Date   
Re: My Plotter has stopped providing CTS information

Mark Erdos
 

Bob,

 

 

I don’t have a Furuno plotter but I am wondering if you can restore the default settings.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Grey via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2020 6:23 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] My Plotter has stopped providing CTS information

 

Good morning Captains, I have an interesting problem on my Amel 55, The Furuno plotter has stopped providing Course to Steer information when I select a waypoint. One day it just stopped, and I'm not sure why, everything else works fine just no CTS on the display information.

Any ideas??

Bob Grey
Amel 55 #25
Renaissance 3

My Plotter has stopped providing CTS information

Bob Grey
 

Good morning Captains, I have an interesting problem on my Amel 55, The Furuno plotter has stopped providing Course to Steer information when I select a waypoint. One day it just stopped, and I'm not sure why, everything else works fine just no CTS on the display information.

Any ideas??

Bob Grey
Amel 55 #25
Renaissance 3

Re: Insurance

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Kent,

I think we would quickly find out why insurance companies are trying to get out of the game.

As to self insurance, ie carrying the risk myself. I don't, but if I took my premiums over 12 years collectively they would have over-subsrcibed my claims noticeably, even if a 50K lightning one was included. On shore in NZ is reasonable. Go off shore and up goes the premium

Kind Regards

Danny

On 18 May 2020 at 13:22 "karkauai via groups.io" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi All,
Given the insurance problems everyone is having, I thought I'd see if there is enough interest and/or expertise to pursue an AYOG self-insurance program.
Pat (Shenanigans) and I have talked about it a little. Here's the gist of what we discussed:

1. A buy-in of some percentage of your boat's  value that would be enough to cover the first year.  For example, a $300,000 SM owner might pay 2% or $6,000. If we had 200 similar owners, we'd have $1,200,000 to pay out.

2. It would' be a high deductible coverage  designed primarily to pay for total loss. Maybe something like 20% of the boat's value.

3. The most common claim would probably be lightening damage, which often amounts to $50,000 or more.  Our plan might pay for half of a major claim like that?

4. Boat's would have to be out of the hurricane zones during the season.  Any other restrictions?

5. Yearly Assessments could replenish what was paid out  Or we could continue to pay in until the principle was self-sustaining. That would require investing the funds and a whole added layer of complexity.

6. A rotating Board of unpaid members would oversee the plan (maybe a LLC?), and an administrator would be hired to do the paperwork.

7. Owners would purchase their own liability insurance.

This is all just a very rough framework that can be built on, scrapped and something else adopted, or what ever seems appropriate.  Any and all thoughts and suggestions are encouraged. I'm hoping we might have an owner or two that have some insurance or legal expertise to help us understand the potential pitfalls and options available.

Thanks for your ideas.
Kent
Kristy
S M 243

Re: Onan ballbearing check and valves values

Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
 

Hello and thanks 4 your answers.

But the question was:

Is there a procedure to check the generator bearings for wear? As mentioned in the manual / service plan?

Oliver from Vela Nautica Amel54#39 
Martinique 

On Sun, May 17, 2020, 18:41 CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Sorry, guys. I did exactly the same thing as Gary Silver, and the bearing was never installed.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sat, May 16, 2020 at 12:45 PM Craig & Katherine Briggs SN 68 Sangaris Tropic Isle Harbor, FL via groups.io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Gary,
It's been awhile, but I replaced the rotor bearing on my Northern Lights 6kw genset in situ with little difficulty. The rotor remains bolted to the flywheel as you remove the end with the bearing - no external support needed. I recall I did the old put-it-in-the-freezer trick to shrink the bearing and it slid in with no press needed.  That was at about 3000 hours; now I'm at 7500 and am overdue, so will tackle again soon. (I'm getting a very slight vibration with heavy loads.)
If you want to remove the rotor, as I did because it needed rewinding from salt water corrosion shorting the wires ($176 in La Paz VZ), it's heavy but quite manageable by hand. However it doesn't sound like you'd need to remove it for the 2500 hr. (if I recall correctly) bearing replacement..
Cheers, Craig

