Date   

Spare electric controle box M61037 #spares

Steven Nieman
 

Hi, does anyone have  A spare electrical black box M61037 for sale for the airco Compact 9 EH - Cod. M60018 unit?


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Paul Osterberg
 

I looking into this BMS which I will probably go for, expensive but I got confidence in my contact, he provided a lot of valuable information 
http://www.bestlithiumbattery.com/
Paul on sykerpa SM 259 


Re: Manual Bilge Pump

Gerhard Mueller
 

In Greece I have received the service kit some weeks ago from:

Alex Karademiris 
 Marine Accessories Sales 
ZOIS EFSTATHIOU S.A. - Imports of Yacht Accessories & Marine Engines
57 Posidonos Ave. - 183 44 MOSCHATO - GREECE
Tel +30 2109409828
Fax +30 2109409112
Email: 
alex_karademiris@...
URL: 
www.zois.gr

They have the Whale service kit AK8050 in stock.
Retail price: 38.63€+VAT
ACS courier transport 4.5€+VAT to Kalamata and received the next day.

--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: Manual Bilge Pump

Cathy & Guillaume
 

Many thanks for your help. I have just ordered a new pump and will service my current one to keep as spare/mobile unit ready for emergencies.

Guillaume
Carpathia III, SM2K #293
Now in Athens


Re: Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

eric freedman
 

Hi Alan,
Thank you so much.
Fair Winds,
Eric

On September 21, 2020 at 11:53 PM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:

Hi Eric,

I drilled the hole in the bottom of the U section...this is the part that supports the stove top grating. I omitted to say that I cut a slot in each side of the U section to match the grating.
The U section sits on a short piece of stainless tube and the screw goes through the U section through the tube piece and into the stove top.
It replicates the original plastic things that eventually melt.

Like this



Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437

 

 


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Denis Foster
 

Hi Arno,

The Kaiken Flash seems to be permanent equalizing.

That said sometimes I have the same feeling as you about Lithium. The maturity for the cruising yacht market doesn t seem that established leading to complex not fail safe systems probably impossible to fix in remote places.

For the moment we have a system that works with Gel batteries (9 years old) religiously maintained and strangely still working. I haven t excluded the possibility of replacing them by the same brand and model. I was also attracted by the Firefly carbon foam AGM. And spending the money saved on a high quality Solar installation that would be ready when Lithium will be at maturity for our specific needs. I know the industrial research on energy storage by Lithium batteries is very active now and the results will pass one day to our little niche market.

Robust, reliable and easy to fix systems have there attraction....

Regards

Denis


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Dennis,

This is one of the problems I have with many BMS systems, if not all. They use passive top-balancing, meaning they can only balance the cells when full and do this by dissipating the energy of the fullest cells.
It seems that the one you found is more clever. It does not say if it uses active balancing as far as I can see.
Some time ago I found this system that does it all: https://enerstone.fr/en/
However this also needs some additional logic to protect the batteries for under/over voltage. I sort of gave up on the Lithium stuff because if you want to do this right it is immensely complex and you will have to come up with a bespoke solution that I find undesirable on a sailing yacht.
Fact is that the market for lithium systems on yachts is quite small compared to other markets so not many companies develop specialized solutions for it.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Eric,

I drilled the hole in the bottom of the U section...this is the part that supports the stove top grating. I omitted to say that I cut a slot in each side of the U section to match the grating.
The U section sits on a short piece of stainless tube and the screw goes through the U section through the tube piece and into the stove top.
It replicates the original plastic things that eventually melt.

Like this



Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: deck leak

Arno Luijten
 

Hi James,

I'm aware of the differences between balsa and Divinycell, particularly the difference in adhesion to polyester. However Hallberg Rassy and many others have been using Divinycell since the eighties and correct me if I'm wrong, I've never heard of a soggy deck on a Halberg-Rassy. I used to own a 1992 model and the deck was solid, even with the gazillion holes because of the teak deck. Not that I would ever want a teak laid boat anymore, but that is another story. My previous boat had no teak deck but did carry a Divinycell cored deck and hull (above the waterline). Not a single problem manifested itself. I sold her when she was 16 years old.
The compression strength is something you can take into account when doing the structural calculations on the boat and should not be a problem.

So although there are some advantages to balsa I find it a poor choice for cored decks simply because water-ingress can be very hard to spot/monitor until it's at an advances state. There is a YouTube channel (Sail Life) that can illustrate the crazy amount of work it can be to rectify the problem once the balsa starts rotting.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: deck leak

James Alton
 

Bill,

   I am glad that you pointed out the concern of leakage into the core from cracks as this does happen.  Not all cracks are the same, some are a concern and some aren’t and telling the difference is sometimes difficult.  Here are a  couple general things that I have learned.

