Date   

Re: Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

Scott SV Tengah
 

Chris - 

You're on a 54, right? Is it the same part number as on a SM?
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: New mainsail for 54

Miles
 

I have gotten wonderful Hydranet sails from Q Sails.   They fit perfectly and have a perfect shape.  And the price is good.

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216  now on mooring in Newport , RI


Re: Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

Chris Likins
 

I had the exact same thing happen to me just a few months ago. 


We were completing a 1100nm passage from Chagos to the Seychelles. We had only 2 miles left to go to the quarantine anchorage and our wind had died so we started the motor and had basically the same symptoms as you. I pumped out what little milkshake fluid was left inside the transmission, topped it up with fresh ATF and motored the remaining 2 miles into the anchorage. I checked again after the anchor was down and the fluid had already mostly leaked out through the exhaust in just 2 miles! 


Anyway, new oil cooler is installed and everything is good now... I don’t think we did any lasting damage to the transmission, at least I hope! 


Re: Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

Alan Leslie
 

Great tale !
Thanks Mark.
I replaced the transmission heat-exchanger on Elyse a few years ago on the advice of an engineer when I was going to replace the just rubber boots. He said, wisely it seems, if the boots need replacing you probably should replace the whole thing.
I'm glad I did after reading your experience.
Hopefully your transmission is OK.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

In the spirit of Pat from Shenanigans "Lessons Learned" post a few week's back I thought I would share what I learned when my Bowman DC60-XCC oil cooler failed while motoring up the coast of Maine a few days ago.  Thankfully, we caught the failure relatively early in large part due to the fact that when cruising in Maine you have to remain hyper-aware at all times because of the lobster pots that are literally all over the place including in marked channels and anchorages. Because of that, both my wife and I were in the cockpit doing nothing but looking out for lobster pots and calling out their positions to whomever was at the helm. There were no podcasts, no music, no book reading, no headphone, just hyper-vigilance with two people, 4 eyes, and 4 ears on watch at all times. 

The first symptom we noticed was what sounded like a slight misfire of the engine.  It sounded like the RPM increased ever so slightly for just a second.  It was just a "blip" and was not large enough to actually even register on the tachometer.  After hearing it a few times, a minute or so apart, I asked my wife if she was hearing it. She said she was. My first thought was a clogged fuel filter despite the fact that my last fuel fill ups were from fairly busy harbors in Annapolis, MD and Onset, Massachusetts and that we had only ~60 hours on the Racor filter.  In addition, the RPMs of the engine seemed to increase not decrease like I would expect from fuel starvation from a clogged fuel filter.  In any case, I switched over to the second Racor but the occasional engine “blip” did not go away. In fact it got more frequent and it actually started to register on the tachometer just barely.  I put my head over the side to take a look at the engine exhaust.  I did not see any white or black smoke coming out of the engine exhaust.  However, I did see an oil slick trailing behind us the likes of which I have never seen before.  My immediate thought was that the engine oil cooler had failed and was leaking engine oil into the raw water system.  We had no choice but to shut the engine down ASAP.  There was only 6-7 knots of wind directly behind us but we also had a bit of favorable current so we just put out the main sail, turned off the engine and called Towboat US.  We are not at all familiar with this area and we did not see any decent anchorages looking at the charts. We were only 2 nm from our destination of Belfast, Maine and the Towboat captain said it would take him about an hour to meet us at the entrance to the harbor.  So we sailed at 1.5-2 knots with just the Main and met the Towboat captain at the entrance to the harbor where he towed us the last mile to our mooring ball where we still sit right now waiting for our replacement oil cooler to arrive from the UK.

 

Once we were safely moored, I went down to the engine room to check the oil in the Yanmar.  It was perfect.  Not a drop appeared to be missing.  After a brief “wtf?” moment, I checked the transmission dipstick.  The fluid level did not even register on the dipstick at all.  However, I could see that there was some ATF left in the transmission case.  That was a bit of a relief but not much.

 

All of this happened on a Saturday and I do not carry a spare oil cooler so I would have to wait until Monday to order a replacement.  First thing Monday morning I started to call all of the USA dealers for Bowman marine products listed on Bowman’s website.  Of those who actually answered the phone, none of them had the DC60-XCC in stock or even just the DC60 (oil cooler with no end caps). One actually told me that he didn't think DC60-XCC was a valid Bowman part number. I said “I’m looking at their catalog online right now.  It is.”

