Date   

Re: Transom tie rod ends rusting on Amel 55

Billy Newport
 


Transom tie rod ends rusting on Amel 55

Billy Newport
 

My tie rods attaching the ram to the transom are pretty corroded. You can see the old one (Durbal BEF 12-60-501 Aluminium) and the replacement I got from Amel (Fluro GIRSW 12 RR 316) which is stainless (as far as I can tell). I'm guessing the cotter pin on the transom is SS and the ram "bolt" is at least steel so is the fast corrosion (3 years) due to metal on metal issues? Interesting that the replacement part is SS. Did Amel fix this on later 55's or 50/60s?

Billy (Amel 55#56)


Re: Cockpit door closing mechanism

Michael Winand
 

The wooden bar sits into the notches, can leave it loose or tighten the knobs to lock it in position. The spring stops it rubbing on the door tracks 
Michael 

On Fri, 23 Jul 2021, 8:54 am EricOpdeweegh, <sv.abayomi@...> wrote:
Thank you Bill, Mark and Michael, 

Sound like a good solution too Mark.

Thanks for the photo Michael,
Does your fall into place automatically Michael or do you need to turn both the plastic nuts each time you want to close tie hatch too?

Fair winds 
Eric Opdeweegh
Sv Abayomi
SM 158
Currently in Rotterdam


Re: Cockpit door closing mechanism

EricOpdeweegh
 

Thank you Bill, Mark for your quick reply.

That sounds like a good solution too Mark

Best Regards and fair winds

Eric Opdeweegh
Sv Abayomi 
SM 158
Currently in Rotterdam 
too, Mark






Op 22 jul. 2021 om 19:41 heeft Mark Garver via groups.io <mgarver@...> het volgende geschreven:

There are no springs as Bill stated. On ours we have a slide bolt at the top which we use mostly, we also have the black plastic nuts on the bar, however, the slide bolt is simply to deploy from the cockpit.

Best,

Mark Garver
S/V It’s Good

On Jul 22, 2021, at 1:31 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

There are no springs. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Thu, Jul 22, 2021, 10:58 AM EricOpdeweegh <sv.abayomi@...> wrote:
Amalians,
Could anyone send me some photos of the cockpit closure mechanism?
When you pull up the door with the bar I thought to remember that it falls into the slot without having to turn the black plastic nuts. Mine there is no springs anymore and we need to turn the black nuts until it sits tight
It seems our wooden bar is not working anymore as it should .
Assume we need some springs but have no idea how big.

Thanks for the ideas and photos

Best Regards and fair winds

Eric Opdeweegh
Sv Abayomi
SM 158
Currently in Rotterdam








Re: Cockpit door closing mechanism

EricOpdeweegh
 

Thank you Bill, Mark and Michael, 

Sound like a good solution too Mark.

Thanks for the photo Michael,
Does your fall into place automatically Michael or do you need to turn both the plastic nuts each time you want to close tie hatch too?

Fair winds 
Eric Opdeweegh
Sv Abayomi
SM 158
Currently in Rotterdam


Re: Cockpit door closing mechanism

Michael Winand
 

This is the original on Nebo sm251 


On Fri, 23 Jul 2021, 1:58 am EricOpdeweegh, <sv.abayomi@...> wrote:
Amalians,
Could anyone send me some photos of the cockpit closure mechanism?
When you pull up the door with the bar I thought to remember that it falls into the slot without having to turn the black plastic nuts. Mine there is no springs anymore and we need to turn the black nuts until it sits tight
It seems our wooden bar is not working anymore as it should .
Assume we need some springs but have no idea how big.

Thanks for the ideas and photos

Best Regards and fair winds

Eric Opdeweegh
Sv Abayomi
SM 158
Currently in Rotterdam







Re: Cockpit door closing mechanism

Mark Garver
 

There are no springs as Bill stated. On ours we have a slide bolt at the top which we use mostly, we also have the black plastic nuts on the bar, however, the slide bolt is simply to deploy from the cockpit.

Best,

Mark Garver
S/V It’s Good

On Jul 22, 2021, at 1:31 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

There are no springs. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Thu, Jul 22, 2021, 10:58 AM EricOpdeweegh <sv.abayomi@...> wrote:
Amalians,
Could anyone send me some photos of the cockpit closure mechanism?
When you pull up the door with the bar I thought to remember that it falls into the slot without having to turn the black plastic nuts. Mine there is no springs anymore and we need to turn the black nuts until it sits tight
It seems our wooden bar is not working anymore as it should .
Assume we need some springs but have no idea how big.

