Date   

Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Gary Silver
 

Hi Eamonn:

I can speak to the "in a marina (spider web of lines" idea.  DON'T DO IT!!!!  I was in Puerto Del Rey marina during Irma and Maria (cat 4 & 5),  Boat stripped, spider web of lines (11), many doubled up,  many many fenders (14) (tied to dock and the boat).  Liahona survived but was damaged.  Half of the fenders weren't found, the remaining half were destroyed.  Boats on either side of me sank. YOU ARE NOT SAFE IN A SLIP NO MATTER WHAT YOU DO. Cloud Street (an Amel SM on the dock behind me had a 65 boat break free from, out dock and come down on her.  As a testament to how stout Amel boats are, Cloud street survived with repairable damage while the boat that hit her sunk next to her.

In a slip you are dealing with storm surge and wind as well as other boats and flying debris.  In PDR (Puerto Del Rey) some boats floated up over top of their docks due to surge.  You are also hazarded by other boats around you.  There is only one of this hazards you can mitigate, on the hard you do away with storm surge issues.   On the hard the boat must be strapped down onto deep set anchors.  The jack stands will fall away/be washed away, or sink in the wet ground.  Only the straps will save you.  Even jack stands welded together is no guarantee.   Many boats on the hard in PDR had the jack stands gone and were supported only by the tie down straps following the storm. In PDR they have a re-inforced concrete grid of footings/anchors buried many feet deep in the ground.  Those proved themselves.  Even a cradle is no guarantee unless it is strapped down.   

I concur that leaving a boat on a mooring in a storm is extremely unwise no matter how big the mooring.

The above is hard earned from my actual experience. 

Wish you the best, 

Gary S. Silver, M.D.
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000  #335
Puerto Del Rey Marina, Puerto Rico


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Giorgio Ardrizzi
 

In May I will return to the third consecutive season at Trinidad where I will leave the boat at the Peake' Shipyard. I always found myself very well, the staff is efficient, the security service is very effective and prices are lower than in Grenada or in the other islands.
I will be away for at least 6 months and I want to sleep quietly without worrying about possible hurricane or mooring or marinas at risk.
Some yachtman was impressed by the news of probable attacks by pirates, but the coast guard is carefully wandering the coast and no such cases were reported in the last year.

Giorgio Ardrizzi
sy Saudade III - Sharki #1
currently in Martinique


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

David Pawley
 

5 tons sounds a lot, it kind of means that if a tug boat gave 5 tons of thrust it could lift 5 tons in weight.(Most of the tugs I worked on were greater than 80T). Don't know about elsewhere but when Cyclone Leanne (think?) hit the Whitsundays a few years ago, maybe 150 boats are still missing ie they were moored and the wrench effect pulled off the bow fitting and the vessels subsequently sank due to water ingress.

On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 at 17:02, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I would not leave the boat in the water during hurricane season in Grenada....
Stored ashore is still a risk but much safer. As Matt says sail to Trinidad.
There are several good yards in Chaguaramus  to store the boat ashore, the price is much the same...the only problem with Trinidad is that the water is dirty from oil so when you launch you want to be ready to leave to either Tobago, which is a day motor against wind and current or an overnight to Grenada.


Nick
Amelia AML54-019


On 13 Feb 2020, at 02:14, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

The best protection from a direct hurricane hit is 100 nm.
Grenada was hit by Ivan in 2004. It damaged most of the boats there. Grenada has learned since, and has improved their yard storage.
Grenada, though on the south edge of the “box”, has seen a dozen or more hurricanes in the past 70 years. If I were to spend the season aboard, Grenada would be my choice. Given all big storms in that region originate in Africa, you have at least 5 days notice to hop 80 miles to Trinidad.
Trinidad is out of the box. 3 hurricanes in 100 years. Two dozen tropical storms. When we were in the eastern Carib, we chose to leave the boat, on the hard, in Trinidad. 
Do NOT leave a boat you value, long term, unattended on a mooring. No one your paying to “watch” it will renew the mooring pennants during a storm. Your lines will chafe. You’ll lose the boat.
So, my recommendation.
Trinidad to leave the boat. Grenada to live aboard for the summer.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 12, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Re: Opening Portlight Seals

Gerhard Mueller
 

You don't need to order via Amel. It might be more expensive this way. Try to find a distributor for industrial rubbers in your country and look for foam rubber of 8 or 10 mm diameter depending the different portlights.
Don't take solid rubber. It will not fit. In Germany I have found: www.gummiprofile24.de
But there should be such a store in any country.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: Opening Portlight Seals

Annsofie & Jonas Svanberg
 

Hi
Use sav@... instead when contacting Amel after sales depertment.

Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM232, 1998


Skickat från min iPhone

13 feb. 2020 kl. 07:06 skrev marklesparkle59 <marklesparkle59@...>:


Thank you Gerhard, I have some ordered. Have you ordered from Amel? Ive made 2 enquiries without any answer via the website contact page. 
Mark



Sent from my Samsung device


-------- Original message --------
From: "Gerhard Mueller via Groups.Io" <carcode@...>
Date: 12/02/2020 08:53 (GMT+00:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Opening Portlight Seals

Hello Mark

I have bought this foam rubber, cut it to the length needed, clued the ends together with superglue and fixed it in the window groove with contact adhesive.
For the different portlights I have used 10 mm or 8 mm diameter foam rubber.

https://www.gummiprofile24.de/epages/64048014.sf/de_DE/?ObjectPath=/Shops/64048014/Categories/Produkte/%22EPDM%20Moosgummi-Rundprofile%20schwarz%22
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

ngtnewington Newington
 

I would not leave the boat in the water during hurricane season in Grenada....
Stored ashore is still a risk but much safer. As Matt says sail to Trinidad.
There are several good yards in Chaguaramus  to store the boat ashore, the price is much the same...the only problem with Trinidad is that the water is dirty from oil so when you launch you want to be ready to leave to either Tobago, which is a day motor against wind and current or an overnight to Grenada.


Nick
Amelia AML54-019


On 13 Feb 2020, at 02:14, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

The best protection from a direct hurricane hit is 100 nm.
Grenada was hit by Ivan in 2004. It damaged most of the boats there. Grenada has learned since, and has improved their yard storage.
Grenada, though on the south edge of the “box”, has seen a dozen or more hurricanes in the past 70 years. If I were to spend the season aboard, Grenada would be my choice. Given all big storms in that region originate in Africa, you have at least 5 days notice to hop 80 miles to Trinidad.
Trinidad is out of the box. 3 hurricanes in 100 years. Two dozen tropical storms. When we were in the eastern Carib, we chose to leave the boat, on the hard, in Trinidad. 
Do NOT leave a boat you value, long term, unattended on a mooring. No one your paying to “watch” it will renew the mooring pennants during a storm. Your lines will chafe. You’ll lose the boat.
So, my recommendation.
Trinidad to leave the boat. Grenada to live aboard for the summer.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 12, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Re: Opening Portlight Seals

marklesparkle59
 

Thank you Gerhard, I have some ordered. Have you ordered from Amel? Ive made 2 enquiries without any answer via the website contact page. 
Mark



Sent from my Samsung device


-------- Original message --------
From: "Gerhard Mueller via Groups.Io" <carcode@...>
Date: 12/02/2020 08:53 (GMT+00:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Opening Portlight Seals

Hello Mark

I have bought this foam rubber, cut it to the length needed, clued the ends together with superglue and fixed it in the window groove with contact adhesive.
For the different portlights I have used 10 mm or 8 mm diameter foam rubber.

https://www.gummiprofile24.de/epages/64048014.sf/de_DE/?ObjectPath=/Shops/64048014/Categories/Produkte/%22EPDM%20Moosgummi-Rundprofile%20schwarz%22
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: 220 volt exhaust blower replacement

JOHN HAYES
 

Hi Mike

I have 2 new 12 volt fans in my Santorin purchased in Wellington last year they were about nz$ 30 each and a common industrial type and performed well during 4 months in the pacific and are going well as we motor towards banks peninsula without any wind on our way to the Auckland islands

On the Santorin one fan sucks air in the other pushes it out through the port cockpit coaming 

The 2 fans  move a significant volume of air

Best

John Hayes
Nga Waka
Sn 41


On 13/02/2020, at 2:56 PM, Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy) <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:

Hi Thomas, Bob and Suzanne, anyone else with advice here,

Did you find a suitable 220V fan that you are happy with? I need to install something to keep the engine room cool while generator, water maker, battery charger, etc. are running. Currently I leave the engine room cover open when I can, not a good set up.