Re: SN, SM, & 54 owners: If your outhaul line has ever slipped, this is a great idea

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Very interesting Bill. The amount of tension required to avoid the line slipping has always been a concern. Who knows when we’ll be back on board. But I will take a look and see if its something we would pursue.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2020 5:38 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] SN, SM, & 54 owners: If your outhaul line has ever slipped, this is a great idea

 

The photo below is of an Amel 55. I have been aboard several 55's but never really noticed the fairleads near the outhaul winch. The way these fairleads are placed causes the outhaul winch to have a much better grasp of the outhaul line. If we could make this change on models previous to the 55, we could reduce the amount of tension on the outhaul line.

 

If anyone is so inclined to take on this project I will be happy to assist.

 

image.png

 

It would be a perfect job with cutting, welding, and painting, but maybe there is a much simpler way to accomplish this.

image.png

 

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

View My Training Calendar

Insurance

karkauai
 

Hi All,
Given the insurance problems everyone is having, I thought I'd see if there is enough interest and/or expertise to pursue an AYOG self-insurance program.
Pat (Shenanigans) and I have talked about it a little. Here's the gist of what we discussed:

1. A buy-in of some percentage of your boat's  value that would be enough to cover the first year.  For example, a $300,000 SM owner might pay 2% or $6,000. If we had 200 similar owners, we'd have $1,200,000 to pay out.

2. It would' be a high deductible coverage  designed primarily to pay for total loss. Maybe something like 20% of the boat's value.

3. The most common claim would probably be lightening damage, which often amounts to $50,000 or more.  Our plan might pay for half of a major claim like that?

4. Boat's would have to be out of the hurricane zones during the season.  Any other restrictions?

5. Yearly Assessments could replenish what was paid out  Or we could continue to pay in until the principle was self-sustaining. That would require investing the funds and a whole added layer of complexity.

6. A rotating Board of unpaid members would oversee the plan (maybe a LLC?), and an administrator would be hired to do the paperwork.

7. Owners would purchase their own liability insurance.

This is all just a very rough framework that can be built on, scrapped and something else adopted, or what ever seems appropriate.  Any and all thoughts and suggestions are encouraged. I'm hoping we might have an owner or two that have some insurance or legal expertise to help us understand the potential pitfalls and options available.

Thanks for your ideas.
Kent
Kristy
S M 243

SN, SM, & 54 owners: If your outhaul line has ever slipped, this is a great idea

 

The photo below is of an Amel 55. I have been aboard several 55's but never really noticed the fairleads near the outhaul winch. The way these fairleads are placed causes the outhaul winch to have a much better grasp of the outhaul line. If we could make this change on models previous to the 55, we could reduce the amount of tension on the outhaul line.

If anyone is so inclined to take on this project I will be happy to assist.

image.png

It would be a perfect job with cutting, welding, and painting, but maybe there is a much simpler way to accomplish this.
image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

Re: Main sail outhaul Motorspor

Kaplan,Andre
 

Mark
Good advice
Thanks again
If things improve we might be in your area later in summer...
Be well
Andre



On May 17, 2020, at 8:12 PM, Miles <milesbid@...> wrote:


*** Attention: This is an external email. Use caution responding, opening attachments or clicking on links. ***

Hello Andre,

 

Before you replace your motor, have someone look at it.  Your problem could be as simple as a brush stuck or worn down.  If the motor is damaged, you can probably find someone to rebuild it.  I understand that it is a truck starting motor, but start with the brushes.  I know this because it happened to me.  Place a tarp under the boom when you take the cover off.  If it is like mine, there is a lot of carbon dust in there.  

 

With luck and cooperating officialdom, I will be in Newport, RI by the end of June.

