Date   

Re: Onan shuts down under load without shutdown codes

Slavko Despotovic
 

Wrong this time. Heat exchanger had to be cleaned. Few hours of cleaning and now the temperatures are 73dC and 23dC. Sea water temperature is 15dC.
Thank you all for help.

--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Portoroz


Re: Isolation of hull inside Amel54 or AmelSM - and hatches etc.

JB Duler
 

Alexander, I would be super careful with over insulating and no air circulation. You may discover later mold problems or create allergies.
Can you fit a second heating unit (webasto or espar)?
Create air circulation between the hull and the material you use, In other words glue battens on the hull and apply some isolation material, but with air gaps.
--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Mike Ondra
 

Eric,
We had both the outhaul and furling motor for the main shear several years ago.
Mike


On May 3, 2021, at 11:01 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



Hi Mike,

What furling motor is this? Main or Genoa?

Fair Winds

Eric

sm

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Mike Ondra via groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 03, 2021 9:11 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

 

Picking up on a thread from last year re shearing of the motor shafts on the furling motors between the motor and gear box.  Happened to SV Delos as shown in Episode 317 around the 10 min. mark. Others have experienced this, all at the same place (Nebo sm251, Aletes SM 240 twice, and I believe Delos is in the 250’s or 260’s). Curious if others have experienced this and if anyone has an explanation. This is a fairly stout shaft and it would seem the motor should stall before shearing if the shaft was healthy (no fatigued). There is no shaft exposure to weather.

 

Mike Ondra

Aleses SM#240

Chesapeake Bay, USA


Re: Isolation of hull inside Amel54 or AmelSM - and hatches etc.

jlm@jlmertz.fr
 

Hello,

Perhaps you can have a look to aerogel :  https://www.agitec.ch/page/aerogel/index.php?lang=FR

For condensation I put on board a dehumidifier (5-10 liter/day !!) : https://www.amazon.fr/gp/product/B07SR9F56P/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Jean Luc

SM 316 CottonBay


Le 04/05/2021 à 11:15, Alexander Hofmann a écrit :
Dear all,
I am planning to sail higher lattitudes in summer times in the coming years in Europe (Norway / Baltic) and globally later on (NZ South / Patagonia / Alaska / New Foundland etc.) where water temperatures even in summer can be really low, producing a really chilly atmosphere inside - and condensation. This is relevant especially for the aft cabin, which has the most direct contact to sea and air outside, and is not really protected through lockers etc. - Might be very helpful in mid and front ship also. 
The only strategy making sense to me is isolationg with a kind of high performance material on the inside of the hull in lockers below, sidewards in lockers and wardrobes also on the hull, under the inside cover. 
Does anybody has made that already or has any relevant experience with it? Which isolation materials ca be recommended? 
Any experience with measures to avoid condensation on hatches (doubling, protection)? 
I am very thankful for any comment and hint!
Alexander,
SY Oceanica I, Amel54#156


Isolation of hull inside Amel54 or AmelSM - and hatches etc.

Alexander Hofmann
 

Dear all,
I am planning to sail higher lattitudes in summer times in the coming years in Europe (Norway / Baltic) and globally later on (NZ South / Patagonia / Alaska / New Foundland etc.) where water temperatures even in summer can be really low, producing a really chilly atmosphere inside - and condensation. This is relevant especially for the aft cabin, which has the most direct contact to sea and air outside, and is not really protected through lockers etc. - Might be very helpful in mid and front ship also. 
The only strategy making sense to me is isolationg with a kind of high performance material on the inside of the hull in lockers below, sidewards in lockers and wardrobes also on the hull, under the inside cover. 
Does anybody has made that already or has any relevant experience with it? Which isolation materials ca be recommended? 
Any experience with measures to avoid condensation on hatches (doubling, protection)? 
I am very thankful for any comment and hint!
Alexander,
SY Oceanica I, Amel54#156


Re: Onan shuts down under load without shutdown codes

Slavko Despotovic
 

I cleaned exhaust elbow, and cleaned manifold. White smoke is gone, but overheating not. I am now left, my opinion, with heat exchanger and thermostat. The flow of the seawater is stronger then it was before the cleaning, so I am more to the direction of faulty thermostat.
Do I have to drain a coolant from the engine to check on the thermostat?
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Portoroz


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

eric freedman
 

Hi Mike,

What furling motor is this? Main or Genoa?

