Date   

Bow thruster tube anomaly

Davi Rozgonyi
 

Hey all... So I've had a terrible time trying to remove my bow thruster foot for service (super maramu #56 1991). I inadvertently damaged the fiberglass tube, which is another question : how do I repair it? Is it a glass job?

But it is still stuck. Tried the usual things (penetrant over weeks, chain wrench, amel tool, tapping, banging, etc). There are these little screws I've never seen before on anyone's bt or in photos. Could they somehow be holding it on? The foot was removed and greased 3.5 years ago with no problem, and barely used, so rust alone seems like a stretch...there is some but doesn't look drastic. I'm afraid to remove all of these screws because of something messes up, I'll have a hard time taking her out to a yard with no bowthruster.

Anyone know what these screws do? Any ideas on how to repair a gouge in the tube?

Thanks, y'all 


Re: Secondary Saltwater Manifold SMs & 54s, and possibly some Santorins, Mangos, and Maramus

 

A US Amel 54 owner has ordered and will install the PVC Secondary Saltwater Manifold. The 54 Secondary Saltwater Manifold is much more complicated than the SM2k. The SM2k Secondary Saltwater Manifold prototype is completed and ready to order. I negotiated a 15% discount for all Amel owners from SOTOMARIN, France. They are the supplier to Amel for the PVC manifolds beginning with the 55 and including the 50 & 60. 

The Amel 54 Secondary Saltwater Manifold kit is 457.18 ‎€ less15% Discount of 68.58 ‎€ = 388.60 ‎€ (Net XVAT + shipping)
Unless you need it immediately, I suggest we wait until I have a report from the first installation.
The Amel Super Maramu 2000 Secondary Saltwater Manifold kit is 437.36 ‎€ less 15% Discount of 65.60 ‎€ = 371.76 ‎€ (Net XVAT + shipping)
This is a simple installation and very straight forward. It is ready to order...see below 
Amel Super Maramu 2000 Secondary Saltwater Manifold Kit...
To order, contact Laura at contact"at"sofomarin.fr

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sat, Feb 6, 2021 at 8:20 AM Vladan Bojic <vladan.bojic@...> wrote:
Interested

Vladan
A54 #157 PAME


Re: Secondary Saltwater Manifold SMs & 54s, and possibly some Santorins, Mangos, and Maramus

Vladan SV PAME
 

Interested

Vladan
A54 #157 PAME


Re: How much Solar?

Chantal & Alain sv Makemo
 

Thank you so much 


Re: How much Solar?

 

Paul,

I believe that you should research spike back voltage to the alternator protection from Lithium Batteries. Every Preferred Vendor of Lithium/LiFePO4 batteries recommends the same Sterling Power Alternator Protection Device 24v. This is less than 100 euro. Maybe they could be wrong, but I don't think so.
image.png
Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sat, Feb 6, 2021 at 3:47 AM Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote:
Alain!
We did not changed anything in our charging system, I had a 5 year old Victron Multiplus charger/inverter works great with Li, My very old Dolphine charger works great as well. My old alternator had before an external Balmar regulator, the only thing I did was to add a temp sensor for the alternator, must admit still on the hard so have not yet started the engine, but see no reason why it should not work. The BMS opens the field winding, when battery "fully" charged. For solar I have 4 Victron MPPT works great so far
Can now run all 220 v gadgets on my 540 Ah LiFePO4, including AC, and hot-water. The issue of course is how to recharge? We have 1,4 kw of solar and Swi-Tec hydrogenerator. Plan not to use the Onan. Yesterday it was raining most of the day and clouds close to 100% of the time still got in 60 Ah from the 1,1 Kw solar currently active. That is in the beginning of Feb when the sun is very low on the sky. Place Lagos Portugal. Solar is fantastic.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


Re: How much Solar?

Paul Osterberg
 

Alain!
We did not changed anything in our charging system, I had a 5 year old Victron Multiplus charger/inverter works great with Li, My very old Dolphine charger works great as well. My old alternator had before an external Balmar regulator, the only thing I did was to add a temp sensor for the alternator, must admit still on the hard so have not yet started the engine, but see no reason why it should not work. The BMS opens the field winding, when battery "fully" charged. For solar I have 4 Victron MPPT works great so far
Can now run all 220 v gadgets on my 540 Ah LiFePO4, including AC, and hot-water. The issue of course is how to recharge? We have 1,4 kw of solar and Swi-Tec hydrogenerator. Plan not to use the Onan. Yesterday it was raining most of the day and clouds close to 100% of the time still got in 60 Ah from the 1,1 Kw solar currently active. That is in the beginning of Feb when the sun is very low on the sky. Place Lagos Portugal. Solar is fantastic.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


Re: Yanmar no start.

eric freedman
 

Hi Dan

Inside the tank there is a screen that in my case got full of silicone that Amel used to seal the inspection ports.

The engine would run fine for days and then suddenly stop. After crossing the Atlantic I was 5 miles from home and the crew said call for a tow—the hell I will. I finally realized that there was a blockage inside the tank. I disconnected the fuel line and put the bell of an air horn over the hose and when I heard bubbling, problem solved. When I got home I drained the tank and took the bottom valve apart and found the “filter” like is used in the shower drains, full of gunk.

 

Next fuel filter change ditch the filter and sensor and get the regular Yanmar filter.  I only know of this as I am installing a new Yanmar 4jh4hte and I traced the wire back as I was rewiring the new engine for an isolated ground . The wire goes into the harness and ends not connected in the control panel. I am using my existing “b” panel .Possibly it is connected in another panel. You can check the harness wiring diagram to see if is doing anything in your unit.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 8:27 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Hello Eric, 

 

Several times when I've had less than 200 liters of fuel in the tank I've removed the inspection port  covers to look inside the tank.  I've never emptied the tank completely. 

 

What I can also say is that when I changed the racor filters and opened the valve to refill the bowls on each side that the fuel flowed very freely from the tank to the racors. So I don't think that there was any obstruction there. 

 

I do have the wiring for the water detector on the Yanmar fuel filter, but I've never drained any water from that fuel filter, or from the simple drain on the bottom of the Onan fuel filter, or seen any water in the Racor bowls (which is the first place that I'd expect to find water, and I inspect pretty regularly).

 

Thanks for the extra recco's.

 

 Best regards, Daniel Carlson, on sv BeBe, SM #387

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 8:14 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Dan,

Did you ever check the filter inside the fuel tank?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Re: Yanmar no start.

JB Duler
 

Sometimes you only think about the bottom of the tank and the Raccor filters.

But the actual hoses between the tank and the filters may have deteriorated INSIDE over the years.  They look OK from the outside.

That creates all king of problems, you get the tank empty, get it cleaned and sometime it is a recurring a problem.

Change the gas lines every 10–20 years, unless it is metal of course/

On Feb 5, 2021, at 17:26, Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:

Hello Eric, 

Several times when I've had less than 200 liters of fuel in the tank I've removed the inspection port  covers to look inside the tank.  I've never emptied the tank completely. 

What I can also say is that when I changed the racor filters and opened the valve to refill the bowls on each side that the fuel flowed very freely from the tank to the racors. So I don't think that there was any obstruction there. 

I do have the wiring for the water detector on the Yanmar fuel filter, but I've never drained any water from that fuel filter, or from the simple drain on the bottom of the Onan fuel filter, or seen any water in the Racor bowls (which is the first place that I'd expect to find water, and I inspect pretty regularly).

Thanks for the extra recco's.

 Best regards, Daniel Carlson, on sv BeBe, SM #387

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 8:14 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Dan,

Did you ever check the filter inside the fuel tank?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC





--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Yanmar no start.

Dan Carlson
 

Hello Eric, 

Several times when I've had less than 200 liters of fuel in the tank I've removed the inspection port  covers to look inside the tank.  I've never emptied the tank completely. 

What I can also say is that when I changed the racor filters and opened the valve to refill the bowls on each side that the fuel flowed very freely from the tank to the racors. So I don't think that there was any obstruction there. 

I do have the wiring for the water detector on the Yanmar fuel filter, but I've never drained any water from that fuel filter, or from the simple drain on the bottom of the Onan fuel filter, or seen any water in the Racor bowls (which is the first place that I'd expect to find water, and I inspect pretty regularly).

Thanks for the extra recco's.

 Best regards, Daniel Carlson, on sv BeBe, SM #387

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 8:14 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Dan,

Did you ever check the filter inside the fuel tank?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


I got tired of the rusty rudder quadrant

eric freedman
 

I also had Amel make the stuffing box for the rudder deeper. It now takes 5 sections of packing---also my wrench is in the photo.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376


Re: Yanmar no start.

eric freedman
 

Hi Dan,

Did you ever check the filter inside the fuel tank?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Yanmar no start.

eric freedman
 

HI,

Do you have an alarm or idiot light indicating that there is water in the Yanmar engine mounted filter?

If you do not you do not need to use that water sensing float  and the special filter for that.

You can just change over to a regular (cheaper)  Yanmar filter without the wiring. On my old engine 4jh3hte with a “B’ Panel there was no need for the water float.

Changing that special filter with the wires attached was always a messy job.

 

My 2 cents with respect to your original problem is that the O ring in the Racor filter or the Yanmar fuel filter started to leak .

Stick with the Howes Meaner power cleaner. It is good for all situations.

I also use 2 micron filters in my Racor filters.

10 micron is suggested but the 2 micron works perfectly well.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Re: How much Solar?

Dan Carlson
 

Hi Scott,

Thanks for your ongoing engagement in the Amel topics on the forum. Providing both your experiences as well as questions for others. 

Regarding AC capacity: I have 90 amps which is all I have found that I need at this time. I have the 230v water-maker and so I need to run the generator 2 to 3 hours per week for the water maker. That leaves me with extra generator capacity to also run the water heater and either 30 or 60 amps of charging. That is more that enough charging for any shortfall in solar that I have here in the Caribbean. I can't remember the last time I ran the generator just for battery charging. 
Regarding the water heater; I've been working on the best way to wire in a switch to be able to supply the 230v panel from the inverter I just need the right piece of faceplate for mounting the switch to be able to complete the job. So far we've not had a strong need, as I do heat water a few times a week when we run the water maker, and also when we run the main engine for an hour when moving the boat around between anchorages that creates a tank of hot water that lasts us almost three days here in the Caribbean.

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387

On Thu, Feb 4, 2021, 1:23 AM Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

Hi everyone,

In FP and Hawaii, we were averaging 5500-6000wh per day. Most I've seen is a handful of days approaching 7000wh. As Mark mentioned, we have a lifepo4 bank (2.5 years now) and that makes a huge difference as you can see when you compare my data to Porter's with similar solar output and similar environmental conditions. I'm sure you all see that once you take a lead battery above 80%, the charge acceptance drops like a rock. And worse, you're supposed to keep lead at high SOC to prevent sulfation so a lot of your solar output will be wasted. With my bank, the full output of the solar (or the 200amps of AC-powered charging) is taken up by the batteries until the upper 90% SOC. And I try to keep the batteries between say 50-80% to maximize longevity, so literally every watt is being put into the batteries.

Another thing that Mark didn't mention, but makes a huge difference is that lifepo4 charging is much more efficient than lead charging. With lead, you lose about 20-30% of your the charge current through inefficiencies. read: heat. With lifepo4 over 2.5 years I'm losing about 2-3%, based on the cumulative data on kWh in compared to kWh out that is provided by my Victron MPPT.

Billy - I suspect something is wrong with your battery monitor? We have 450ah and with 2 fridges and a freezer running, we drop about 8% overnight or 36AH. Not sure if you have water cooled fridges on the 55, but the homemade Frankenstein brushless pump (detailed in another post) has reduced power consumption considerably. Freezer is colder, too! You also stated that you figure about 5kw a day, which should be 5000/25.6v = 195AH, which sounds more realistic. Or are you running other items that we're not? In any event, I don't think your 750w on gel will be enough to eliminate genset usage most days if you are anything like us. 2 fridges plus a freezer and computers on, electric kettle, microwave and plus, the admiral has gotten addicted to Ozark, so the TV is on quite a bit. :) That said, we also run the water maker off our batteries and the 2.2kw scuba compressor if the batteries get too full. But I still suspect 750w on gel won't be enough.

Dan - have you considered adding more AC-based charging capacity? If you have to run the genset, since you have lithium, which can accept high currents, might as well add as much charging capacity to reduce genset runtimes. Your calculated figures on $/hr for genset usage frightened me into looking at more solar! And it's not just the money, I am consciously trying to reduce ongoing maintenance. With our 200amps charging capacity, on the rare instances we run the genset, it's almost always for less than an hour. I suggest rewiring that water heater. We do, in fact, run the water heater on battery/inverter. Our heater is only 700w and I run it for say 20 minutes prior to each shower, which gives me just enough hot water for 2 people.

Eric - no need to add extra ventilation, at least on our passage berth mounted batteries. I have monitored individual battery temps via bluetooth and they rarely get above 30c. They only get hot (40c or so) when I'm running AC-based chargers at 200amps and try to take them to 90%+ in order to balance out the batteries and help the battery monitor reset.

Justin - do you have the hardtop panels on a separate MPPT? Once you get on your boat, I am really really curious to know how many AH you get out of them, compared to your aft panels. Another boat we met in FP has 2kw of solar on their decks and they produce about the same kWH per day as we do with only 960w of arch mounted solar. Much of that inefficiency is probably related to shading, but if you look at the specs on most panels, the power output drops about 0.3-0.5% PER degree C increase over 25degC. I measured the panel temps on mine and it's not much above ambient since they get cooled by the breeze blowing underneath them. I would love to add them but it would be a lot of brain damage for me, so I want to make sure it's worth the effort or maybe I just accept I'll have to run the genset every few weeks.  

Ken is very right with the weight balance issue! I am sick of scrubbing the port side gelcoat! 

At the end of the day, energy is like money - the more you have, the more you use!


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Yanmar no start.

Dan Carlson
 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

All appears good now.

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

A few additional points:
- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)
- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 
- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.
- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 
- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)
- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.
- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

Fair winds to all, 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua



On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Re: Solid cockpit roof on Super Maramu

Alain Blanchard
 

Dear all

I Just bought Koriolys with this Hard top.


Alain
SM 146
Grui(France)
Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 4 févr. 2021 à 22:30, michael winand via groups.io <mfw642000@...> a écrit :

Thanks for your very detailed response, we are very interested in going to a hard top next time we have to replace the bimini.
Michael  Elaine. Nebo 


On Thu, 4 Feb 2021 at 11:25 pm, Ann-Sofie
<ann-sofie@...> wrote:

Hi Michael

To build a new roof from scratch is probably easier than renovate one. To shape the roof use either polyurethan insulation plates or Divinycell sheets and then laminate with 2-3 layers of epoxi and grp matt.
After that its time to shape the rail which is done using polyurethan insulation plates in small pieces, when the shape is ok, laminate the rail with 1 layer epoxi and grp matt.
Sand the roof and then put on epoxi filler to get a smooth surface, sand. 

Mill lines for cables and lights. Fill the space above the cables to create a smooth surface.

Paint with 2-component paint (International Perfection as one example) primer, 2 layers and sand. 2 or more layers of top paint Perfection.

How long time for this production, probably around 100-200 hours, much depending on the place of work. For us it took far more but much of that was down to the renovation part. 

Hope this will give you a hint of producing one your self.  Feel free to come back if you have any questions.

Regards,
Jonas

Den 2021-02-02 kl. 22:34, skrev michael winand via groups.io:
Thanks for sharing.  Could you please advise on the approximate hours to construct your own?
Thanks, Michael, Nebo sm251 


On Wed, 3 Feb 2021 at 2:53 am, Ann-Sofie
As per request we have made a short film about our cockpit roof on our SuperMaramu S/Y Lady Annila.
Please follow this URL https://www.dropbox.com/sh/i9dzki9zbz2s4mv/AAA1Nv70ovxLvpMuDCQHAUG1a?dl=0

Regards
Annsofie & Jonas
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232, 1998
Present in Algarve, Portugal
-- 
Ann-Sofie Svanberg
Edificio Pluma
Rua Teofilo Braga 17-6a
8500-668 Portimao
Portugal

00351-914 879 021


Re: Yanmar no start.

Karen Smith
 

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Re: Amel wanted

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

Here The link to Möck Yachtargecy 


I by Balu in 2015 by Mrs Möck 
Verry similar with Amel 

Best 
Elja SM Balu 222

Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Re: How much Solar?

Billy Newport
 
Edited

My last boat, I had 1200w of solar and each panel had its own mppt controller. I think I had 16 controllers, genasun typically with 2 victrons for the largest panels. Besides the insane wiring, I got 90A@12v out of that peak and it managed shade very well but that was expensive to do.

Here is a link to a phot album on Google of that boat.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/YZv6xncC821Rquqn8


Re: Amel wanted

JB Duler
 

I reached out to Michel Charpentier last year as I was looking for boats in the Med.

He put me in touch with the Encasta folks (I think they bought him out). I was from impressed by the Encasta broker, total waste of time.

Understand brokers, they are salespeople paid on a commission basis.

But some brokers are exceptional (Joel Potter!), and you can figure that out within 5’.

Another value a broker brings is E&O (or errors and omissions) / professional liability insurance coverage. Do not be afraid to get a copy of their certificate of insurance.
On that document I would look at the limit: $1M is a minimum, $2-5M is better (if they sell bigger boats), and the name of the insurance company. Then look up the name of that insurance on AM Best.

Good insurance company (=A rated, enough capital, part of a big company): great

Bad insurance company (= B rating from AM Best, not enough capital, non admitted coverage, some Lloyds syndicates): red flag. Why? They may have had claims in the past, can’t get coverage from a good company, and they fall back on second tier companies.

Good luck!

On Feb 5, 2021, at 03:54, Davi Rozgonyi <davi.rozgonyi@...> wrote:

Michel Charpentier is who put me together with our boat as well. Very very simple, trustworthy, defo look him up. 


--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Yanmar no start.

 

Hallo Daniel 
There are so many possible causes:
Here just some ideas to consider:
Did you Check the Air Filter? May be your Machine does Not get enough Air?

And, when it is running, what is the Color of the smoke/exhaust like?
More White than normal, and too less water circulation impeller Not okay,   
More Black than normal, the bearings ?/dichtungen, valves are Not tight
More blue than normal: Maybe the turbo charger is not tight or dirty?

Or, you got Bad Gasolina? Maybe diesel bacterias? There are cleaning products From liqui moly

Or, just as a last try before it does not Start : spray a Bit of Start Pilot into the carburator, but not too often, it may damage the machine.   

 Best wishes.
Goetz
SM #200 (PARSIFAL, actually in canarias) and succes.    


Holen Sie sich Outlook für Android



Von: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...>
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 3. Februar 2021, 21:37
An: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

Thanks for the tips Bill and Steve,

I tried to trouble shoot the solenoid by having Lori actuate the stop button on the console while I monitored for the clicking down at the engine.  That sounded normal. I tried to start and again it cranked but did not catch.  But it sounded like it was just getting some combustion at the end, so one more try and it slowly caught and when I gave it some slight throttle in neutral it picked up. I ran it for 15  minutes at 1700 rpm to get to temperature. It had a little bit of load from the alternator, charging the Li batteries. After it reached temp I switched the alternator regulator to "float"/ no load, ran the rpms slowly up to 2500 and back down to 1000 rpm. After a minute there I put the throttle back to the idle position and the rpms decreased to about 500 and then the engine stopped. So it seems like I have a low rpm idle setting or fuel flow issue at idle. I think I can adjust the idle up slightly, but that doesn't account for the change in performance of the engine, both the unexpected stopping as well as the difficult starting. (I've never had to apply any throttle when starting in the past.)

Steve, I'm not sure if I can test that small of a change in the fuel pump performance on the boat. 

Also, the fuel injectors were rebuilt and the valves adjusted a a little less than two hundred hours ago. 

Does that trigger any more ideas? 

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387.


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021, 4:23 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
My 8 Ball Crystal Ball says, "Check Back Later"😀

I wonder if the fuel flow stop solenoid or the stop button is not working and cutting off fuel?


image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 1:03 PM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:
Hello Yanmar diesel gurus.

Our Yanmar 4Jh3-HTE has never missed a beat, until today.

Engine started fine and operated for 30-40 mins to lift anchor exit anchorage and get underway. Mostly at 1200-1500rpm.  Normal shutdown, with a short rev to approx 2500rmp before return to idle for a minute or two then shutdown.  Temp and oil pressure all normal.

After approx 1 hr sail to next anchorage engine started fine and operated at approx 1500 rpm for 15 minutes into anchorage then idling while anchoring for approx 5 mins, 1200-1300rpm to back down anchor, then after a short idle another rev to approx 2800 rpm then return to idle. When the engine rpms returned to idle the engine just stopped.  After thinking through everything that just happened I attempted to restart the engine and it did not catch after approx 3-5 seconds of cranking.  

We had lunch and allowed the engine to cool for a little over an hour. I checked coolent level, oil level, fuel in racor, looked over the engine and then attempted to start with no luck.  Next I pumped the fuel priming pump on top of the filter a few times but I did not bleed any fuel out.  I attempted to start two more times with approximately 5 seconds of cranking each time with no success. No indication of any firing. 

Finally: I drained about 1/4 cup of clean fuel from the bottom of the fuel filter, then loosened the fuel bleed valve and pumped some more fuel out of the bleed valve. It did not appear that there was any noticable air in the system.  Cleaned up and retried with Lori cranking for 5 seconds while I pumped the priming pump. No success.

Fuel tank has over 500 liters.

I thought I'd  check in with other Amel owners to get inputs on the next steps for troubleshooting. 

Advice appreciated.

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387


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