Date   

Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Chris Doucette
 

Matt, 
Thanks for this!  Being a rock climber-  i am comfortable up the mast- However, only if i use  two fully redundant  rope systems.  I get winched on one systen and keep a prusik on a separate fixed line that i slide up and down with me.  If the first system fails i sit comfortably down on the fixed line prusik..   have a look and they are not expensive!  

On May 2, 2021, at 6:20 PM, Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:


Matt, we feel awful for you. But glad you're alive to tell the tale. Thank you for sharing this. It's a stark reminder of lessons learned the (very) hard and painful way. We wish you a speedy and full recovery.



Sent from my Galaxy


-------- Original message --------
From: "Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia" <charlesmatthewday@...>
Date: 2021-05-01 14:30 (GMT-05:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mast Climbing Safety

As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Wolfgang Weber
 

Not the first time we heard about  an accident while mast-climbing.
All the best and  good recovery - restitutio ad integrum !
2 months ago I participated an ARC Preparation online /zoom  presentation for mastclimbing. Perhaps you may find the video online.
I learned a lot of things - better this way.
I attached some informations .
Stay healty , Wolfgang SY ELISE Amel 54 #162


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Wolfgang Weber
 

Thank you all, phantastic , I have hope to get it fixed. I dont want to have technicians on board who start a  De-,Amel-isation !
I add the information from Stephane G / Pochon La Rochelle.
I think the best and easiest way is to add an extra GPS NEMA 0183 .
I found  online  TriNav GPS 160 NEMA 0183 - good choice ?
Perhaps Dean and Arno may send more informations ?
Thank you very much
Wolfgang SY ELISE Amel 54 #162 Playboy Marina /Fort Lauderdale


Re: Dessalator no manual flushing

Wolfgang Weber
 

Thank you to the group,
I will try this  on thursday and will report
Wolfgang Amel 54#162


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Ian Townsend
 

Matt, we feel awful for you. But glad you're alive to tell the tale. Thank you for sharing this. It's a stark reminder of lessons learned the (very) hard and painful way. We wish you a speedy and full recovery.



Sent from my Galaxy


-------- Original message --------
From: "Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia" <charlesmatthewday@...>
Date: 2021-05-01 14:30 (GMT-05:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mast Climbing Safety

As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA


VHF antennae replacement

Kiana
 

We are looking to replace our vhf antennae atop the mast of our 2002 SM 2000.  Does anyone once have a good source in the US? Does anyone know the make and model?  

kind Regards
kris
s/v Kiana
hull #362


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Mark Erdos
 

Ouch Matt! I hope you get better fast.

 

A couple of thoughts after reading your post: Cindy is the one who works the winch as I go up and down the mast. She is careful to tie off the line tail to two separate cleats as I go up. So, if the rope does slip out of the winch clutch, the cleat will stop me from falling all the way down. Should it fail while she is adjusting the line tail on one cleat, I am always tied to another. On the way down she reverses the procedure allow only so much free line to move me about 10 feet at a time. Also, at the first opportunity, I will snap on a safety line either around the mast or onto a shroud, I use the MOB harness tether for this.

 

We use headsets to communicate.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 


Re: Draining Fuel tank

 

Pat,

If you haven't already solved it, I have a solution that works for me. Your problem is the length of lift portion of the hose and the weight of the diesel in the hose in that lift portion.  

You can decrease the weight of the diesel in the lift portion of the hose by adding air pockets. With the suction on, lift intermittently the suction end of the hose for a split second allowing some air to enter. Do this several times until you have flow on the down side of the hose.  

I learned this when acquiring my PHD in Shade Tree Engineering 🌴🌴

I hope this helps. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Sun, May 2, 2021, 8:20 AM Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I only have about 30 gallons of fuel in my tank and I want to drain it. My boat is on the hard ,so I placed a five foot length of 1/2" cpvc tube into the tank and attached a 25' length of 1/2"OD plastic hose , I drop that over the side hoping I could siphon the fuel out. I attached the hose to a shop vac , sealing the connection with tape and yet it did not produce enough suction to pull the fuel up out of the tank by more than two feet ,about to the height of the cockpit seat. I was surprised by that ,it is a big vac ,with a lot of suction. Does anyone have a suggestion on how or what to use to suck the fuel up and out of the tank.
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


Re: Water Intrusion and watertight bulkheads

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi All.

if you want to convince yourself about the inadequacy of bilge pumps in the case of a hull breach remove your speed log from the through hull when the boat is in the water.