 

I then called Bowman in the UK and asked if they knew anyone in the USA who might have one of these in stock and they hesitated and said the only one who might have one is Tradewinds Power Corporation.  When I had previously called Tradewinds Power Corporation they said "our computer system is down right now" so we will need to call you back.  They never did.  

Luckily, I had also asked Bowman who in the UK would definitely have them in stock and would ship to the USA.  Without hesitation, they told me that Lancing Marine will definitely have it and they ship around the world.  So I called Lancing Marine (https://www.lancingmarine.com/) and had a wonderful experience buying from them.  Not only were their prices the lowest by far that I had seen anywhere online (79 GBP/~109 USD including new couplers) but the ordering experience was fantastic despite it being phone order only.  The person I spoke to also obviously knows these transmissions well.  His name was Mike and I'm pretty sure he is the owner and founder of the company - founded in 1970!  He gave me his opinion on the state of my transmission (he thinks it’s probably fine) and advice on how to test it to see even before the replacement cooler arrives.  On top of all that, despite it being about 3pm their time when I called, the coolers (I ordered a spare) shipped out the same day.  Last, he said that if I do need to get the transmission rebuilt, that he would highly recommend a company in the lower Chesapeake Bay called Transatlantic Diesels. He says that they know these ZF transmissions better than anyone and he has done business with them for years.  It was really just a great overall buying experience that seems to be so rare in these days of anonymous Amazon purchases.


The moral of the story is that for ~$109 plus shipping and an hour of my time I should have replaced the transmission oil cooler PROACTIVELY soon after I bought the boat back in July 2017.  Especially given that I did not know the age of this critical part.  Or I should have replaced one of four times that I have replaced the transmission fluid.  At the bare minimum, I should have had a spare oil cooler already on board.  The engine, and I assume the oil cooler, just surpassed the 2000 hour mark.  Researching this site after the fact I found at least two other SM owners who had the same failure at around the 2000 hour mark. Both, I believe, lost their transmissions.  Hopefully, I have not. I will know in a few days time.


So in the spirit of the #lessonslearned, don’t be like me.  If you are not sure how old your transmission oil cooler is, replace it.  If it’s approaching 2000 hours, replace it.  At a minimum, get yourself a spare oil cooler.  And if you can’t find it locally, get it from the nice people at Lancing Marine in the UK so that we all have at least one place in the world that keeps these things in stock.

 
--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Bali Hai Abandoned

Mark Garver
 

I tracked Bali Hai for a couple of days after the crew was rescued, from EPIRB transmission from a friend at the USCG, including official posts from RCC Norfolk. Along with the EPIRB, the RO activated his Satellite Emergency Notification Device (SEND), not sure if it was an Iridium GO! or a Garmin InReach that alerted the IERCC in Montgomery, TX. A day or two after there was a  notice, I believe it was on boat watch that a salvage boat was steaming toward her last known location. 

Mark
S/V It’s Good
SM #105
Currently having all electrical systems returned to Amel specifications! Thanks Admiral Bill Rouse for the heads up!


On Aug 25, 2021, at 3:01 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Having been underwater on Kimberlite, I would never install a solar arch, or a panel open to the weather.

I really like the idea of mounting solar panels on a hard dodger as Ian Jenkins did on his  boat Pen Azen.

 

I would NEVER go to sea without a Jordan series drogue. It turns terrible conditions to a walk in the park.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, August 25, 2021 2:07 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

Out of curiosity has anyone else had problems with solar arch mounted panels in heavy conditions?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer




Re: Bali Hai Abandoned

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thanks Brent for remining us again of the truth that if you aren't there you have no idea what the crew are going through.

One thing I want to pick up on. If I had had things stored on deck, fuel and life raft for example or solar panels on an arch when I had seas breaking over my 42 footer they would possibly have been torn away and if so highly likely we would have been lost. I know a lot of amelians are stacking ever greater numbers of solar panels on huge arches.

