Date   

Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

 

Paul,

I assume that you tested the fit?
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Nov 3, 2020 at 7:50 AM Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Bill R,

The diameter of the Rudder Shaft Post measured exactly 50 mm using a digital caliper which means the circumference should be 157.08 mm

The wealth of information on this forum never ceases to amaze me.

Thank you all for your knowledgeable and detailed responses.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Paul Stascavage
 

Bill R,

The diameter of the Rudder Shaft Post measured exactly 50 mm using a digital caliper which means the circumference should be 157.08 mm

The wealth of information on this forum never ceases to amaze me.

Thank you all for your knowledgeable and detailed responses.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: New 175 am alternator

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Karen,

 Good to read. We have also found over the years that our main engine alternator is a very efficient means of charging. It would be really useful if you could add your boat name and number so people can see what year your SM was built--in this case we would then know the size of engine you have and the number of batteries.

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...>
Sent: 31 October 2020 14:57
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] New 175 am alternator
 
This isn't advice, just our experience.  

Our boat was one of what seems to have been few SMs that were delivered with the "standard" 50 Amp alternator.  For the way we use our boat, that has been completely sufficient.  It supplies all the power we need when motoring, with enough left over to run the watermaker, or top off the batteries.  It's rare that we leave an anchorage with less than 80% charge in our batteries, so we are not normally asking the main engine alternator to deliver very much in the way of charge.  If we actually need to bulk charge the batteries while underway, we use the generator.


Re: Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

Laurens Vos
 

Had the same problem with my bilge switch. A water sensor is a good safety device. 


Re: Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Scott,

 

This is really good info. Should I ever find myself in a similar situation I’ll be sure to follow your advice.

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98 - Grenada

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott SV Tengah
Sent: 02 November 2020 19:48
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

 

Hi all,

We just completed a 2900nm passage from Hawaii to French Polynesia with pretty rough upwind/up current conditions for the first 10 days or so. Just a bit longer than the Atlantic crossing but much more difficult, with days on end at 38-40 degrees apparent, bashing into current and waves. The second half was a bit better, but two little failed switches almost ruined our trip.

1) The on-off switch for our bilge pump float tube failed. I presume it's the original - 13 years old. Internally, it corroded and while it has been working perfectly during our ownership until now, the resistance finally got high enough that it didn't activate the bilge pump when the water level rose in the gray water bilge. The quick connect tabs are not well sealed and I believe this is how moisture gets into the switch.

The secondary bilge water level alarm on my A54 is located to port of the gray water bilge. Because this was a hard upwind port tack, the gray water (and saltwater from the anchor well and bow deck locker) pooled to starboard and NEARLY SUBMERGED THE ALTERNATORS. I would guess another few hours or another shower or two and it would have been an expensive problem.

I would suggest everyone check their bilge switches for resistance in the "on" position. Ours was approaching 500 ohms. It's a bit of a custom job, so you may want to plan on having a backup made or purchase one from Amel.

I also intend to install a water sensor on the float tube itself, in case we ever find ourselves on another multi-day port tack upwind adventure with a dead switch or bilge pump.

2) We have been having intermittent electrical issues with our Volvo D3-110C where it would turn off randomly, generally with the helm display going blank. Further, the Volvo displayed voltage was always 0.1-0.3v less than what we measured at the engine-side battery cables and less than what was displayed on our Onan remote panel.  I believe I have found the problem and I believe it's a design fault resulting from Volvo's adaptation of a car engine for marine use.

On the starboard side of the engine lid/cover is an "auxiliary stop button" that is normally closed and allows power to flow to the ECU. When you press this button, it opens the circuit and depowers the ECU, turning off the motor.

The problem is that this switch is not sealed and is in the path of the engine room intake fan. That means salty air is blown onto it and since it's not sealed, it will corrode internally over time. See attached photo. We had a motor that would die randomly and had major difficulty starting up as we were heading south from the doldrums into southerly winds.  Not a great place to have an intermittent motor.

