Date   

Water hoses in engine room

Vic Fryzel
 

Hi,

For the first time, I'm looking at replacing a lot of or ~all of the hoses/valves that deliver fresh or raw water in the engine room.

Some of mine have become extremely rusted or are a bit split. A lot of the hose clamps are rusted closed. And some of the valves are barely usable because of some corrosion or rust. I'm hoping folks might be able to help me with a few questions:

1. Is there a type or class of hose I need to use? Any other hose requirements? Are transparent hoses okay?
2. Should I be double clamping each hose end?
3. Is there a valve material or SAE/metric requirement for both fresh and salt water?
4. When cutting the hoses, do I need any sort of special tool?
5. Similar questions for the bilge pump hoses specifically. Not sure if there are requirements of these?
6. Any retailers that sell this stuff that come to mind? I have a West Marine close by, but am happy to go elsewhere. For reference my boat is in San Diego right now.
7. After I replace this stuff, is there any specific type of maintenance other than visual inspection to keep things in good working order?
8. For my hot water heater, do folks have any references they could link me to on how to clean it? I don't think it's been cleaned/serviced in 6+ years.

Thanks!
-Vic "Moon Dog" SM248


Re: Surveyor in Annapolis area?

Aras Grinius
 

Michael Previti. He surveyed my Sharki for Insurance purposes.  He is down in Solomons.

Mike Previti

President; PMC, Inc.

410 610 8761


Aras
SV FIASCO Sharki #163 1988


On Mon, Aug 17, 2020 at 12:46 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:
Can anyone recommend a good Marine Surveyor for an Amel in Annapolis MD area?

KS





--
Aras Grinius


Surveyor in Annapolis area?

Kevin Schmit
 

Can anyone recommend a good Marine Surveyor for an Amel in Annapolis MD area?

KS


Re: Anchor washing pump model

Slavko Despotovic
 

I disassembled pump, clean it and put it back as it was. Starts working, but after  30-40 seconds the fuse goes off. I can reset and it starts again and after 30 seconds the fuse gores off. No water comes on anchor. Is there anything that can block the water or the way to anchor?
The pump is REYA A 66B, 24V, 10A

Thank you.

Slavko


Re: Power usage data for Washer dryer on Amel 55

Arno Luijten
 

Whatever. It may be a 30 sec. capacity. It’s like audio amplifiers with their heavily inflated power rating. The thing is 2kW continuously, the only number you can count on.
Bad Mastervolt...
Regards,

Arno


Re: Power usage data for Washer dryer on Amel 55

Billy Newport
 

Peak is actually 5kw. See here: https://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-sine-24v/mass-sine-24-2500-230v-50hz/

2.5kw is their P30 number, I don't know what P30 means, 30 second pulse? 5kw might be momentary peak for motors and so on.

Billy
SV Coder
A55-56


Re: Power usage data for Washer dryer on Amel 55

Arno Luijten
 

Well, as I stated earlier, your Mastervolt is actually only 2kW. The 2.5 kW is peak load...

Cheers,

Arno Luijten,
SV Luna,
A54-121


Power usage data for Washer dryer on Amel 55

Billy Newport
 
Edited

I added a Shelly EM AC monitor to my MV 2500 inverter today so I did a wash/dry cycle on my LG Direct 7 machine and here is the data. So, max draw of around 1.8kw, the motor itself uses < 300W, the heater is the bulk of the power draw. Notice that the inverter voltage drops from 234V to 225V at 1.7kw draw, makes you wonder what the voltage would be at the rated 2.5kw draw. I added the screen shot at my Album here also as the quality of the attached photo seems pretty bad. https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/album?id=252162


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

He Brant

so I see many problems I can't control as an electrolaie ( inexperienced)
I don't know that plug and play

Elja


Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Brent Cameron
 

All of those leads are tied together at a common post so it’s putting each pair in parallel and unless the offending battery completely disconnects (i.e. breaks the circuit), the second battery can get back fed 24V from the rest of the bank. This is why it’s so important that your batteries are well balanced and the leads are the same length as any difference in resistance can result in a battery getting a significant portion of the full capability of the load (which on Amel’s can be very considerable with things like the bow thruster, anchor windless, A/C, appliances, etc). 

