Date   

Re: Surveyor in Charleston area

Kevin Schmit
 

Nick,

I found an awesome guy who just did our 2003 Amel SM.  He was phenomenal!

Nick Lombardi

+1 (978) 479-3864

charlestonmarinesurvey@...
I highly recommend him.  Very professional, courteous and knowledgeable.


Kevin


On Nov 10, 2020, at 6:44 PM, Nick Fowle <nhfowle@...> wrote:

Would anyone be able to recommend a surveyor in the Charleston area please? Ideally one with Amel experience.

thanks 


Surveyor in Charleston area

Nick Fowle <nhfowle@...>
 

Would anyone be able to recommend a surveyor in the Charleston area please? Ideally one with Amel experience.

thanks 


Re: Locking Hatch board 54

Courtney Gorman
 

Thanks Mark but I’m talking about the crossbar 


On Nov 10, 2020, at 1:15 PM, Mark & Debbie Mueller <brass.ring@...> wrote:

If you mean the top of the hatch where the latch attaches take a look at the attached.  About 3 minutes from the marina is Unique Molding & Doors,  1005 I St, Brunswick, GA 31520  912.222.0414 - I used them when I was there and they did an excellent job.
--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54
<A54 Top of Hatch Board Dimensions.pdf>
<20201110_123524.jpg>


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Stefan and Anne Deerberg
 

Hi Paul!

We had a webasto 10kw hydronic water heater on our previous Beneteau 50. We sailed in the Baltic winter and the boat was pretty warm in all cabins, even the temperature dropped under zero Celsius.
We are planning to install the same heater in our SM 2000, before we sailing up north to Greenland.
In our Truck, where we lived all the year, we had very good experience with the Planar 44D, a air van heater from Russia. 

All the best 

Stefan 
SV OYA, SM 373
Le Marin / Martinique 
sailing.oya 

Stefan Deerberg 

Geschäftsführer 
Deerberg GmbH 
Unternehmer/ Entrepreneur

Velgen 35
29582 Hanstedt 
Germany

Mobil: +49 172 7757444
stefan.deerberg@...
www.deerberg.de



On 9. Nov 2020, at 19:51, Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote:

Hello again Arnold!
What size of heater do you have? I'm lean towards the Webasto 9 Kw, a bit small if one follow the guidelines from the suppliers, but I do not need room temperature all over the boat, if I can keep 17 degree C i most of the boat, or 19 in the saloon and 17 in the after cabin, and keep the front cabin closed. I'm happy. it's another 1 k€ to go up one size!
Paul SY Kerpa SM#259


Re: Silicone BT seals

Leslie Washburn
 

Glad it was useful.  I'm big on checklists.

I agree with your statement and love the phrase "between terrifying and hysterically funny" I think I'll use that alot as it captures many moments we have on the ocean.

Great laugh for the day, thanks!

Leslie



Leslie A. Washburn 
Washburn Coaching & Consulting 
Yacht Deliveries & Provisioning
312.952.2145 m 


-------- Original message --------
From: William O'Toole <william@...>
Date: 11/9/20 8:12 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: "main@amelyachtowners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Silicone BT seals

Leslie,
This is exactly what I was hoping to find. Had a friend that actually had the anchor (not secured) dislodge in a short choppy swell. As he described it, it was so unexpected, and the retrieving it while underway, was an experience balancing between terrifying and hysterically funny. Always said a boat can instantaneously turn anyone into looking like a complete idiot in a second.  

Thanks again for the great samples. Reduces the folly factor!


-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular

On Nov 8, 2020, at 1:50 PM, Leslie Washburn via groups.io <washburn.leslie1@...> wrote:

William,
 
Here are a few samples that could be helpful.
 
 
 
SAMPLE #1
 
<image002.png>
 
 
 
 
 