1.  Cracks that occur near a high load areas where hardware is attached usually extend into the glass laminate.  

2.  Cracks that form on an open deck area such as what we commonly see in the simulated teak decks should only be in the gelcoat so there is no path for water to leak into the core.

3.  You can get some idea of whether a particular crack is serious by how much displacement there is on the surface.  Is the top of the crack level or is one edge raised?  If level, odds are pretty good that the laminate is still ok.  If you can catch your fingernail on a raised edge, the crack likely extends into the laminate at least some.  

3.  Your advice to fix damage caused by dropping something heavy and fracturing the glass laminate is really good advice.  An amazing amount of water can enter through even a small crack or hole over time and it is a one way trip since it is pretty much impossible to remove short of using vacuum pump.  

James 





   

On Sep 21, 2020, at 10:09 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Bill & Karen and everyone,

I love your sketch and simple explanation of potentially a serious issue. I will add a word of caution. Small cracks in the gelcoat of any Amel can possibly lead to a serious core moisture problem. 

How many of us have walked past a tiny crack without thinking through the potential of a serious repair? If you choose to do nothing, one day you might regret it. I suggest that at the very least, temporarily seal that crack until gelcoat repair can be done. The most common areas that I see cracks that will cause moisture penetration is near the aft lazarette and on the cockpit seats where something heavy has hit the area with force. The most common cause is damage from the bottom fin of an outboard engine. 

If you have created a small crack, don't wish for the best, do something.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Sep 20, 2020 at 7:41 PM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello Amelians,

Here are our thoughts about this deck leak!

Any deck leak, no matter how small, in the main cabin of a Super Maramu is a serious issue that needs to be addressed RIGHT AWAY.  
This is the voice of painful experience. A TINY little salt line was all that alerted us to one of the biggest jobs we have had to do to our boat.

Here is why...

From the aft edge of the hatch in the main saloon forward, the deck is pretty standard balsa cored deck. 
Right behind the hatch, the deck surface rises about 3 inches, while the cabin ceiling height does not change. 
 
The cabin ceiling here is thin (4-6mm plywood) and there is an empty space between the cabin ceiling and the structural underside of the deck. 
If there is ANY leak into this space, the water is free to roll around, and will find a place to drip down probably quite remote from the actual source.

What makes this situation so serious, is the back edge of the balsa core on the forward deck is not sealed, and is exposed into this space. It will soak up that water, and rot.  This is a big expensive repair to do right.  

Leaks into this space can come from the traveler, but more likely is from the hatch in the main cabin.  

There is a hardwood frame around the hatch opening, and the hatch frame is screwed into this with wood screws.  
 A lot of force is applied to the screws that secure the hinge side of the frame.  
If one of these starts to leak, the wood saturates, and water is then deposited into that empty space between the sailing and the deck, and problems start. 

Karen Smith & Bill Kinney
SM #160
Annapolis, MD





Re: deck leak

James Alton
 

A mid range  Divinycell (H80) has a compressive strength of about 174 PSI (http://www.fiberglasssupply.com/pdf/core/hmanm.pdf)

End grain balsa core has a compressive strength of around 1,837 PSI according to this site.(http://www.cstsales.com/end_grain_balsa.html)  Balsa does vary in density but this is a huge increase over any foam that I am aware of.  (http://www.cstsales.com/end_grain_balsa.html)

In general, polyester resins  create a fairly low secondary bond.  The balsa soaks up the resin so that the bond penetrates deep into the balsa and and this can create an exceptional bond, even with polyester if the layup is done properly.  It is best to float the balsa in resin before installing to keep the wood from sucking up too much resin leaving a dry joint.  With a foam like Dinvinycell the resin does not soak into the product, it pretty much sits on the surface.  If a core fails in it’s bond to the fibreglass layers or crushes from an applied load it is a structural integrity is compromised even if the foam itself is ok.  Divinycell seems to bond quite well to epoxies used in aircraft construction but most boats are built with Polyester resins.

So yes, one has got to take care in keeping water out of a balsa core but there are some really good reasons to use this material as a core material in my experience so I do not fault Amel at all for using it.  In fact so far I have not seen anything that I like better for core.