In a “drop in replacement “ battery like the Battle Born, if the internal BMS (battery management system) is sealed and the battery can’t tell an external charge source when to stop charging or a load to stop discharging (which is the definition of a drop in replacement) it CAN lead to problems. 

The current rating on many of these internal BMS systems is nothing like the full current that can be run through the loads generated on an Amel. Many drop in replacement batteries use tiny little MOFSET switches as the BMS on/off switching and these things can’t handle even the TYPICAL loads of an Amel. Remember that for a battery rated at a continuous load of say 100A, you are asking for potentially ALL of that load to pass through a printed circuit board, a few short light gauge wires (nothing like your battery cables), and some solid state FET switches. That’s a big ask. 

Remember that if your parallel wiring isn’t perfect (i.e. the leads aren't all the same length and the crimp connections don’t all have the same resistance, some of those batteries are going to be seeing a LOT more than 1C charge/discharge rate so relying on a tiny switch that can theoretically handle only a fraction of 1C is problematic to say the least. 

This can also be problematic to your charging sources like alternators that might not like seeing 100A suddenly disappear with no communication. Those diodes will go poof and at a minimum the voltages will go to about 80V just before that happens so your fancy electronics may go poof too. At a minimum, I’d install an external alternator protection device to prevent issues. 

I’d be happier if BB allowed their internal BMS to communicate with the entire system like what happens with Mastervolt on a CANbus system but I guess that’s one way they are selling for a fraction of the price. 

Brent

On Aug 16, 2020, 4:40 AM -0400, Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222 <Bijorka@...>, wrote:
He all

On the SM and I assume on the 54/55 each pair of batteries 2x12 V / 24 V is supplied by a seperate plus and minus . ?
so every package has one
extra line to load .
therefore, for solution 24v 50 AH, each battery itself should decide when the load is terminated ? The battery is not used to be used in the battery.

Elja
SM Balu
222

Von meinem iPhone gesendet




--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

He all

On the SM and I assume on the 54/55 each pair of batteries 2x12 V / 24 V is supplied by a seperate plus and minus . ?
so every package has one
extra line to load .
therefore, for solution 24v 50 AH, each battery itself should decide when the load is terminated ? The battery is not used to be used in the battery.

Elja
SM Balu
222

Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Brent Cameron
 

I asked that exact question of the BB guys and they assured us that the second battery would refuse any charge as a result of being wired in series (I gather because the first one is taken completely out of the circuit by its internal BMS). That said, it’s relying on an internal solid state relay to switch off 100A so I personally am still not totally convinced it’s totally kosher but I guess if they stand behind that architecture with a 10 year warranty you aren't out much (except the inconvenience somewhere in the South Pacific). I think it is one more reason to go for the 50A 24VDC batteries instead of wiring two 100A 12VDC batteries in series. 

Brent

On Aug 15, 2020, 4:59 PM -0400, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...>, wrote:
One last thought:

If BB batteries have internal BMS that can disconnect charging and load on a battery level, some questions come up.  For example, if battery 1, consisting of 4 cells, has a high voltage condition, the BMS in that battery stops charging in Battery1 only. 

At first glance, that seems ideal. You may not need an external charge or load disconnect circuit because the battery experiencing a fault just stops accepting charge or stops driving load if there's a high cell voltage or low cell voltage condition, respectively.

My question is what happens then? I only ask this because I don't know but it could cause problems. Say you have 12 batteries = 6 pairs of 12v batteries. Each 12v battery pair is in serial to create 24v and each pair of batteries connected in parallel to the other 5 pairs to create your AH total. Say Battery1 has a high cell voltage condition and the internal BMS cuts off charging to this battery, but still allows load. That means that Battery 1 is still connected to its Battery2 serial pair and hence connected to the entire bank. The charger is still outputting 26+ volts. But for this battery1-battery2 pair, only one of them is accepting charge. Is that ok?