After finding the problem, I simply butt connected the two wires leading into the aux stop switch and if we can't find a SEALED replacement switch, we will likely leave it as such. The aux stop switch is redundant there because you can always remove the ECU blade fuse right next to this faulty switch.

I'd suggest owners of the D3-110 check resistance on their aux stop switch. Also examine the quick connect spade connectors - both of mine were corroded from the constant flow of salty air.

Hope this helps someone.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

Mark Erdos
 

Scott,

 

Glad to hear you found your issues.

 

Putting a water sensor on the tube is a GREAT idea!

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Scott SV Tengah
Sent: Monday, November 2, 2020 8:48 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

 

Hi all,

We just completed a 2900nm passage from Hawaii to French Polynesia with pretty rough upwind/up current conditions for the first 10 days or so. Just a bit longer than the Atlantic crossing but much more difficult, with days on end at 38-40 degrees apparent, bashing into current and waves. The second half was a bit better, but two little failed switches almost ruined our trip.

1) The on-off switch for our bilge pump float tube failed. I presume it's the original - 13 years old. Internally, it corroded and while it has been working perfectly during our ownership until now, the resistance finally got high enough that it didn't activate the bilge pump when the water level rose in the gray water bilge. The quick connect tabs are not well sealed and I believe this is how moisture gets into the switch.

The secondary bilge water level alarm on my A54 is located to port of the gray water bilge. Because this was a hard upwind port tack, the gray water (and saltwater from the anchor well and bow deck locker) pooled to starboard and NEARLY SUBMERGED THE ALTERNATORS. I would guess another few hours or another shower or two and it would have been an expensive problem.

I would suggest everyone check their bilge switches for resistance in the "on" position. Ours was approaching 500 ohms. It's a bit of a custom job, so you may want to plan on having a backup made or purchase one from Amel.

I also intend to install a water sensor on the float tube itself, in case we ever find ourselves on another multi-day port tack upwind adventure with a dead switch or bilge pump.

2) We have been having intermittent electrical issues with our Volvo D3-110C where it would turn off randomly, generally with the helm display going blank. Further, the Volvo displayed voltage was always 0.1-0.3v less than what we measured at the engine-side battery cables and less than what was displayed on our Onan remote panel.  I believe I have found the problem and I believe it's a design fault resulting from Volvo's adaptation of a car engine for marine use.

On the starboard side of the engine lid/cover is an "auxiliary stop button" that is normally closed and allows power to flow to the ECU. When you press this button, it opens the circuit and depowers the ECU, turning off the motor.

The problem is that this switch is not sealed and is in the path of the engine room intake fan. That means salty air is blown onto it and since it's not sealed, it will corrode internally over time. See attached photo. We had a motor that would die randomly and had major difficulty starting up as we were heading south from the doldrums into southerly winds.  Not a great place to have an intermittent motor.

After finding the problem, I simply butt connected the two wires leading into the aux stop switch and if we can't find a SEALED replacement switch, we will likely leave it as such. The aux stop switch is redundant there because you can always remove the ECU blade fuse right next to this faulty switch.

I'd suggest owners of the D3-110 check resistance on their aux stop switch. Also examine the quick connect spade connectors - both of mine were corroded from the constant flow of salty air.

Hope this helps someone.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

Scott SV Tengah
 

Hi all,

We just completed a 2900nm passage from Hawaii to French Polynesia with pretty rough upwind/up current conditions for the first 10 days or so. Just a bit longer than the Atlantic crossing but much more difficult, with days on end at 38-40 degrees apparent, bashing into current and waves. The second half was a bit better, but two little failed switches almost ruined our trip.

1) The on-off switch for our bilge pump float tube failed. I presume it's the original - 13 years old. Internally, it corroded and while it has been working perfectly during our ownership until now, the resistance finally got high enough that it didn't activate the bilge pump when the water level rose in the gray water bilge. The quick connect tabs are not well sealed and I believe this is how moisture gets into the switch.