 
SAMPLE #2
 
1 Before leaving marina / moving vessel
Anchor chain/line • Chain & line. Chafe ?
Anchor winch • Does it work/ handle available ?
Cockpit drain • Is it clogged ?
Compass light • Check it at night
Engine belts • Tight ? Worn ? Aligned ?
Engines • Inspection for leaks etc Spares
EPIRB • In date?
Fire extinguishers • In date / Charged
Flashlights • Do they work ? Spare batteries
Handheld instruments • Batteries good? Do they work?
Hatches • Do they close 100%. Handles, knobs etc
Instruments • Turn them on to check ?
Lifelines • Visual inspection for breaks etc
Lights • Interior, exterior & Nav lights. Spare bulbs.
Lockers • Make sure they lock shut.
Man-over-board gear • Check quick release and condition
Navigation lights • Easy to check at night
Outboard engine • You have spares ? Does it work ?
Ports • Do they close 100%. Handles, knobs etc
Radios • Batteries ? Do they work? Licenses ?
Safety equipment • Valid date ? Ready for use ?
Stanchions • Are they solid ?
Toilets • In good working order ? Holding tank OK ?
Clean Propeller • Dive and check
2 Before long ocean passage
Cockpit drain • Is it clogged ?
Compass light • Check it at night
Engine mounts • Visual inspection. Are they secure ?
EPIRB • In date?
Expiry dates • Ship papers/radio licences etc.
Fire extinguishers • In date / charged
Flashlights • Do they work ? Spare batteries.
Gas bottles • Rusty? Are they secure? Change hose ?
Odour?
Gas locker • Is vent hole plugged?
Handheld instruments • Batteries good ? Do they work?
Lifelines • Visual inspection for breaks etc
Liferaft • In date? Secure ? Accessible ?
Lights • Interior, exterior & Nav lights. Spare bulbs.
Man-over-board gear • Check quick release and condition
Navigation lights • Easy to check at night
Rigging • Visual inspection from top to bottom.
Roller furlers • Rinse, grease, visual inspection.
Free running ?
Safety equipment • Valid date ? Ready for use ?
Sails • Stitching. Chafe
Ship's papers - Visas • Complete
Stanchions • Are they solid ?
Wind vane • Check it out before you need it
3 Daily
Gas leak • Is there any odour near/under the stove/
pipes?
4 Weekly
Bilges • Is there water/ fuel present ?
Fuel leaks • Fuel in the bilge/ around the tanks ?
Underwater leaks • If salt water in bilges check all fittings
5 Monthly
Batteries • Acid level ? Clean terminals ?
Deck leaks • Check chainplates/hatches/ports etc. ?
Electrics • Run everything to make sure it works.
Spare fuses.
Engines • Inspection for leaks etc Spares
Fire extinguishers • Positions, mounting, in date ?
Flashlights • Do they work? Spare batteries ?
Gas locker • Is vent hole plugged?
Pumps • Do they work? Handles for manual pumps
Toilets • In good working order ? Holding tank OK ?
Seacock • Open / Close / Check movement
 
 
 