 

Miles, sm 216, s/y Ladybug,  Le Marin, Martinique

 

Re: Main sail outhaul Motorspor

Miles
 

Hello Andre,

 

Before you replace your motor, have someone look at it.  Your problem could be as simple as a brush stuck or worn down.  If the motor is damaged, you can probably find someone to rebuild it.  I understand that it is a truck starting motor, but start with the brushes.  I know this because it happened to me.  Place a tarp under the boom when you take the cover off.  If it is like mine, there is a lot of carbon dust in there.  

 

With luck and cooperating officialdom, I will be in Newport, RI by the end of June.

 

Miles, sm 216, s/y Ladybug,  Le Marin, Martinique

 

Re: anchor wash safety note

 

You did not mention the 24v breaker for the anchor wash pump in the engine room.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, May 17, 2020 at 3:37 PM william reynolds <sail23692@...> wrote:

The 24 vdc breaker on the 24 volt panel controls the power to activators on the windlass, the sail motors and winches but not to the anchor wash. 

The anchor wash has direct power from the C/B panel to the switch to the pump and is fused at 10 amps @24 vdc.and is hot all the time unless you go down into the engine room and trip the circuit breaker. Running this current through the 24 vdc switch on the 24 vdc main panel for the anchor, windlass and sail motors would be an overload situation. So, the anchor wash switch is hot as long as the C/B in the engine bay is activated.

I was advised that you should to get into the engine compartment and kill or activate the anchor wash circuit breaker there to disable/enable the power to the anchor wash. Not everyone is going to do this and the anchor wash pump switch will be live (or dead) all the time.

The anchor wash power cable is right under the Ray marine A/P head in the upper access over the galley.

I installed a 15 amp, 24 vdc relay in the anchor wash power line and connected the relay activator (42 milli-amp) to the 24 volt switch that controls everything else.

Attached are photos of the installed relay and wiring choices.

Now the anchor wash switch is hot only when the main 24 vdc power to the other items is selected. A   $15 fix to protect a $250 saltwater pump.

Bill Reynolds  CloudStreet SM2K

Re: Near constant hot water without a generator - Here is how i did it.

 

Bravo Eric. and I do not believe there is any difference in AC vs DC resistance heating element...but ask an electrician.

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, May 17, 2020 at 9:40 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Eric,
Excellent configuration. Where do you get $C heating elements? And is there really a difference between AC and DC elements? Seems it would just be a resistance heater? Different resistance?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On May 17, 2020, at 10:04 AM, Eric Meury <ericmeury@...> wrote:

We have an santorin with no generator but have 1000 Watts of solar.  400 of those watts are shaded -  200 is behind the main mast flexible panels and 200 is on the new hard top bimini (room for more)  The bulk of the power comes from 600 Watts on the arch. 

Here is what we did.  

1.  Added the Victron 712 Battery Monitor that is bluetooth and replaced the Amel Shunt 

2.  Changed out the AC heating element for a 600 Watt DC element (300 Watt can be used as well)

3.  Added a Victron Battery Protect -  this serves as the relay and what powers the heating element.  - ie the heating element positive cable is connected to the battery protect .
 (BPR065022000 Victron Energy BPR065022000 Smart BatteryProtect with Bluetooth 12/24V - 65A) -  $59 bucks from pkys

4.  Disconnected the thermostat wire from the heating element and attached it directly to the relay.

Here is how it works -  The BMV has a relay setting.  This is set to Default mode but i changed the settings to Invert.  The Low SOC is set to 90 and 96.  What this means is that the relay will be powered when the SOC is anything above 90%.  When it gets to 90% it will turn off and will not turn back on again until the SOC is 96% (these can be changed)  -  This send a signal to the battery protect to "turn on" thus sending power to the heating element.  The battery protect has a shutdown setting of 12.4 volts  (i can change that to really anything but this was set to be an absolule failsafe to never let the batteries go below 12.4).  It turns back on when the batteries are 12.75. I have never seen 12.4 from my bank.   The tempature sensor is set to what ever the factory setting is...i  imagine it is 105 degrees (torried marine water heater).  

