Date   

Re: A question about coppercoat

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Paul,

We put Coppercoat on 10 years ago when we were in England .  In our first season we went up to Scotland and on to the Med and we have been in the Med ever since.

 We were disappointed in our first season as the hull stayed a sort of brown colour  ( as originally painted ) and we had some fouling. We then sanded very gently and have not looked back.

 We had some rust coming through on the iron keel after 5 years so we had  Coppercoat applied afresh  on that section by Cleopatra marina in Preveza in the Ionian. ( they did a very thorough job )

We now sail for 5 months of the year, April till June, coming ashore for July and August, then afloat in the autumn and ashore in the winter.

 Our Coppercoat is now green. The copper has really come through and is completely effective against fouling. Someone had told me that Coppercoat gets better as the years go by. I took that with a pinch of salt at the time but today I share that view.  After three months in the summer we can detect a slime on parts of the hull but it comes off with a sponge when we are swimming.  Med sea temperature in the summer can get up to 27c ( 80F) and was still at 24c  ( 75F) last week.
When we lift we are as clean as when we launch. 

 For us, with our limited number of months afloat, Coppercoat has delivered. For 33 years we antifouled, doing everything ourselves--sanding down, filling patches, painting etc etc. Now that our combined ages approach 143 ( Judy has just reached her 30's ) I look for every labour saving device to complement the best labour saving yacht we have ever owned. Coppercoat has proved one such.

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Barry Connor via groups.io <connor_barry@...>
Sent: 29 October 2020 15:03
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] A question about coppercoat
 
Hi Paul,
I have gone 9 months and no problem. CopperCoat been on for over 3 years now.
On another issue. I have changed the the lifting pistons on my windscreen in preparation for replacement. Can’t get to Grenada yet. See photo. I put a centre attachment for easier closing. Calling it the “EZ Close” New pistons are each 150n. I have a 300n piston if anyone who has an early 54 with the single piston needs a replacement. I changed because I couldn’t get a 300n piston.
 
Very Best

Barry and Penny
“SV Lady Penrlope II”
Amel 54. #17
Sainte Anne anchorage Martinique 

On Oct 29, 2020, at 10:30, Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown <paul.dowd@...> wrote:



Hi all,

 

With Coppercoat, my understanding is that scraping should be done 2-4 times a year depending on where you are. My question is: does it matter of the hull is not scraped for an extended period, say 9-12 months? Would this make it any more difficult to clean the hull later? Or even be detrimental in any way?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98 - Grenada

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: A question about coppercoat

Barry Connor
 

Hi Paul,
I have gone 9 months and no problem. CopperCoat been on for over 3 years now.
On another issue. I have changed the the lifting pistons on my windscreen in preparation for replacement. Can’t get to Grenada yet. See photo. I put a centre attachment for easier closing. Calling it the “EZ Close” New pistons are each 150n. I have a 300n piston if anyone who has an early 54 with the single piston needs a replacement. I changed because I couldn’t get a 300n piston.
 
Very Best

Barry and Penny
“SV Lady Penrlope II”
Amel 54. #17
Sainte Anne anchorage Martinique 

On Oct 29, 2020, at 10:30, Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown <paul.dowd@...> wrote:



Hi all,

 

With Coppercoat, my understanding is that scraping should be done 2-4 times a year depending on where you are. My question is: does it matter of the hull is not scraped for an extended period, say 9-12 months? Would this make it any more difficult to clean the hull later? Or even be detrimental in any way?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98 - Grenada

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


A question about coppercoat

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Hi all,

 

With Coppercoat, my understanding is that scraping should be done 2-4 times a year depending on where you are. My question is: does it matter of the hull is not scraped for an extended period, say 9-12 months? Would this make it any more difficult to clean the hull later? Or even be detrimental in any way?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98 - Grenada

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: Differences between Super Maramu (SM) and Super Maramu 2000 (SM2000; SM2k)

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

Jim,

That's because there really is no one definitive list.  Although there was a definitive name change to Super Maramu 2000, some of the design changes were made BEFORE the name change and some were made after.  Throw in all the minor revisions made over the years, the engine changes, and the many different options offered by Amel (dive compressor, diesel heater, watermakers, comfort pack, etc.) and you will begin to see that while ALL SMs are all more alike than they are different, each individual one is a bit unique.  From a cost/joy of ownership standpoint, you will likely be happier with an early SM that has been lovingly and well maintained by her owner(s) vs an SM 2000 that has been neglected by her owner(s) for the last 15 years.

