Date   

Re: Silicone BT seals

Dan Wilcox
 

Are the seals still available?  This is a constant problem I'm fighting.

Thanks, Dan
Feierabend SM#86

On Tuesday, June 1, 2021, 12:32:45 PM EDT, Stephen Davis <flyboyscd@...> wrote:


Hi Kent,

I can’t promise you the way I installed the seals is correct, but I can tell you that we have gone over 4000 miles since installation with zero water intrusion. The way you received the seals fitted together is not the way they are installed. Also, the seals will not be flush, but will be about 1/8” above the flat surface around them. Because of this, I attempted to contact cement the upper foam seal against the silicone seal, and that didn’t really work. I now have the foam seal free floating between the bottom of the motor and the top of the seal. It really just acts as a pad between the motor and the seals when the motor is in the down position. You do not need the foam seal to prevent water intrusion, as no water gets by the silicone seals. Another difference in the install is that I used a lot of adhesive RTV sealant (black) to firmly hold the seals in place, and have had no issues with the seals coming out. I also put a very thin coat on Moly-kote on the shaft of the thruster to make it move a bit easier through the 2 seals. see the attached picture for the orientation of my seals. 

Prior to the installation of the silicone seals, we always had water getting in the boat in spite of servicing the thruster once a year. This is one of the better improvements I have made to the boat, and it has completely solved the water getting by the seals issue. Another benefit is that I see absolutely no reason to change the seals until you see some deterioration of the silicone, which I expect to be many years. 


Good luck with the install. 


Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Anchored in Poulsbo, WA


Re: Fuel Bladders

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Bill Rouse, 

We concur with your view: we have 1 X 20 litre of diesel and 1 X 20 litre gasoline for the outboard. Neither one was used during our longest sea legs

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera SM007


On 2/06/2021, at 8:00 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


David,

In our 10 years and 40,000 miles, we never needed the 190 extra liters and most of the miles we didn't have solar.

If we were to do it again, we would probably not carry extra fuel, but would have about 800 watts of solar. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 1:50 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck.  PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof.  (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel?  We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all.  I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus.  We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities.  Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs.  We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429










Re: Fuel Bladders

 

David,

In our 10 years and 40,000 miles, we never needed the 190 extra liters and most of the miles we didn't have solar.

If we were to do it again, we would probably not carry extra fuel, but would have about 800 watts of solar. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 1:50 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck.  PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof.  (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel?  We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all.  I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus.  We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities.  Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs.  We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429










Re: Fuel Bladders

David Vogel
 

Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck. PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof. (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel? We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all. I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus. We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities. Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs. We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@gmail.com>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429


Re: Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Johannes Schmidt
 

Dear Greg,
 
Thank you for your message. I will be happy to keep you up to date.
Thank you for that great offer - yes, please send me the  the measurement of the original - so I'm definitely on the safe side.
My e-mail is: js@...

I‘m looking forward to reading from you, have fun in Preveza, we have been there for a few years!
 
Best regards!
 
Johannes


Re: Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Gregory Shea
 

Dear Johannes, 
Plese let us know if you receive a reply from Amel SAV. 
If they cannot help you, I will be at my boat this weekend and I have a leather wrapped wheel. I can send you photos and dimensions. What is the best private E mail to reach you?

Greg Shea
Sharki 133
Cap des iles
Preveza, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Johannes Schmidt <info@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 1:32 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?
 
Dear Mark,

thank you for that suggestion - yes I did and I‘m still waiting for an answer - therefore I also looked out for alternative providers (which all ask for measurements, of course) ;-)

Do you have any contact details? I just send an inquiry via their Website - Contact Form....?

Kind regards,

Johannes


Re: Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Johannes Schmidt
 

Dear Mark,

thank you for that suggestion - yes I did and I‘m still waiting for an answer - therefore I also looked out for alternative providers (which all ask for measurements, of course) ;-)

Do you have any contact details? I just send an inquiry via their Website - Contact Form....?

Kind regards,

Johannes


Re: Mainsheet Traveller replacement on an early Super Maramu

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Mark and Nicky,

We own SM#72, and I’ll attach a picture of our main sheet traveler. The early SMs had Lewmar travelers, and sometime not too long after our hull number Amel switched to Antal. It is a bit odd, as all other blocks on our boat are Antal like every other Amel. Our traveler still works fine, but the plastic rollers on the ends fell apart, and I rigged the block you will see in the picture for the traveler adjustment lines. I do lose a bit of adjustment, but it works fine for my non racing style. If I ever have to change the traveler, It will require removing the track, filling the holes, and installing new track with a new traveler. I can’t find any currently made traveler that will fit my almost 30 year old track. The blocks on the end of the track were also made by Lewmar. They were made of some composite material which finally disintegrated with the UV. They were fairly easy to remove, and I had a very talented machinist in Port Townsend make me new ones out of anodized aluminum with beautiful sheaves this winter, as nothing was commercially available. 