It is down right scary how much water comes in FAST from that relatively small hole. The idea of massive capacity 120 or 230 volt pumps sounds good till you consider Murphy's' law. What can go  wrong, will go wrong, at at the worst possible time. Batteries don't like being under water.

What situation would necessitate that huge volume pump? You can bet not a quiet controlled one. Panic and mayhem may prevail. Gen set wont start. inverter fails, someone in panic gets it all wrong. 

The captains Amel watertight bulkheads make all the sense in the world. But does all your crew know where the locking bars are, and how to fit  them? Do you know where they are so you could put your hand on them in an instant.

Do the valves on the bilge piping that passes through the bulkhead operate, or are they frozen?The water tight bulkheads  will buy valuable time while you find a method to pug the hole. Above the waterline, cushions stuffed in. Below the waterline a more compressed plugging. Large holes, fothering which is drawing a sail or something similar over the outside of the hull.

Certainly large pumps are great but just one of the methods needed. 

Joel is it true that at an Annapolis boat show years ago they flooded the front cabin on a SM and showed the boat could still sail? 

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 03 May 2021 at 03:37 Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

I recently finished reading the book 66 days Adrift, where a boat was "attacked" by a large pod of pilot whales 1000 miles into the passage between panama and Hawaii and the boat was lost due to water intrusion in the main salon area, in a matter of minutes. I have always thought about the survivability and resilience of our Amels in different scenarios. I have the following questions and hoping the answers are within our group.

  1. Will there be sufficient buoyancy to stay afloat, if there is a large breach in the salon area and the forward and aft bulkhead doors are secured?
  2. Are the forward and aft bulkhead areas watertight only to a certain height about the cabin floor, or could the entire volume be flooded without water intruding into the engine compartment or the salon area. This would be important if there is a large breach at the cabin top, thus allowing the volume to be filled by waves or the boat is inverted.
  3. I have thought about and there has been some discussion about carrying an auxiliary pump, in order to buy some time, in case of a major leak, so that a temporary repair can be implemented. The following chart shows the amount of water flow by hole size and depth of hole. As you can see, at even 2 feet below the water line, a 1.5 inch hole is sufficient to overcome any pumps that we have been discussing in the group. Has anyone come up with a viable design of an engine mounted/operated trash type pump design, or maybe a larger electric pump that could utilize the full  output of the generator (11KW) to allow for significantly more pumping capacity.

    Boat Flooding Rates in Gallons per Minute

    Depth of Hole Below Waterline

    Diameter of Opening or Hole

    1 in

    1.5 in

    2 in

    2.5 in

    3 in

    3.5 in

    4 in

    1 ft

    19.4

    43.8

    77.9

    121.7

    175.3

    238.6

    311.6

    2 ft

    27.8

    62.5

    111.1

    173.6

    250.0

    340.2

    444.4

    3 ft

    33.9

    76.3

    135.7

    212.0

    305.3

    415.6

    542.8

    4 ft

    39.3

    88.4

    157.1

    245.3

    353.5

    481.2

    628.4


Any and all other thought sand plans to add to our tool bag to help in similar situations, would be appreciated.


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

John Clark
 

Thank you Matt,
  I have a fear of heights which tends to keep me out of trouble going aloft, but you are right, a split second decision in any number of circumstances can be deadly.  Think about going forward at night while underway.  I have felt that pull that says it is only for a few seconds and weather is good no need to clip in....  We all need to be reminded every once in a while.

John Clark
Annie SM 37
St Thomas, USVI


Re: Draining Fuel tank

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Pat, Fill the hose, put your thumb over the end, take it over the side to below the tank and take your thumb off. Or put a plug in the end instead of your thumb.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl 

On 03 May 2021 at 01:20 "Patrick McAneny via groups.io" <sailw32@...> wrote:

I only have about 30 gallons of fuel in my tank and I want to drain it. My boat is on the hard ,so I placed a five foot length of 1/2" cpvc tube into the tank and attached a 25' length of 1/2"OD plastic hose , I drop that over the side hoping I could siphon the fuel out. I attached the hose to a shop vac , sealing the connection with tape and yet it did not produce enough suction to pull the fuel up out of the tank by more than two feet ,about to the height of the cockpit seat. I was surprised by that ,it is a big vac ,with a lot of suction. Does anyone have a suggestion on how or what to use to suck the fuel up and out of the tank.
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


Re: Draining Fuel tank

Eric Freedman
 

Pat ,

I use a reverse oil change pump.

Or you could put a bucket in the bilge, remove the fittings at the bottom of the tank and add a piece of hose.

On Kimberlite I needed to use a very thin wrench to disassemble the valve on the tank. It is called a tappet wrench.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 02, 2021 9:21 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Draining Fuel tank

 

I only have about 30 gallons of fuel in my tank and I want to drain it. My boat is on the hard ,so I placed a five foot length of 1/2" cpvc tube into the tank and attached a 25' length of 1/2"OD plastic hose , I drop that over the side hoping I could siphon the fuel out. I attached the hose to a shop vac , sealing the connection with tape and yet it did not produce enough suction to pull the fuel up out of the tank by more than two feet ,about to the height of the cockpit seat. I was surprised by that ,it is a big vac ,with a lot of suction. Does anyone have a suggestion on how or what to use to suck the fuel up and out of the tank.
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


Re: Water Intrusion and watertight bulkheads

Clive Chapman
 

I’ve not been in the Royal Navy, but I have been lucky enough to spend substantial times at sea with them on a variety of different RN and RFA vessels. They have a very well developed system of ‘damage control’ - born out of much first hand experience of life threatening situations. Once past immediate threat to individual’s lives, their focus is very much on stabilising any situation to prevent it deteriorating. Applying this to your situation, my ‘first aid’ would be all about reducing the inflow of water by any means possible - in-extremist one crew holding ‘something’ against the breach to reduce the flow and allow enough time for the other crew to get pumps working.

The other thing we can all learn from the RN is ‘practice’! Lots, and lots of practice! How many of us have actually, really, taken the time to practically exercise how we’d handle a fire, hull breach, a bit of standing rigging letting go, etc, etc? Turn it in to a game…select six ‘disasters’…roll a dice…and…GO!


Re: Question for Barry SV Penelope 11

Barry Connor
 

Hi Nick,

We are nearly finished with the complete changeover to Lithium.
I will be able to post a lot next week. We started this back in June 2020, luckily we have had to stay put here in Le Marin, Martinique. The Amel base here is very helpful and knowledgeable. Would not have wanted to do this project anywhere else.
Please wait another week and I will post the complete work on this site.

Very Best

Barry and Penny
"SV Lady Penelope II"
Amel 54.  #17
Sainte Anne anchorage Martinique

On Saturday, May 1, 2021, 12:16:42 PM EDT, ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:


High Barry,

I was just wondering about your project to change the pulley on the 24v Leece Neville alternator to a micro v type. Have you done it and if so how is it going?

I still have not been back to Amelia in Leros Greece, but my flight is booked 11th of June. I  will fit the new pulleys that I have bought and had machined here in the UK and report on the outcome.

Poor Amelia has been left since mid September. Hopefully all will be well!!

Nick

S/Y Amelia
AML 54-019 stored ashore in Leros Gr.


Re: Draining Fuel tank

Derick Gates SM2K #400 Brava
 

Pat, you can also fill the tubing with the shop vac suction while there is less of a height to the top of the tubing (e.g. while still in the engine room. Once filled, seal off the exit end with a plug and lift it manually up and over the side so that the exit is now lower than the end in the tank. It should siphon like a champion then as long as you don’t get an air gap in the hose. 


Water Intrusion and watertight bulkheads

Mohammad Shirloo
 

I recently finished reading the book 66 days Adrift, where a boat was "attacked" by a large pod of pilot whales 1000 miles into the passage between panama and Hawaii and the boat was lost due to water intrusion in the main salon area, in a matter of minutes. I have always thought about the survivability and resilience of our Amels in different scenarios. I have the following questions and hoping the answers are within our group.

  1. Will there be sufficient buoyancy to stay afloat, if there is a large breach in the salon area and the forward and aft bulkhead doors are secured?
  2. Are the forward and aft bulkhead areas watertight only to a certain height about the cabin floor, or could the entire volume be flooded without water intruding into the engine compartment or the salon area. This would be important if there is a large breach at the cabin top, thus allowing the volume to be filled by waves or the boat is inverted.
  3. I have thought about and there has been some discussion about carrying an auxiliary pump, in order to buy some time, in case of a major leak, so that a temporary repair can be implemented. The following chart shows the amount of water flow by hole size and depth of hole. As you can see, at even 2 feet below the water line, a 1.5 inch hole is sufficient to overcome any pumps that we have been discussing in the group. Has anyone come up with a viable design of an engine mounted/operated trash type pump design, or maybe a larger electric pump that could utilize the full  output of the generator (11KW) to allow for significantly more pumping capacity.

    Boat Flooding Rates in Gallons per Minute

    Depth of Hole Below Waterline

    Diameter of Opening or Hole

    1 in

    1.5 in

    2 in

    2.5 in

    3 in

    3.5 in

    4 in

    1 ft

    19.4

    43.8

    77.9

    121.7

    175.3

    238.6

    311.6

    2 ft

    27.8

    62.5

    111.1

    173.6

    250.0

    340.2

    444.4

    3 ft

    33.9

    76.3

    135.7

    212.0

    305.3

    415.6

    542.8

    4 ft

    39.3

    88.4

    157.1

    245.3

    353.5

    481.2

    628.4


Any and all other thought sand plans to add to our tool bag to help in similar situations, would be appreciated.


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

 

Wolfgang,

I agree with Dean: "Buy a GPS antenna with NMEA outputs and mount it behind the chart table panel. Use this to feed the radios directly. I did this when Furuno told me they could not fix my GP150 output drivers."
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, May 2, 2021 at 12:05 AM Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:
Wolfgang,
I had exactly the same problem. The output drivers of the GP150 failed, but otherwise the unit seems to work ok, and displays the correct latlon on the screen. As Stephane says, the Furuno system switches automatically to use the latlon provided by AIS on the network, BUT this does not go to the other peripherals like the radios which are fed by the GP150 NMEA outputs directly.
Furuno cannot repair the GP150, and will offer you the newer model - which does not fit in the cutout!
Other options are
1. Configure the Furuno MFD at the chart table to output latlon data on one of its unused data outputs, and wire this to the radios. I did this on Stella as a first step while I waited for Furuno to repair the GP150.
2. Buy a GPS antenna with NMEA outputs and mount it behind the chart table panel. Use this to feed the radios directly. I did this when Furuno told me they could not fix my GP150 output drivers. This gives better redundancy than 1.

Let me know if you have further questions and I can dig out my notes and assist further.

Dean
SV Stella
A54-154

X





Re: Draining Fuel tank

Patrick McAneny
 

Derick, The tube was at angle to the tank and I even lifted it off the bottom an inch to make sure that was not an issue. 
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: Derick Gates SM2K #400 Brava <derickgates@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, May 2, 2021 10:38 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Draining Fuel tank

[Edited Message Follows]
Pat, make sure the business end of the 1/2” cpvc tube is not sealing down to the bottom of the tank. It should be cut at a slight diagonal. 

Derick
SM2K Brava 


Re: Draining Fuel tank

Derick Gates SM2K #400 Brava
 
Edited

Pat, make sure the business end of the 1/2” cpvc tube is not sealing down to the bottom of the tank. It should be cut at a slight diagonal. 


Derick
SM2K Brava 


Draining Fuel tank

Patrick McAneny
 

I only have about 30 gallons of fuel in my tank and I want to drain it. My boat is on the hard ,so I placed a five foot length of 1/2" cpvc tube into the tank and attached a 25' length of 1/2"OD plastic hose , I drop that over the side hoping I could siphon the fuel out. I attached the hose to a shop vac , sealing the connection with tape and yet it did not produce enough suction to pull the fuel up out of the tank by more than two feet ,about to the height of the cockpit seat. I was surprised by that ,it is a big vac ,with a lot of suction. Does anyone have a suggestion on how or what to use to suck the fuel up and out of the tank.
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans

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