That said, here are a few links discussing the differences between an SM and the SM 2000:  
https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/topic/29758905#15849
https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/topic/29762066#23099
https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/topic/66433839#49441

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Re: Differences between Super Maramu (SM) and Super Maramu 2000 (SM2000; SM2k)

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

In case this helps you in the interim, this is an old Cruisers Forum post which could be helpful in addition to contacting Joel - https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f47/difference-between-amel-models-137037.html

Cheers
Colin Streeter

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 1:13 PM Bill Schwanitz <billschwanitz@...> wrote:
Jim, After you talk to Joel, would you please post your findings back to the group?

Thanks,
Bill



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Differences between Super Maramu (SM) and Super Maramu 2000 (SM2000; SM2k)

Bill Schwanitz
 

Jim, After you talk to Joel, would you please post your findings back to the group?

Thanks,
Bill


Re: Differences between Super Maramu (SM) and Super Maramu 2000 (SM2000; SM2k)

 

I agree...Joel Potter can be reached at Joel Potter <jfpottercys"at"att.net>

He owned 2 SMs and 1 54..He specializes in selling Amels. 

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 8:26 PM Courtney Gorman via groups.io <Itsfun1=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Your best bet would be to reach out to Joel Potter 


On Oct 28, 2020, at 9:18 PM, jimbo ken <jimbokennedy@...> wrote:

I have searched the group but can not find anything that lists what are the main differences between the early SM and the SM 2000 - could somebody please point me to the post if they know it or list the top differences - 

Jim


Re: Differences between Super Maramu (SM) and Super Maramu 2000 (SM2000; SM2k)

Courtney Gorman
 

Your best bet would be to reach out to Joel Potter 


On Oct 28, 2020, at 9:18 PM, jimbo ken <jimbokennedy@...> wrote:

I have searched the group but can not find anything that lists what are the main differences between the early SM and the SM 2000 - could somebody please point me to the post if they know it or list the top differences - 

Jim


Differences between Super Maramu (SM) and Super Maramu 2000 (SM2000; SM2k)

jimbo ken
 

I have searched the group but can not find anything that lists what are the main differences between the early SM and the SM 2000 - could somebody please point me to the post if they know it or list the top differences - 

Jim


Re: winterizing the watermaker

 

Ryan,

As I said, it was from someone else and I have zero experience winterizing...as I tell everyone, I am allergic to cold.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 1:19 PM Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote:
Miles,

Where/how do you connect your hand pump to the flow meter and other tubes?

Bill,
I appreciate the additional instructions, but as with so many winterization instructions for this unit, they mainly talk about the seawater side.  The fresh water side seems to be almost an afterthought -- "take care ... there is no fresh water inside".  I don't know how to put that into practice.

We're expecting the first freeze of the year this Friday night, and our boat is already on the hard.

Thanks,

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Salem, MA, USA


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 1:08 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Recently a trusted owner wrote the following:
Winterizing: Recommend using -50F degrees non-toxic water system antifreeze. (2 gallons for a D160)
With the pressure regulator fully counter-clockwise, pump this into the inlet of the high-pressure pump
and through the membrane tubes under minimum pressure. Once the solution has been pumped in, turn
the pressure regulator valve fully clockwise to close it off and retain the solution inside the membrane
tubes. Make sure to blow out the product water lines - take care to make sure there is no fresh water
inside the product flow meter tube. Open, drain, and clean the pre-filter housings.

Disclaimer: I have no experience in winterizing...brrrrr

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 11:43 AM Miles <milesbid@...> wrote:

Ryan,

 

I have a small hand pump.  I connect the plastic tube to the flow meter and pump it full of pink stuff, and continue pumping until I think the surrounding tubes are full.  I also use this on the hot water pipes. 

 

Miles

 

s/y Ladybug,  sm216  200 miles off Bermuda heading south.


Re: winterizing the watermaker

Ryan Meador
 

Miles,

Where/how do you connect your hand pump to the flow meter and other tubes?

Bill,
I appreciate the additional instructions, but as with so many winterization instructions for this unit, they mainly talk about the seawater side.  The fresh water side seems to be almost an afterthought -- "take care ... there is no fresh water inside".  I don't know how to put that into practice.

We're expecting the first freeze of the year this Friday night, and our boat is already on the hard.

Thanks,

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Salem, MA, USA


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 1:08 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Recently a trusted owner wrote the following:
Winterizing: Recommend using -50F degrees non-toxic water system antifreeze. (2 gallons for a D160)
With the pressure regulator fully counter-clockwise, pump this into the inlet of the high-pressure pump
and through the membrane tubes under minimum pressure. Once the solution has been pumped in, turn
the pressure regulator valve fully clockwise to close it off and retain the solution inside the membrane
tubes. Make sure to blow out the product water lines - take care to make sure there is no fresh water
inside the product flow meter tube. Open, drain, and clean the pre-filter housings.