Regards
Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Anchored in Poulsbo, WA


Re: Silicone BT seals

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Kent,

I can’t promise you the way I installed the seals is correct, but I can tell you that we have gone over 4000 miles since installation with zero water intrusion. The way you received the seals fitted together is not the way they are installed. Also, the seals will not be flush, but will be about 1/8” above the flat surface around them. Because of this, I attempted to contact cement the upper foam seal against the silicone seal, and that didn’t really work. I now have the foam seal free floating between the bottom of the motor and the top of the seal. It really just acts as a pad between the motor and the seals when the motor is in the down position. You do not need the foam seal to prevent water intrusion, as no water gets by the silicone seals. Another difference in the install is that I used a lot of adhesive RTV sealant (black) to firmly hold the seals in place, and have had no issues with the seals coming out. I also put a very thin coat on Moly-kote on the shaft of the thruster to make it move a bit easier through the 2 seals. see the attached picture for the orientation of my seals. 

Prior to the installation of the silicone seals, we always had water getting in the boat in spite of servicing the thruster once a year. This is one of the better improvements I have made to the boat, and it has completely solved the water getting by the seals issue. Another benefit is that I see absolutely no reason to change the seals until you see some deterioration of the silicone, which I expect to be many years. 


Good luck with the install. 


Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Anchored in Poulsbo, WA


Re: Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Mark Erdos
 

Have you tried contacting Amel for a new wheel cover. They recently provided a new cover for our SM.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Johannes Schmidt
Sent: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 1:42 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

 

Dear all,

We followed your experiences with new leather covers for steering wheels with great interest.

Since we also have to change our leather cover, but are currently not on our Sharki and have forgotten to take the measurements, we are looking for your support here.

 

Does anyone know of you - or can someone take the measurements from the steering wheel of an AMEL Sharki?

  • The Diameter of the wheel
  • The Diameter of the steel tube
  • The Diameter of the spokes at the welding point (Outside of the Wheel)
  • The Diameter of the spokes at 10cm distance from the Outside of the Wheel

Thank you all in advance and kind regards,

Johannes


Steering Wheel Dimensions for new leather cover - AMEL Sharki?

Johannes Schmidt
 

Dear all,
We followed your experiences with new leather covers for steering wheels with great interest.
Since we also have to change our leather cover, but are currently not on our Sharki and have forgotten to take the measurements, we are looking for your support here.
 
Does anyone know of you - or can someone take the measurements from the steering wheel of an AMEL Sharki?

  • The Diameter of the wheel
  • The Diameter of the steel tube
  • The Diameter of the spokes at the welding point (Outside of the Wheel)
  • The Diameter of the spokes at 10cm distance from the Outside of the Wheel
Thank you all in advance and kind regards,

Johannes


Re: What is this puller for

karkauai
 

Thanks again, Danny, I will need to pull the wheel this Fall!

Kent

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Silicone BT seals

karkauai
 

I need instructions on orientation of the bow thruster seals designed by Jose. I have a set, but haven't installed them yet.  Have others installed them with similar success as Jose has had?

Are there pics or schematic of them in place?

Thanks
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Mainsheet Traveller replacement on an early Super Maramu

Mark Barter
 

On Mon, May 31, 2021 at 03:32 PM, Bill Kinney wrote:
Hi Bill,
That is very helpful. 

I am sure that the previous owner fitted this car and I also think he devised a way of fitting it without removing the track. The problem is that I don't know how he did it and I can't contact him. 

With regard to cutting the track, what I was thinking of doing is cutting the track about 15cm from the end with a multitool and then just removing the screws from the shorter part. The shorter part can then be removed. Once the car had been replaced or repaired I would refit the shorter part. 

Your advice regarding removal of the screws is excellent. I will try that when I am back at the boat.

Thank you for time on this.
 