Thanks for the ideas and photos

Best Regards and fair winds

Eric Opdeweegh
Sv Abayomi
SM 158
Currently in Rotterdam








Re: Cockpit door closing mechanism

 

There are no springs. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Thu, Jul 22, 2021, 10:58 AM EricOpdeweegh <sv.abayomi@...> wrote:
Amalians,
Could anyone send me some photos of the cockpit closure mechanism?
When you pull up the door with the bar I thought to remember that it falls into the slot without having to turn the black plastic nuts. Mine there is no springs anymore and we need to turn the black nuts until it sits tight
It seems our wooden bar is not working anymore as it should .
Assume we need some springs but have no idea how big.

Thanks for the ideas and photos

Best Regards and fair winds

Eric Opdeweegh
Sv Abayomi
SM 158
Currently in Rotterdam







Re: feathering props for a mango

Ron Hynes
 

My max prop has been  trouble free for 23 years so I can’t help with a prop recommendation. The J-Prop marketed by Beta seems interesting as you can adjust the pitch without removing it from the shaft.  However, I am considering driving an alternator with the prop shaft. Can you tell me the pulley ratio or the sizes of each and the amount of power you produce?

Ron Hynes
954.319.0944

On Jul 22, 2021, at 10:09 AM, Hank rose via groups.io <hankonthewater@...> wrote:

My 28 year old max prop developed a crack in the body, discovered on a recent haulout. Never caused issues (when I owned it), but It is not repairable, so they say.
Any suggestions or experiences out there? Autostream said they do not make a model that fit my requirements. Considering now: Max prop, Variprop, and Autoprop.
Do I need a shaft brake for the Autoprop? hmm that would it make it more complicated.
I am planning to re-install a prop shaft mounted alternator again (as it came originally with that). Got all the hardware etc for it.
Hank
~take care~


Cockpit door closing mechanism

EricOpdeweegh
 

Amalians,
Could anyone send me some photos of the cockpit closure mechanism?
When you pull up the door with the bar I thought to remember that it falls into the slot without having to turn the black plastic nuts. Mine there is no springs anymore and we need to turn the black nuts until it sits tight
It seems our wooden bar is not working anymore as it should .
Assume we need some springs but have no idea how big.

Thanks for the ideas and photos

Best Regards and fair winds

Eric Opdeweegh
Sv Abayomi
SM 158
Currently in Rotterdam


feathering props for a mango

Hank rose
 

My 28 year old max prop developed a crack in the body, discovered on a recent haulout. Never caused issues (when I owned it), but It is not repairable, so they say.
Any suggestions or experiences out there? Autostream said they do not make a model that fit my requirements. Considering now: Max prop, Variprop, and Autoprop.
Do I need a shaft brake for the Autoprop? hmm that would it make it more complicated.
I am planning to re-install a prop shaft mounted alternator again (as it came originally with that). Got all the hardware etc for it.
Hank
~take care~


Anchor chain counter resets after power down

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Our chain counter resets to 78.2 meters whenever it is powered off and on. We reset to zero, when the anchor is up and everything works fine, The issue obviously, is when we go to bring up the anchor, or need to let out more chain or pull some up, after a power cycle, we are back to 78.2 meters, regardless of how much chain we have out. Is there a battery inside the unit for saving the amount of chain out? Other potential sources of the problem?


Re: Yanmar - Replacement Exhaust Elbow position

Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia
 

Dan,

While I have dreams of one day being an AMEL expert, I have spent many years certifying engine installations (JD, CAT, Volvo and Yanmar) in heavy equipment.  To get a definitive answer to your question, you really must ask Amel/Yanmar.  When Amel contracted with Yanmar to use their engine (or Volvo for that matter) the Amel engineers had to submit an installation design based upon Yanmar's Installation Requirements Document (I believe it is at Revision 17.2.A).  Yanmar does a pre-installation review of the data submitted and provides a go/no-go decision.  The first Yanmar engine can then be shipped to Amel for test fit/install.  Amel then installs the engine, and Yanmar engineers show up and run a gazillion tests across typically 5-7 days (cooling, fuel flow, vibration, exhaust pressure diff, blah blah blah).  If the tests pass, Yanmar gives an Authorization to Supply, ships Amel engines, and stands behind their 2000Hr/2Yr warranty.  The point is to ensure the engineering design is maintained and will perform as expected. 

The orientation of the exhaust elbow will be in that cert document.  As will be the fuel line lengths, fuel pump model/placement, electrical harness length, key switch location, vibration model/mount, overflow size/location/height, exhaust hose size and length, intake size and length, etc/etc/etc/etc. All the sexy data is in that document....even the mass-spring spectrum graph....sweet! 