Best,

James
 

On Sep 21, 2020, at 6:29 PM, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,

Thanks for your wise words of advice. This is actually hitting on one my least favorite aspects of an Amel, the usage of balsa-wood in the deck core. This should have been abandoned in favor of Divinycell 30 years ago in my opinion.
For 54's a special word of advice: have a look at the point when the central stanchion sits in the rear railing/lifeline. It sits in this sort of cup that is bolted in the deck (it actually goes right through it). Amel fit this in with some caulking but (in my case) did not bother to protect the core material after drilling the hole.
In my case I had to remove the rotting core for about 10 cm diameter and fill the void with thickened epoxy. This also resolved a leak into the rear lazarette. Even great boat builders can drop a ball occasionally.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: deck leak

James Alton
 

Bill,

   Thanks so much for alerting me to this potential problem.  I will remove the hatch as you suggested and will seal the core at every deck penetration.  I will also use filled epoxy for this job just as you suggested.  I do normally try to preserve or restore the fibreglass for the top hole in such repairs which makes the process a bit more difficult but the idea is the same.   I have pulled the deck fills and most every deck penetration that I could find on our boat, removed the core and filled with epoxy.  So far I have not found any rotten core though the balsa was damp in the holes for the twist turns on the forward hatch locker lids,  not bad on a 33 year old boat!

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Sep 21, 2020, at 8:38 PM, Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...> wrote:

James,

”what has to be removed for inspection.”

I wish I had an easy answer for you on this one, unfortunately I do not. We discovered the problem when we had obvious core failure, so our “inspection” was peeling off the upper deck surface until we go to sound core.  Miles’ approach of pulling screws from the hatch frame and looking is I think as good as it gets.

There is a preventative that should be considered.  Remove the hatch and drill out the screw holes in the deck significantly larger than the diameter of the screw.  Drill down all the way through the wood piece.  Fill it with epoxy thickened with LOTS of high strength thickener.  Redrill a pilot hole for the screws, and again drill all the way through.  You want isolate the leak path from the wood, and you want to SEE a drip right away, not have it get trapped.  If you go this route, be prepared for surprises.  Not all the screws, and I bet not all the boats, are fixed in the same way!

Doing this is a bit fussy, requiring a bit of disassembly of the interior trim and for the hinge side screws it has to be done very carefully or else the screws will pull out in short order.  There are some other viable alternatives for resetting the screws, but pretty much all of them require pulling the hatch.

Bill Kinney


Re: deck leak

Karen Smith
 

James,

”what has to be removed for inspection.”

I wish I had an easy answer for you on this one, unfortunately I do not. We discovered the problem when we had obvious core failure, so our “inspection” was peeling off the upper deck surface until we go to sound core.  Miles’ approach of pulling screws from the hatch frame and looking is I think as good as it gets.

There is a preventative that should be considered.  Remove the hatch and drill out the screw holes in the deck significantly larger than the diameter of the screw.  Drill down all the way through the wood piece.  Fill it with epoxy thickened with LOTS of high strength thickener.  Redrill a pilot hole for the screws, and again drill all the way through.  You want isolate the leak path from the wood, and you want to SEE a drip right away, not have it get trapped.  If you go this route, be prepared for surprises.  Not all the screws, and I bet not all the boats, are fixed in the same way!

Doing this is a bit fussy, requiring a bit of disassembly of the interior trim and for the hinge side screws it has to be done very carefully or else the screws will pull out in short order.  There are some other viable alternatives for resetting the screws, but pretty much all of them require pulling the hatch.

Bill Kinney


Re: Ordered Today --Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Thank you Eric for spending the time to take care of the group. Please let us know how to make payment.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of eric freedman via groups.io
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 4:21 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io; 'eric' <kimberlite@...>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Ordered Today --Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

 

Hi Amelians,

 

I have ordered sensors for the following people.

They should ship to me within 2 weeks from the west coast.

I will send them out Priority mail when I receive them.

Mark 1 PC

Mohammad 3

Jim 1

Bob 1

Vladimir 1

Mike Longcor 2

Alan 1

Mike Mueller 1

Kent 3

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of VLADIMIR SONSEV
Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2020 6:41 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Last Call Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

 

Eric,

 

I want jut to make sure that my name is on your list.

 

Vladimir Sonsev

 

96 Fiddlers Hill Rd, Edgewater, MD 21037

 

Tel: 202 258 1916

 

Best Regards

Vladimir

S/V " Life is Food"

 

 

On Thu, Sep 17, 2020, 6:24 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

I am ordering these switches on Monday—sorry for the delay.

They will be shipped to you express mail.

If anyone else is interested, Please email me with the

the quantity you wish and your MAILING address.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

I have broken a few of these switches over the years. I have done this by reaching over the generator to retrieve something stored behind the genset.

I received a quote from my Onan dealer and on Amazon for around $90- plus tax which is ridiculous.