So everyday and a couple of times a day depending on how much water is used, my heater will turn on automatically in the mid morning as by that time i have recovered from the nightly discharge and am now above 96%/.  The element will draw a full 600 Watts until such time that either thhe SOC is 90% OR the tempature sensor says - he we are good and have plenty of hot water.  The first time i rant it it took a good 1.5 to 2 hours to get to that tempature. but my batteries never eached 90% as i'm usually producting 400-500 Watts and only have 600 watt drain so max i see going out during the day is 200-250 watts -  (if you use a 300 Watt Element and have plenty of solar you won't go negative but will talke longer)  Since i have this it only needs to run for maybe 15 to 20 mins and occastionally longer to keep the water at the tempature set by the tempature sensor.  

We now take a hot shower everyday and my 2 year old plays in a warm baby pool almost everyday.  -  All of this is powered with solar. (and soon to be wind)   

If i'm on the hard (which i am right now) it still works just the same and If i plug in heat water just by using the battery charger.  

If you have a desire (or don't have one) to not have to run your genset to heat water daily then this is a good way to go provided you have enough solar to make it happen.  We have one fridge and one freezer and a 12 volt home built spectra watermaker.  All of the settings are controlled from my phone via the victron connect app.  I can completley turn off the water heater by accessign the battery protect  - there is a setting to disable.  

I do not have lithium batteries but my bank is large with 4 - L16 Flooded Wet Cell batteries with 840 Amp hours.  

Re: Onan ballbearing check and valves values

 

Sorry, guys. I did exactly the same thing as Gary Silver, and the bearing was never installed.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sat, May 16, 2020 at 12:45 PM Craig & Katherine Briggs SN 68 Sangaris Tropic Isle Harbor, FL via groups.io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Gary,
It's been awhile, but I replaced the rotor bearing on my Northern Lights 6kw genset in situ with little difficulty. The rotor remains bolted to the flywheel as you remove the end with the bearing - no external support needed. I recall I did the old put-it-in-the-freezer trick to shrink the bearing and it slid in with no press needed.  That was at about 3000 hours; now I'm at 7500 and am overdue, so will tackle again soon. (I'm getting a very slight vibration with heavy loads.)
If you want to remove the rotor, as I did because it needed rewinding from salt water corrosion shorting the wires ($176 in La Paz VZ), it's heavy but quite manageable by hand. However it doesn't sound like you'd need to remove it for the 2500 hr. (if I recall correctly) bearing replacement..
Cheers, Craig

Re: Whole Boat Permanent Inverter for 220VAC 50Hz

Scott SV Tengah
 

Michael,

Have you used the VE-Config software, or other means, to check the output hz on your system when connected to 60hz shorepower? Does it show that you're getting 50hz output?

When I was designing my system, the Victron tech I talked to stated that the Victron Isolation Transformer is flexible in that it can accept 50/60hz but will not adjust a 60hz input to 50hz or vice versa. The data sheet seems to imply the same.
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

Re: Whole Boat Permanent Inverter for 220VAC 50Hz

Scott SV Tengah
 

The stated inverter loss you mentioned is a bit simplified. A deeper look will allow you to make the best decision given your usage patterns, which is different than everyone else's. This may be especially helpful for you as you think about adding lithium, because there are differences to lead-acid that aren't so obvious until you dig deeper. Efficiency wasn't a stated goal in Gary's post, but I presume he doesn't want to waste energy/money.