SAMPLE #3
ON DECK
  • Anchors are shackled and seized to rode, and there is some means of securing them to bow-roller / deck-chocks (or below deck) once you leave confined waters
  • Bitter end of anchor rode is secured to boat below decks
  • Chain hawsepipe is as watertight as possible
  • Deck storage cans for water and fuel are well-lashed
  • Deck-mounted dinghy is tightly lashed
  • Outboard motor is securely stowed on pushpit, in deck locker or elsewhere on deck where fuel cannot leak into boat 
  • Outboard fuel securely stowed on deck or in a sealed deck locker
  • Rubber gaskets on hatches and opening ports are sound
  • Hatches and ports shut and dogged, hatch-covers fitted as appropriate
  • Deck-filler caps for fuel and water properly done-up and o-rings in good condition
  • Cockpit drains are clear and draining freely
  • Washboards are sound and handy (ready to fit when needed)
  • Lifeline connectors are in good condition and properly done up
  • Lifelines/stanchions are strong enough to support a heavy crewmember’s weight
  • Stanchions are secured with pins or bolts in their bases; bases are bolted securely through deck (not screwed)
  • Sharp knife stowed close to cockpit for emergency rope-cutting
SAILS
  • all sails inspected for rips, holes and broken stitching on seams
  • batten ends securely fastened and in good condition
  • sail slides in good condition (none worn, broken or sun-damaged)
  • Roller headsails furl freely and top swivel is working properly
  • Headsail hanks working freely
  • Comprehensive sail repair kit on board, plus spare sailcloth and strong adhesive for major ‘instant’ repairs
REEFING
  • Roller reefing lubricated and handle stowed in appropriate place
  • Slab reefing lines working and chafe-free
SPARS
  • No metal-fatigue, corrosion or chafe on load-bearing fittings such as mast crane and shroud tangs
  • Spreaders are secure at inboard end and correctly angled
  • Anti-chafe on spreader-ends to prevent damage to sails
  • Wooden spars inspected for shakes or areas of softness around fittings
RIGGING
  • Bosun’s chair is in good condition and stowed somewhere accessible in case of emergency
  • Rigging wire is sound: no broken strands, particularly around terminal fittings
  • Shackle-pins (aloft & on deck) firmly done up and seized
  • All shackles, terminals, turning blocks and mast fittings inspected for fractures, wear and pitting
  • Sheaves turn freely
  • Split-pins/rings in all rigging screws or turnbuckles (aloft & on deck)
  • Exposed split-pins are taped to prevent snagging of sheets, sails or passing legs
  • Rig is correctly tensioned: mast is in column and leaning neither to port or starboard
  • Chainplates inspected for cracks or corrosion
  • Hacksaw plus spare blades on board (for emergency rigging removal), and bull-dog clips for a jury rig
STEERING
  • Rudder has no excessive play
  • Wheel steering: cables are properly tensioned, lubricated and protected from interference by gear stowed nearby.  Inspect for broken strands.
  • Tiller is sound (no splits or cracks) and firmly secured to rudder stock
  • Self-steering is correctly set up
  • Emergency tiller has been tested and crew know how to find, rig and use it
HEAVY WEATHER GEAR
  • Trysail and storm jib have been hoisted and checked for condition, sheeting angles, tack strops etc
  • Rode, turning blocks and anti-chafe assembled and accessible for sea-anchor/drogue
  • Storm boards accessible for windows and skylights
DOWN BELOW
  • Seacocks are working freely; skin fittings in good condition
  • All through-hulls have tapered softwood bungs attached by lanyard in case of skin-fitting failure
  • Flexible piping is secured to through-hull fittings with double hose-clamps.  Hose clamps in good condition
  • All siphon-breaks and breathers clear and working
  • All movable items are stowed in lockers, fastened or lashed in place
  • Fiddles are in ‘offshore’ position
  • All drawers and locker doors have catches to prevent them flying open at sea
  • Lee cloths/boards for bunks are strong and have adequate fastenings
ENGINE
  • Overheat alarm/light is working
  • Drip tray under engine is oil-free
  • Fuel tanks are full
  • Fuel sumps and filters checked for water and diesel fungus
  • Oil is clean and topped up
  • You have enough spare oil on board for at least one oil-change
  • Cooling water through-hull and strainer are clear of blockages and growth
  • Drive belts inspected for condition and correct tension
  • Stern gland adjusted and lubricated
ENGINE RUNNING CHECKS
  • Cooling water is pumping
  • Throttle control and gear-shift are working correctly
  • No excessive vibration
  • Ammeter/voltmeter shows alternator is charging
POWER GENERATION
  • You have sufficient means of generating power to run navigation lights, house lights, instruments and any other appliances you wish to use at sea
  • Batteries are holding a charge
  • Batteries are securely contained in boxes clear of bilge-water
  • Battery terminals are clean, free of corrosion, and cables securely connected
  • Electrolyte level correct in battery cells (if not, top up with distilled water)
GALLEY
  • Galley-strap securely fastened, and strong enough to take a heavy crewmember’s weight
  • Stove has adequate fiddles to retain pans/kettle in rough seas
  • Gas bottles properly stowed; gas alarm working
  • Gas bottles, valves, piping and stove checked for condition
  • Sufficient food and stove-fuel on board for anticipated passage-time plus safety margin
  • All dry stores in waterproof packaging or containers
  • Rough weather provisions (snacks, instant meals etc) easily accessible
WATER
  • All water tanks topped-up and caps securely in place
  • Tank plumbing checked for leaks
  • Flexible water bladders protected against chafe
  • Manual fresh water pump working
  • Pressure water pump system turned OFF
  • Toilets tested and free of leaks
FIRE
  • Extinguishers are in good condition and mounted in places they can be accessed easily during an engine or galley fire
  • Engine fuel shut-off valve located and tested
  • Bucket stowed in cockpit or lazarette for use in engine-room fire or emergency bailing situation
  • Fire blanket is easily accessible (not buried in a locker)
LEAK MANAGEMENT
  • You have at least 2 bilge pumps on board, one of them manual
  • Bilges and limber-holes are clear of debris (so will not block pumps)
  • Manual bilge pump hose is fitted with a strainer
  • Manual bilge pump is strongly mounted and working efficiently, with handle easy to access in emergency
  • Electric bilge pump working (including float switch and panel light)
  • Electric bilge pump switched to ‘AUTO’
  • Bilges are dry (to allow monitoring of leaks underway)
  • Rudder tube and gland checked for leaks
  • All areas of bilge are accessible in case you need to inspect at sea
  • Crew are aware that head valves must be closed immediately after use
NAVIGATION
  • GPS is working and securely mounted
  • GPS waypoints double-checked for co-ordinate accuracy and datum discrepancies
  • Compass is correctly adjusted, with deviation card on board
  • Nothing metal or magnetic (tools, aerosol cans, radio, cameras) stowed near compass
  • Log, depth-sounder etc correctly calibrated and barometer set
  • Sufficient chart coverage of planned and contingency routes, as well as pilotage information
  • Plotting tools (pencils, dividers, parallel rules/protractor etc)
  • Hand-bearing compass and binoculars are secure but accessible
  • Relevant tide tables on board
NIGHT SAILING
  • Compass light working
  • Chart table light and galley light screened to avoid blinding watch-keepers
  • Waterproof torches (with fresh batteries!) available for use on deck or in emergency
VISIBILITY
  • Mast-head lights are working
  • Navigation lights are working (fore and aft); and positioned so they cannot be obscured by sails
  • Back-up navigation lights (battery) in case of electrical system failure
  • Powerful torch or portable spotlight within reach of cockpit (to draw attention to your boat when a collision is possible)
  • Fog horn is working
  • Adequate radar reflectors in place
RADIO
  • Radios functioning and signal checked
  • all crew are familiar with distress procedure (and/or instructions are taped near radio)
  • you have up-to-date frequencies and times for weather broadcasts
SAFETY
  • A jack-line of adequate breaking strain is securely rigged between cockpit and foredeck both sides (for clipping harness tether onto)
  • Deck is sufficiently non-skid, particularly the coachroof, foredeck and around the mast
  • You have sufficient hand-holds along the side-decks (if not, rig temporary ones using rope or webbing)
  • EPIRB tested, and batteries are in date
  • Liferaft is in date, large enough for the number of crew, and stowed securely in an accessible position
  • Liferaft tie-downs checked for sun-damage and chafe
  • Sufficient harnesses, tethers and lifejackets for the number of crew: all in good condition and located for easy access underway
  • Danbuoy, lifebuoys, upside-down lights etc firmly mounted and ready for deployment
  • A good supply of flares (the necessary number in date) stowed in waterproof containers
  • Waterproof ‘grab kit’ stowed for easy accessibility, containing useful items for liferaft or dinghy survival at sea
  • All crew are familiar with your Man Overboard procedure
CREW WELFARE
  • First aid kit: check adequate and waterproof
  • Offshore medical kit is comprehensive, with drugs in date, and waterproof
  • Do-it-yourself medical handbook onboard
  • Seasick pills, sun-block and painkillers easily accessible
  • Drinking water bottle handy to cockpit
  • Sufficient warm clothing, bedding and foul weather gear for all crew
  • Watch system and galley rota organised
 