Fair Winds

Eric

sm

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Mike Ondra via groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 03, 2021 9:11 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

 

Picking up on a thread from last year re shearing of the motor shafts on the furling motors between the motor and gear box.  Happened to SV Delos as shown in Episode 317 around the 10 min. mark. Others have experienced this, all at the same place (Nebo sm251, Aletes SM 240 twice, and I believe Delos is in the 250’s or 260’s). Curious if others have experienced this and if anyone has an explanation. This is a fairly stout shaft and it would seem the motor should stall before shearing if the shaft was healthy (no fatigued). There is no shaft exposure to weather.

 

Mike Ondra

Aleses SM#240

Chesapeake Bay, USA


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Brent Cameron
 

Hi Mike.  Delos is Hull #303.  

Brent

On May 3, 2021, 9:11 PM -0400, Mike Ondra via groups.io <mdondra@...>, wrote:

Picking up on a thread from last year re shearing of the motor shafts on the furling motors between the motor and gear box.  Happened to SV Delos as shown in Episode 317 around the 10 min. mark. Others have experienced this, all at the same place (Nebo sm251, Aletes SM 240 twice, and I believe Delos is in the 250’s or 260’s). Curious if others have experienced this and if anyone has an explanation. This is a fairly stout shaft and it would seem the motor should stall before shearing if the shaft was healthy (no fatigued). There is no shaft exposure to weather.

 

Mike Ondra

Aleses SM#240

Chesapeake Bay, USA


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Mike Ondra
 

Picking up on a thread from last year re shearing of the motor shafts on the furling motors between the motor and gear box.  Happened to SV Delos as shown in Episode 317 around the 10 min. mark. Others have experienced this, all at the same place (Nebo sm251, Aletes SM 240 twice, and I believe Delos is in the 250’s or 260’s). Curious if others have experienced this and if anyone has an explanation. This is a fairly stout shaft and it would seem the motor should stall before shearing if the shaft was healthy (no fatigued). There is no shaft exposure to weather.

 

Mike Ondra

Aleses SM#240

Chesapeake Bay, USA


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Wolfgang Weber
 

Dean,
thank you for the diagram. As I see the GP 150 has no longer a connection, the new GPS is wired to the junction box and gives data to all instruments etc.
I hope I  can manage to do this. I  ordered the  Tri Nav  GPS, because I  would like the  system is working on 3  satellite systems and should give a good accuracy of the position of the boat and the important thing is I hopefully will have it in 3 days - not in june from china.
Thank you for the help - perhaps I will need more, when  doing/starting the repair.
You all stay healthy - Wolfgang SY ELISE Amel 54 #162 Fort Lauderdale /Playboy Marina  ( who named this Marina ????)


watertight doors

eric freedman
 

Have any members experienced the watertight door pulling away from the seal at the top when the crossbar is attached?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Sunday, May 02, 2021 3:17 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Water Intrusion and watertight bulkheads

 

Hi All.

if you want to convince yourself about the inadequacy of bilge pumps in the case of a hull breach remove your speed log from the through hull when the boat is in the water.

It is down right scary how much water comes in FAST from that relatively small hole. The idea of massive capacity 120 or 230 volt pumps sounds good till you consider Murphy's' law. What can go  wrong, will go wrong, at at the worst possible time. Batteries don't like being under water.

What situation would necessitate that huge volume pump? You can bet not a quiet controlled one. Panic and mayhem may prevail. Gen set wont start. inverter fails, someone in panic gets it all wrong. 

The captains Amel watertight bulkheads make all the sense in the world. But does all your crew know where the locking bars are, and how to fit  them? Do you know where they are so you could put your hand on them in an instant.