Thomas, I like your idea of a less expensive industrial type fan. Did you find one that works? Can you recommend a brand, model, CFM rating?

I'm currently in New Zealand if anyone has any suggestions of where to look.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Matt Salatino
 

The best protection from a direct hurricane hit is 100 nm.
Grenada was hit by Ivan in 2004. It damaged most of the boats there. Grenada has learned since, and has improved their yard storage.
Grenada, though on the south edge of the “box”, has seen a dozen or more hurricanes in the past 70 years. If I were to spend the season aboard, Grenada would be my choice. Given all big storms in that region originate in Africa, you have at least 5 days notice to hop 80 miles to Trinidad.
Trinidad is out of the box. 3 hurricanes in 100 years. Two dozen tropical storms. When we were in the eastern Carib, we chose to leave the boat, on the hard, in Trinidad. 
Do NOT leave a boat you value, long term, unattended on a mooring. No one your paying to “watch” it will renew the mooring pennants during a storm. Your lines will chafe. You’ll lose the boat.
So, my recommendation.
Trinidad to leave the boat. Grenada to live aboard for the summer.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 12, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Re: 220 volt exhaust blower replacement

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Thomas, Bob and Suzanne, anyone else with advice here,

Did you find a suitable 220V fan that you are happy with? I need to install something to keep the engine room cool while generator, water maker, battery charger, etc. are running. Currently I leave the engine room cover open when I can, not a good set up.

Thomas, I like your idea of a less expensive industrial type fan. Did you find one that works? Can you recommend a brand, model, CFM rating?

I'm currently in New Zealand if anyone has any suggestions of where to look.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


Re: Tef-Gel excellent price from National Supply

Matt Salatino
 

Duralac is special stuff, but has a shelf life, and it shortens above 20°C.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 12, 2020, at 8:12 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi ,

Did you ever try Duralac?

I have built 2 boats using this stuff. It is amazing and I believe it is better than Tef Gel.

In addition it is a cream and when it dries it is somewhat like locktite.  For example, I use it on my spurs line cutter and the

set screws (grub) on my propeller. After 2 years it is still there and is a bit stubborn to remove—not like epoxy but you know that he screw is not going to loosen.

 

One tube will last many years.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/saddington-consultants-plus-duralac-anti-corrosion-jointing-compound     USA

https://www.silmid.com/sealants/jointing-compounds/Duralac-Anti-Corrosive-Jointing-Compound-in-various-sizes/  England

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Clark via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 6:38 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Tef-Gel excellent price from National Supply

 

Hi All,
   My  boat-local West Marine ran out of Tef-Gel so I went online to order some and found a supplier that is much less costly than WestMarine...well that isn't saying anything novel is it?  It is cheaper than Amazon too!  By a lot.     Tef-Gel is the goop that you use when connecting two dissimilar metals, like bolting the furling gears to the boom or mast, solar panels to the SS arch, and for external electrical connections.   

I have no connections to National Supply ...except being the guy who just bought five tubes.

https://www.nationalsupplydirect.com/tef-gel-anti-seize-1oz-syringe.html?gclid=CjwKCAiA4Y7yBRB8EiwADV1haUAszB0IwwMVTbDn226XmhNVQNbSdhioXqw0OjQQgA06rlfjCv8UBhoC1d8QAvD_BwE

John Clark
SV Annie SM37
Brunswick GA

 


Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Eamonn Washington
 

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Re: Tef-Gel excellent price from National Supply

eric freedman
 

Hi ,

Did you ever try Duralac?

I have built 2 boats using this stuff. It is amazing and I believe it is better than Tef Gel.

In addition it is a cream and when it dries it is somewhat like locktite.  For example, I use it on my spurs line cutter and the

set screws (grub) on my propeller. After 2 years it is still there and is a bit stubborn to remove—not like epoxy but you know that he screw is not going to loosen.