We've been living full-time with our full-boat inverter system for 18 months. Every single AC device aside from the 2nd Skylla-i Charger is wired to operate via our Quattro 5kw inverter. We routinely run the scuba compressor for an hour via inverter, with no problems. I believe the Bauer Junior II compressor has a 3x inrush current, so even 6.6kw inrush doesn't cause issues with our Quattro 5kw. Over the past 18 months, I've worked at optimizing both power production and usage. Based on those optimizations, we went from running the genset and charging our lithiums every 3 days with 200amps to now, not running the genset at all on anchor and as I am typing this at 11am, finding ways to burn off the excess solar energy to keep the batteries from getting above 90% SOC. We are running the dishwasher/washing machine/etc at the highest temp setting to burn off the excess energy.

We nearly eliminated our genset usage and ran every AC appliance aboard, efficiently, through a bit of research. It may be tempting to apply rules of thumb, but the danger if it's wrong is that it leads you to making bad decisions. Here's what I've found, which may be helpful to you and to others:

https://www.victronenergy.com/upload/documents/Output-rating-operating-temperature-and-efficiency.pdf

Under section 3, they talk about efficiency vs. load. This is for the Victron 3kw, but since Victron states that the Quattro and Multiplus are mostly the same internally, let's assume it scales, just with beefier components and therefore higher numbers. The Victron inverters seem to hit above 90% efficiency by 100/3000 = 6.67% of rated load. For us, that means we run the Quattro 5kw for all uses except low load items like the computer, projector and LCD. For those, we use the 800w Mastervolt inverter that came with the boat. Note also I would suggest installing a simple $5 switch to turn off the inverter when not in use. Our Quattro draws at least 40 measured watts when idle, so that $5 switch saves us 40/26.3*=36AH a day alone.

 

https://www.victronenergy.com/upload/documents/VE_Marine_generator_test_RVA_07-jan-2008.pdf

Regarding genset load, our A54 came with the Onan 11KW MDKBN. Luckily Victron tested this very genset and based on the data, we can deduce that it's not necessarily best to run at full load. The efficiency curve starts to flatten out considerably around 5kw, which is less than half load for us. Further, I recall from the Onan documentation that for maximum longevity and reiterated here by Mastervolt and Fischer Panda that running above 70% reduces genset longevity. For us, our 120a Quattro + 80a Skylla=200 amps of charging (which admittedly we don't use much anymore) puts roughly a 5.2kw load on the genset which puts us in the sweet spot with respect to specific fuel consumption and most emissions measures while maximizing longevity.

Also, I think you are confusing inverter output and charger input - when Gary talks about a 4kw inverter, I believe he is talking about the inverter AC output, not AC charger input. For example, my Quattro is called a 5kw inverter but that means it can output 5kw AC from the inverter. The charger portion is only 120amps, which is roughly 120*25.6= 3kw draw from genset or shorepower when charging my batteries. It's important to understand the difference in order to size the system correctly.

With respect to the hypothetical 62 amp deficit if he were to run a 100amp (~2.6kw) charger with a 4kw inverter, there are a few more things to think about:

1) I have never run a 4kw continuous load for more than say 20 minutes. As you mention, the loads are only for a short period. Even with my aft AC, the duty cycle is really less than 40%, which means an average load of only 600w. With the washing machine, the full current is drawn when the water is being heated, which isn't for too long.
2) If you were to somehow find a way to use 4kw continuously all day, you will find that your inverter will likely heat up and reduce output, per the curves on the Victron white paper. 
3) If you are intending to go lithium, the 62 amp deficit on say my 450AH system would mean the batteries could make up the 62amp difference for over 7 hours at 4kw peak usage.

I know everyone has their own energy needs, but we've found after some thinking and tinkering, that with our usage patterns and system, we're very happy to have the inverter run everything on the boat. 

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

anchor wash safety note

william reynolds
 


The 24 vdc breaker on the 24 volt panel controls the power to activators on the windlass, the sail motors and winches but not to the anchor wash. 

The anchor wash has direct power from the C/B panel to the switch to the pump and is fused at 10 amps @24 vdc.and is hot all the time unless you go down into the engine room and trip the circuit breaker. Running this current through the 24 vdc switch on the 24 vdc main panel for the anchor, windlass and sail motors would be an overload situation. So, the anchor wash switch is hot as long as the C/B in the engine bay is activated.