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

I think all batteriecompartment from SM , 54/55 are watertight

Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Billy Newport
 

Well,
I learned something today. The battery compartment on a 55 is watertight? Good to know. All MV is attractive given the bus and so on.


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Scott SV Tengah
 

One last thought:

If BB batteries have internal BMS that can disconnect charging and load on a battery level, some questions come up.  For example, if battery 1, consisting of 4 cells, has a high voltage condition, the BMS in that battery stops charging in Battery1 only. 

At first glance, that seems ideal. You may not need an external charge or load disconnect circuit because the battery experiencing a fault just stops accepting charge or stops driving load if there's a high cell voltage or low cell voltage condition, respectively.

My question is what happens then? I only ask this because I don't know but it could cause problems. Say you have 12 batteries = 6 pairs of 12v batteries. Each 12v battery pair is in serial to create 24v and each pair of batteries connected in parallel to the other 5 pairs to create your AH total. Say Battery1 has a high cell voltage condition and the internal BMS cuts off charging to this battery, but still allows load. That means that Battery 1 is still connected to its Battery2 serial pair and hence connected to the entire bank. The charger is still outputting 26+ volts. But for this battery1-battery2 pair, only one of them is accepting charge. Is that ok?


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

Thank you for your detailed report

From all of this I think it will be silent to find an expert who will instruct the batteries and chargers in this way

thanks Elja
SM Balu 222

Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Re: Switch to LiFePO4

Scott SV Tengah
 

Kent,

Tom on L'Orient (who we met recently here in Oahu) called me the Lithium Evangelist or something similar. I do love my lithium and the impact that it has had on our comfort aboard, but I will add that I'm also a perfectionist with it so I'll quickly point out what I perceive to be problems that I perceive with my (and others') setups. My experience is not as an engineer but as someone who probably overthinks his lithium setup (because it was damn expensive and I don't want to damage it!) and on my most recent check, have run 2470kwh through my batteries, which is around 350 cycles at my 60% DOD average over the past nearly 2 years and they're as good as new. 

Here are some responses to your questions:

- Check that your charger inverter has a lithium profile. That's the easiest way to do it.

- The Skylla has a lifepo4 profile -  I own one.

- The Victron mppt have lithium profiles, use them. I own the 150/35. No temp compensation except there is a low temp charge cutoff. 

- I have 450AH. That is a good sweet spot IMO because once you have more than the amount of capacity you need to run 24 hours, you should be thinking about your renewable output. I put out about 250AH a day via solar. With our usage pattern, while stationary, we only run the generator to make sure it still works. You will have to do your own energy budget.

Example: If you have 1,000ah and use more daily than you put in with your renewables, all you gain from all that extra money spent on batteries is a longer interval between running the generator. Better to spend that money on renewables, imo. And unlike lead, you can take lifopo4 down to 20% very safely and still get 2000 cycles out of them. In fact, if I had a 1,000AH bank and kept it between 75-100% SOC, I'd probably be worse off because lithiums do not like being kept at the upper end of their SOC range. More is not always better.

Adding batteries later is not recommended, at least per my long conversations with Victron engineers. You really should have them all installed upfront or at latest 6 months later because while the batteries age slowly, they do age. Adding newer batteries to an old bank will cause charging imbalances.

- Making the chargers work together involves making sure they have the exact same charging voltages and durations. My Quattro and Skylla oddly do not talk to each other, but they work together perfectly because of this.

-I met with Peter Kennedy when I was trying to figure out how to safely shutdown my Mastervolt 110 alternator when I have a high cell voltage condition, aka cell imbalance. He seemed reasonably knowledgeable and as a Victron dealer understood how the Victron BMS sends out a signal that could be used to safely turn off my alternator when the BMS detects a high cell voltage condition. He suggested the solid state relay that I ended up using as he had tried it on someone else's setup. I will say that he admitted that he wired it incorrectly and fried it but still thought it would work. What was a bit surprising is that he didn't know that solid state relays cause a voltage drop and that causes problems with my/his proposed method of using the the Victron BMS to control the "reg-on" wire of the Mastervolt regulator. The problem was that the reg-on is also the voltage sense wire for the regulator, so you can imagine that a voltage drop on a sensing wire is not good. I solved that with the help of a very capable automotive ECU tuning engineer and detailed it in a post on my long lithium thread.