 
SAMPLE #4
 
every day CHECKLIST

Chafe Detection - At least once a day we walk around the deck to check for chafe on the items listed:

  • Anchor ties
  • Pole guys and control lines
  • Jib/Yankee /Staysail sheets
  • Main halyard
  • Mainsheet
  • Reefing lines
  • Dingy tiedown lines
  • Jerry container tiedown lines
  • Mainsail at spreaders if we are off the wind'
  • Mainsail, Jib, Staysail tacks
  • Roller furlers
  • Main boom goosenecks
  • Windvane control lines
  • Mizzen halyard
  • Mizzen sheet'
  • Mizzen reefing lines
  • Mizzen tack
  • Mizzen gooseneck

Assure Items are Secure

  • Liferaft Hold downs
  • Fenderboard
  • Outboard motor
  • MOB pole
  • MOB horseshoe ring
  • Lifesling

Engine

  • Check oil level
  • Check voltage on all batteries
 
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of William O'Toole
Sent: Friday, November 6, 2020 7:25 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Silicone BT seals
 

Excellent suggestion. Use flow to create the list. (You commercial big iron guys are the best!)

William Sent from my iPhone 


On Nov 6, 2020, at 5:00 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hello William,
 
I flew heavies and they all use a flow form of checklist.  I have never needed a written one but you could develop your own, specific to your vessel, broken down by areas of concern.  
 
Include BT pin removal before leaving the dock.  Start the engine 10 minutes before leaving the dock if it is likely you’ll need to give it the beans… perhaps run the genset if you expect to use the BT or windlass.
 
Fair winds,
 
 
Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ
 
 


On 7 Nov 2020, at 13:32, William O'Toole <william@...> wrote:
 
Was a private pilot and very familiar with check lists. But…in my sailing I never crossed the concept of checklist from flying pre-flight over to leaving the dock. Humbling realization. Anybody have a checklist for going bow to stern and back again that they could share?
-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular


On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:15 PM, rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:
 
Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429 
 
 



12v / 24 v altinator

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

He all 
 ever thought about switching the 12-V altinator  to charge the launch battery for a 24-ounce and using the service batteries to speed up the charges. If we're charging the launch battery, we'd have a battery charger
Battery used to battery 24-12 V.
 
can and should do something like that would be against it?
 
 thanks Elja
SM Baloo 222


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Joerg Esdorn
 

Paul, on my A55, Amel installed the Webasto Thermo Pro 90.  It warms up the boat nicely and quickly.  Given that your boat has less internal volume, I would think the 9 KW is enough. The heat exchangers are Kalori Silencio (in the heads) and Silencio 2 (in the salon and the cabins (if I recall correctly).  The Silencio units have a second, booster speed which is very nice.  I attach some materials for your reference.  I hope this helps.  Cheers Joerg  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53 Kincsem
On the hard in Vigo, Spain


Re: Locking Hatch board 54

Mark & Debbie Mueller
 

If you mean the top of the hatch where the latch attaches take a look at the attached.  About 3 minutes from the marina is Unique Molding & Doors,  1005 I St, Brunswick, GA 31520  912.222.0414 - I used them when I was there and they did an excellent job.
--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54


Re: Diruptor on A54

Sv Garulfo
 

No, the red/green buttoned ones. This one unipolar is used for the galley extractor (and also in the engine room).
Unsure how many more onboard.

Thanks


Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

David Kurtz
 

Thanks, folks!  REALLY liked hearing about what chlorine might do to the stainless steel keelboats as I left a pretty strong bleach solution in the tank yesterday!  Have to get back to the boat tomorrow and rinse it all off.  Regardless, it may not look perfect, but it will be clean, which is kind of the goal.
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Reppainting the Faux Caulking (black lines) on SM EUTIKIA

Giovanni TESTA
 

Hi to all,

after 12 years sailing around the world, I planned to improve the aesthetical aspect of “Eutikia” deck as the Faux Caulking (black lines) had suffered from UV, salt and very hot temperature. To prepare myself, I read every suggestion in this Group and I listened to some professionals.

You find enclosed my personal experience and photos.

Let me know if you need more infos.

It is very important not to be in a hurry, take your time and more…any ocean passage starts with the first mile.

Buon Vento !

Giovanni Testa

sv EUTIKIA SM2K n 428 (2004)

Now on the hard at Cleopatra Marina_Preveza (GR)

https://www.youtube.com/user/eutikia1

 


Re: Silicone BT seals

William O'Toole
 

Leslie,
This is exactly what I was hoping to find. Had a friend that actually had the anchor (not secured) dislodge in a short choppy swell. As he described it, it was so unexpected, and the retrieving it while underway, was an experience balancing between terrifying and hysterically funny. Always said a boat can instantaneously turn anyone into looking like a complete idiot in a second.  

Thanks again for the great samples. Reduces the folly factor!


-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular

On Nov 8, 2020, at 1:50 PM, Leslie Washburn via groups.io <washburn.leslie1@...> wrote:

William,
 
Here are a few samples that could be helpful.
 
 
 
SAMPLE #1
 
<image002.png>
 
 
 
 
 
 
SAMPLE #2
 
1 Before leaving marina / moving vessel
Anchor chain/line • Chain & line. Chafe ?
Anchor winch • Does it work/ handle available ?
Cockpit drain • Is it clogged ?
Compass light • Check it at night
Engine belts • Tight ? Worn ? Aligned ?
Engines • Inspection for leaks etc Spares
EPIRB • In date?
Fire extinguishers • In date / Charged
Flashlights • Do they work ? Spare batteries
Handheld instruments • Batteries good? Do they work?
Hatches • Do they close 100%. Handles, knobs etc
Instruments • Turn them on to check ?
Lifelines • Visual inspection for breaks etc
Lights • Interior, exterior & Nav lights. Spare bulbs.
Lockers • Make sure they lock shut.
Man-over-board gear • Check quick release and condition
Navigation lights • Easy to check at night
Outboard engine • You have spares ? Does it work ?
Ports • Do they close 100%. Handles, knobs etc
Radios • Batteries ? Do they work? Licenses ?
Safety equipment • Valid date ? Ready for use ?
Stanchions • Are they solid ?
Toilets • In good working order ? Holding tank OK ?
Clean Propeller • Dive and check
2 Before long ocean passage
Cockpit drain • Is it clogged ?
Compass light • Check it at night
Engine mounts • Visual inspection. Are they secure ?
EPIRB • In date?
Expiry dates • Ship papers/radio licences etc.
Fire extinguishers • In date / charged
Flashlights • Do they work ? Spare batteries.
Gas bottles • Rusty? Are they secure? Change hose ?
Odour?
Gas locker • Is vent hole plugged?
Handheld instruments • Batteries good ? Do they work?
Lifelines • Visual inspection for breaks etc
Liferaft • In date? Secure ? Accessible ?
Lights • Interior, exterior & Nav lights. Spare bulbs.
Man-over-board gear • Check quick release and condition
Navigation lights • Easy to check at night
Rigging • Visual inspection from top to bottom.
Roller furlers • Rinse, grease, visual inspection.
Free running ?
Safety equipment • Valid date ? Ready for use ?
Sails • Stitching. Chafe
Ship's papers - Visas • Complete
Stanchions • Are they solid ?
Wind vane • Check it out before you need it
3 Daily
Gas leak • Is there any odour near/under the stove/
pipes?
4 Weekly
Bilges • Is there water/ fuel present ?
Fuel leaks • Fuel in the bilge/ around the tanks ?
Underwater leaks • If salt water in bilges check all fittings
5 Monthly
Batteries • Acid level ? Clean terminals ?
Deck leaks • Check chainplates/hatches/ports etc. ?
Electrics • Run everything to make sure it works.
Spare fuses.
Engines • Inspection for leaks etc Spares
Fire extinguishers • Positions, mounting, in date ?
Flashlights • Do they work? Spare batteries ?
Gas locker • Is vent hole plugged?
Pumps • Do they work? Handles for manual pumps
Toilets • In good working order ? Holding tank OK ?
Seacock • Open / Close / Check movement
 
 
 
SAMPLE #3
ON DECK
  • Anchors are shackled and seized to rode, and there is some means of securing them to bow-roller / deck-chocks (or below deck) once you leave confined waters
  • Bitter end of anchor rode is secured to boat below decks
  • Chain hawsepipe is as watertight as possible
  • Deck storage cans for water and fuel are well-lashed
  • Deck-mounted dinghy is tightly lashed
  • Outboard motor is securely stowed on pushpit, in deck locker or elsewhere on deck where fuel cannot leak into boat 
  • Outboard fuel securely stowed on deck or in a sealed deck locker
  • Rubber gaskets on hatches and opening ports are sound
  • Hatches and ports shut and dogged, hatch-covers fitted as appropriate
  • Deck-filler caps for fuel and water properly done-up and o-rings in good condition
  • Cockpit drains are clear and draining freely
  • Washboards are sound and handy (ready to fit when needed)
  • Lifeline connectors are in good condition and properly done up
  • Lifelines/stanchions are strong enough to support a heavy crewmember’s weight
  • Stanchions are secured with pins or bolts in their bases; bases are bolted securely through deck (not screwed)
  • Sharp knife stowed close to cockpit for emergency rope-cutting
SAILS
  • all sails inspected for rips, holes and broken stitching on seams
  • batten ends securely fastened and in good condition
  • sail slides in good condition (none worn, broken or sun-damaged)
  • Roller headsails furl freely and top swivel is working properly
  • Headsail hanks working freely
  • Comprehensive sail repair kit on board, plus spare sailcloth and strong adhesive for major ‘instant’ repairs
REEFING
  • Roller reefing lubricated and handle stowed in appropriate place
  • Slab reefing lines working and chafe-free
SPARS
  • No metal-fatigue, corrosion or chafe on load-bearing fittings such as mast crane and shroud tangs
  • Spreaders are secure at inboard end and correctly angled
  • Anti-chafe on spreader-ends to prevent damage to sails
  • Wooden spars inspected for shakes or areas of softness around fittings
RIGGING
  • Bosun’s chair is in good condition and stowed somewhere accessible in case of emergency
  • Rigging wire is sound: no broken strands, particularly around terminal fittings
  • Shackle-pins (aloft & on deck) firmly done up and seized
  • All shackles, terminals, turning blocks and mast fittings inspected for fractures, wear and pitting
  • Sheaves turn freely
  • Split-pins/rings in all rigging screws or turnbuckles (aloft & on deck)
  • Exposed split-pins are taped to prevent snagging of sheets, sails or passing legs
  • Rig is correctly tensioned: mast is in column and leaning neither to port or starboard
  • Chainplates inspected for cracks or corrosion
  • Hacksaw plus spare blades on board (for emergency rigging removal), and bull-dog clips for a jury rig
STEERING
  • Rudder has no excessive play
  • Wheel steering: cables are properly tensioned, lubricated and protected from interference by gear stowed nearby.  Inspect for broken strands.
  • Tiller is sound (no splits or cracks) and firmly secured to rudder stock
  • Self-steering is correctly set up
  • Emergency tiller has been tested and crew know how to find, rig and use it
HEAVY WEATHER GEAR
  • Trysail and storm jib have been hoisted and checked for condition, sheeting angles, tack strops etc
  • Rode, turning blocks and anti-chafe assembled and accessible for sea-anchor/drogue
  • Storm boards accessible for windows and skylights
DOWN BELOW
  • Seacocks are working freely; skin fittings in good condition
  • All through-hulls have tapered softwood bungs attached by lanyard in case of skin-fitting failure
  • Flexible piping is secured to through-hull fittings with double hose-clamps.  Hose clamps in good condition
  • All siphon-breaks and breathers clear and working
  • All movable items are stowed in lockers, fastened or lashed in place
  • Fiddles are in ‘offshore’ position
  • All drawers and locker doors have catches to prevent them flying open at sea
  • Lee cloths/boards for bunks are strong and have adequate fastenings
ENGINE
  • Overheat alarm/light is working
  • Drip tray under engine is oil-free
  • Fuel tanks are full
  • Fuel sumps and filters checked for water and diesel fungus
  • Oil is clean and topped up
  • You have enough spare oil on board for at least one oil-change
  • Cooling water through-hull and strainer are clear of blockages and growth
  • Drive belts inspected for condition and correct tension
  • Stern gland adjusted and lubricated
ENGINE RUNNING CHECKS
  • Cooling water is pumping
  • Throttle control and gear-shift are working correctly
  • No excessive vibration
  • Ammeter/voltmeter shows alternator is charging
POWER GENERATION
  • You have sufficient means of generating power to run navigation lights, house lights, instruments and any other appliances you wish to use at sea
  • Batteries are holding a charge
  • Batteries are securely contained in boxes clear of bilge-water
  • Battery terminals are clean, free of corrosion, and cables securely connected
  • Electrolyte level correct in battery cells (if not, top up with distilled water)
GALLEY
  • Galley-strap securely fastened, and strong enough to take a heavy crewmember’s weight
  • Stove has adequate fiddles to retain pans/kettle in rough seas
  • Gas bottles properly stowed; gas alarm working
  • Gas bottles, valves, piping and stove checked for condition
  • Sufficient food and stove-fuel on board for anticipated passage-time plus safety margin
  • All dry stores in waterproof packaging or containers
  • Rough weather provisions (snacks, instant meals etc) easily accessible
WATER
  • All water tanks topped-up and caps securely in place
  • Tank plumbing checked for leaks
  • Flexible water bladders protected against chafe
  • Manual fresh water pump working
  • Pressure water pump system turned OFF
  • Toilets tested and free of leaks
FIRE
  • Extinguishers are in good condition and mounted in places they can be accessed easily during an engine or galley fire
  • Engine fuel shut-off valve located and tested
  • Bucket stowed in cockpit or lazarette for use in engine-room fire or emergency bailing situation
  • Fire blanket is easily accessible (not buried in a locker)
LEAK MANAGEMENT
  • You have at least 2 bilge pumps on board, one of them manual
  • Bilges and limber-holes are clear of debris (so will not block pumps)
  • Manual bilge pump hose is fitted with a strainer
  • Manual bilge pump is strongly mounted and working efficiently, with handle easy to access in emergency
  • Electric bilge pump working (including float switch and panel light)
  • Electric bilge pump switched to ‘AUTO’
  • Bilges are dry (to allow monitoring of leaks underway)
  • Rudder tube and gland checked for leaks
  • All areas of bilge are accessible in case you need to inspect at sea
  • Crew are aware that head valves must be closed immediately after use
NAVIGATION
  • GPS is working and securely mounted
  • GPS waypoints double-checked for co-ordinate accuracy and datum discrepancies
  • Compass is correctly adjusted, with deviation card on board
  • Nothing metal or magnetic (tools, aerosol cans, radio, cameras) stowed near compass
  • Log, depth-sounder etc correctly calibrated and barometer set
  • Sufficient chart coverage of planned and contingency routes, as well as pilotage information
  • Plotting tools (pencils, dividers, parallel rules/protractor etc)
  • Hand-bearing compass and binoculars are secure but accessible
  • Relevant tide tables on board
NIGHT SAILING
  • Compass light working
  • Chart table light and galley light screened to avoid blinding watch-keepers
  • Waterproof torches (with fresh batteries!) available for use on deck or in emergency
VISIBILITY
  • Mast-head lights are working
  • Navigation lights are working (fore and aft); and positioned so they cannot be obscured by sails
  • Back-up navigation lights (battery) in case of electrical system failure
  • Powerful torch or portable spotlight within reach of cockpit (to draw attention to your boat when a collision is possible)
  • Fog horn is working
  • Adequate radar reflectors in place
RADIO
  • Radios functioning and signal checked
  • all crew are familiar with distress procedure (and/or instructions are taped near radio)
  • you have up-to-date frequencies and times for weather broadcasts
SAFETY
  • A jack-line of adequate breaking strain is securely rigged between cockpit and foredeck both sides (for clipping harness tether onto)
  • Deck is sufficiently non-skid, particularly the coachroof, foredeck and around the mast
  • You have sufficient hand-holds along the side-decks (if not, rig temporary ones using rope or webbing)
  • EPIRB tested, and batteries are in date
  • Liferaft is in date, large enough for the number of crew, and stowed securely in an accessible position
  • Liferaft tie-downs checked for sun-damage and chafe
  • Sufficient harnesses, tethers and lifejackets for the number of crew: all in good condition and located for easy access underway
  • Danbuoy, lifebuoys, upside-down lights etc firmly mounted and ready for deployment
  • A good supply of flares (the necessary number in date) stowed in waterproof containers
  • Waterproof ‘grab kit’ stowed for easy accessibility, containing useful items for liferaft or dinghy survival at sea
  • All crew are familiar with your Man Overboard procedure
CREW WELFARE
  • First aid kit: check adequate and waterproof
  • Offshore medical kit is comprehensive, with drugs in date, and waterproof
  • Do-it-yourself medical handbook onboard
  • Seasick pills, sun-block and painkillers easily accessible
  • Drinking water bottle handy to cockpit
  • Sufficient warm clothing, bedding and foul weather gear for all crew
  • Watch system and galley rota organised
 