I was advised that you should to get into the engine compartment and kill or activate the anchor wash circuit breaker there to disable/enable the power to the anchor wash. Not everyone is going to do this and the anchor wash pump switch will be live (or dead) all the time.

The anchor wash power cable is right under the Ray marine A/P head in the upper access over the galley.

I installed a 15 amp, 24 vdc relay in the anchor wash power line and connected the relay activator (42 milli-amp) to the 24 volt switch that controls everything else.

Attached are photos of the installed relay and wiring choices.

Now the anchor wash switch is hot only when the main 24 vdc power to the other items is selected. A   $15 fix to protect a $250 saltwater pump.

Bill Reynolds  CloudStreet SM2K

Re: Main sail outhaul Motorspor

Kaplan,Andre
 

Mark
Thanks for your reply. Yes, I did check the breaker.. it was not tripped, but it may be suspect since it had been replaced...
I’m not on the boat today, but I will take photos next week. Unfortunately, I can hear a click when I throw the switch... by your assessment, it may be the motor... if so, does anyone know where and how to get a replacement motor? Must it come from Amel or is there a standard motor that can be used as replacement.

BTW, I always try to limit strain on motor by heading into the wind during furling or unfurling mainsail.

Thanks for any suggestions on motor replacement.

Boat lies in Westbrook, CT

Andre
Renaissance 2000
Mango 71, 1988

On May 17, 2020, at 2:21 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

*** Attention: This is an external email. Use caution responding, opening attachments or clicking on links. ***

Andre,

I am unsure if the solenoid is the same on the Mango as the SM. If it is, it
is a product used in forklift trucks. This should help you find one (not
sure where you are located). Perhaps you can post a picture.

That said, it is not usually the solenoid that fails. They are extremely
heavy duty. More often the motor burns out due to the operator putting too
much strain on it. If you hear a click as you work the outhaul switch on the
control panel, it is not the solenoid.

Stating the obvious, have you checked the breaker?


With best regards,

Mark

Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.creampuff.us__;!!N0rdg9Wr!_jfC8TlOKSYZuv_1Syg0ZKXhUrJXC8xanwngc1sf7FudMOEIRLMZFtx284jF3o8$

-----Original Message-----
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io]
On Behalf Of Kaplan,Andre
Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2020 4:43 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Main sail outhaul motor

I have a 1988 Mango no.71. On recommissioning this spring, the electric
outhaul for the mainsail is not working. A quick look by a yard worker
suggested the solenoid might be bad. Can someone give me advice on how to
approach this problem? If the solenoid is bad, how can I replace it? Is
there a standard solenoid that can replace the original? If so, what is the
model that I need? Must I get the replacement from Amel? If the outhaul
motor is bad, how and where can I get a replacement?
Thanks for any advice.

Andre Kaplan
Renaissance 2000
Mango 71 88





Re: Zoom Meeting Presentation of the Amel 50 from La Rochelle #ZOOM

Tilo Peters
 

Hi Matt,

Great that you got a good sail in today! Thanks for that. I’m also 6’1” and it’s good to have that frame of reference.

You did great and it was a super informative session. I hope to meet you and Cindy sometime one of these days—either in the Med or in my old stomping grounds of the Caribbean one of these days!

Cheers,

Tilo

On 17May, 2020, at 19:52, Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

Oh, you asked me how tall I was, and the signal stopped working...
I’m a hair over 6’1”

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On May 17, 2020, at 2:46 PM, Tilo Peters <tilo.peters@...> wrote:

Thanks again Matt & Cindy for the tour, and thanks Bill for setting it all up!

I’ve processed the zoom video and added subtitles.