Does it matter?  The Japanese engine manufacturers DO NOT do random decision making.  The part is the way it is installed for a very specific reason in THIS INSTALLATION.  You have one data point that shows that it has not mattered based on how that boat has been operated.  Maybe there are risk mitigations that are overly conservative.  Maybe they just have not hit yet. The only way you will truly know is to ask Amel or your local Yanmar rep to look at the cert document.  Another option is to reach out to the Yanmar America Certification group in Adairsville Georgia.  They are good guys and may be willing to give you guidance or a definitive answer.

Matt
Talia - SM#208
Hampton, VA       


Re: chain counter

Thomas Peacock
 

Hi Bill,

By chain counter “hot” I hope that you mean just powered, and not hot to the touch. Bill Rouse suggests a way to turn it off, we also have the older version, I was unaware of that function. That said, we do have a toggle switch in the compartment above the galley sink which controls the chain counter power. Not sure if it was factory installed, I suspect not. But a good idea nevertheless. Also, my memory is that at least one wire goes to the joystick control for the windlass. 

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay

On Jul 20, 2021, at 7:01 PM, william reynolds <sail23692@...> wrote:

Does anyone have a good wiring schematic for the original Pochon Chain counter. I have the factory drawings which are not decipherable even if you read French.
I have 3 cables coming to the panel instrument and 2 of these go to a box above the sink labeled "Chain counter". .In this box is a terminal strip which connects the two cables from the panel and also there are 3 smaller cables with 3 wires each.  which connect in some form to the larger cables. One of these smaller cables comes from the constant power supply and one from the counter on the windless.  I can ring out the windless sensor and power supply but what the other cables are is a mystery.
The chain counter is hot all the time when then the power supply is on. This is a bad idea. Having a hot wire in the windless when you are underway and salt spray is flying is inviting corrosion. Needs a dedicated  off/of switch. 
Bill R
Cloudstreet SM2K 331


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: Yanmar - Replacement Exhaust Elbow position

Dan Carlson
 

Thanks for the feedback Eric,

Structurally the hose is probably good for more years to come, but I'm having the cooling system serviced and while it's all disconnected I thought a new hose would be good. There is some corrosion in a few places where cracks in the hose have allowed air/moisture to corrode the wire inside the hose. And so the question is; if replacing, then why put such a tight bend back into the new hose. 

Thanks and regards, Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387


On Mon, Jul 19, 2021, 8:05 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Dan,

Mine has been at that angle for the last 19+ years with no problem. I did have a metal water lift muffler made as my plastic one melted down.  You can move the muffler a bit for and aft to find a sweet spot for the hose. I also I had them change the angle on the muffler input slightly to reduce the bend in the hose.

 

Fair Winds

 

 

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Monday, July 19, 2021 11:43 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar - Replacement Exhaust Elbow position

 

This is specifically for Amel SM owners with the Yanmar 4JH3-HTE engine who have replaced the Exhaust Elbow with the cast SS replacement.    (see attached photos)

 

I am planning to replace the ~1 meter exhaust hose that goes from the Exhaust elbow to the water separator.   When the mechanic looked at it his first question was “can the mounting be rotated 120 degrees so that it does not put such a bend in the exhaust pipe?”    So that is my question to this group. 

 

My replacement elbow is currently mounted with the exhaust exit vertical with a slight bend to the back of the engine, the water comes in from the front side.   If I rotated it 120 degrees, then the exhaust would exit more toward the back and greatly reduce the bend in the exhaust pipe.  The water would come in at a lower angle.   I don’t think that it would introduce any more risk of water back up into the turbo.  

 

Anyone have experience or knowledge related to this?

 

Thanks and regards,  Daniel Carlson, Amel SM #387, sv BeBe

             

 

 

 


Re: In Mast Furling

Martin Birkhoff
 

Hi Laurens,

1. Until today, we had no problems furling and unfurling the main and mizzen, no matter which angle to the wind the boat was facing and how strong the wind was.


2. We had these concerns too. However, there is enough room in the mast. When fully furled, the mainsail leaves about 1.75 to 2 cm of space between the sail and the mast chamber measured at the bottom of the mast chamber. It should be noted that on Mago del Sur both the main foil and the mizzen foil have a diameter of 35 mm. You should explicitly point this out to Stade if you have a 40 mm profile for the main. In all cases it is an advantage if the foils are reinforced by an additional aluminum element which is inserted in the foil (available by Amel).


