Date   

Re: Insurance

Patrick McAneny
 

Eric, For a couple of hundred bucks ,I think it adds a significant safety margin in the event of a major leak,giving me time to deal with the issue. Along with that ,I feel good that I have a pump on board that I could lend to another boat in distress, taking on water . It could potentially save another boat from sinking as well as my own.
Pat
SM Shenanigans
Sassafras River , Md.


-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sat, May 1, 2021 7:01 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance

Pat,
Thank you. Good Idea !!!
Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376
 
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2021 9:00 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance
 
Eric , I bought the one you have the link to , the Tsurumi pump and it is 120v  ,which I will run off my inverter . The 45 gal./minute I quoted is from their chart at a 7 ft. head pressure. Not sure you can rely on any numbers produced by manufacturers ,but it does pump a hell of a lot of water . I think it could keep up with a broken  sea cock . It can handle 1/4" objects and has pumped our pond out ,where the bottom has leaves and crap ,dirtier than I hope my boat ever gets.
Pat
SM Shenanigans

-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 7:43 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance
Is this a 220 volt unit or do you run it off of an inverter?
The only issue I see with the one attached is the starting amps is 12.5.
It looks like a great pump ; however it does have an impeller..
 
Our AMFA bilge pump is a diaphragm pump . Last time I took it apart it was incredible what was inside of the pump including a few cable ties. I just wonder how resistant to clogging the electric one is..
 
The pumps I see on construction sites always seem to be diaphragm pumps.
 
Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376
 
 
 
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 3:21 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance
 
While on passage to the Caribbean a couple of years ago at about 3 am . I discovered about a foot of water under the floor boards by the nav station. Conditions had been rough for days and the bow thruster had been leaking obviously for some time. I had a household A/C submersible pump and that eventually pumped out the water ,but it clogged a lot with bits of paper etc. and only pumped thru a garden hose. That confirmed for me ,that I would always want to have an auxiliary pump on board ,just a bigger ,better one that can not clog. 
So I now have a A/C submersible trash pump, a trash pump is designed to pump high volumes of water while allowing  debris to pass thru and out the pump without clogging. The pump I bought pumps 45 gallons per minute thru a two inch hose. The cord is very long and the hose is 50 ft. long. This has the advantage of being able to locate the pump where needed. I could drop it over the side and put a lot of water on a fire as well. While I can't remember what I paid ,it was not more than $400.
I also have a water garden with ponds totaling 4000 gallons ,which I can now drain quickly with no clogging as opposed to hours with my previous pump clogging every few minutes. Goggle trash pumps. 
Pat
SM Shenanigans
Sassafras River , Md.
 
-----Original Message-----
From: CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 2:17 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance
The extra-large bilge pump requirement is becoming popular among insurance companies. It started with one "brilliant" underwriter. Frankly, I am waiting for the same "brilliant" or another expert to require watertight compartments.😀
 
I suggest that you buy a large-capacity submersible 24-volt Rule Pump and the required length of hose to be able to use the pump anywhere in your Amel. Maybe you can justify the few hundred expense to be able to pump out your water tank.
image.png
 
Image removed by sender.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.
 
Image removed by sender.
 
 
On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 12:35 PM Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:
Joerg,
 
I do not have a clause for a bilge pump requirement. My TopSail underwriter is 100% Great Lakes Insurance SE. It look like they subbed your policy to MRRSI.
 
This is an issue that has been bought up previously in this group. If I am to face the same clause, I would just install a secondary pump higher than the original (perhaps in the dry area just forward of the Amel drive) and splice the output hose with a Y valve past the primary pump. This way the original pump is still the primary and the secondary is there to match the insurance needs but would never be cycled. This could be done for about €150.
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joerg Esdorn via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 5:06 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance
 
I just received a competitive quote from Topsail but it contains a condition that I need to have a bilge pump capable of 100l/minute.   The standard electrical pump on the A55 does 30l/minute only and it’s the same pump as is installed on most recent prior models.   Mark, did you have to install a bigger pump to get Topsail cover?  Cover is through  Great Lakes Insurance SE via Munich Re Risk Solutions Ireland (MRRSI).   

Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53 Kincsem
Vigo, Spain


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Alain Blanchard
 

Hello Matt

Unfortunately, risk is not only at seas. It may surprise us when we feel more « confortable ».
Thank you for your post.
It’s a very good reminder for all of us 

All the n’est to north of you

Alain
Koriolys /SM 146/Gruissan/France



Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 2 mai 2021 à 10:30, Peter Forbes <ppsforbes@...> a écrit :

 This is probably the single most important post on this site that I have read.

Thank you.

Get back to full strength soon.

Peter

Peter Forbes
Carango Amel 54 #035
La Rochelle
00447836 209730


On 2 May 2021, at 00:54, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



Sorry to hear the news.

Get better soon.

Spring is here.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia
Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2021 2:30 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mast Climbing Safety

 

As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Peter Forbes
 

This is probably the single most important post on this site that I have read.

Thank you.

Get back to full strength soon.

Peter

Peter Forbes
Carango Amel 54 #035
La Rochelle
00447836 209730


On 2 May 2021, at 00:54, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



Sorry to hear the news.

Get better soon.

Spring is here.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia
Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2021 2:30 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mast Climbing Safety

 

As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Dean Gillies
 

Wolfgang,
I had exactly the same problem. The output drivers of the GP150 failed, but otherwise the unit seems to work ok, and displays the correct latlon on the screen. As Stephane says, the Furuno system switches automatically to use the latlon provided by AIS on the network, BUT this does not go to the other peripherals like the radios which are fed by the GP150 NMEA outputs directly.
Furuno cannot repair the GP150, and will offer you the newer model - which does not fit in the cutout!
Other options are
1. Configure the Furuno MFD at the chart table to output latlon data on one of its unused data outputs, and wire this to the radios. I did this on Stella as a first step while I waited for Furuno to repair the GP150.
2. Buy a GPS antenna with NMEA outputs and mount it behind the chart table panel. Use this to feed the radios directly. I did this when Furuno told me they could not fix my GP150 output drivers. This gives better redundancy than 1.

Let me know if you have further questions and I can dig out my notes and assist further.

Dean
SV Stella
A54-154

Sent from my iPhone X


Re: Dessalator no manual flushing

Porter McRoberts
 

In Fort Lauderdale for water maker repair try Bobby. He was quick and honest  9549372415

Porter McRoberts 
S/V IBIS A54-152 
WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206
Www.fouribis.net

On May 1, 2021, at 4:15 PM, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Bill/Wolfgang,

The three way valve (actually it is a 2-way) is in parallel with the solenoid. So the solenoid has no impact.
I find the theory that the three way valve is the problem not very likely. But it is easy to test as you can remove the pre-filter and see if fresh water comes out of the filter connector when you open the three way valve for fresh water.
My guess is either a clogged connection hose or stuck valves in the high pressure pump.
Take off the hose between the pump and the membranes and see if fresh water comes trough. If not the pump may be the problem. Next reconnect the hose and remove the brine (output) hose from the membranes. That is the high pressure hose on the other side. See if water comes out of the connection point. If so then the problem may be in the regulator at the console.

Regards,
Arno Luijten,
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Thomas, 

That is funny, that box used to reside behind the right fauteuil on our boat before I replaced most of the nav stuff. 


Arno 


Re: Dessalator no manual flushing

Arno Luijten
 

Bill/Wolfgang,

The three way valve (actually it is a 2-way) is in parallel with the solenoid. So the solenoid has no impact.
I find the theory that the three way valve is the problem not very likely. But it is easy to test as you can remove the pre-filter and see if fresh water comes out of the filter connector when you open the three way valve for fresh water.
My guess is either a clogged connection hose or stuck valves in the high pressure pump.
Take off the hose between the pump and the membranes and see if fresh water comes trough. If not the pump may be the problem. Next reconnect the hose and remove the brine (output) hose from the membranes. That is the high pressure hose on the other side. See if water comes out of the connection point. If so then the problem may be in the regulator at the console.

Regards,
Arno Luijten,
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Sv Garulfo
 

Wolfgang,

If your A54 is anything like ours, there is a junction box behind the navnet3D screen at the chart table that distributes the NMEA from the GP-150 to the VHF&SSB. If neither are showing lat/lon, it could be a bad connection in that junction box or at the GPS output (data 1, for me). Or it could be the GP-150 that’s not longer broadcasting NMEA on that output.

Do you see lat/lon on your hydra? If yes, the GP-150 still outputs NMEA to the data3 port (again, according to the setup on Garulfo).

In fact, for us, the navnet3D shows lat/lon thanks to data2 output from the GP-150.

So i think you could just have a bad connection at data1 of the gp-150, or at the junction box that distributes that output to the vhf/SSB. 

It doesn’t explain why the radar overlay does not work though. It sounds like something different. 
It does not explain the speed issue on autopilot. Do you see SOG in hydra and navnet3D ? Do you see STW in hydra / navnet3D ?



Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Huahine, French Polynesia 



On 1 May 2021, at 14:23, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Wolfgang,

I assume that you do not have GPS SOG but probably have SOW (Boat Speed as reported through the B&G Hydra.

It sounds like the likely cause is the Furuno GP-150 which is no longer made. I did a quick search for a used one and did not find one. I think the best thing for you to do is get a Furuno technician onboard. I do not have a recommendation, but with a search on Google and on Furuno Dealer Search (https://www.furunousa.com/en/company/find_a_dealer) I see there are many.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 6:47 PM Wolfgang Weber <weberamel54@...> wrote:
Hello to the group,
2. problem : Starting my Nav-electronics :  Furuno GP 150 ( no failure),  Autopilot   ( later - no speed data), Navnet 3 D ( shows Lat/Lon and  plotter working; Radar ? overlay not working), VHF and SSB ( no Lat/Lon).
Stephane G. from Pochon /La Rochell was very helpful and send a wiring schema and  his suggestion was that GP 150 NEMA output of GPS (LAT/Lon) did not work and that Navnet 3 D received Lat/lon from  FA-50 AIS.
Question : Hardwarefailure ? change GP-150 ?
Any recommendation for  electronic/Furuno in Fort Lauderdale ?
Thankyou very much!
Wolfgang SY Elise Amel 54 #162


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Wolfgang,

You are correct to assume the GP150 has no connection to the Navnet 3D system. I just made a major update to my system and this is how I know.
The GP 150 only feeds the VHF and in your case the SSB. I have heard of cases where the output driver of the NEMA0183 output failed. As Bill said the GP 150 is no longer available and if it were, it is very expensive as it is a SOLAS certified GPS.
However there is some good news as the GP150 has three outputs for GPS data and at least one of them is still unused in the default Amel installation. You may be able to use this output as alternative. I know this because I used that output to feed the EPIRB I have on the boat (Some fancy ACR thing).
You may need to alter the config of the GP150 to get the output to work in the way required.

For your information I also made a connection between the fast-heading output of the NavPilot 500 to the input NMEA input of the B&G H3000 CPU. On my boat Amel forgot to do that so the H3000 CPU had no way to calculate the ground wind (wind direction relative to the north). This enable you to plot a graph on the H3000 graphic display to see the wind direction changes over time.

Let me know if you need more information.

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Dessalator no manual flushing

 

Wolfgang,

I assume that you have the automatic rinse solenoid valve and also the manual ball valve to rinse the membranes. I am trying to remember but is it possible that the valve might be before the auto rinse valve. If so the auto rinse solenoid may be stuck. If I am correct, possibly bypassing the auto rinse valve will work for you.

Another thing that may help you is if you run the watermaker every 3-4 days, even for 30 minutes, you can skip the rinsing until you get it repaired.

I am sure that there are some great watermaker mechanics in Ft Lauderdale, but I do not know them.


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 6:38 PM Wolfgang Weber <weberamel54@...> wrote:
Hello to the group,
after 1 year away from ELISE - Amel 54 - I managed US - Immigration.
Now trying to  manual flush the Dessalator Watermaker - no flow.
Martin from Dessalator/spain mentoined that the problem is the 3-way valve.
Any help or comments ?
Wolfgang SY ELISE Amel 54#162 , Fort Lauderdale /Playboy Marina


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

 

Wolfgang,

I assume that you do not have GPS SOG but probably have SOW (Boat Speed as reported through the B&G Hydra.

It sounds like the likely cause is the Furuno GP-150 which is no longer made. I did a quick search for a used one and did not find one. I think the best thing for you to do is get a Furuno technician onboard. I do not have a recommendation, but with a search on Google and on Furuno Dealer Search (https://www.furunousa.com/en/company/find_a_dealer) I see there are many.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 6:47 PM Wolfgang Weber <weberamel54@...> wrote:
Hello to the group,
2. problem : Starting my Nav-electronics :  Furuno GP 150 ( no failure),  Autopilot   ( later - no speed data), Navnet 3 D ( shows Lat/Lon and  plotter working; Radar ? overlay not working), VHF and SSB ( no Lat/Lon).
Stephane G. from Pochon /La Rochell was very helpful and send a wiring schema and  his suggestion was that GP 150 NEMA output of GPS (LAT/Lon) did not work and that Navnet 3 D received Lat/lon from  FA-50 AIS.
Question : Hardwarefailure ? change GP-150 ?
Any recommendation for  electronic/Furuno in Fort Lauderdale ?
Thankyou very much!
Wolfgang SY Elise Amel 54 #162


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

eric freedman
 

Sorry to hear the news.

Get better soon.