You can find it at https://youtu.be/PK2yf-Hzr58

Best,

Tilo

On 16May, 2020, at 23:41, David Kurtz via groups.io <Davidwkurtz@...> wrote:

Matt & Cindy, thank you for a great meeting.  I happen to think this is an excellent way to stay in touch with the Amel community (I'm a new member as well).  My goal one of these days is to sail into La Rochelle on my Amel after crossing The Atlantic.  And perhaps as a future meeting, a tour of the Amel ship building facility would be really interesting.  And thanks also to Bill and Tilo for putting this together.

Regards,
Dave
-- 
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan



Re: Main sail outhaul motor

Mark Erdos
 

Andre,

I am unsure if the solenoid is the same on the Mango as the SM. If it is, it
is a product used in forklift trucks. This should help you find one (not
sure where you are located). Perhaps you can post a picture.

That said, it is not usually the solenoid that fails. They are extremely
heavy duty. More often the motor burns out due to the operator putting too
much strain on it. If you hear a click as you work the outhaul switch on the
control panel, it is not the solenoid.

Stating the obvious, have you checked the breaker?


With best regards,

Mark

Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia
www.creampuff.us

-----Original Message-----
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io]
On Behalf Of Kaplan,Andre
Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2020 4:43 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Main sail outhaul motor

I have a 1988 Mango no.71. On recommissioning this spring, the electric
outhaul for the mainsail is not working. A quick look by a yard worker
suggested the solenoid might be bad. Can someone give me advice on how to
approach this problem? If the solenoid is bad, how can I replace it? Is
there a standard solenoid that can replace the original? If so, what is the
model that I need? Must I get the replacement from Amel? If the outhaul
motor is bad, how and where can I get a replacement?
Thanks for any advice.

Andre Kaplan
Renaissance 2000
Mango 71 88

Re: Zoom Meeting Presentation of the Amel 50 from La Rochelle #ZOOM

Matt Salatino
 

Oh, you asked me how tall I was, and the signal stopped working...
I’m a hair over 6’1”

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On May 17, 2020, at 2:46 PM, Tilo Peters <tilo.peters@...> wrote:

Thanks again Matt & Cindy for the tour, and thanks Bill for setting it all up!

I’ve processed the zoom video and added subtitles.

You can find it at https://youtu.be/PK2yf-Hzr58

Best,

Tilo

On 16May, 2020, at 23:41, David Kurtz via groups.io <Davidwkurtz@...> wrote:

Matt & Cindy, thank you for a great meeting.  I happen to think this is an excellent way to stay in touch with the Amel community (I'm a new member as well).  My goal one of these days is to sail into La Rochelle on my Amel after crossing The Atlantic.  And perhaps as a future meeting, a tour of the Amel ship building facility would be really interesting.  And thanks also to Bill and Tilo for putting this together.

Regards,
Dave
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Re: Zoom Meeting Presentation of the Amel 50 from La Rochelle #ZOOM

Matt Salatino
 

Oh, and we went sailing on a beautiful day today!

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On May 17, 2020, at 7:15 PM, Matthew Salatino <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

Thanks! We had a blast. Of course, we thought of lots of other stuff worth demonstrating, AFTER the presentation ended!
Thanks for the opportunity, and it was a pleasure to play with you!

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On May 17, 2020, at 2:46 PM, Tilo Peters <tilo.peters@...> wrote:

Thanks again Matt & Cindy for the tour, and thanks Bill for setting it all up!

I’ve processed the zoom video and added subtitles.

You can find it at https://youtu.be/PK2yf-Hzr58

Best,

Tilo

On 16May, 2020, at 23:41, David Kurtz via groups.io <Davidwkurtz@...> wrote:

Matt & Cindy, thank you for a great meeting.  I happen to think this is an excellent way to stay in touch with the Amel community (I'm a new member as well).  My goal one of these days is to sail into La Rochelle on my Amel after crossing The Atlantic.  And perhaps as a future meeting, a tour of the Amel ship building facility would be really interesting.  And thanks also to Bill and Tilo for putting this together.

Regards,
Dave
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan