. Start from the forward most chainplate and press the rubber slot onto the protrusion. Start at the chainplate because the rubber is cut and it's easier to get it started.  7. Lube up the rubber with copious amounts of dishsoap. Especially the slot and the back that will need to be pressed down against the gunwale.  8. Do not continue until you have  measured out the rubber to be sure that it will reach the full length to the bow. You will need to stretch the rubber just enough to cover the distance, but not too much or you will have too much. 9. Press the rubber onto the protrusion for about a half meter. 10. Starting back a half meter from where you have the rubber on the protrusion. press the rubber down against the gunwale with a wooden stick (I found a stout wooden spatchula works best) being careful not to scratch the gunwale. Don't use metal (like we did in the video!) 11. With two people, while one person is a half meter ahead lubing and fitting the rubber onto the hull protrusion, the other is back a half meter pressing it down against the gunwale. Good luck, Bode
--
Steve Bode
Capt. SV Intention
Amel SM #117 (1994)
+1 415 710-6659 Mobile/Text/WhatsApp
facebook.com/stevebodesanfrancisco
svintention.com


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

Steve Bode
 

This is a very interesting thread! I love the way Intention sails in all wind conditions! Last summer, we were punching into 30+ knots apparent with two reefs in the genoa, no main and one reef in the mizzen and she was ever so happy to do so. I was very pleased. 

Sorry if this is not the right thread for this question, but I see several people in this thread mention a 90% jib. That's what I'd like because sailing in the med, we often need to punch into the wind for days and a 90 would be built for the task. The issue is when we reef the genoa, while the sail shape is okay, the leads are so far outboard that we can't point. Again, I am NOT interested in rigging a staysail stay. I would drop the genoa and raise the 'blade' instead of the Genoa.
So, here are my questions;

1. Would buying a new 90 and laying a new track on the deck that was more inboard be a good idea or not?

2. Has anyone out there actually done something like this on their SM and what was your experience? I saw pictures of a SM with a self-tacking track setup (SV Nomad) and a staysail. Mind you, I am NOT interested in a staysail, I would drop the jib and rig the 90 on days when I know I'm headed upwind all day...or all week.

Many thanks for your input.

THIS IS SV NOMAD 


--
Steve Bode
Capt. SV Intention
Amel SM #117 (1994)
+1 415 710-6659 Mobile/Text/WhatsApp
facebook.com/stevebodesanfrancisco
svintention.com


Re: Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

Matt Salatino
 

All good points, James.
Working with dessicant dryers for air compressors, on a humid day, the crystals were pink (from clear) in a few hours. 
I fear that a proper dryer that one could set and forget for 6 months, if it exists, would be active, powered, and be another,complex system to maintain and monitor. Maybe a pressurized system like the ones on automobiles would work, that don’t allow air, readily into the system? I’ve not studied how they work, so I plead ignorance....😊

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 5:06 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Matt,

  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.

Best,

James
  
On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  
So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.


So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  

So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  

I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.

And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  

I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.

Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110






On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Hi Scott and Porter,

I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.

In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.

The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.

I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.

Nick

Amelia AML 54-019
Kilada Greece
On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  

I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”

Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.

Porter A54-152

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com






Re: rub rail insert

Patrick McAneny
 

Good question,Maud sent the same diagram ,but without  removing the scupper its hard to know the profile.
Pat
SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: Jarek Zemlo via Groups.Io <noa_blue@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Feb 9, 2020 12:52 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] rub rail insert

Rink Hi,

I got this profile from Maud (see  below). Do you know if this is the correct one for the SM (1997) ?

Best regards
--
Jarek Zemlo
NOA BLUE


Re: Washing Machine Replacement for SM #160

Karen Smith
 

Steve,

That gives us a trail to follow...  The Eudora/Sora Babynova and Euronova lines of machines do fit the space available.  Now we just have to see if there is any way to get one in the USA at a reasonable cost.  Either that, or do laundry in a bucket until we get to the eastern Caribbean!

Apparently, they were installed on some Lagoon models, and we are docked across from one of the largest Lagoon dealers in the world, so maybe we can try there!


Re: Paranoia about the D3-110 Volvo Penta - diesel bug

James Alton
 

Matt,

  I agree.    The desiccant cartridges would need to be replaced from time to time  Most of the ones I have considered change colour indicating the need while others can be heated to drive off the moisture and returned to service.  I have been looking at some commercial solutions so the cost is fairly reasonable but more research is needed to determine the effectiveness and life expectancy in a marine environment.   If anyone has found a good workable solution for installed a desiccant in the vent line please share.

Best,

James
  

On Feb 9, 2020, at 3:10 PM, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

A desiccant/dryer would be a great idea. Finding one that is maintenance free, and passive, may be a problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:23 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Some great discussion here.  One item that I did not see discussed that could be  helpful especially in humid climates is adding a dessicant dryer to the vent line.  Regular replacement and lubrication of the O ring seal at the fill cap is important as well.  Best of luck.

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Feb 9, 2020 11:49 AM, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
I agree Nick— You're right, certainly about the industry norm.  And I’m sure there are many theories on this: and mine may be incorrect.  But the way I think of it: Crud exists in a myriad of sizes.  Crud forms… then  gets into the filter system and clogs.  If i have a series of sequentially smaller sized filters, i simply clog them all. and then replace them all.  If a bolus of crud makes it into the sequential filtering setup: filters essentially sort the crud into smaller sizes at a great cost (especially with the last Volvo filter now being fouled).  So we've cruised with the 2 micron setup for about 500 hours of motoring from panama to NZ last year and it seemed to work well.  no issues.  Filters seemed pretty good looking when i changed them  Usually around 100 hrs,  (I previously was quite derelict about it, prior to really understanding how important clean fuel was.)  I have noticed the manometer pressure reading on the setup would climb slightly over the 100 hrs, but never concerningly high.  
So scenario above A, with ostensibly clean fuel, worked for us, for this while.


So… Scenario B: Cruddy fuel shows up.  A slosh of crud makes it into the filter setup. (is this an isolated bit of crud, or does it advertize a yet much larger crub problem in the tank)  Currently it would saturate the 2 micron first filter and pressures climb, engine shuts down alerting us to a pressure scenario  and we change filter: but now we know we have cruddy fuel and need to polish it and the tank. (and why I’d like a separate fuel polishing system on board.)  Heres where my scenario breaks down: it depends on the amount of crud: pump it out and through baja filter into jerry cans? then run engine off jerry cans?  or...( I do have a bunch of 10mn  and 30mn sizes as well) as well put those on and let the filters clean the crud out: but if I increase the racor size then ill be clogging my 130$ volvo filters very fast: i carry about 4 of those, They're proprietary and hard to get in places.  It turns into a "S" show.  

So what's governed our cruising: sail smart, with wind as much as possible so we motor little.  Praise our relatively large 900 litre tank, and the freedom it adds to be discriminate about fuel choice. When others are fueling out of necessity, i find myself adding fuel not because i think we're low, but…  hey were sailors and should keep topped up stores.  

I'd be surprised if I’d completely thought this through, I'm sure there are some folks who really understand this at a much deeper level and I would love to hear from them and you.

And as you note Nick, it is the industry norm, and usually there is good reason for that!  To that end, if the Volvo-proprietary “C” filters were as inexpensive as the racors—I’d also stick to industry norm.  

I’d respectfully welcome any thinking and guidance.

Porter A54-154 with a  “H” model D3-110






On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Hi Scott and Porter,

I choose to use a 10 or even 30 micron filter on the Racor followed by the Volvo secondary filter which is 2 micron I believe.

In my opinion by having the pre-filter at 2 micron you are in effect only having one filter. So in the event of major contamination the Racor will plug and the engine will suffer from fuel starvation. You may also damage the fuel pump, although on the 54 the fuel is gravity fed from the tank to the filters.

The same principle applies to the water maker. There is a course filter followed by the fine filter. You can not just go straight to the fine.

I know this is a controversial subject but that is my opinion….and the industry norm.

Nick

Amelia AML 54-019
Kilada Greece
On 9 Feb 2020, at 15:10, Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

I understand. We have the same setup. The dual racor (A vs B) and A+B if one wishes.  We keep the 2 micron on both A and B and use only A or B, switching back and forth.  Filter C is of course the very pricey Volvo-specific filter/fuel water separator, which is what I want to spare by using the 2 micron. I watch the pressure gauge on the racors a lot.  That’s why we change frequently, to keep pressures low.  We have no pre-pre filters.  

I remember a thread on this about a year ago, the 2 micron pre-filter argument.  That’s when we switched.  Its hard to be scientific when we have limited data re what works “best.”

Great comments on why to keep the tank full during storage.

Porter A54-152

On Feb 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

Porter,

I have the two racor filter setup. I consider this the primary filter / pre-filter.

Options:

1) FilterA only
2) FilterB only
3) FilterA and FilterB in parallel

Do you run the 2 micron filters here?

On my D3-110C there's a Volvo spin-on filter (2 micron) on the engine itself. We'll call that FilterC

Did you install a pre-filter before the Racors??
-- 
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com






Voyageur Amel Super Maramu 2000 #373 from 2002 for sale

Lotta Edwards
 

Dear Amelians,

We have decided to sell our Voyageur.
More info under subgroup "Yacht for sale"

Best regards and thank you all for the best forum
Per-Erik and Lotta Edwards


Re: A54 bow thruster directly to battery or through main switches?

Matt Salatino
 

Borrow several voltmeters. Attach them to the BT wiring at a few places along the wiring path. Run the BT to failure, check each voltmeter for voltage. Thus will help you locate the problem. Its likely a thermal open failure. Some termination, when cool, transfers current. Its got a resistive problem (maybe a corroded or loose ring terminal?). It heats as the BT operates. When it gets warm enough, mechanical movement causes an open, and it stops. When it cools, the process starts again. Also, it possible that after the BT stops, to quickly lay hands (or use an IR thermometer) to check for a hot termination somewhere along the wiring path. That would be your suspect problem location.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 9, 2020, at 12:34 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Scott,

    That is a strange one.  I would try measuring the voltage at the motor during operation to what is going on.  If you lose power at the BT during your test then back track the BT wiring  while operating the BT to find the fault.  If you have voltage at the motor when it stops during your test then look into the motor.  Maybe a relay issue?   Best of luck.  
James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Feb 9, 2020 9:07 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Our bow thruster was indeed wired through a switch, too.

I've worked with Sleipner to try to isolate the intermittent functioning problem to no avail. It runs full speed and then stops momentarily and then will start again. No slowdown to indicate drop in voltage. The Amel joystick has been cleaned and tested and shows nearly zero ohms on activation.

Every switch and thermal protection within the Sidepower thruster has been "jumpered" and it still doesn't work. I was hoping the problem was the main battery switch but I moved the positive bow thruster supply wire from the secondary side of the switch directly to the battery side. The only thing left is the motor itself but the brushes and commutator look perfect. The annoying bit is that this motor is only a year old and Sleipner wants me to ship it back to them from Panama at my cost, wait for them to test it, get warranty approval, ship it back (at my cost) and pay customs duty. I might as well buy a new motor! With a canal appointment, I clearly don't want to do this.

Anyone have any other ideas on what I should check? I haven't tested voltage at the BT during operation because I don't have alligator clips, but the fact that the BT either runs full speed or not at all, without any slowdown indicates to me that it's not an issue with enough voltage getting to the BT.


--Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com