Most of us will never experience the life threatening situations but if we plan on ocean crossings we need to ensure we have the boat in a state that does not compromise it's survival ability. Keep the decks clear and be careful what you hang high

As to calling for rescue. On another return voyage on the same 42 ft boat we were dismasted 600 miles from Fiji and New Zealand. We were a 5 man race crew and very skilled.

But as skipper I felt a huge responsibility and if needed for crew safety I would have abandoned the boat for rescue in the blink of an eye.

But we dropped the mast into the watery deep along with my nice new mainsail. We rigged the boom as a mast. Put the storm jib in front and the tri sail behind and sailed the 600 miles home in six days. We got into our home port an hour before a gale hit.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 26 August 2021 at 02:32 "Brent Cameron via groups.io" <brentcameron61@...> wrote:

The details are a little foggy but I recall that the rear solar panels that were mounted to the mizzen backstays came loose and were acting a huge wind vane weather cocking the boat into the wind. I believe that they couldn’t get the engine running for some reason and that the Genoa furler had gotten jammed as well. The skipper (nice guy, met him in Bermuda a couple of years previous to this) had broken some ribs in the attempt to get the boat under control and was in no condition to go aft to cut away the solar panel as it was mounted high on the mizzen backstays.  From the video you can see a bit of this. I never did get on Bali Hai so don’t know exactly how the panels were mounted but I recall discussions here or elsewhere about this detail. 

Having had broken ribs and a collapsed lung, I’m very aware of how incapacitating that is. Throw in getting tossed around in huge swells by a boat that is not under control and it would be hell on earth.  As we all know, if you lose the back stay, you will likely soon lose the mizzen and then the triatic which is holding up the main mast. A bunch of masts in the water and held to the boat in those conditions would be not easy to deal with in full health with a big crew.   I’d never dream of judging a skipper in those conditions who decided the lives of his crew (and himself) were more important than salvaging the boat with rescue at hand. It’s sad that the boat isn’t been found yet (to my knowledge) but it could have been much worse. 

I think severe seasickness is somehow like childbirth for women. You think you are going to die and swear that you will never go through it again and then somehow you gloss all over it and head right back into the breach (no pun intended) again. :-) (Speaking only as someone who has watched a woman he put in that situation 5 times go through it) . Every time that I get badly seasick, I swear I’m done with it but as soon as my stomach gets under control (even before the voyage is over), I’m raring to go back out again!  The mind plays wonderful tricks on us to get us to do things we love to do! 

Brent Cameron
Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator
On Aug 25, 2021, 5:40 AM -0700, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>, wrote:

Hi again JB. Just to.pick up on your promise to never go to sea again. A friend and I on a light displacement 6 tonne 42 ft racer cruiser got caught in a weather bomb 200 miles out from New Zealand on a return voyage from the Pacific. We sailed through it with a storm jib half rolled. 70 knot Wind. Breaking seas higher than our mast. One broke right over the boat at least two meters deep. Another hit the stern and drove the stern sideways 45 degrees with a huge whump.We survived and swore to never sail again. Memory is a funny thing and like you a year later we were off again. My mate was rock solid. Would sail anywhere with him

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 19:01 JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:

It is very difficult to judge the crew based on third party reports. Anybody who has experienced extreme seasickness will tell you that they would have preferred to die.

We were caught in the same area in 1994, on a Swan 47, in the path of Huricane Gordon. We experienced 50 foot waves due to the combination of gulf stream current and wind in opposite directions. As we fell down a monstrous wave we broke the hydraulic of the back stay and the hydraulic boom vang. We rigged cable running backs we had ready to deploy. Then the furled genoa exploded and we had shredded pieces flying on the fore stay, the noise was unbelievable. It was pretty close to living hell.

We had a little storm sail on a second fore stay, just to surf the waves and to avoid being rolled over.

We were four of us, very experienced but very seasick. Vomit over over the galley and saloon, spilled pasta and tuna we had tried to cook. The smell was unbearable.

I tried to call the Coast Guard multiple times (a PanPan instead of Mayday, just to inform them of the situation and to talk to somebody). We could never connect with them, we were too far with only the VHF.

Since our SSB was down, and without news, my company triggered a search by the Coast Guards. We did not know that.