The point of that long story is that PKYS knows more than any other group I've encountered but it's your boat and even those who appear to understand lithium do not understand the intricacies of your specific setup and mistakes occur as a result of that or worse, the result of applying lead acid thinking to lithium. 

A few other thoughts in general and on others' responses:

-I chose 12v series pairs rather than 24v batteries to provide a backup to my starting battery. With 12v pairs, you do need to ensure that the individual batteries in the pairs are fully charged with a slow charger before installing them. Once a year, you disconnect and individually charge the 12v batteries in the pairs to ensure that they are balanced between them. I use a few cheap 12v/1.5a Lifepo4 chargers that run on 110-220v that you can get on Amazon for $20. As noted, the BMS will balance between batteries in parallel but not batteries in series. As a side note, each 12v pair is then, of course, put in parallel to create the 450ah capacity and as long as each PAIR is not too imbalanced, each pair will balance out with the other pairs. Hope that makes sense.

24v batteries does solve the problem of imbalance between 12v pairs, so that would be nice. If you go that route, just get a "backup 12v starting battery" that you keep charged via a dc-dc converter or even just a trickle charger that runs whenever you have the genset on, assuming your setup requires you run the generator now and then. That would probably be ideal.

I would be wary of going for a single massive 24v, say 450ah battery bank. Individual cells do die now and then and with a massive bank, unless you're very capable and confident about assembling/disassembling batteries, you won't be able to take it apart and remove those cells and continue on. If I'm in the Tuamotus and one cell dies, I just take that 12v PAIR offline and still have 300Ah of capacity left. Even I can do that without killing myself.

- Stop thinking float. That's lead acid thinking and will quickly kill your lithiums if you set it anywhere near your absorption voltage. If your charger requires you enter a float voltage, set it to 27v float and forget it. Controlling when charging stops with respect to SOC involves setting absorption voltage and duration. That said, it's very very difficult to try to target an ending SOC based on voltage. Lithiums have voltage "knees" on the top and bottom. The voltage with respect to SOC is nearly flat from around 10%-90% state of charge and then hockey stick up at 90% and down at 10%. But voltage is an unreliable indicator of SOC. To give you a real life example, I set my alternator's absorption voltage at around 27.2 volts, I believe. That was done so the batteries aren't kept at 100% during long motoring sessions. If I was going for fully charged, I set it at 28.4volts. During the last nearly 2 years, the alternator will stop charging anywhere from 85-95% SOC, as indicated by my battery monitor. It's not easy to target SOC using charge voltage on lithiums. And it's even harder if you're not targeting high terminal SOC because of the flat voltage vs SOC relationship when you're not at SOC extremes.

This is also a reason why most balancers only work when the batteries are at 28+ volts. When my own batteries were imbalanced a year ago, the cell voltages looked perfectly equal until 90% SOC and then and only then did the imbalance show itself. As a side note - charge your bank to 100% once a month. It helps balance the batteries and also resets your battery monitor since that really only tells you SOC based on amps in vs. amps out and charging to 100% calibrates it.

- You need a way to shutoff your alternator that is related to both overall bank state of charge and high cell voltage. Your state of charge may be at 90% but one cell may be at 4.2v and since your absorption voltage setting look at overall bank SOC and tells the alternator to keep charging, that 4.2v cell will keep getting fed with current and will therefore die shortly. This cell imbalance does not show itself when you look at overall bank voltage, but is detected by the BMS, which monitors cell level voltage.

Solving this honestly took me over a year and the help of aforementioned car tuning engineer to solve. Note that I spoke to countless lithium "experts" including Victron and Mastervolt engineers prior to this without a solution. I took a quick look at your regulator's manual. It says:

"Many LiFePo4 batteries have a Battery Management System (BMS) that may disconnect the battery from the alternator as a protective action or when charging is complete. The regulator must be shut down before the battery is disconnected .Running an alternator without a battery will damage the alternator and may damage any attached system. This is doubly true if the battery can be disconnected during

high current charging, causing a load dump. The load dump can easily cause a high voltage spike
which will destroy the alternator’s rectifier, at minimum. This is not a warrantable failure. To reiterate: THE ALTERNATOR MUST BE SHUT DOWN BEFORE DISCONNECTING THE BATTERY. THE ONLY SAFE WAY TO SHUT DOWN THE ALTERNATOR IS TO TURN OFF THE REGULATOR. The preferred method of turning off the regulator is disconnecting the regulator’s ignition (brown) wire, but if used as
an EMERGENCY ONLY shutdown, disconnecting the regulator’s power input (red) wire in addition to the 
ignition wire has a very low chance of damaging the regulator."


(1) You need a signal from the BMS to tell the alternator to turn off. The BB batteries seem to have an internal BMS that cuts off charging if there's a high cell voltage condition - does it send a signal that you can use to tell the alternator to turn off? Perhaps it's not a problem because with each BB battery having an internal BMS, maybe only that one battery is taken offline?

(2) You need to use that signal and use it in a way that safely turns off the alternator without frying it, per your Balmar manual. 

As noted in my long thread on my install, on my Victron BMS, there's a signal wire called "charge disconnect" that I use to control my Mastervolt regulator's "reg-on" wire. Seems you may be able to something similar on the Balmar as long as your BMS can send a signal when there's a high cell voltage condition.

Also with the alternator you will need to install a temp sensor. Balmar says that in their manual. When you're charging lead /agm/gel, the alternator only outputs full current for short period and tapers off quickly. I understand that internal resistance goes up at higher SOC. Lithium does not have this problem so your alternator/chargers will output full current until the battery is nearly full. That may cause overheating and fry your alternator. The Mastervolt engineers said my 110a alternator can handle that heat, but just to be safe, I installed an alternator temp sensor anyways. I recommend you do the same.

This has been long enough, I hope it helps someone at least a bit.

I will end by saying that I agree with Joerg on using one brand to the extent possible. I only went mostly Victron because I started with a Victron solar MPPT before I even knew what lithium was. Victron does not make alternator charge controllers and that was the source of my main issue, which is now solved thankfully. If you mix brands, be ready to have every company point its fingers at others if your batteries die. My understanding is that MV also allows you to set SOC based charging limits, which would be very useful. I haven't fully researched them, so I don't know what their disadvantages are but I'm sure there are some.  

Biggest disadvantage I've seen - If you think Victron batteries are expensive, Mastervolt will change that opinion.






--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Anchor washing pump model

rossirossix4
 

When my anchor wash pump stopped I attemped to rotate the shaft (could not see it because it faced away from me) with a screw driver (like you can do with the AC or Dessalator feed pumps).  By mirror I discovered that three is not a hole for access to a slot on the shaft.  Instead, to rotate the pump shaft, I inserted a thin shafted screw driver into the fan housing against a fan blade and carefully rotated the pump that way.  It solved the problem and I have had no problem for 4 years.  Worth a try.
Bob Rossi SM429, KAIMI


Re: 175A alternator belts

Scott SV Tengah
 

My A54 has the Mastervolt 110 and a single Volvo serpentine belt. We have over 500 hours on the current belt and it looks new. By saying that I'm sure it will break tomorrow!

If there's any way you can adapt your setup to use the serpentine, that may solve your problem?
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Useful addition to Volvo D3-110 engine's sea water circuit

Teun BAAS
 

CURACAO on the hard!!!!

Getting old????


Teun

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: "Arno Luijten via groups.io" <arno.luijten@...>
Date: 8/15/20 07:51 (GMT-07:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Useful addition to Volvo D3-110 engine's sea water circuit

For those interested, here is a picture of the strainer in real life. Now where is my boat ....

Cheers,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121
Saint Martin

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