 

One tube will last many years.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/saddington-consultants-plus-duralac-anti-corrosion-jointing-compound     USA

https://www.silmid.com/sealants/jointing-compounds/Duralac-Anti-Corrosive-Jointing-Compound-in-various-sizes/  England

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Clark via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 6:38 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Tef-Gel excellent price from National Supply

 

Hi All,
   My  boat-local West Marine ran out of Tef-Gel so I went online to order some and found a supplier that is much less costly than WestMarine...well that isn't saying anything novel is it?  It is cheaper than Amazon too!  By a lot.     Tef-Gel is the goop that you use when connecting two dissimilar metals, like bolting the furling gears to the boom or mast, solar panels to the SS arch, and for external electrical connections.   

I have no connections to National Supply ...except being the guy who just bought five tubes.

https://www.nationalsupplydirect.com/tef-gel-anti-seize-1oz-syringe.html?gclid=CjwKCAiA4Y7yBRB8EiwADV1haUAszB0IwwMVTbDn226XmhNVQNbSdhioXqw0OjQQgA06rlfjCv8UBhoC1d8QAvD_BwE

John Clark
SV Annie SM37
Brunswick GA

 


Tef-Gel excellent price from National Supply

John Clark
 

Hi All,
   My  boat-local West Marine ran out of Tef-Gel so I went online to order some and found a supplier that is much less costly than WestMarine...well that isn't saying anything novel is it?  It is cheaper than Amazon too!  By a lot.     Tef-Gel is the goop that you use when connecting two dissimilar metals, like bolting the furling gears to the boom or mast, solar panels to the SS arch, and for external electrical connections.   

I have no connections to National Supply ...except being the guy who just bought five tubes.

https://www.nationalsupplydirect.com/tef-gel-anti-seize-1oz-syringe.html?gclid=CjwKCAiA4Y7yBRB8EiwADV1haUAszB0IwwMVTbDn226XmhNVQNbSdhioXqw0OjQQgA06rlfjCv8UBhoC1d8QAvD_BwE

John Clark
SV Annie SM37
Brunswick GA

 


Re: Howes fuel treatment

Arnold Mente
 

Hi Dan,
in Europe you only get diesel with organic additives everywhere. In addition, the EU has passed a law on the use of effective additives for environmental reasons. Only professional users have access to such additives. In the meantime, various manufacturers are trying to find an effective replacement and have so far already had new products on the market. Grotamar, I think the best additive is no longer being manufactured. It is particularly important that the tank is full to keep the amount of oxygen as small as possible. I do not know which products are available to you. Liqui Moly and ERC are the alternatives I know currently in Europe. In countries such as Colombia (Cartagena), the problem should be known and additives should also be available.
I hope it helps you in your decision, air and water are the biggest enemy of biodiesel as well as the time of storage because it is organic.

Best

Arnold 
SY Zephyr
SM203

Am 12.02.2020 um 19:45 schrieb Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...>:

Thanks Arnold, it would be helpful to know if you were refueling with bio-diesel?  And if you were in a hot tropical location?

I have the dilema of being in Cartagena where they sell bio-diesel. I currently have 475 liters and need to decide if I top up before heading out or wait until I can reach a country with better fuel, but risk running the tank to less than 1/3. 

Best regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, sm #387.

On Tue, Feb 11, 2020, 8:08 PM Arnold Mente via Groups.Io <Arnold.mente=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi

I just want to get to the heart of this long discussion.

I have 30 years of positive experience with a full tank and an additive for diesel. There was never water in the tank and organic pollution. Last year I was so smart not to do this because lack of wind had covered a distance of 1500 SM under motor and had refueled several times. The result after 2 months in the port with a 1/4 full tank and without Grotamar (additiv) in the diesel was a complete algae infestation of the tank and lines before the winter break and the refilling of the tank.
I can highly recommend filling the tank completely with the addition of a good additiv at every opportunity and before any longer standstill.
There was a great deal of effort in cleaning the tank and completely replacing the lines and the filter system.

Best

Arnold
SY Zephyr
SM203


Am 12.02.2020 um 01:45 schrieb Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...>:

There is a third reason to keep the tank reasonably full.  As the tank gets closer to empty the sloshing of the remaining fuel at lower levels will begin to stir up that sludge cocktail at the bottom and it will begin to enter your fuel system.  You can see it in the Racor bowls, if may increase your vacuum gauge if you have it in the Racor and it can clog your fuel line.   

Last season another boater (non Amel) had engine trouble and changed his fuel filter. He then experienced air seeping into his fuel lines around the Racor connections.  In the end it turned out that was because his fuel line was so clogged.  He borrowed my suction fluid extractor and sucked about 20 liters of crud and fuel off the bottom of his tank before he had it clean enough to proceed.  When they were stopped they were not in a location with easy access to fuel polishing services.  He believes what broke it all loose was a very rough passage with low fuel levels.

Regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, sm # 387, currently in Cartagena




On Tue, Feb 11, 2020, 5:41 PM John Clark <john.biohead@...> wrote:
Hi Bernd,
     When I purchased SM37 in 2016 the previous owner stressed to me to always keep the tank full and to always use the Baja filter.  He said in the 16 years he had her no one drop of fuel went into the tank other than through the Baja.  He did two circumnavigations and claims to never have had an issue.  I followed his advice.
A year into my ownership, I performed maintenance changing out the Racor filter and the Volvo engine filter.  Both were clean.  I intentionally ran the diesel tank dry and used a boroscope to inspect the tank and found it also spotless.    I continued to use the Baja filter and also add a Biocide each time I fill up.  
 
 There are two reasons to keep the tank full, one is it prevents condensation from forming in the tank as temperature changes.  Gas expands and contracts with temperature and draws in moisture.  In a climate with daily temperature changes the cycle can pull in a notable amount of moisture after a period.  The moisture aids in the growth of bio-organisms that feed on diesel.   Second reason at least  for me in the Atlantic and Caribbean, is to have the ability to run from a hurricane at a moments notice.  Amels have large tanks which give them excellent range in a pinch I like to have that capability.

   Regards,  John

John Clark
SV Annie SM 37
Brunswick GA   



On Mon, Feb 10, 2020 at 10:13 AM Bernd Spanner <bernd.spanner@...> wrote:

Why fill up your tank to the max when you know where you want to go?

I think filling it up to the max only makes sense when you go for a really long passage and then you add some anti diesel bug adds.
When you fly on an airliner to your boat they only take as much fuel as they need plus alternate, contingency and a bit more for unforeseens.

--
Bernd
SN 119 / Cascais, Portugal








--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203



Arnold Mente

Urbaniweg 12
7000 Eisenstadt 

Tel: +43 660 6699019

arnold.mente@...




--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: Howes fuel treatment

Dan Carlson
 

Thanks Arnold, it would be helpful to know if you were refueling with bio-diesel?  And if you were in a hot tropical location?

I have the dilema of being in Cartagena where they sell bio-diesel. I currently have 475 liters and need to decide if I top up before heading out or wait until I can reach a country with better fuel, but risk running the tank to less than 1/3. 

Best regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, sm #387.

On Tue, Feb 11, 2020, 8:08 PM Arnold Mente via Groups.Io <Arnold.mente=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi

I just want to get to the heart of this long discussion.

I have 30 years of positive experience with a full tank and an additive for diesel. There was never water in the tank and organic pollution. Last year I was so smart not to do this because lack of wind had covered a distance of 1500 SM under motor and had refueled several times. The result after 2 months in the port with a 1/4 full tank and without Grotamar (additiv) in the diesel was a complete algae infestation of the tank and lines before the winter break and the refilling of the tank.
I can highly recommend filling the tank completely with the addition of a good additiv at every opportunity and before any longer standstill.
There was a great deal of effort in cleaning the tank and completely replacing the lines and the filter system.

Best

Arnold
SY Zephyr
SM203


Am 12.02.2020 um 01:45 schrieb Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...>:

There is a third reason to keep the tank reasonably full.  As the tank gets closer to empty the sloshing of the remaining fuel at lower levels will begin to stir up that sludge cocktail at the bottom and it will begin to enter your fuel system.  You can see it in the Racor bowls, if may increase your vacuum gauge if you have it in the Racor and it can clog your fuel line.   

