Date   

Re: Holes in the watertight bulkhead

Eric Freedman
 

Mike,

The wire conduit on the starboard side under the pull-out bunk runs very low along the hull and runs through the bulkhead. It raises up about an inch just aft of the bulkhead making pulling a wire a pain. It is under a flap of carpet and is about 1 inch and a half in diameter. As you mentioned the aft bulkhead has wires running through it in the engine room high on the port side for the AC wiring.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
Sent: Monday, July 19, 2021 9:40 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Holes in the watertight bulkhead

 

Our vessel, a 1990 SM#23, has domestic water lines running through the bulkhead where Eric describes (outboard, portside, along the hull, near the waterline). They look original and are glassed in, which means they should be sealed. Makes me wonder what headaches will come when they fail and need replacing. Same story going aft - domestic water lines penetrate the bulkhead to supply the aft head. Air conditioning circulation hose goes back that way as well. But other than that, wire conduits are higher up, basically just below the deck.

 

Cheers,

Mike Longcor

SV Trilogy SM23

NZ

 

On Tue, Jul 20, 2021, 12:30 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Eric,

If I understand you correctly, your bulkheads were never actually water tight as delivered by Amel with open conduit going through? That seems... odd?  But boats are odd things...

The water lines do (of course) need to go through the bulkhead to the head sink, and the position of those varies through the production run, but all the ones I have seen were well sealed, and none (of the ones I have seen)  were at the outboard edge near the hull.

I haven't seen a majority of SM's by any means, but I have seen a fair number, and that this be a new one for me...

Live and learn...

I'd love to see pictures.

Bill


Re: Holes in the watertight bulkhead

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Our vessel, a 1990 SM#23, has domestic water lines running through the bulkhead where Eric describes (outboard, portside, along the hull, near the waterline). They look original and are glassed in, which means they should be sealed. Makes me wonder what headaches will come when they fail and need replacing. Same story going aft - domestic water lines penetrate the bulkhead to supply the aft head. Air conditioning circulation hose goes back that way as well. But other than that, wire conduits are higher up, basically just below the deck.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
NZ

On Tue, Jul 20, 2021, 12:30 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Eric,

If I understand you correctly, your bulkheads were never actually water tight as delivered by Amel with open conduit going through? That seems... odd?  But boats are odd things...

The water lines do (of course) need to go through the bulkhead to the head sink, and the position of those varies through the production run, but all the ones I have seen were well sealed, and none (of the ones I have seen)  were at the outboard edge near the hull.

I haven't seen a majority of SM's by any means, but I have seen a fair number, and that this be a new one for me...

Live and learn...

I'd love to see pictures.

Bill


Re: Galley Stove Replacement #galley #stove

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello Richard,

I’ll get to it later today

Cheers

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM007 Opua NZ



On 20 Jul 2021, at 02:58, Richard May via groups.io <airwisrich2000@...> wrote:



JP Germain
can you post a photo detail of how you lock the induction cooktop into your OC3?


I am about to install and OC and am very excited for it.  I did not want to take full dive into their induction OC because I have not upgraded my electrical sys.   Seems like more aHr would be a must. 


Re: Holes in the watertight bulkhead

Bill Kinney
 

Eric,

If I understand you correctly, your bulkheads were never actually water tight as delivered by Amel with open conduit going through? That seems... odd?  But boats are odd things...

The water lines do (of course) need to go through the bulkhead to the head sink, and the position of those varies through the production run, but all the ones I have seen were well sealed, and none (of the ones I have seen)  were at the outboard edge near the hull.

I haven't seen a majority of SM's by any means, but I have seen a fair number, and that this be a new one for me...

Live and learn...

I'd love to see pictures.

Bill


Re: Yanmar - Replacement Exhaust Elbow position

Eric Freedman
 

Hi Dan,

Mine has been at that angle for the last 19+ years with no problem. I did have a metal water lift muffler made as my plastic one melted down.  You can move the muffler a bit for and aft to find a sweet spot for the hose. I also I had them change the angle on the muffler input slightly to reduce the bend in the hose.

 

Fair Winds

 

 

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Monday, July 19, 2021 11:43 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar - Replacement Exhaust Elbow position

 

This is specifically for Amel SM owners with the Yanmar 4JH3-HTE engine who have replaced the Exhaust Elbow with the cast SS replacement.    (see attached photos)

 

I am planning to replace the ~1 meter exhaust hose that goes from the Exhaust elbow to the water separator.   When the mechanic looked at it his first question was “can the mounting be rotated 120 degrees so that it does not put such a bend in the exhaust pipe?”    So that is my question to this group. 