The Coasties saved the crew of a big Hinckley that was scared to death. The boat was lost.
The Coasties saved a couple off Hatteras. The sailboat was found the following year going in circles in the same area.

As for us they abandoned the search and informed my company that we had probably sunk with no chance to survive (we did! otherwise I would not here today to tell you the story).
I am told that when you die everybody says that you were the greatest and kindliest man on earth. So everybody mourned us.

After we finally landed in Fort Lauderdale we promised ourselves that we would never be again on a sailboat. EVER. But the following year we were together crossing the Pacific on a race to Hawaii.

Be kind to others if they get rescued, everybody has a different level of stamina, or just willingness to live.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


 


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


 


Re: 𝗦𝗮𝗶𝗹𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗔𝗺𝗲𝗹

Nick Newington
 

Hi Ulrich,
I am dropping off my wife and daughter/friends tomorrow and sailing back to Leros tomorrow, to haulout for a month or so.
Interesting that you decided to go for a new main without battens …..How do you find the sail shape without battens?
I am sure that the furling and unfurling is easier.
The question is how much easier v how much performance is lost?
Nick
AML 54-019
Kalymnos


On 25 Aug 2021, at 23:03, Porter McRoberts via groups.io <portermcroberts@...> wrote:

Bill.

How completely cool.  So appreciated.

Once again, amazed,

A54-152



On Aug 26, 2021, at 2:09 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

All,

I have been negotiating with Incidence Sails for some time to get special pricing for Amel owners. As many of you know Incidence is the supplier of sails to Amel. The terms and prices I negotiated for HydraNet sails for most model Amels are the same or less than the terms and prices that I negotiated with QSails. As most of you are aware, I negotiate these prices for my clients. I leverage the size of my client base (currently over 250) for a discount for my clients. There is absolutely nothing for me in this because I never accept payments or commissions of any kind from anyone except my clients. I place advertisements in my Amel Book and on my website for the vendors that offer discounts to my clients, but there is no cost to the vendor. This way I can be a totally unconflicted third party in helping my clients. 

I will release the final terms and prices shortly. These prices and terms will apply to all of my clients and any member of the Amel Yacht Owners Group. The negotiated prices are especially good on HydraNet, saving thousands on a complete set of sails. I also negotiated very good prices on lesser quality sails for your Amel from Incidence. Anyone wanting the information right away, email me at brouse@...

Nick, 

I am sending you the information directly.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar
On Wed, Aug 25, 2021 at 7:27 AM ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am thinking it is time to buy a new mainsail.
My inclination is to go for a direct replacement of the existing;
Hydranet
4 vertical battens 176cm long


I am also thinking of Q sails in Turkey, now that the Greek/Turkish border has opened. Should be VA T free!

Anyone have any good or bad experiences with Q sails?

Nick
AML 54-019
Kalymnos Gr







Re: Stuck mainsail swivel

Dom Cigale
 

Hello,
I confirm what Dieter says about nylon rings.
Why not with a heat gun, but a kettle is easy to use.
Is the sail still in the mast?


Re: 𝗦𝗮𝗶𝗹𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗔𝗺𝗲𝗹

Porter McRoberts
 

Bill.

How completely cool.  So appreciated.

Once again, amazed,

A54-152



On Aug 26, 2021, at 2:09 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

All,

I have been negotiating with Incidence Sails for some time to get special pricing for Amel owners. As many of you know Incidence is the supplier of sails to Amel. The terms and prices I negotiated for HydraNet sails for most model Amels are the same or less than the terms and prices that I negotiated with QSails. As most of you are aware, I negotiate these prices for my clients. I leverage the size of my client base (currently over 250) for a discount for my clients. There is absolutely nothing for me in this because I never accept payments or commissions of any kind from anyone except my clients. I place advertisements in my Amel Book and on my website for the vendors that offer discounts to my clients, but there is no cost to the vendor. This way I can be a totally unconflicted third party in helping my clients. 

I will release the final terms and prices shortly. These prices and terms will apply to all of my clients and any member of the Amel Yacht Owners Group. The negotiated prices are especially good on HydraNet, saving thousands on a complete set of sails. I also negotiated very good prices on lesser quality sails for your Amel from Incidence. Anyone wanting the information right away, email me at brouse@...