Do the valves on the bilge piping that passes through the bulkhead operate, or are they frozen?The water tight bulkheads  will buy valuable time while you find a method to pug the hole. Above the waterline, cushions stuffed in. Below the waterline a more compressed plugging. Large holes, fothering which is drawing a sail or something similar over the outside of the hull.

Certainly large pumps are great but just one of the methods needed. 

Joel is it true that at an Annapolis boat show years ago they flooded the front cabin on a SM and showed the boat could still sail? 

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 03 May 2021 at 03:37 Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

I recently finished reading the book 66 days Adrift, where a boat was "attacked" by a large pod of pilot whales 1000 miles into the passage between panama and Hawaii and the boat was lost due to water intrusion in the main salon area, in a matter of minutes. I have always thought about the survivability and resilience of our Amels in different scenarios. I have the following questions and hoping the answers are within our group.

  1. Will there be sufficient buoyancy to stay afloat, if there is a large breach in the salon area and the forward and aft bulkhead doors are secured?
  2. Are the forward and aft bulkhead areas watertight only to a certain height about the cabin floor, or could the entire volume be flooded without water intruding into the engine compartment or the salon area. This would be important if there is a large breach at the cabin top, thus allowing the volume to be filled by waves or the boat is inverted.
  3. I have thought about and there has been some discussion about carrying an auxiliary pump, in order to buy some time, in case of a major leak, so that a temporary repair can be implemented. The following chart shows the amount of water flow by hole size and depth of hole. As you can see, at even 2 feet below the water line, a 1.5 inch hole is sufficient to overcome any pumps that we have been discussing in the group. Has anyone come up with a viable design of an engine mounted/operated trash type pump design, or maybe a larger electric pump that could utilize the full  output of the generator (11KW) to allow for significantly more pumping capacity.

Boat Flooding Rates in Gallons per Minute

Depth of Hole Below Waterline

Diameter of Opening or Hole

1 in

1.5 in

2 in

2.5 in

3 in

3.5 in

4 in

1 ft

19.4

43.8

77.9

121.7

175.3

238.6

311.6

2 ft

27.8

62.5

111.1

173.6

250.0

340.2

444.4

3 ft

33.9

76.3

135.7

212.0

305.3

415.6

542.8

4 ft

39.3

88.4

157.1

245.3

353.5

481.2

628.4


Any and all other thought sand plans to add to our tool bag to help in similar situations, would be appreciated.


Re: VHF antennae replacement

Thomas Peacock
 

Hi Kris,

There was a nice thread on this earlier this year which outlined what you need. We used a Shakespeare 5215 36 inch antenna. Available from most larger on-line chandleries, as well as (no surprise) Amazon.

We elected to run the RG-8X non-stop from the bottom of the antenna all the way to the VHF unit, not creating a connection at the base of the mast. If we ever pull the mast, we would just cut the VHF connector off and pull those 12 feet or so of cable inside the salon with the mast, then put another connector on when the mast goes back up. The only weak point then is the connection to the antenna, which requires a lot of love to make weather proof for many years. We took a butane food torch to the top of the mast to heat shrink the connection.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay

On May 2, 2021, at 5:35 PM, Kiana <skisail07@...> wrote:

We are looking to replace our vhf antennae atop the mast of our 2002 SM 2000.  Does anyone once have a good source in the US? Does anyone know the make and model?  

kind Regards
kris
s/v Kiana
hull #362


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Ian Park
 

Yes a prussic round the mast does work, but you have to get past the spreaders, so you need a second one to swap to as you pass.
A long tape sling is better than rope on the mast. I tend only to use one as a safety back up. Using prussik knots on a halliard is ok but sometimes you have to ease the knot to get it to slide. Ascenders used by climbers and cavers are much easier to use, especially on the way down.

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN 96


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Ian Townsend
 

We have two mizzen ballooner halyards to go up the mizzenmast. They run through port and starboard blocks just below the masthead.

Ian & Margaret
S/V Loca Lola II 
SM153

On May 3, 2021, at 8:14 AM, Thomas Peacock <peacock8491@...> wrote:

Great idea, Matt.