 

My replacement elbow is currently mounted with the exhaust exit vertical with a slight bend to the back of the engine, the water comes in from the front side.   If I rotated it 120 degrees, then the exhaust would exit more toward the back and greatly reduce the bend in the exhaust pipe.  The water would come in at a lower angle.   I don’t think that it would introduce any more risk of water back up into the turbo.  

 

Anyone have experience or knowledge related to this?

 

Thanks and regards,  Daniel Carlson, Amel SM #387, sv BeBe

             

 

 

 


Re: Holes in the watertight bulkhead

Eric Freedman
 

I purchased Kimberlite new at the factory.

On the starboard side under the pullout bunk at the bulkhead there is an open conduit that made it easy to

pull cable through the bulkhead that we used for 110 volts. It is under the carpet.

 

On the port side at the hull level there are some hoses that also go through the bulkhead. I assume it to for hot and cold-water lines.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: Monday, July 19, 2021 10:48 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Holes in the watertight bulkhead

 

Eric,

As far as I know no stock Super Maramus ever had wire and plumbing penetrations through the watertight bulkheads in the places you describe when they left La Rochelle.  

Holes drilled through the watertight bulkheads are by far the most common modification I have seen to Super Maramus that compromise the intent of Amel's design for these boats. It is usually done as part of modifications made by people who do not understand or appreciate the importance of the integrity of these bulkheads to the design of the boat.  Of course holes can be drilled and then sealed, but it is usually easier/better to just use the existing wire chases. 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick, GA


Re: In Mast Furling

Randall Walker
 

I believe the best description is best explained if you can attach some pictures.

Randall
A54#56

On Mon, Jul 19, 2021 at 09:27 Martin Birkhoff <mbirkhoff@...> wrote:

Hi All,

we follow the discussion with great interest. But up to now we did not see any comment of an experienced sailmaker. So we decided to ask Jens Nickel 
and his oppinion. Jens is a well known German sailmaker (Segelwerkstatt Stade) with excellent reputation. We think his answer of interest to all of you. Here my “free” translation:

“A furling mainsail without battens (excuse the expression) is simply crap. The top 18 to 20% of the sail only create drag (resistance) and no lift/buoyancy (more heeling, more rudder pressure, less speed).

- A mainsail with short vertical battens is already better, but the leech rounding is still limited, which mitigates the points described above but does not really cancel them out. Furthermore the short battens have no reefing function (see below). The main reason against short battens, however, is that they can get jammed in the mast on the starboard inner mast edge (when, as usual, furled anti-clockwise). This does not happen often, but when it does you have a real problem.

- The only argument against full battening is the higher price. These sails produce more propulsion, less heeling, less rudder pressure. Furthermore, the battens are perfect reefing steps. The battens are not parallel to the luff, but slightly slanted. Reefing should now always be done in such a way that the batten is always completely furled into the mast. It then winds itself slightly around the pole in the mast as a spiral and thus stretches the "new luff" a little.

After more than 25 years of producing fully battened furling mainsails we have never had one owner who was not satisfied with the conversion.”

 

I have to add: The battens are round (diameter some 8 to 10 mm) and made of two different materials: glass fibre and carbon, the latter used in the upper part of the sail to keep the aft part stiff.

Further I have to add this: When we got our Mago del Sur in March 2016 she was fitted with original genoa, main and mizzen. (The jib had disappeared.) Main and mizzen were bare of the vertical battens. The leeches of all three sails were worn out and causing enormous flapping and vibrations. In spite of that the performance of these sails was surprisingly good. When we had to furl in the main the first time during our delivery trip (with winds of some 7 Beaufort) the furling system blocked because of overload. Thus giving us the chance to furl in the main by hand. Which worked very well.

In July 2016 we ordered new genoa, jib, full battened main and full battened mizzen from Jens Nickel. Since then we never had any problem to furl in or out main and mizzen. We can do it on all angles to the apparent wind and in all wind speeds we have met until now. The furling systems never blocked. Meanwhile we sail the full batten sails some six years without any problems.

But there is one aspect you have to know if you think about a full batten sail. The connection between halyard and sail has to be reliable. Once it happened that a boatyard fitted our main to the mast with an unreliable connection. I insisted to change it but I forget to proof the connection after the main mast was fitted on the boat. After 3 hours of sailing the main came down -  more or less half way and creating an interesting S-shaped new sail design because the battens blocked the rest of its way down. It was quite a nice job to get the battens out of their pockets piece by piece …
But finally we managed it to get the sail down.