The secondary bilge water level alarm on my A54 is located to port of the gray water bilge. Because this was a hard upwind port tack, the gray water (and saltwater from the anchor well and bow deck locker) pooled to starboard and NEARLY SUBMERGED THE ALTERNATORS. I would guess another few hours or another shower or two and it would have been an expensive problem.

I would suggest everyone check their bilge switches for resistance in the "on" position. Ours was approaching 500 ohms. It's a bit of a custom job, so you may want to plan on having a backup made or purchase one from Amel.

I also intend to install a water sensor on the float tube itself, in case we ever find ourselves on another multi-day port tack upwind adventure with a dead switch or bilge pump.

2) We have been having intermittent electrical issues with our Volvo D3-110C where it would turn off randomly, generally with the helm display going blank. Further, the Volvo displayed voltage was always 0.1-0.3v less than what we measured at the engine-side battery cables and less than what was displayed on our Onan remote panel.  I believe I have found the problem and I believe it's a design fault resulting from Volvo's adaptation of a car engine for marine use.

On the starboard side of the engine lid/cover is an "auxiliary stop button" that is normally closed and allows power to flow to the ECU. When you press this button, it opens the circuit and depowers the ECU, turning off the motor.

The problem is that this switch is not sealed and is in the path of the engine room intake fan. That means salty air is blown onto it and since it's not sealed, it will corrode internally over time. See attached photo. We had a motor that would die randomly and had major difficulty starting up as we were heading south from the doldrums into southerly winds.  Not a great place to have an intermittent motor.

After finding the problem, I simply butt connected the two wires leading into the aux stop switch and if we can't find a SEALED replacement switch, we will likely leave it as such. The aux stop switch is redundant there because you can always remove the ECU blade fuse right next to this faulty switch.

I'd suggest owners of the D3-110 check resistance on their aux stop switch. Also examine the quick connect spade connectors - both of mine were corroded from the constant flow of salty air.

Hope this helps someone.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Bow Thruster Amel 54

Doug Smith
 

I wanted to add to the information available for the bow thrusters for Amel 54’s.  Mine wasn’t going up or down, and when it was down, it wasn’t going to starboard.  If you are having difficulty with your thruster or just want to understand it better, these files might help.

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

Deltaville, VA USA

 


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

 

Dan,

According to Alban in Martinique, when new packing is installed, you will likely have to tighten in 30-60 days.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 8:21 AM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:
That is what I received from Amel last month as well. 

I cut to length with diagonal cuts. Installed each piece offset about 120 degrees. Carefully pounding each piece down around the shaft.

Based on some other information I was very careful when tightening the ring back down to make sure that I did not strip out the threads. 

A few days of motorsailing down the calm Chesepeake and so far no drips. Will keep checking as we go offshore next. 

Best regards, Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387



On Sat, Oct 31, 2020, 5:15 PM Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good day all,

I recently ordered the packing material from AMEL.

I specifically requested:

"Quantity 2 - Package of 3 rings of packing material for the Rudder Post"

What I received was two individual lengths of material (70 cm each) - see attached photo.

My question is,  has AMEL switched to 1 piece of material rather than 3 or did I only receive 2 of the 3 rings?

I am hoping someone will be able to answer the question based on the length of material supplied (70 cm).

Thanks in advance for your replies.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Dan Carlson
 

That is what I received from Amel last month as well. 

I cut to length with diagonal cuts. Installed each piece offset about 120 degrees. Carefully pounding each piece down around the shaft.

Based on some other information I was very careful when tightening the ring back down to make sure that I did not strip out the threads. 

A few days of motorsailing down the calm Chesepeake and so far no drips. Will keep checking as we go offshore next. 

Best regards, Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387



On Sat, Oct 31, 2020, 5:15 PM Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good day all,

I recently ordered the packing material from AMEL.