Last season another boater (non Amel) had engine trouble and changed his fuel filter. He then experienced air seeping into his fuel lines around the Racor connections.  In the end it turned out that was because his fuel line was so clogged.  He borrowed my suction fluid extractor and sucked about 20 liters of crud and fuel off the bottom of his tank before he had it clean enough to proceed.  When they were stopped they were not in a location with easy access to fuel polishing services.  He believes what broke it all loose was a very rough passage with low fuel levels.

Regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, sm # 387, currently in Cartagena




On Tue, Feb 11, 2020, 5:41 PM John Clark <john.biohead@...> wrote:
Hi Bernd,
     When I purchased SM37 in 2016 the previous owner stressed to me to always keep the tank full and to always use the Baja filter.  He said in the 16 years he had her no one drop of fuel went into the tank other than through the Baja.  He did two circumnavigations and claims to never have had an issue.  I followed his advice.
A year into my ownership, I performed maintenance changing out the Racor filter and the Volvo engine filter.  Both were clean.  I intentionally ran the diesel tank dry and used a boroscope to inspect the tank and found it also spotless.    I continued to use the Baja filter and also add a Biocide each time I fill up.  
 
 There are two reasons to keep the tank full, one is it prevents condensation from forming in the tank as temperature changes.  Gas expands and contracts with temperature and draws in moisture.  In a climate with daily temperature changes the cycle can pull in a notable amount of moisture after a period.  The moisture aids in the growth of bio-organisms that feed on diesel.   Second reason at least  for me in the Atlantic and Caribbean, is to have the ability to run from a hurricane at a moments notice.  Amels have large tanks which give them excellent range in a pinch I like to have that capability.

   Regards,  John

John Clark
SV Annie SM 37
Brunswick GA   



On Mon, Feb 10, 2020 at 10:13 AM Bernd Spanner <bernd.spanner@...> wrote:

Why fill up your tank to the max when you know where you want to go?

I think filling it up to the max only makes sense when you go for a really long passage and then you add some anti diesel bug adds.
When you fly on an airliner to your boat they only take as much fuel as they need plus alternate, contingency and a bit more for unforeseens.

--
Bernd
SN 119 / Cascais, Portugal








--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


SPAM - one got through

 

You haven't seen any email SPAM until this morning. 

I apologize for that. I made a mistake and accidentally approved the SPAM email. I deleted it a few minutes ago. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


Re: Opening Portlight Seals

Gerhard Mueller
 

Hello Mark

I have bought this foam rubber, cut it to the length needed, clued the ends together with superglue and fixed it in the window groove with contact adhesive.
For the different portlights I have used 10 mm or 8 mm diameter foam rubber.

https://www.gummiprofile24.de/epages/64048014.sf/de_DE/?ObjectPath=/Shops/64048014/Categories/Produkte/%22EPDM%20Moosgummi-Rundprofile%20schwarz%22
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Opening Portlight Seals

marklesparkle59
 

Good morning, can anyone share their experience of buying and fitting seals for the opening portlights, the photographs are from a 1983 Sharki.
If Maud is the answer how is she contacted?
Thank you.
Mark Porter
Sea Hobo
Sharki #96


Re: turning direction of prop and thread pitch - Santorin

Volker Hasenauer
 

Hi Olivier,

I am quite certain that I have the aluminum casing - so that would mean I have the RH version. What does RH standing for....probably "right...."?

Would you know the pitch of the thread? Its a M 20 thread...but no pitch has been mentioned and my boat is in the water.....

Many thanks,

Volker 

On Wed, Feb 12, 2020 at 10:27 AM Beaute Olivier via Groups.Io <atlanticyachtsurvey=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Volker,

Originally, this Santorin has an aluminum casing C-drive, labelled CATEP, with a RH pitch propeller.
Since 1990, the drive may have been replaced with a cast iron casing one, and if so, the prop is a LH.
Check the casing with a magnet, or send a picture of the drive top unit.

Olivier

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 11 févr. 2020 à 01:37, Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...> a écrit :


Hi Everyone,

I wonder if the turning direction of the prop on the Santorin in left or right hand? 

Does anyone of you know the pitch of the thread on the Santorin? I have a drawing on the gearbox, however it only say M 20.....but is silent about the pitch.

Volker
SY Aquamarine, Santorin 027
Borneo/Malaysia