Martin Birkhoff
Mago del Sur 54#40
sailing near Cap Trafalgar heading east


Re: Galley Stove Replacement #galley #stove

Bill Kinney
 

We recently installed a Force10 and are very happy with the upgrade from the original.

We found a special deal on the four burner model, but would have been just as happy with the three burner.  Our old stove had two burners, each “medium” in heat.  Sometimes too cool, sometimes too hot, rarely perfect. This has one really hot burner, and three smaller ones, a good mix for almost all the cooking I do.  We really like the thermostatically controlled oven, that does a great job at holding the set temperature.  And having the overhead broiler is a great asset.

As far as current production quality, it uses exactly the same parts and design as the one I installed 20 years ago, that is still going strong in that boat.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick, GA


Furuno MFDBB black box does not boot anymore - upgrade to new TZT2 black box and TZT3

Ralph Heilig
 

after working more then 10 years without any problem, my furuno MFDBB black box stopped working. For a couple of days, I could restart it for a few minutes, but now no more signal after booting.
Pochon (the company that installs all instruments for AMEL ) suggested be to replace the hardware with the new TZT3 display 12 inches at the cockpit and the TZT2 black box at the chart table to keep the existing screen.

Has anyone already done this upgrade? In what problems did you run? I heard that I might need a interface for the radar and some  NMEA 183 - 2000 converter (Hydra 3000, GPS). Also the TZT3 display in the cockpit has some different dimensions than the old MFD12. It does look a litte complicated (tranfer of the charts to the new system can only be done by furuno etc..)

Any experiece or suggestion would be helpful!

Ralph
Santa Isabella currently located in northern Italy.
A54 #144

 


Re: Identify this part

Mark Erdos
 

Bill,

 

I had to trade out my prop for a short time while in the US. The boatyard swapped them for me. Once the fixed prop was on, the washer with the tab is next and then the nut. Once the nut was secure they bent the tab of the washer up to lock the nut in place.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Monday, July 19, 2021 3:10 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Identify this part

 

I would appreciate it if someone who has installed the fixed prop will verify the image below and the correct way to lock the prop in place:

image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

View My Training Calendar

 

 

On Mon, Jul 19, 2021 at 7:48 AM Richard May via groups.io <airwisrich2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Super Maramu.  


Re: Identify this part

Jeaneric Ziegler
 



Le lun. 19 juil. 2021 à 15:10, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> a écrit :
I would appreciate it if someone who has installed the fixed prop will verify the image below and the correct way to lock the prop in place:
image.png
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Jul 19, 2021 at 7:48 AM Richard May via groups.io <airwisrich2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Super Maramu.  


Re: Identify this part

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Bill;

 

Just completed this install under water. Confirm that your depiction is the correct way of installing the fixed prop. Attached please find some pictures of our final installation. Sorry for the blank screens in the screen shots. I have 4 monitors, so that’s how it comes out. But it is easy to zoom in and get a clear picture.

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse via groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 19, 2021 6:10 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Identify this part

 

I would appreciate it if someone who has installed the fixed prop will verify the image below and the correct way to lock the prop in place:

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

View My Training Calendar

 

 

On Mon, Jul 19, 2021 at 7:48 AM Richard May via groups.io <airwisrich2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Super Maramu.  


Yanmar - Replacement Exhaust Elbow position

Dan Carlson
 

This is specifically for Amel SM owners with the Yanmar 4JH3-HTE engine who have replaced the Exhaust Elbow with the cast SS replacement.    (see attached photos)

 

I am planning to replace the ~1 meter exhaust hose that goes from the Exhaust elbow to the water separator.   When the mechanic looked at it his first question was “can the mounting be rotated 120 degrees so that it does not put such a bend in the exhaust pipe?”    So that is my question to this group. 

 

My replacement elbow is currently mounted with the exhaust exit vertical with a slight bend to the back of the engine, the water comes in from the front side.   If I rotated it 120 degrees, then the exhaust would exit more toward the back and greatly reduce the bend in the exhaust pipe.  The water would come in at a lower angle.   I don’t think that it would introduce any more risk of water back up into the turbo.  

 

Anyone have experience or knowledge related to this?

 

Thanks and regards,  Daniel Carlson, Amel SM #387, sv BeBe

             

 

 

 


Yanmar stop solenoid

Steve Bell s/y Dusk SM378
 

Question: can the stop solenoid be removed from the pump housing after removing the fuel load adjusting screw cover?.
regards
Steve

s/v Dusk sm 378


Re: Galley Stove Replacement #galley #stove

Richard May
 

JP Germain
can you post a photo detail of how you lock the induction cooktop into your OC3?