Disclaimer: I have no experience in winterizing...brrrrr

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 11:43 AM Miles <milesbid@...> wrote:

Ryan,

 

I have a small hand pump.  I connect the plastic tube to the flow meter and pump it full of pink stuff, and continue pumping until I think the surrounding tubes are full.  I also use this on the hot water pipes. 

 

Miles

 

s/y Ladybug,  sm216  200 miles off Bermuda heading south.


Re: winterizing the watermaker

 

Recently a trusted owner wrote the following:
Winterizing: Recommend using -50F degrees non-toxic water system antifreeze. (2 gallons for a D160)
With the pressure regulator fully counter-clockwise, pump this into the inlet of the high-pressure pump
and through the membrane tubes under minimum pressure. Once the solution has been pumped in, turn
the pressure regulator valve fully clockwise to close it off and retain the solution inside the membrane
tubes. Make sure to blow out the product water lines - take care to make sure there is no fresh water
inside the product flow meter tube. Open, drain, and clean the pre-filter housings.

Disclaimer: I have no experience in winterizing...brrrrr

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 11:43 AM Miles <milesbid@...> wrote:

Ryan,

 

I have a small hand pump.  I connect the plastic tube to the flow meter and pump it full of pink stuff, and continue pumping until I think the surrounding tubes are full.  I also use this on the hot water pipes. 

 

Miles

 

s/y Ladybug,  sm216  200 miles off Bermuda heading south.


Re: winterizing the watermaker

Miles
 

Ryan,

 

I have a small hand pump.  I connect the plastic tube to the flow meter and pump it full of pink stuff, and continue pumping until I think the surrounding tubes are full.  I also use this on the hot water pipes. 

 

Miles

 

s/y Ladybug,  sm216  200 miles off Bermuda heading south.


Re: winterizing the watermaker

Jamie Wendell
 

You have to manually disconnect the small plastic fittings at the flow meter and drain it, as well as the return hose at the panel. There will be water in both the hose and the sight glass if you do not. I learned the hard way a couple of years ago.
The sight glass froze over the winter and broke - very expensive part from Dessalator.
Pumping pink through the LP pump is all you need to do otherwise based on the many times I have winterized my watermaker (230V only).
Jamie
Phantom, A54 #44


Re: Anchor guide measurement

Karen Smith
 

Arnold,

Our setup looks identical to yours, and the width between the plates is exactly 4 inches (103 mm), BUT.... it does narrow down where the forestay chainplate is located to 3.375 inches (87 mm).

We also protected the deck in that area from abrasion by the chain.  We used a 3 inch wide strip of kevlar fabric set in polyester resin that is holding up very well, but also considered a 4 or 5 mm thick plate of Delrin instead of stainless.  A lot easier to machine on the boat :), and very durable to the kind of sliding abuse that the chain inflicts.  It also looks better as it wears.

Bill & Karen
s/v Harmonie
SM160
Annapolis MD, USA


Re: winterizing the watermaker

eric freedman
 

Ryan,
The gauges on my 160 lph watermaker are oil filled.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM376 Kimberlite

On October 27, 2020 at 7:54 PM Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote:

Hi Arnold,

Thanks for the info.

We followed basically those instructions already.  Blowing into the blue hose (I assume this is the one marked with blue tape, which is the product water output) did not clear the flowmeter.  It also didn't empty the membranes, nor the pressure gauge.  Has anyone been able to do this procedure successfully?

Thanks,

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Salem, MA, USA


On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 4:42 PM Arnold Mente via groups.io <Arnold.mente=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

DESALATOR SAYS:

FREEZING CONDITIONS: If the boat stays in a very cold region, please take a bucket containing 8 litres of warm fresh water mixed with one glycerine litre (you will find it in a drugstore) and let the seawater inlet hose suck up the mixture by starting the watermaker without pressure. You should then empty the flow meter tube on the control panel by blowing into the blue hose connected to the membranes. In normal winter conditions, only empty the flow meter tube and use the sterilizing cartridge ST2.

Arnold
SV Zephyr
SM203


Am 27.10.2020 um 20:17 schrieb Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...>:

Hi all,

We have the 60L/hr, 24V-only Dessalator.  Following the great instructions from past threads on this subject, we've successfully winterized the raw water side with pink antifreeze.  But none of the threads we've found have gone into detail on how to winterize the fresh (product) water side of the system, and we can't figure it out.  We disconnected the product water fittings near the end of the tubes, but little water came out.  I suspect the control panel tubes drained, but the membranes did not.  Also, I still see water inside the flow meter and pressure gauge.  Do any of you know how to drain these and/or replace the fresh water with antifreeze?