One question: many SM do not have an extra halyard on the main; and as far as I know, on the mizzen there is only the mizzen sail halyard (not accessible if the mizzen is in the mast), and the ballooner halyard. If you’re using the balloon halyard to go up, to what do you attach your prussic? Can you deploy it around the mast?

Thanks,

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay

On May 2, 2021, at 9:00 PM, Chris Doucette <amaroksailing@...> wrote:

Matt, 
Thanks for this!  Being a rock climber-  i am comfortable up the mast- However, only if i use  two fully redundant  rope systems.  I get winched on one systen and keep a prusik on a separate fixed line that i slide up and down with me.  If the first system fails i sit comfortably down on the fixed line prusik..   have a look and they are not expensive!  

https://youtu.be/EFHxQ5fiUvI


On May 2, 2021, at 6:20 PM, Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:


Matt, we feel awful for you. But glad you're alive to tell the tale. Thank you for sharing this. It's a stark reminder of lessons learned the (very) hard and painful way. We wish you a speedy and full recovery.



Sent from my Galaxy


-------- Original message --------
From: "Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia" <charlesmatthewday@...>
Date: 2021-05-01 14:30 (GMT-05:00)
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mast Climbing Safety

As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Thomas Peacock
 

Great idea, Matt.

One question: many SM do not have an extra halyard on the main; and as far as I know, on the mizzen there is only the mizzen sail halyard (not accessible if the mizzen is in the mast), and the ballooner halyard. If you’re using the balloon halyard to go up, to what do you attach your prussic? Can you deploy it around the mast?

Thanks,

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay

On May 2, 2021, at 9:00 PM, Chris Doucette <amaroksailing@...> wrote:

Matt, 
Thanks for this!  Being a rock climber-  i am comfortable up the mast- However, only if i use  two fully redundant  rope systems.  I get winched on one systen and keep a prusik on a separate fixed line that i slide up and down with me.  If the first system fails i sit comfortably down on the fixed line prusik..   have a look and they are not expensive!  

https://youtu.be/EFHxQ5fiUvI


On May 2, 2021, at 6:20 PM, Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:


Matt, we feel awful for you. But glad you're alive to tell the tale. Thank you for sharing this. It's a stark reminder of lessons learned the (very) hard and painful way. We wish you a speedy and full recovery.



Sent from my Galaxy


-------- Original message --------
From: "Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia" <charlesmatthewday@...>
Date: 2021-05-01 14:30 (GMT-05:00)
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mast Climbing Safety

As some of you are aware, back in February I gutted the NMEA0183 network and instruments on Talia, and replaced them with a new set of B&G NMEA2K kit.  The project took me 2 weeks, and was a great deal of fun.  I was alone, so was not planning to complete the mast work (radar strut replacement, radar replacement, VHF antennae replacement and wind instrument replacement).  That would have to wait for another trip to the Chesapeake (preferably in warmer weather).

To my great joy, my amazing wife surprised me by traveling the 650 miles to come give me a hand over the last 4 days of work scheduled. We churned through the to-do list like champions.  With 2 days left I decided it was a great time to add the mast work to the list and knock it out.   Next trip we could commission the system and be back on the water!

I had been up the main mast twice to remove and start the wire pull, and up the mizzen twice removing the old radar dish and pulling he new radar cable.  My next trip up the mizzen was to replace the radar strut and add the new dish.  Piece of cake....all the steps were preplanned, tools were laid out in batches, and I was ready to go.

Going up to the radar dish is no big deal as I was only up 27.4 ft from the cockpit deck (I just didi it twice).  We were short of time, it was time to get this done.  Harnessed up on February 25th I was being winched up the mast, made it to just above the radar dish where I wanted to be, and the halyard slipped from the clutch.  I fell just under 30 ft to the deck of Talia.

Somehow I hit the Bimini, bounced off, landed on my left leg atop the cockpit seat next to the mizzen, and fell in the open space towards the companionway. I managed to only break my left leg in 6 places.  If the Bimini were not in place, I would have hit the helm seat and either died or worse broken my neck and been paralyzed.   I have had exceptional medical care and am expected to make a full recovery in hopefully a year.