I am about to install and OC and am very excited for it.  I did not want to take full dive into their induction OC because I have not upgraded my electrical sys.   Seems like more aHr would be a must. 


Re: Identify this part

Bill Kinney
 

Bill,

You are correct. This style of locking prop washer is very common on French built boats using metric standard prop shaft tapers.

For boats using these, it is best to carry a spare washer.  They can be peened over to lock the nut a couple of times, but they eventually fatigue and fracture.  It is best practice to replace them each time the prop is removed.

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Brunswick, GA


Re: Holes in the watertight bulkhead

Bill Kinney
 

Eric,

As far as I know no stock Super Maramus ever had wire and plumbing penetrations through the watertight bulkheads in the places you describe when they left La Rochelle.  

Holes drilled through the watertight bulkheads are by far the most common modification I have seen to Super Maramus that compromise the intent of Amel's design for these boats. It is usually done as part of modifications made by people who do not understand or appreciate the importance of the integrity of these bulkheads to the design of the boat.  Of course holes can be drilled and then sealed, but it is usually easier/better to just use the existing wire chases. 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick, GA


Re: In Mast Furling

Martin Birkhoff
 

Hi All,

we follow the discussion with great interest. But up to now we did not see any comment of an experienced sailmaker. So we decided to ask Jens Nickel 
and his oppinion. Jens is a well known German sailmaker (Segelwerkstatt Stade) with excellent reputation. We think his answer of interest to all of you. Here my “free” translation:

“A furling mainsail without battens (excuse the expression) is simply crap. The top 18 to 20% of the sail only create drag (resistance) and no lift/buoyancy (more heeling, more rudder pressure, less speed).

- A mainsail with short vertical battens is already better, but the leech rounding is still limited, which mitigates the points described above but does not really cancel them out. Furthermore the short battens have no reefing function (see below). The main reason against short battens, however, is that they can get jammed in the mast on the starboard inner mast edge (when, as usual, furled anti-clockwise). This does not happen often, but when it does you have a real problem.

- The only argument against full battening is the higher price. These sails produce more propulsion, less heeling, less rudder pressure. Furthermore, the battens are perfect reefing steps. The battens are not parallel to the luff, but slightly slanted. Reefing should now always be done in such a way that the batten is always completely furled into the mast. It then winds itself slightly around the pole in the mast as a spiral and thus stretches the "new luff" a little.

After more than 25 years of producing fully battened furling mainsails we have never had one owner who was not satisfied with the conversion.”

 

I have to add: The battens are round (diameter some 8 to 10 mm) and made of two different materials: glass fibre and carbon, the latter used in the upper part of the sail to keep the aft part stiff.

Further I have to add this: When we got our Mago del Sur in March 2016 she was fitted with original genoa, main and mizzen. (The jib had disappeared.) Main and mizzen were bare of the vertical battens. The leeches of all three sails were worn out and causing enormous flapping and vibrations. In spite of that the performance of these sails was surprisingly good. When we had to furl in the main the first time during our delivery trip (with winds of some 7 Beaufort) the furling system blocked because of overload. Thus giving us the chance to furl in the main by hand. Which worked very well.

In July 2016 we ordered new genoa, jib, full battened main and full battened mizzen from Jens Nickel. Since then we never had any problem to furl in or out main and mizzen. We can do it on all angles to the apparent wind and in all wind speeds we have met until now. The furling systems never blocked. Meanwhile we sail the full batten sails some six years without any problems.

But there is one aspect you have to know if you think about a full batten sail. The connection between halyard and sail has to be reliable. Once it happened that a boatyard fitted our main to the mast with an unreliable connection. I insisted to change it but I forget to proof the connection after the main mast was fitted on the boat. After 3 hours of sailing the main came down -  more or less half way and creating an interesting S-shaped new sail design because the battens blocked the rest of its way down. It was quite a nice job to get the battens out of their pockets piece by piece …
But finally we managed it to get the sail down.


Martin Birkhoff
Mago del Sur 54#40
sailing near Cap Trafalgar heading east


Re: Identify this part

 

I would appreciate it if someone who has installed the fixed prop will verify the image below and the correct way to lock the prop in place:
image.png
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Jul 19, 2021 at 7:48 AM Richard May via groups.io <airwisrich2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Super Maramu.  


Re: Identify this part

Richard May
 

Super Maramu.  

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