--
Mark & Nicky Barter
S/V Nunky
SM 110


Re: Mainsheet Traveller replacement on an early Super Maramu

Bill Kinney
 

The original on our boat, (looks like the other photos posted) was made by Antal.  It doesn’t match exactly traveler cars in the current catalog, but in our experience with other parts, Antal has some of these older things they made for OEM still in stock, if not actually in production.  Contact the local distributor with dimensions and photos, including dimensions for the track.If you are not in Italy, it can take a while for the communications to go back and forth.

If the stainless steel loop is the part that broke, (most likely failure point) that can be replaced in place.  No need to remove the car from the track. Do this if at all possible.  While you have the car apart, it a good time to clean and inspect the sheaves.

I’d try very hard not to cut this track. Losing length would limit the utility of the traveler, and while it’s not much, every little thing adds up. On our boat, we have to lift the track to replace the outhaul car on the main boom.  We found we did not have to remove the whole thing, it was surprisingly flexible

Pulling screws like this should be a routine maintenance thing, every few years. SOMEDAY it will need to be done, and it will never get any easier! Previous owners of our boat did this, and reinstalled them with a good lubricant.  With the right tools we have never had any trouble getting them out.

The right tool starts with a proper sized bit.  Older SMs used all slot drive screws, and exact size bits for these large screws can be hard to find, but are essential to do it right.  The bit needs to have a blade the full width of the screw head, and be a good tight fit. I have these in 1/2 inch impact drive.  If it is not a good fit, the head will mangle before full torque can be applied.  Sometimes you can have better luck finding these in really large sizes by searching for “drag link sockets”

I start with a breaker bar, if that doesn’t turn, I’ll go with an extension. If you go to the extension, it can be a two person job.  One holding the bit straight down in the screw, while the other applies the torque. You can use a 1/2” ratchet instead of the breaker bar, but you’ll risk damaging it with an extension.  Steady, smooth torque—slowly increasing—is the best way to break them free and will minimize risk of breaking the bolt.

If hand torque doesn’t get me anywhere, I have resorted to using an impact wrench, but that does increase the chance of breaking something.

Bill Kinney
S/V Harmonie
Hollywood Florida, 
(headed to the Bahamas in a day or two...)


Re: Rebuilding the main furler worm gear box...seal orientation

Brian Gifford
 

Hey Kent, 

I would say to keep them in the original orientation (spring in) and to remove the RTV from the pitting and put in JB weld to fill the pitting. Then come in and smooth it carefully back to the original level with 180-grit or finer sandpaper to the original level. I have done this before on other aluminum casting and met with more success than with other filler options. The issue I have had previously was that the aluminum would continue to corrode under things like RTV. If you come in and remove the RTV with a small carbide burr in a dremel tool then fill with JB weld it will seal the air and water out of the porosity and give a much longer lasting seal. 

I would also recommend to check the shaft diameter with calipers and verify that the seal Inner dimension is at least 1mm smaller than the shaft diameter so that the lips have good positive force against the shaft which will prevent water intrusion. 

On my Maramu I filled the area on the outside of the gearbox (where the plastic mounting ring sits) with waterproof grease to help keep water from pooling around the shaft and causing corrosion of the shaft. My shafts were very bad around the seal to the point that I had to buy new gearboxes which will be installed when I return to my boat this fall.


--
Brian Gifford
Maramu #243
"Jamesby"
Windward/ Leeward Is.


Re: Running rigging

 

I have a list if you want it. 

brouse@...

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Sun, May 30, 2021, 9:24 PM Bryce Procter via groups.io <Balibryce=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

Currently waiting out the pandemic in Pangkor Malaysia and trying to make the most of the downtime by bringing forward some refit work. Next project is to replace all running rigging. Any suggestions or is there a company that does packages based on your hull # such as Acmo does for standing rigging?

Cheers

Bryce Procter
SM 2000 # 467


Re: Mainsheet Traveller replacement on an early Super Maramu

Jarek Zemlo
 

Hello Mark & Nicky

below attached pictures of the traveller from my SM201 (original traveller installed by AMEL)

--
Jarek
SY NOA BLUE
SM 201


Re: What is this for

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

That is your Original Espar Heater temperature sensor.  


Sincerely, Alexandre (formally SM2K #289 NIKIMAT)



On Monday, May 31, 2021, 06:44:31 AM CDT, Slavko Despotovic <slavko@...> wrote:


Hi,

no idea what is this for. Is it original from Amel?

Thank you for help.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Portoroz


What is this for

Slavko Despotovic
 

Hi,

no idea what is this for. Is it original from Amel?

Thank you for help.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Portoroz

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