I write this note to all of you, not looking for sympathies or well wishes, but hoping you do not make similar stupid mistakes.  I single dumb decision has costed my family to fear the worst for my health, cost over $200k in medical bills (gotta love the American medical system), and a great deal of personal pain from surgery and rehab.  And I am not done yet.  

I have been the Chief Safety Officer in two industrial plants.  I work in the Aerospace industry where people die when you do not follow the rules.  As an engineer, following the rules and playing out safety risks is how I work....except this time for some reason.  

I was in a hurry with only two days left.  The work was only 20-30 ft up the mast....What's the big deal?  Did Michelle and I talk about how I wanted to go up?  Yes, we did.  Did she say to me, "Do you want to use the starboard line as a secondary?"  Yes, and I declined.....too much time....only doing a job at 20-30 ft.

Every single coworker I have told this story has responded the same way, "YOU would not make that kind of decision and do that!"  It took less than 2 seconds to have this lapse in judgement, because I felt the pressure of meeting a timeline (that I imposed on myself!).  I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to spend the next year paying the price.

My hope in this message is that it will give you pause when working on your fine machine.  Electrical, mechanical, mast work, scrubbing the deck, using power tools...whatever, there are opportunities to make the right and the wrong decisions that can harm you and the people around you.  Please use my example as one that did both.  

I wish you all well, and hope I have not come off too preachy.

Matt & Michelle Day
SM#208 SV Talia
Hampton, VA


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Gerhard Mueller
 

Thank you so much for all the good advices. To complete things there is another system called SwissTech Mastlift.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: Mast Climbing Safety

Ian Park
 

Lot of good advice here. I have always used to climbing Ascenders. One for my harness and one for two foot loops. I can get up and down the mast solo by using the ascenders on two separate ropes, or just using the foot sling ascender to stand up while my wife takes in the slack on the seat harness ( no cranking the winch handle needed).
The double foot sling means I can comfortably stand above the height of the mast to work, or sit in the harness to rest.
I also take at least a be 8ft tape climbing sling with me. If something broke or jammed you can use the sling as a prussik round the mast to transfer your weight onto.
Two ascenders and a home made double foot sling is way cheaper than some of the commercial stuff and the ability to work above the mast height is a boon.

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Dean Gillies
 

and this is the diagram of my system showing how it is wired ...

https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/files/FURUNO%20Electronics/Stella%20Instrumentation%20Diagram%20April%202019%201.0.pdf


Re: Furuno GP 150 - no Lat/Lon to VHF

Dean Gillies
 

Hi Wolfgang,
The digital yacht product you mention will do the job, but it does other functions too, which you may or may not want. It is rather expensive if you simply want a GPS device to produce NMEA1083 data and nothing more.

If you type "GPS Antenna 0183" unto the US Ebay site you will find them starting at $30-40 each. They look like the picture below.
There are lots available from China. I struggle with finding local (US) sources on the US EBAY website, maybe because I'm in Australia. 
These are old technology devices, and should be very cheap to buy. Buy two. I paid $75AUD for two in 2019.
You only need to provide 12V power to it and connect the data output wire to your radios etc in place of the original broken output data wire from your GP150.
Good luck
Dean
SV Stella
A54-154

  


Re: Water Intrusion and watertight bulkheads

Davi Rozgonyi
 

I've had this conversation with a few Sailors this year. Not 100 percent related, but. We're currently sailing Greece, so within 50 miles of land always (often less than 5). For this, we have the electric and manual bilge pumps of course, but also a 220v crash/trash pump with thick hose. I understand that batteries don't like being wet but for us, these are under the pilot berth 2 feet off the cabin sole, which would take a whole lot of water to drown.... Although now I'm wondering if it would be good to waterproof the battery compartment (keeping the vent open of course).

For serious passage making, days offshore sort of thing, our plan is to buy a 300 buck petrol trash pump. They go at 200-300 liters per minute, and are entirely self contained. After the passage, I sell it to some guy coming back. It seems like cheap insurance to me. 

761 - 780 of 58545