I specifically requested:

"Quantity 2 - Package of 3 rings of packing material for the Rudder Post"

What I received was two individual lengths of material (70 cm each) - see attached photo.

My question is,  has AMEL switched to 1 piece of material rather than 3 or did I only receive 2 of the 3 rings?

I am hoping someone will be able to answer the question based on the length of material supplied (70 cm).

Thanks in advance for your replies.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

 

Eric,

I spoke to Amel. Yes, it has always come precut, but with some people recently retiring, some bits of previous and undocumented experience was lost. The new people did not have the correct length. I believe it is totally understandable and that we have been somewhat spoiled. I was also told by Amel SAV that the material is 8mmx8mm  or 5/16’’.

I asked Paul to use the formula Length = (diameter * pi) and to test this formula with a correct fit. When Paul has tested this, either Paul or I will post it here.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Nov 1, 2020 at 9:05 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:
Did you speak with Amel and ask why the packing did not come in precut?
For the last 18 years mine was always precut.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberite

On November 1, 2020 at 2:45 PM "Paul Stascavage via groups.io" <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Eric, Bill, Danny, and Jarek,

Thank you for your replies.

I guess I’m going to have to cut the rings myself.

If anyone has any additional advice, I would greatly appreciate it.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com

 


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Olaf Bauer
 

Hi Paul,

 

Here is how I did it:

 

For the shaft packing  I used 70cm of PTFE Flax shaft packing 5/16” which have to cut into three pieces. Cut the corners at an angle for a better sealing.

I never remember the length of each part but you can use the old packings or the hole for measurement.

When installing the new packing coat them with silicon grease.

 

 

When taking into place be sure that the cuts are as fare away from each other for better sealing:

See also https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/files/AMEL%20SM2K%20Rudder%20Removal

 

 

Fair winds

Olaf

 

S/V Katchopine, SM2K 392

currently in Trinidad

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Stascavage via groups.io
Sent: Samstag, 31. Oktober 2020 17:15
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

 

Good day all,

I recently ordered the packing material from AMEL.

I specifically requested:

"Quantity 2 - Package of 3 rings of packing material for the Rudder Post"

What I received was two individual lengths of material (70 cm each) - see attached photo.

My question is,  has AMEL switched to 1 piece of material rather than 3 or did I only receive 2 of the 3 rings?

I am hoping someone will be able to answer the question based on the length of material supplied (70 cm).

Thanks in advance for your replies.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Bow Thruster Amps rating.

Bob Chapman
 

My belief, from many years in both aerospace and industrial electrical engineering, is that one should only put one terminal under a fastener (screw or bolt or nut). When there are more than one, it significantly increases the chance that a wire will wiggle, particularly where there is any vibration, thus loosening the whole “stack”.  Then the added resistance due to the looseness will quickly lead to a red-hot stack If there’s much current flowing in the stack.  I clearly remember ordering silver bars drilled and tapped to use as common bars. Wasn’t so very expensive. 

On Oct 30, 2020, at 3:58 PM, Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:



Hi Chris,   Please share pictures of how things look after you “unstack” the main switches.  I have been considering that as well. 

 

Here are a few responses to your ideas: 

  1. I would prefer to leave the very heavy bow-thruster cables as is on the Main switch.  I don’t want to add anything in that heavy load circuit that I can avoid.  
  2. I read a few concerns about ANL fuses for heavy load circuits and recommendations to use Class T for those.  I have one 400A class T from Blue Sea on the positive battery cable.  The inverter/charger, solar MPPT etc are also fused separately (200A ANL on the Victron Multi-Plus 3000/70/16)

 

Would also be interested in more information on where you mount and how you wire your rotary switch when you get that installed.

 

Thanks and regards,  Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, sm #387

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Doucette
Sent: Friday, October 30, 2020 8:55 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bow Thruster Amps rating.