Thanks,

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Salem, MA, USA



--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


 


Re: winterizing the watermaker

Ryan Meador
 

Hi Arnold,

Thanks for the info.

We followed basically those instructions already.  Blowing into the blue hose (I assume this is the one marked with blue tape, which is the product water output) did not clear the flowmeter.  It also didn't empty the membranes, nor the pressure gauge.  Has anyone been able to do this procedure successfully?

Thanks,

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Salem, MA, USA


On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 4:42 PM Arnold Mente via groups.io <Arnold.mente=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

DESALATOR SAYS:

FREEZING CONDITIONS: If the boat stays in a very cold region, please take a bucket containing 8 litres of warm fresh water mixed with one glycerine litre (you will find it in a drugstore) and let the seawater inlet hose suck up the mixture by starting the watermaker without pressure. You should then empty the flow meter tube on the control panel by blowing into the blue hose connected to the membranes. In normal winter conditions, only empty the flow meter tube and use the sterilizing cartridge ST2.

Arnold
SV Zephyr
SM203


Am 27.10.2020 um 20:17 schrieb Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...>:

Hi all,

We have the 60L/hr, 24V-only Dessalator.  Following the great instructions from past threads on this subject, we've successfully winterized the raw water side with pink antifreeze.  But none of the threads we've found have gone into detail on how to winterize the fresh (product) water side of the system, and we can't figure it out.  We disconnected the product water fittings near the end of the tubes, but little water came out.  I suspect the control panel tubes drained, but the membranes did not.  Also, I still see water inside the flow meter and pressure gauge.  Do any of you know how to drain these and/or replace the fresh water with antifreeze?

Thanks,

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Salem, MA, USA



--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: Volvo 12v alternator

Mike Ondra
 

So here’s a couple of things that we learned about the alternator systems on the Volvo. Our original problem was that the 24 V alternator was not charging until fairly high rpm above 1800. Ultimately what we determine was that the warning light on the 24 v panel in the main salon was burned out therefore not completing the exciter circuit. When replaced by a new indicator light the 24 V system behaved properly.

During troubleshooting we noticed the yellow wire on the 12 V alternator was disconnected. It must’ve happened recently because the 12 V alternator was not putting out any voltage today but we didn’t have a problem with the battery in the past several weeks.. The battery was down to 12.4 V. Interestingly the tachometer did not work either, Which makes sense since it’s connected with the black and gray wire to the alternator picking up the unrectified voltage to pace the RPM. 

Turns out that the yellow wire should have been and perhaps was attached to a tab on the main positive lug on the alternator to the battery. That yellow wire appears to feed the 12 V voltage regulator.

Anyway, with the 24 V warning light replaced and the yellow wire connected to the positive lug on the 12 V alternator everything is working great. Thank you all for your input. Note that the above is our rationalization for what happened and may not necessarily be 100% correct.

Mike
Aletes SM240




On Oct 27, 2020, at 1:56 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Mike,

I am not sure if the following applies to the Volvo 12v alternator, but it applies to the Yanmar 12v alternator:

There is an unused tachometer output wire on all SM Yanmar 12v alternators. See the photo below. Please let me know if yours is the tachometer wire.

Also, possibly there is an issue with the "excite circuit." The alternator will self-excite at higher rpm. Try revving the engine in neutral to 1800 rpm.
<image.png>

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 10:28 AM Mike Ondra via groups.io <mdondra=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Lost output from 12 V alternator. Doing initial  trouble shooting  trying to understand the function of the short yellow wire which arises from near the voltage regulator and is not connected to anything else at the female terminal end. Should it be? And to what?


Mike Ondra
Aletes SM 240






Re: Anchor guide measurement

Arnold Mente
 


Hi Amelians,

is someone able to give me the measurement of the anchor guide?
I have attached the picture.

Thank you so much for help, I am now far away and search a solution to build in a SS plate that the chain not damage further the last 20 cm to the bow roller.

Best

Arnold
SV Zephyr
SM 203



--





--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


Anchor guide measurement

Arnold Mente
 

Hi Amelians,

is someone able to give me the measurement of the anchor guide?
I have attached the picture.

Thank you so much for help, I am now far away and search a solution to build in a SS plate that the chain not damage further the last 20 cm to the bow roller.

Best

Arnold
SV Zephyr
SM 203



--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203

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