3. We cannot answer the question about differences. The old sails had lost their battens and their leeches and aft parts including the leech genoa were no longer standing. We changed all sails at the same time so we could not recognize which effects were caused by the genoa and which by main and mizzen. I beg your pardon, we cannot make a reliable comparison.

4. 
Both the main and the mizzen are equipped with a leech line, which is usually not necessary. (This is different with the gennua, where we have to use it regularly).


5. The negative effects are

  •         The sails are more expensive.
  •         It takes a lot more work to take down the sails, as it is not easy to get the long battens out. At the jetty, we always take the battens out completely and disassemble them into their parts when they are lying on the jetty.
  • If the halyard comes off the sail, you have a problem because the long battens prevent the sail from sinking down completely or from being pulled down. You then have to pull the battens out part by part, which requires a lot of work with the sagged sail. It is therefore important that the halyard and the knot at the head of the sail are in perfect condition and reliable.

Regards

Martin
Mago del Sur - 54#40
La Línea, Spain


Re: In Mast Furling

Laurens Vos
 

Hi Martin,

Very interesting and many thanks that you made us aware of the way a sail can be build.
I checked the website of Stade and almost sure I’m going to visit them soon to discuss the possibilities for our 54.
Regarding the furling, you wrote that you never had problems with furling in any wind and any direction you furled the sail. Is that correct ? 
But with the battens all the way down doesn’t get the rolled sail too big for the space inside the mast ? 
Did you experienced a difference in power of the sail or less or helm compared to the sail with the short battens ? 
Do you still need a leech line to prevent slapping ? 
Are there any negative effects to this way of battens in a sail ? 

Best regards 

Laurens Vos 
Fun@Sea - 54#92
La Rochelle 


Re: In Mast Furling

 

Interesting. None of the 54s I have seen (probably 30-40) have battens this low. Everyone I have seen has battens in about the top 1/3rd to top 1/2 of the sail.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Jul 21, 2021 at 1:45 PM Martin Birkhoff <mbirkhoff@...> wrote:

Hi,
here a pic I made today. It shows the fourth of five battens of the main. I furled it to a position to demonstrate the slant of the batten. The top of the batten pocket has disapeared in the mast, only the last stitching is visible. At the lower end the batten pocket is 2 cm out of the mast. The longer the batten (first, second and third batten) the bigger this effect.
Hope this pic is helpful.

Regards

Martin

Mago del Sur - 54#40
La Línea, Spain


Re: In Mast Furling

Martin Birkhoff
 

Hi,
here a pic I made today. It shows the fourth of five battens of the main. I furled it to a position to demonstrate the slant of the batten. The top of the batten pocket has disapeared in the mast, only the last stitching is visible. At the lower end the batten pocket is 2 cm out of the mast. The longer the batten (first, second and third batten) the bigger this effect.
Hope this pic is helpful.

Regards

Martin

Mago del Sur - 54#40
La Línea, Spain


Re: #newboat #newboat

Peter Attinge
 

Thanks for the superfast response!!
@ Ann-Sofie right now she's located in Gävle Sweden

Kind Regards

Peter Attinge


Den ons 21 juli 2021 kl 18:12 skrev Ann-Sofie, S/Y Lady Annila <ann-sofie@...>:

Hej Pete
Välkomnen till Amel familjen ◡̈ 
 (Hi Peter, welcome to the Amel family)

Take a better picture if the broken part and send it to Maude at sav@... and ask if they have it as a spare part. Don’t forget to mention model, year and hull no.

To fix the gear box, you have to dismount the whole unit and then take it to a machine shop. They can probably help you.

Where are you located? 

Regards
Ann-Sofie & Jonas Svanberg
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232, 1998
Present close to Benidorm, Spain


Skickat från min iPhone

21/07/2021 kl. 17:45 skrev CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>:


Email vikasa.vignando@... or phone Pierangelo Vignando +41 79 447 21 42 (French ONLY). Tell him that Bill Rouse gave you the contact info.

He owned the company that made these for Amel. He has only 2 complete gearboxes with motors around 5k-6k euro. He also has some parts. None of what he has will last long.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Jul 21, 2021 at 10:40 AM Peter Attinge <elifaab@...> wrote:
Hello al Amel friends!

i have just payd the first 10% for a SM2K 2005. Son named S/Y TINTIN

The gearbox for the jib is broken. the owner is willing to reduce the price for a repare and leave me to solve the problem.
I thing thets not a problem while thet.

 What will it cost to let a company repare it, approxely?

As u can see at the picture they have apply silicone to seal it, and the ring for rope looks like it's broken and need to replace?!

i hope you can manage to understand my spelling :-) 

Kind Regards 

Peter Attinge  Sweden

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