 

 

Thanks everyone!  My setup has me in 4 groups of 100AH 12V Battle Borns @24v (400AH).  I have each group's positives and negatives aggregating to corresponding bus bars that then lead to the battery box posts.  I have an AMP ANL-style fuse holder in-line on the positive bus bar.  Everything I touch on this boat is going to be fused / breakered out appropriately.  I'll start with the 500amp and move up to 600 if needed.  

 

Bill Kinney- basically doing what you have done with your 24v / 12v distribution. I am going to work backwards from distribution and  "Unstack" the main Amel switches and move all the cables to bus bars (4 of them Engine Pos, Engine Neg, House load Pos, House Neg.) proper fusing closest to distribution and breakered out for switching. Same goes with any of the 12v distributions. All with appropriate marine wire, fittings, and labeling. 

 

On the AC side I am removing the Amel Auto Priority Gen / Shore Power priority switch (yes it has severed her well so far) in favor of a manual rotary Gen-Off_Shore switch..  Just for my peace of mind. 

Chris 

 


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

eric freedman
 

Did you speak with Amel and ask why the packing did not come in precut?
For the last 18 years mine was always precut.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberite

On November 1, 2020 at 2:45 PM "Paul Stascavage via groups.io" <pstas2003@...> wrote:

Eric, Bill, Danny, and Jarek,

Thank you for your replies.

I guess I’m going to have to cut the rings myself.

If anyone has any additional advice, I would greatly appreciate it.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com

 


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello Paul,

It’s an easy task; arm yourself with a very sharp knife. Remove all the old packing. (I use a dental pick) Wrap the new material around the rudder shaft and cut diagonally at about 1 mm longer than needed. With a wooden block of suitable size (no wider than the groove), tamp down the first layer.  Add Teflon grease atop this first layer.  Do the same for the second layer ensuring the cut is 120 degrees away from the first cut.  

Idem. For 3rd layer.

Install the white nylon nut and tighten accordingly.  Sea trial when able… retighten if needed.


Jean-Pierre Germain,Eleuthera, SM007 New Zealand



On 2 Nov 2020, at 08:45, Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003@...> wrote:

Eric, Bill, Danny, and Jarek,

Thank you for your replies.

I guess I’m going to have to cut the rings myself.

If anyone has any additional advice, I would greatly appreciate it.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Karen Smith
 

The exact metric size packing that Amel ships can be the very devil to source in the US, but the closest inch size works fine. If I recall Amel supplies 8mm packing, and 5/16 inch packing is within 1% of that.  But measure before you buy, my memory isn't 100% on 8mm or 10mm...

Far better to cut by wrapping it around the shaft than to do it by measure.  If you do perfectly square cuts on a length of packing exactly equal to the shaft OD, the cuts will gap apart on the outside of the packing with is significantly longer in circumference than the shaft.

Bill
Harmonie
SM160
Annapolis, MD.


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Alan Leslie
 

You can buy stuffing box packing from any decent chandler, it's not Amel specific. 
We did ours 7 years ago and it hasn't leaked since.
Agree with Danny, used the shaft as a template, cut diagonally and it doesn't have to be dead on accurate, insert the three rings so the cuts are 120 degrees off from each other and you will have no problems.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

 

C=pi*diameter

Measure the diameter

Length of packing=

(3.14159265359* diameter)

Let me know the answer. 😃

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Sun, Nov 1, 2020, 1:45 PM Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Eric, Bill, Danny, and Jarek,

Thank you for your replies.

I guess I’m going to have to cut the rings myself.

If anyone has any additional advice, I would greatly appreciate it.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Paul Stascavage
 

Eric, Bill, Danny, and Jarek,

Thank you for your replies.

I guess I’m going to have to cut the rings myself.

If anyone has any additional advice, I would greatly appreciate it.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Jarek Zemlo
 

Hi,

I purchased for my SM also 1 x 70cm from SAV AMEL. This is perfectly normal as the stuffing material is supplied in 1 single length that will have to be re-cut into 3 pieces.

Regards
Jarek Zemlo
S/Y NOA BLUE

1661 - 1680 of 56728