 
SAMPLE #4
 
every day CHECKLIST

Chafe Detection - At least once a day we walk around the deck to check for chafe on the items listed:

  • Anchor ties
  • Pole guys and control lines
  • Jib/Yankee /Staysail sheets
  • Main halyard
  • Mainsheet
  • Reefing lines
  • Dingy tiedown lines
  • Jerry container tiedown lines
  • Mainsail at spreaders if we are off the wind'
  • Mainsail, Jib, Staysail tacks
  • Roller furlers
  • Main boom goosenecks
  • Windvane control lines
  • Mizzen halyard
  • Mizzen sheet'
  • Mizzen reefing lines
  • Mizzen tack
  • Mizzen gooseneck

Assure Items are Secure

  • Liferaft Hold downs
  • Fenderboard
  • Outboard motor
  • MOB pole
  • MOB horseshoe ring
  • Lifesling

Engine

  • Check oil level
  • Check voltage on all batteries
 
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of William O'Toole
Sent: Friday, November 6, 2020 7:25 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Silicone BT seals
 

Excellent suggestion. Use flow to create the list. (You commercial big iron guys are the best!)

William Sent from my iPhone 


On Nov 6, 2020, at 5:00 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hello William,
 
I flew heavies and they all use a flow form of checklist.  I have never needed a written one but you could develop your own, specific to your vessel, broken down by areas of concern.  
 
Include BT pin removal before leaving the dock.  Start the engine 10 minutes before leaving the dock if it is likely you’ll need to give it the beans… perhaps run the genset if you expect to use the BT or windlass.
 
Fair winds,
 
 
Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ
 
 


On 7 Nov 2020, at 13:32, William O'Toole <william@...> wrote:
 
Was a private pilot and very familiar with check lists. But…in my sailing I never crossed the concept of checklist from flying pre-flight over to leaving the dock. Humbling realization. Anybody have a checklist for going bow to stern and back again that they could share?
-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular


On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:15 PM, rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:
 
Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429 
 
 



Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

michael winand
 

Thanks Ken, I think we all appreciate your videos. 
Safe travels. 
Michael Nebo 


On Tue, 10 Nov 2020 at 4:14 am, Ken Powers SV Aquarius
<ken@...> wrote:
I would have to agree with Bill,  

To fix you furler it will probably take a new motor, and maybe a new gearbox.  I would rebuild the old gear box and carry it as a spare.  I carry a new spare motor, and a spare rebuilt gear box, ready to go in case of a problem.  Someone mentioned that the new motors are a different diameter, and I found this out as well.  I built up the diameter of the the motor where it attaches to the cover attachment with some good tape.  Just about 3 to 4 times around the motor with some good tape and the cover attachment piece fit snugly on the motor.  It was in one of my videos about the Main Sail of a Super Maramu.