Spring is here.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia
Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2021 2:30 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mast Climbing Safety

 

As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA


Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Wolfgang Weber
 

Hello to the group,
2. problem : Starting my Nav-electronics :  Furuno GP 150 ( no failure),  Autopilot   ( later - no speed data), Navnet 3 D ( shows Lat/Lon and  plotter working; Radar ? overlay not working), VHF and SSB ( no Lat/Lon).
Stephane G. from Pochon /La Rochell was very helpful and send a wiring schema and  his suggestion was that GP 150 NEMA output of GPS (LAT/Lon) did not work and that Navnet 3 D received Lat/lon from  FA-50 AIS.
Question : Hardwarefailure ? change GP-150 ?
Any recommendation for  electronic/Furuno in Fort Lauderdale ?
Thankyou very much!
Wolfgang SY Elise Amel 54 #162


Dessalator no manual flushing

Wolfgang Weber
 

Hello to the group,
after 1 year away from ELISE - Amel 54 - I managed US - Immigration.
Now trying to  manual flush the Dessalator Watermaker - no flow.
Martin from Dessalator/spain mentoined that the problem is the 3-way valve.
Any help or comments ?
Wolfgang SY ELISE Amel 54#162 , Fort Lauderdale /Playboy Marina


Re: Insurance

eric freedman
 

Pat,

Thank you. Good Idea !!!

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2021 9:00 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance

 

Eric , I bought the one you have the link to , the Tsurumi pump and it is 120v  ,which I will run off my inverter . The 45 gal./minute I quoted is from their chart at a 7 ft. head pressure. Not sure you can rely on any numbers produced by manufacturers ,but it does pump a hell of a lot of water . I think it could keep up with a broken  sea cock . It can handle 1/4" objects and has pumped our pond out ,where the bottom has leaves and crap ,dirtier than I hope my boat ever gets.

Pat

SM Shenanigans

-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 7:43 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance

Is this a 220 volt unit or do you run it off of an inverter?

The only issue I see with the one attached is the starting amps is 12.5.

It looks like a great pump ; however it does have an impeller..

 

Our AMFA bilge pump is a diaphragm pump . Last time I took it apart it was incredible what was inside of the pump including a few cable ties. I just wonder how resistant to clogging the electric one is..

 

The pumps I see on construction sites always seem to be diaphragm pumps.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 3:21 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance

 

While on passage to the Caribbean a couple of years ago at about 3 am . I discovered about a foot of water under the floor boards by the nav station. Conditions had been rough for days and the bow thruster had been leaking obviously for some time. I had a household A/C submersible pump and that eventually pumped out the water ,but it clogged a lot with bits of paper etc. and only pumped thru a garden hose. That confirmed for me ,that I would always want to have an auxiliary pump on board ,just a bigger ,better one that can not clog. 

So I now have a A/C submersible trash pump, a trash pump is designed to pump high volumes of water while allowing  debris to pass thru and out the pump without clogging. The pump I bought pumps 45 gallons per minute thru a two inch hose. The cord is very long and the hose is 50 ft. long. This has the advantage of being able to locate the pump where needed. I could drop it over the side and put a lot of water on a fire as well. While I can't remember what I paid ,it was not more than $400.

I also have a water garden with ponds totaling 4000 gallons ,which I can now drain quickly with no clogging as opposed to hours with my previous pump clogging every few minutes. Goggle trash pumps. 

Pat

SM Shenanigans

Sassafras River , Md.

 

-----Original Message-----
From: CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 2:17 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance

The extra-large bilge pump requirement is becoming popular among insurance companies. It started with one "brilliant" underwriter. Frankly, I am waiting for the same "brilliant" or another expert to require watertight compartments.😀

 

I suggest that you buy a large-capacity submersible 24-volt Rule Pump and the required length of hose to be able to use the pump anywhere in your Amel. Maybe you can justify the few hundred expense to be able to pump out your water tank.

image.png

 

Image removed by sender.

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.

 

Image removed by sender.

 

 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 12:35 PM Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

Joerg,

 

I do not have a clause for a bilge pump requirement. My TopSail underwriter is 100% Great Lakes Insurance SE. It look like they subbed your policy to MRRSI.

 

This is an issue that has been bought up previously in this group. If I am to face the same clause, I would just install a secondary pump higher than the original (perhaps in the dry area just forward of the Amel drive) and splice the output hose with a Y valve past the primary pump. This way the original pump is still the primary and the secondary is there to match the insurance needs but would never be cycled. This could be done for about €150.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joerg Esdorn via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 5:06 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Insurance

 

I just received a competitive quote from Topsail but it contains a condition that I need to have a bilge pump capable of 100l/minute.   The standard electrical pump on the A55 does 30l/minute only and it’s the same pump as is installed on most recent prior models.   Mark, did you have to install a bigger pump to get Topsail cover?  Cover is through  Great Lakes Insurance SE via Munich Re Risk Solutions Ireland (MRRSI).   


Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53 Kincsem
Vigo, Spain


Re: Photo of the fuel tank out of the boat

eric freedman
 

I am glad my suggestion might help; I used an air horn.

It puts out a lot more pressure.

The filter that Amel puts at the outlet inside of the fuel tank is an odd place to put a filter.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Thomas Kleman
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 8:20 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Photo of the fuel tank out of the boat

 

Yes- removed both inspection ports, made gaskets out of Nitrile (1/8 inch) and cleaned the outlet. When refilling the tank, I only took on 90 pct of my diesel and left the dregs in their temp storage tank. Then bled the system at the racors so it will hopefully start OK. The bottom of the tank had to be scraped out with a metal scraper- it was coated with a filmy resin. 

Note to Eric- after reading your post about stalling out 10 mi from your house and using compressed air through the fuel line, I keep our electric dinghy inflation pump handy on passages with the correct tip for the fuel line.

Tom and Kirstin

SV L'ORIENT
SM2K 422
Tahiti


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Craig Briggs
 

Matt,

Kudos for sharing this. Safety shortcuts are so easy to fall into and you posting this, from a super competent person, is a sobering message to all of us.

I am curious, though, as to just how the "halyard slipped from the clutch"?  By "clutch" do you mean the "self-tailer" on the winch or the "rope clutch" of the mizzen halyard - or were you using the mizzen staysail halyard directly to a winch (not going through the rope clutch).

If using the mizzen halyard clutch, and assuming the line was still running through the clutch hole it could not have slipped "from" the clutch, but must have slipped "through" the clutch. If so, did the fact that the tension was all on the winch allow the locking lever to fall open (mine will indeed do that occasionally), thus allowing the line to run freely through the clutch, and then somehow the line came off the winch? Or did you unlock the clutch because it was on the winch and then the line came off the winch.

The clutch, being a one-way locking device that you can leave locked while going up will not slip if the line is taken off the winch. It sounds as though (if you were using the clutch) you either unlocked the clutch before you went up, or being "where you wanted to be" your crew unlocked the clutch to lower you back down. 

Katherine is taking me up tomorrow to remove my mizzen lowers, as I start to replace my rigging after the failure a couple of weeks ago. I'll be using the foc d'artimon halyard run to the anchor windlass (no electric winches on the SN) and I will run it through the mizzen halyard clutch, plus I'll use the passerelle / outboard hoisting halyard as a safety, but I'd appreciate more details on your episode.

Best regards,
Craig--
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Leslie Washburn
 

I don't typically jump in on many stories but this one in particular made me want to say thank you. 

I'm sorry your lesson for us came at such a cost. 

I'm glad you are healing and that you shared the story. We all have had this lapse at some time or another.  Schedules..they always seem to find a way to dissolve some of our common sense.

Perhaps you can take some satisfaction in knowing that you may have just helped keep safe another 100+ people, at least until the sting of the story wears off and we forget again.

Hats off to your wife for reminding you and asking you.  It can be hard for work mates to ask, cajole, remind others to take the precautions especially if the person in action is confident and sure. It's a tough spot. I hope she is also doing OK as I'm sure it was a deep trauma for both of you.

Thanks again, heal well.

Leslie



Leslie A. Washburn 
Washburn Coaching & Consulting 
Yacht Deliveries & Provisioning
312.952.2145 m 


-------- Original message --------
From: "Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia" <charlesmatthewday@...>
Date: 5/1/21 1:30 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mast Climbing Safety

As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

JB Duler
 

Matt,

I am so sorry to hear your story and so happy that you have recovered.
I really appreciate you sharing your story. Very humbling.

Of course, like most of us, I pushed things to the limits many, many times. I did not clip the harness to avoid being tangled in the sheets while changing head sails, or I did not tie a second halyard as I was climbing the mast. I did not tie myself while I was relieving myself over the lifelines in heavy seas. The list goes on, with a lot of "near misses", and quick recoveries because I was fit and young...Not the case anymore.

Your story is reminder for all us to be careful. Especially now that we sail with limited crew or a spouse.

Thank you so much,
--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

 

Matt,

Thank you very much for posting this. It is very important for all of us to take a few seconds to remind ourselves of the need for safety.

I grimace from my own imagined pain every time I think about your injury.

I am excited about your recovery to date and I am anxious for your full recovery.

My best to you and Michelle.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 1:30 PM Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia <charlesmatthewday@...> wrote:
As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA

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