I tracked down the OEM manufacturer and the cost is about $23- plus a one time set up fee of about $50- I plan on ordering 2 of these. They stated that they make this for ONAN. If anyone is interested please let me know and I can order them for you $33- each plus USPS of about $8.00.

I will order the switches within a week.

Fair Winds,

Eric

SM 376 Kimberlite 


Re: Personal Kent Kristy--Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

eric freedman
 

Hi Kent,

I will be on board Kimberlite until Oct-28 ish. I will then head to somewhere in the Caribbean.

Depending on Covid.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of eric freedman
Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2020 6:22 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Personal Kent Kristy--Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

 

Hi Kent,

Looks like I will order the switches Monday.

Please send me your mailing address.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of karkauai via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 9:29 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

 

Thanks Eric,

Ive had two go bad in the last year. Please order three for me.

 

We'll be coming down from Maine in late Sept.  Will you be home then?

Thanks.

Kent & Iris

Kristy

SM 243

 

On Jul 28, 2020 8:37 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

I have broken a few of these switches over the years. I have done this by reaching over the generator to retrieve something stored behind the genset.

I received a quote from my Onan dealer and on Amazon for around $90- plus tax which is ridiculous.

I tracked down the OEM manufacturer and the cost is about $23- plus a one time set up fee of about $50- I plan on ordering 2 of these. They stated that they make this for ONAN. If anyone is interested please let me know and I can order them for you $33- each plus USPS of about $8.00.

I will order the switches within a week.

Fair Winds,

Eric

SM 376 Kimberlite 

 


Re: Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

eric freedman
 

Hi Alan,

Thanks for the Photo.

Nice clean job !

Sorry I do not understand how you fastened the tubing to the stove.

You said you drilled a hole in the bottom of the tubing??

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan Leslie
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 7:06 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

 

Eric,

Found a picture :


Ordered Today --Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

eric freedman
 

Hi Amelians,

 

I have ordered sensors for the following people.

They should ship to me within 2 weeks from the west coast.

I will send them out Priority mail when I receive them.

Mark 1 PC

Mohammad 3

Jim 1

Bob 1

Vladimir 1

Mike Longcor 2

Alan 1

Mike Mueller 1

Kent 3

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of VLADIMIR SONSEV
Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2020 6:41 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Last Call Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

 

Eric,

 

I want jut to make sure that my name is on your list.

 

Vladimir Sonsev

 

96 Fiddlers Hill Rd, Edgewater, MD 21037

 

Tel: 202 258 1916

 

Best Regards

Vladimir

S/V " Life is Food"

 

 

On Thu, Sep 17, 2020, 6:24 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

I am ordering these switches on Monday—sorry for the delay.

They will be shipped to you express mail.

If anyone else is interested, Please email me with the

the quantity you wish and your MAILING address.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

I have broken a few of these switches over the years. I have done this by reaching over the generator to retrieve something stored behind the genset.

I received a quote from my Onan dealer and on Amazon for around $90- plus tax which is ridiculous.

I tracked down the OEM manufacturer and the cost is about $23- plus a one time set up fee of about $50- I plan on ordering 2 of these. They stated that they make this for ONAN. If anyone is interested please let me know and I can order them for you $33- each plus USPS of about $8.00.

I will order the switches within a week.

Fair Winds,

Eric

SM 376 Kimberlite 


Re: Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

Alan Leslie
 

Eric,

Found a picture :


Re: deck leak

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Bill,

Thanks for your wise words of advice. This is actually hitting on one my least favorite aspects of an Amel, the usage of balsa-wood in the deck core. This should have been abandoned in favor of Divinycell 30 years ago in my opinion.
For 54's a special word of advice: have a look at the point when the central stanchion sits in the rear railing/lifeline. It sits in this sort of cup that is bolted in the deck (it actually goes right through it). Amel fit this in with some caulking but (in my case) did not bother to protect the core material after drilling the hole.
In my case I had to remove the rotting core for about 10 cm diameter and fill the void with thickened epoxy. This also resolved a leak into the rear lazarette. Even great boat builders can drop a ball occasionally.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Eric,

First, I took a piece of stainless rod, bent the ends 90 degrees and threaded them, drilled a hole each side vertically through the stove side bar, mounted the rod and put a washer and nut underneath, that stops the fypans from sliding out.
Second I got some stainless tube and cut standoffs the appropriate length and fabricated small supports from U section stainless, drilled a hole in the bottom and put a self tapping screw through both into the stove top where the plastic ones were located.
Sorry I don't have any pictures.
I can;t get to Elyse for the foreseeable future.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
 

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