Ken Powers
Aquarius
SM2K 262

Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxxNAIa8-mg

Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0HIWBv1Pfc

Part 3 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bdvDqBMqxs

Part 4 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Srg4Q2oL5I


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

michael winand
 

Thanks Mike.  I think you may have been able to explain what caused the problem. I know it's been installed for 20years in my case. Upon removing the gearbox and motor to inspect, I found that it was in good order being in the original condition. Cover over the motor still  had the original silicone. 
I may have a engineering workaround to repair the shaft for a spare. 
Michael Nebo sm251 


On Tue, 10 Nov 2020 at 4:04 am, Mike Ondra via groups.io
<mdondra@...> wrote:
I have experienced exactly the same shaft sharing on both the outhaul Leroy summer motor as well as the furling motor. Clean brakes both. My sense is that with a very very slight misalignment of the gearbox to the motor shaft that overtime stresses eventually weaken the shaft and then an incident of shock load from operating The motor shears the shaft.
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM #240

On Nov 8, 2020, at 3:15 AM, michael winand via groups.io <mfw642000@...> wrote:

Hi.I have encountered this problem with my main furler motor. 
I have sheared the shaft on the leroy somer motor where it enters the gearbox. 
Any suggestions on how I would be causing this problem?
The gearbox is still working well. As I have it apart I will give it a full service. 
I would like to ask if anyone has been through this issue and what action is needed to fix this. 
I'm not sure if this is a design that allows the shaft to be replaced as a sacrificial item to prevent overloading?I have taken a photo of the issue. 
Apon removal it was still the original installation. The electrical brushes still have most of their length intact. 
Many thanks to the group 
Michael  Nebo  sm251 
<20201108_171619.jpg>




<20201108_171619.jpg>


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Arnold Mente
 

Hi Paul,

the M12 is installed in my boat but it is a older one, the control units now more different. I have a switch on/off close to the Generator switch in the galley and a temp regulation in all places as also a switch close to the vans at the heat exchangers. I have them marked in the pictures.

Best

Arnold






Am 09.11.2020 um 19:51 schrieb Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...>:

Hello again Arnold!
What size of heater do you have? I'm lean towards the Webasto 9 Kw, a bit small if one follow the guidelines from the suppliers, but I do not need room temperature all over the boat, if I can keep 17 degree C i most of the boat, or 19 in the saloon and 17 in the after cabin, and keep the front cabin closed. I'm happy. it's another 1 k€ to go up one size!
Paul SY Kerpa SM#259


--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: Diruptor on A54

Roque
 

Hi

If you mean those on the panel over the sink,  I bought mine from BlueSea


Hope it helps

Roque
Attika A54
Paraty Brazil 

Em seg., 9 de nov. de 2020 às 15:52, Sv Garulfo <svgarulfo@...> escreveu:

Hello
is there a list of all disruptors installed on Amel 54 (by ref and spec)?
I understand there are different references (either unipolar / bipolar).

Need to source a replacement for 7122104 10D (72vdc,400vac), not provided by  sav Amel. Wondering how many of those are fitted onboard.


Thanks
S

GARULFO A54-122
Moorea, French Polynesia


Diruptor on A54

Sv Garulfo
 

Hello
is there a list of all disruptors installed on Amel 54 (by ref and spec)?
I understand there are different references (either unipolar / bipolar).

Need to source a replacement for 7122104 10D (72vdc,400vac), not provided by  sav Amel. Wondering how many of those are fitted onboard.


Thanks
S

GARULFO A54-122
Moorea, French Polynesia


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Paul Osterberg
 

Hello again Arnold!
What size of heater do you have? I'm lean towards the Webasto 9 Kw, a bit small if one follow the guidelines from the suppliers, but I do not need room temperature all over the boat, if I can keep 17 degree C i most of the boat, or 19 in the saloon and 17 in the after cabin, and keep the front cabin closed. I'm happy. it's another 1 k€ to go up one size!
Paul SY Kerpa SM#259


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...>
 

I would have to agree with Bill,  

To fix you furler it will probably take a new motor, and maybe a new gearbox.  I would rebuild the old gear box and carry it as a spare.  I carry a new spare motor, and a spare rebuilt gear box, ready to go in case of a problem.  Someone mentioned that the new motors are a different diameter, and I found this out as well.  I built up the diameter of the the motor where it attaches to the cover attachment with some good tape.  Just about 3 to 4 times around the motor with some good tape and the cover attachment piece fit snugly on the motor.  It was in one of my videos about the Main Sail of a Super Maramu.

Ken Powers
Aquarius
SM2K 262

Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxxNAIa8-mg

Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0HIWBv1Pfc

Part 3 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bdvDqBMqxs

Part 4 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Srg4Q2oL5I


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Mike Ondra
 

I have experienced exactly the same shaft sharing on both the outhaul Leroy summer motor as well as the furling motor. Clean brakes both. My sense is that with a very very slight misalignment of the gearbox to the motor shaft that overtime stresses eventually weaken the shaft and then an incident of shock load from operating The motor shears the shaft.
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM #240

On Nov 8, 2020, at 3:15 AM, michael winand via groups.io <mfw642000@...> wrote:

Hi.I have encountered this problem with my main furler motor. 
I have sheared the shaft on the leroy somer motor where it enters the gearbox. 
Any suggestions on how I would be causing this problem?
The gearbox is still working well. As I have it apart I will give it a full service. 
I would like to ask if anyone has been through this issue and what action is needed to fix this. 
I'm not sure if this is a design that allows the shaft to be replaced as a sacrificial item to prevent overloading?I have taken a photo of the issue. 
Apon removal it was still the original installation. The electrical brushes still have most of their length intact. 
Many thanks to the group 
Michael  Nebo  sm251 
<20201108_171619.jpg>




<20201108_171619.jpg>

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