Date   

Re: 2008 Amel 54 rigging

Bill Kinney
 

Courntey,

There are several ways to do the rigging on an Amel (or any other boat, for that matter)  You can have the exact dimensions on file, and cut the wires to length at a factory and prepare the end terminals there and ship out the competed product.  This is what ACMO does, and does well.

The standard process that most riggers use is to measure the wires, then prepare the rig at their shop and install it on the boat. There are a couple issues here.  It is very difficult to measure the lengths precisely with the rig up, so most riggers will want the rig down.  Also, there are very few rigging shops that use a proper rotary hammer swaging machine, preferring the much smaller, much less expensive roller swager instead.  A roller swager can certainly make a good sage, but a lot depends on the skill, experience, and careful attention of the operator.

We worked with a rigger who did things a bit differently.

When we re-rigged last year we looked at the ACMO package.  If we were going to install it ourselves, we would certainly have gone that way.  But we were busy with other projects, and the amount of aloft time needed to install a new rig just didn't appeal. Since local riggers make a good piece of their profit on materials, if you come to most of them with a rig on a pallet for installation (i.e., ACMO), it can get expensive.

We used Nance and Underwood in Fort Lauderdale to make and install the new rig.  They have done a LOT of Amel re-rigs, under Joel Potter's tutoring. They know the boats. They have a design for a bespoke bronze turnbuckle they make in-house for the Super Maramu and others that use that furler so can fully replace the forestay fittings inside the furler without compromise. For their work process, mechanical terminals work out very well.  They make up the top end of all the wires at the shop, and leave them a little long. At the boat, they take down one wire at a time, lay it out on the dock, cut the new wire to the exact length, install the lower terminal, and hang the wire. In our experience they come pretty close to the right tuning at the dock, but be prepared to go through the last couple of steps in Olivier's rigging instructions when you get the boat sailing to make sure it is right.

Things to be aware of:  There will be minor changes--I believe with any USA based rigger.  Getting ALL the metric based fittings here is extremely difficult, so some things will be switched over to inch sizes.  That requires enlarging some holes in chainplates.  If that bothers you, your only real option is to use an ACMO kit, or rerig in Europe or the French Caribbean, or wait a long time for slow deliveries.  As far as I can tell, inch size rigging fittings are available everywhere, metric sizes are less widely distributed. The lower shroud turnbuckles also end up rotated 90 degrees, so the lifelines no longer go through them. A minor frustration. If it really bothered you, you COULD drill out a new cotter pin hole in the lower stud. If you use Nance and Underwood, try to find a marina with wood docks, or work with them ahead of time to figure out how to protect the wire from damage while it is being handled and dragged on a concrete dock surface.

All the terminals on our new rig are mechanical terminals--except the lower forestay.  A swage is needed here because on the Super Maramu it has to fit up inside the furler, and there are no mechanical fittings of small enough diameter to do this.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: ACMO v Kos Hama X rigging wire

 


I said the benefits of ordering from ACMO are:
1.) ACMO is the OEM provider to Amel for rigging and has been for over 40 years.
2.) ACMO is up-to-date with Amel specs. 
3.)ACMO is a designated Preferred Vendor to my Yacht School clients and I believe about 50 of my clients have purchased rigging kits from ACMO. 
4.) Two of the three riggers I will recommend worldwide buy ACMO rigging material.
The most important benefits are 1 & 2 above. ACMO has the exact specifications in terms of size and length that are needed, in most cases, to properly rig an Amel. With many Maramus, Santorins, and some Super Maramus an owner is the 5th owner to own the boat and the 2nd owner to re-rig it. Ensuring accuracy and including needed updates (as in the case of the 54) are important and some 54 owners have discovered that their non-ACMO re-rig wasn't done with the most recent Amel specs. The A-54 rigging updates were made during the production of the 54. I doubt that Amel will make any rigging update after they cease production of a model and as far as I know that has never happened. 

I also previously wrote, "All of the above said, you should buy from the supplier you feel is best for you. It is possible that the company you choose will be as good or better than ACMO."

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 8:51 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Laurens,

There is no easy answer to "how long" for rigging.  The problem is that stainless steel can fail in ways that give absolutely no visual warning.  It can look perfect--right up until the rig fails. The idea that a visual inspection can "certify" a rig as good is just a total falsehood.  Certainly there ARE issues a visual inspection can find, but there are many more it can not.

Failures occur with increasing frequency with age, so there is no magic cutoff.  The "generally accepted" practice for rigging used in tropical salt water is a life span of 15 years.  Warmer, saltier, water (like the Gulf of Mexico or the Med) gives a shorter life.  Colder, fresher, water allows a longer lifespan.  Rig tuning, and the amount of sailing and the kind of sailing also factor in, but all in a very unquantifiable way.  We replaced our rig after 14 years, not because there was any indication of failure, but the consequences of failure are just too high.

I would specifically ask for BRONZE turnbuckles.  Chrome plated, if you prefer the shiny look.  They are just as strong as stainless, less susceptible to crevice corrosion, and most importantly, far less likely to "gall" and lock the threads with the stainless studs.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: 2008 Amel 54 rigging

Courtney Gorman
 

Joel do you have any recommendations about where to have this done? I have a year left before my rig is 15 and would like to plan ahead.
Cheers
Courtney 


-----Original Message-----
From: amelforme <jfpottercys@...>
To: laurensrineke@...; main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Apr 12, 2021 2:02 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] 2008 Amel 54 rigging

Hello Laurens. Long time…
It is best to ask your insurance carrier what limitations of time are placed on your standing rigging. Most insurance companies that do state limitations usually require complete replacement at 15 years of age.
 
Many years ago as a teen ager, I worked as a rigger in Chicago where the boats come out of the water every fall and the top tier racing boats would always have the masts and rigging pulled for deep inspection and storage. I learned a lot from these experiences. The most important thing I learned is that regarding swaged rigging fittings, like the ones on your Amel 54,  they cannot be visually inspected to reliably determine their condition. While a cracked swage fitting means that the rigging has failed and must not be used, a swage fitting can be a day away from failing with no external indication. Why? The swage fails from internal corrosion that generally cannot be seen until a failure has occurred. Again, an incipient failure may not be visible even moments before a total failure.
 
It is for this reason that I recommend that offshore cruising sailing yachts use mechanical end fittings such as Sta-Lok www.stalok.com .
These fittings are actually stronger than the wire they are applied to and, importantly, they do not retain moisture internally which causes the failure of swage fittings. Sta-Lok fittings are stronger and more durable than swage fittings and that is a verifiable fact. Even if your insurance provider does not have time limitations on your current rigging, I would not have sailed my Amel boats I have owned with rigging even a day older than 15 years and I would always replace it with mechanical end fittings.
 
I do not work for Sta-Lok nor any of their agents.
 
Say hello to Rineke. Have fun with your Amel!  
 
All the best,
Joel
 
           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.
                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy
UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE
                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485
 


Re: Best Sailrite flightcase storage in A54?

Arno Luijten
 

Because of the angled surface where the sailrite is placed below the dining table, the sailrite does not move, It’s also above the keel so motions are faily limited anyway. I did not need to add any lockup things for that. I just slide is as much as possible to the centre line as possible. I use some storage boxes to fill up the remaining cavities with other “stuff”. I like to have to this kind of weight close to the keel. 


Regards,
Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: ACMO rigging - unusual failure

Bill Kinney
 

Craig,

Speculating on a topic like this without actually inspecting the materials is likely to be a problematic exercise, but I have an idea for you.  Note well that I am discussing this having MUCH more experience with SM rigs than SN, but I do not believe that Amel made significant changes in the way they designed these systems.

I think your mizzen backstays are (much) too tight.  Your description of the failure you were lucky (???) enough to have watched as involving an "explosive bang" is a pretty big clue. At rest, these wires should not be that tight.

There are a LOT of moving parts here.  The length of the triatic, and the degree of rake of the masts are key.  You say your rig was made by ACMO, so it's a reasonable assumption that the triatic was the right length, but you might want to confirm that.

Did you measure the tension in the mizzen backstays during the rigging process?  If not measured, would you describe them as "ringing" tight?
Did you need to tension them significantly to pull the mizzen back to vertical after making the adjustments to the main mast?
Did you measure the mainmast backstay tension?  I am wondering if the mizzen backstays and triatic are taking more than their fair share of the load of the forestay tension.

The fact you have had TWO failures here seems to indicate something is systemically wrong... 

I hesitate to blame the swages, all the ones I have seen from ACMO where very high quality rotary hammer swages.  Can you post a photo of the failed parts?

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA.


Re: ACMO v Kos Hama X rigging wire

Bill Kinney
 

Laurens,

There is no easy answer to "how long" for rigging.  The problem is that stainless steel can fail in ways that give absolutely no visual warning.  It can look perfect--right up until the rig fails. The idea that a visual inspection can "certify" a rig as good is just a total falsehood.  Certainly there ARE issues a visual inspection can find, but there are many more it can not.

Failures occur with increasing frequency with age, so there is no magic cutoff.  The "generally accepted" practice for rigging used in tropical salt water is a life span of 15 years.  Warmer, saltier, water (like the Gulf of Mexico or the Med) gives a shorter life.  Colder, fresher, water allows a longer lifespan.  Rig tuning, and the amount of sailing and the kind of sailing also factor in, but all in a very unquantifiable way.  We replaced our rig after 14 years, not because there was any indication of failure, but the consequences of failure are just too high.

I would specifically ask for BRONZE turnbuckles.  Chrome plated, if you prefer the shiny look.  They are just as strong as stainless, less susceptible to crevice corrosion, and most importantly, far less likely to "gall" and lock the threads with the stainless studs.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: ACMO v Kos Hama X rigging wire

Bill Kinney
 

Paul,

If both parties are talking 316 stainless steel, and are using the defined international standards for that alloy, there should be NO difference in breaking strength. The tensile strength of the wire is fixed by the alloy composition, and its construction.  It is possible that ACMO uses 316L stainless, that DOES have a lower breaking strength.  316L has lower carbon, which makes welds easier to make corrosion free.  This obviously has little benefit to rigging wire.

As far as corrosion resistance for the ACMO wire, I have to say I have not seen it to be obviously superior.  I have seen several boats with recently installed ACMO rigs, and all were showing significant "rouging" of the wire within a year of installation.  Light, rust colored stains.  Not really of any consequence to the ultimate strength or lifespan of the wire, but not something that I would describe as "superior" to other wire rope suppliers I have seen.  ACMO dismissed the concerns of some of these owners as dirt sticking to grease left over from the manufacturing proccss, but that was clearly NOT the case.  I will emphasize  that there is NOTHING wrong with ACMO rigging, it's just not "clearly superior" to others a priori.

As far as I know, the dimensions of the Super Maramu wires have never changed.  The rig on the 54 HAS gone through a at least on iteration.  I wouldn't count on any rigger to keep up with that.  It's an owner's job.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: ACMO v Kos Hama X rigging wire

 

Amel changed the specs of the Mainmast Lower and Intermediate Shrouds during the production of the 54. The final revision was:
Lower (BAS HAUBANS AR) Changed from 10 to 12mm
Intermediate (INTERS) Changed from 8 to 10mm.
If you order from ACMO, they have this change, but be sure to check and verify.

I hope this helps you.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 12:15 PM Laurens Vos <laurensrineke@...> wrote:
What is the average lifespan for the ACMO rigging ? Our 54 is from 2008 when we need to think about replacement ? 

Best 
Laurens 


Re: ACMO v Kos Hama X rigging wire

Peter Forbes
 

Carango is a 2006 yacht and we are replacing the standing rigging this Spring 2021.

i hope that helps - we have specifically asked for stainless turnbuckles.

Peter

Peter Forbes
CARANGO Amel 54 #035
La Rochelle
07836 209730

On 12 Apr 2021, at 18:15, Laurens Vos <laurensrineke@...> wrote:

What is the average lifespan for the ACMO rigging ? Our 54 is from 2008 when we need to think about replacement ? 

Best 
Laurens 


Re: 2008 Amel 54 rigging

 

ACMO offers you a choice of either swaged or mechanical fittings. 

If I recall correctly, ACMO charges about 100-200 euro more for mechanical fittings (StaLok type).

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:02 PM amelforme <jfpottercys@...> wrote:

Hello Laurens. Long time…

It is best to ask your insurance carrier what limitations of time are placed on your standing rigging. Most insurance companies that do state limitations usually require complete replacement at 15 years of age.

 

Many years ago as a teen ager, I worked as a rigger in Chicago where the boats come out of the water every fall and the top tier racing boats would always have the masts and rigging pulled for deep inspection and storage. I learned a lot from these experiences. The most important thing I learned is that regarding swaged rigging fittings, like the ones on your Amel 54,  they cannot be visually inspected to reliably determine their condition. While a cracked swage fitting means that the rigging has failed and must not be used, a swage fitting can be a day away from failing with no external indication. Why? The swage fails from internal corrosion that generally cannot be seen until a failure has occurred. Again, an incipient failure may not be visible even moments before a total failure.

 

It is for this reason that I recommend that offshore cruising sailing yachts use mechanical end fittings such as Sta-Lok www.stalok.com .

These fittings are actually stronger than the wire they are applied to and, importantly, they do not retain moisture internally which causes the failure of swage fittings. Sta-Lok fittings are stronger and more durable than swage fittings and that is a verifiable fact. Even if your insurance provider does not have time limitations on your current rigging, I would not have sailed my Amel boats I have owned with rigging even a day older than 15 years and I would always replace it with mechanical end fittings.

 

I do not work for Sta-Lok nor any of their agents.

 

Say hello to Rineke. Have fun with your Amel!  

 

All the best,

Joel

 

           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.

                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 


2008 Amel 54 rigging

amelforme
 

Hello Laurens. Long time…

It is best to ask your insurance carrier what limitations of time are placed on your standing rigging. Most insurance companies that do state limitations usually require complete replacement at 15 years of age.

 

Many years ago as a teen ager, I worked as a rigger in Chicago where the boats come out of the water every fall and the top tier racing boats would always have the masts and rigging pulled for deep inspection and storage. I learned a lot from these experiences. The most important thing I learned is that regarding swaged rigging fittings, like the ones on your Amel 54,  they cannot be visually inspected to reliably determine their condition. While a cracked swage fitting means that the rigging has failed and must not be used, a swage fitting can be a day away from failing with no external indication. Why? The swage fails from internal corrosion that generally cannot be seen until a failure has occurred. Again, an incipient failure may not be visible even moments before a total failure.

 

It is for this reason that I recommend that offshore cruising sailing yachts use mechanical end fittings such as Sta-Lok www.stalok.com .

These fittings are actually stronger than the wire they are applied to and, importantly, they do not retain moisture internally which causes the failure of swage fittings. Sta-Lok fittings are stronger and more durable than swage fittings and that is a verifiable fact. Even if your insurance provider does not have time limitations on your current rigging, I would not have sailed my Amel boats I have owned with rigging even a day older than 15 years and I would always replace it with mechanical end fittings.

 

I do not work for Sta-Lok nor any of their agents.

 

Say hello to Rineke. Have fun with your Amel!  

 

All the best,

Joel

 

           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.

                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 


Re: ACMO v Kos Hama X rigging wire

Laurens Vos
 

What is the average lifespan for the ACMO rigging ? Our 54 is from 2008 when we need to think about replacement ? 

Best 
Laurens 


Re: Lofrans Tigris Windlass

Ian Park
 

Thanks Bill, but the breaker was on as each time I tested with the cockpit joystick first and it’s running fine!
When I find the issue I will post the cause and solution.

Ian


Re: Lofrans Tigris Windlass

 

Ian,

I know that you know the following, but since you did not say, I will offer this:
I have had more than 1 experienced clients have the same issue. I always ask if they have turned on what I call the Command Breaker. In every case, so far, my embarrassed clients advised me that the problem was solved. Sorry to waste your time with this, but it has happened more than once. I do not have a photo of the SN panel, but the symbol will be the same:
image.png
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 3:16 AM Ian Park <parkianj@...> wrote:
Craig,
Thanks for your reply. It looks quite similar to my wiring. The red and two brown wires on my photo to up to the windlass switches. There is no voltage registering on the red wire which is the common wire to both switches.
I think I'll try a 12 v feed separately to the switch and see if that activates the windlass. Then it will be a matter of tracking the feed back to where the supply voltage has stopped feeding!
If I find a fuse I'll post a photo in the photos library!
Ian







Re: Best Sailrite flightcase storage in A54?

Alexander Hofmann
 

Hi Thomas,

 

one of the reasons why I have my sailrite under the portside double berth in the front cabin is, that it fits in perfectly there.

If you use the 2nd compartment, seen from the left hand side, you will recognize, that its width is just a small bit wider than the sailrite flightcase.

Not easy actually to get it in and out, bring it in in a kind of circle movement, good physical training 😊, but it is a perfect fit there and cannot move.

Under the table (Arno’s recommendation, which I like!) I would (and will maybe) install some wooden fixation to hold the flightcase in place.

 

Best regards

Alexander – SY Oceanica I - Amel54#156


Re: Lofrans Tigris Windlass

Ian Park
 

Craig,
Thanks for your reply. It looks quite similar to my wiring. The red and two brown wires on my photo to up to the windlass switches. There is no voltage registering on the red wire which is the common wire to both switches.
I think I'll try a 12 v feed separately to the switch and see if that activates the windlass. Then it will be a matter of tracking the feed back to where the supply voltage has stopped feeding!
If I find a fuse I'll post a photo in the photos library!
Ian


Re: FW: Amel Owners Survey Results

Marcel Tromp
 

Hey Teun

I'm referring you to the AMEL insurance group.
If you want to hear about this plan talk to me. 


On Sun, 11 Apr 2021 at 7:45 am, Teun BAAS
<teun@...> wrote:

In today’s, very interesting & informative, AYOG ZOOM meeting Joel POTTER also specifically warned for the escalating boat insurance problems and to make sure you are able to obtain cover BEFORE buying a boat.

 

It might not be a problem in EUROPE however it surely is a problem in USA, CARIBBEAN as well as in SOUTH PACIFIC.

See if your EUROPEAN carrier is willing to ensure you sailing in any of these waters without either excessive premiums and/or excessive (long/lat; named storms; calendar block out periods etc.) restrictions/conditions.

 

Best Regards Teun

SV AMELIT  A54  #128

 

COOMERA (near BRISBANE) QLD AUSTRALIA

April 10, 2021 14:37:39

 

You can follow AMELIT via this link: https://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/AMELIT

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann-Sofie via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2021 11:29
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] FW: Amel Owners Survey Results

 

In Europe there is no problem to get an insurance.

This must be a US problem.

Hälsningar

Ann-Sofie Svanberg

 

 

Skickat från min iPhone



10/04/2021 kl. 18:19 skrev Teun BAAS <teun@...>:



Just attended this morning the OCC (Ocean Cruising Club) Annual Meeting.

 

During the meeting it was mentioned that it is becoming very difficult to obtain insurance for our boats and an ad hoc vote was taken asking if the OCC should get involved.

Abt. 83% voted YES; about 4% NO and 13% NO OPINION.

 

Clearly more & more boat insurance is becoming a problem but not every AMEL owner is aware of this right now until they are being declined for renewal.

 

We have a small group of AMEL owners researching the possibility of getting coverage where we are more involved/in control. Although we have had a respectable number of feed back on our survey so far we still would like to have more in order to have a meaningful discussion with re-insurance/front companies. The survey is completely confidential; with the exception of JB none of the research team members have access to the completed surveys!!!

Attached the survey results so far.

 

Therefore: IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY, please help us by filling out the survey at: https://kivfinance.typeform.com/to/weCULvfW 

 

 

Thanks

 

Best Regards Teun

SV AMELIT  A54  #128

 

In Storage on the hard in COOMERA (near BRISBANE) QLD AUSTRALIA

April 10, 2021 10:14:20

 

USA cell: +1 832 477 8842

AUSTRALIA cell: +61 5951 8909

 

You can follow AMELIT via this link: https://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/AMELIT

 

 

 

From: Pauline Granel <pauline@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 08:56
Cc: jb duler <jb@...>
Subject: Amel Owners Survey Results

 

Hi,

 

Thank you for answering the Amel Owners survey. Your participation is a great help.

 

You expressed interest in receiving the results.

JB asked me to send you the following report.

If you have any questions, you can contact jb@....

 

Best,

 

Pauline Granel

 

 

<Amel Owners Insurance Group Survey results.pdf>


ACMO rigging - unusual failure

Craig Briggs
 

We keep our 1992 SN "Sangaris" at the dock in front of our condo in Delray Beach, FL, where she's been in her slip for two years, what with Covid and other issues preventing active cruising. Today, Katherine and I were walking to the boat at mid-day to continue readying her for our planned summer cruising (finally!).

Incredibly, as we walked up to the boat along the dock we heard an explosive "bang" and actually saw the starboard mizzen backstay break at the top of the lower swage and proceed to whip across the deck. An amazing coincidence. We went aboard and easily contained it, but what a shock. The rigging was new in 2010.  Had we not actually seen it break we would have been totally at a loss to understand what had happened. Clearly, just sitting at the dock with gentle rocking had been weakening that stay.  

We had, indeed,  observed a concerning amount of rust just above the lower swaged fittings (mostly on the mizzen stays) but dismissed it as inconsequential. That being said, in 2009 the aft lower mizzen stay blew up under load at the lower swage while we were power reaching at 8+ kts with four sails off Catania, Italy, and that is what motivated us to replace all the rigging in 2010. ACOM provided the new rigging for about $5000 US and we installed it ourselves. 

Our plan now is to replace all the rigging and use mechanical fittings, rather than swages. But to have a stay "blow up" at the dock while you are walking by seems pretty bizarre - good thing we were not on passage.
 
All experiential input from fellow owners, of course, would be appreciated.

Cheers, Craig
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: Lofrans Tigris Windlass

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Ian,
I checked my SN today and find no 5A fuse (or any other small size) in the low voltage wires to the windlass. I only have the 100A breaker in this picture. 
--The fuse holder to the upper left of it is something I added for a Caframo fan in the forward stateroom - nothing to do with the windlass. I believe the heavy cables you see heading aft through conduit up high are going to the "Mat" and "Bome" furling relays in the head, so nothing to do with the windlass.  On my boat there are two holes through the forward bulkhead - the one on the right carries only 3 wires for the genoa furler and the one one the left carries the windlass wires plus some other wires that seem to be running lights, maybe chain counter and low voltage switch wires for the windlass. 
Sorry not to be more definitive, but hope this helps a bit.
Best regards, Craig 
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: ACMO v Kos Hama X rigging wire

 

Paul,

I am careful not to criticize a vendor or product in this Group because it is against our rules. Instead I will focus on positive comments as long as I have positive comments to offer.

1.) ACMO is the OEM provider to Amel for rigging and have been for over 40 years.
2.) ACMO is up-to-date with Amel specs. 
3.)ACMO is a designated Preferred Vendor to my Yacht School  clients and I believe about 50 of my  clients have purchased rigging kits from ACMO. 
4.) Two of the three riggers I will recommend worldwide buy ACMO rigging material.

All of the above said, you should buy from the supplier you feel is best for you. It is possible that the company you choose will be as good or better than ACMO.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Sun, Apr 11, 2021, 1:35 PM Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote:
Bill
I asked Acmo, the cost including fittings was 10631 € fd, remains installation and tuning, The cost to have the whole job done with Kos wire is 9100 € with Selden fittings and the turnbuckles for The fore stay that has to be ACMO, that including the masts on and off. To motivate the Extra cost of  minimum 3000 €, there has to be substantial advantages, not only the measurements. 
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259, Lagos, Portugal

3081 - 3100 of 60471