Nick, 

I am sending you the information directly.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar
On Wed, Aug 25, 2021 at 7:27 AM ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am thinking it is time to buy a new mainsail.
My inclination is to go for a direct replacement of the existing;
Hydranet
4 vertical battens 176cm long


I am also thinking of Q sails in Turkey, now that the Greek/Turkish border has opened. Should be VA T free!

Anyone have any good or bad experiences with Q sails?

Nick
AML 54-019
Kalymnos Gr







Re: Bali Hai Abandoned

Eric Freedman
 

Having been underwater on Kimberlite, I would never install a solar arch, or a panel open to the weather.

I really like the idea of mounting solar panels on a hard dodger as Ian Jenkins did on his  boat Pen Azen.

 

I would NEVER go to sea without a Jordan series drogue. It turns terrible conditions to a walk in the park.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, August 25, 2021 2:07 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

Out of curiosity has anyone else had problems with solar arch mounted panels in heavy conditions?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: sailing through Tunisian waters

Roy Zakheym
 

Hi Vladan
Just came back from a trip in the area (left our boat in Ragusa)
I can give you some nice tips regarding the coast line if you have the time there are a few nice places to see
You can write me in private
Best
Roy zakheym
Joanna 2 SM 442


Re: Bali Hai Abandoned

Paul Harries
 

Out of curiosity has anyone else had problems with solar arch mounted panels in heavy conditions?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: Bali Hai Abandoned

Rick Stanley
 

Also not being judgemental...but seems to me it would be significantly better to heave to for 24 hours. Or, 48 hours. Or however long it takes to sort out the issue enough to carry on sailing, even if that means heading right for the nearest port. Abandoning ship seems extreme to me -- unless there's an immediate life threatening medical condition onboard (heart attack, etc). Curious to know what happened.

Rick
S/V Althea
AMEL SM2K #317


Re: Annapolis Open Boat Saturday 10/16 4-8pm

Paul Harries
 

Thanks Joel
I am not in market for a 50.
If it were not for covid and associated hassles I would be seriously looking for a 54 or possibly an SM 
My goal from a show visit would be to get a better appreciation of Amel philosophy. See what it looks like new. Get an idea of how Amel feel lithium and solar should be ideally implimented. Does that make me a time waster from Amel perspective? If not who should I contact at Amel prior to show?

As a result of Covid timelines have gone out the window, Admiral's fear is of getting stuck overseas and not being able to return if kids needed her.

One thing I have gleamed is that unless Admiral is happy cruising is miserable.



--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: Stuck mainsail swivel

INUS - BUSCH
 

Greg,

 

I disassembled the genoa swivel I had as a spare part. There are two nylon rings in contact with the moving inner part
of aluminium. To my understanding these two rings cause the main friction while furling, not the ball bearing or the seal rings.
I have sent a word doc with drawings and fotos directely to you.

 

All the best

Dieter

Sharki #135

 


Re: New mainsail for 54

Ulrich Michael Dangelmeyer
 

Hello Nick,

Just my two cents...

I recommend Incidence Sails, as they are the original equipment manufacturer for AMEL (and have taken over former sailmaker DeEmme Sails, which you also still have).
If Bill has negotiated a special arrangement for us in the group, all the better....

We did it last year, ordered it directly from Incidence at the Dusseldorf boat show in january for a really good price.
The incomparable advantage of Incidence is: they have the original cuts from Amel/ DeEmme regarding your hull number, so a real OEM issue. No need for measurements or a sailmaker on site (if your setup is still the original!).
The fit is of the best quality. Shipping from France to Leros: no problem, on time, great handling. Their loft is in Perigny, right next to Amel. Better than anywhere else.

We ordered main and mizzen sails Hydranet Triradial, WITHOUT battens and pockets, because we always had trouble with furling and unfurling with our previous DeEmme sails (still original). Also the old ones were so soggy. Now it is perfect and smooth as it should be. The new sails are cut a little fuller at the leech and have little more surface area than the old ones, so also a better performance. That only works if you have the original cuts as a template.
Good luck and fair winds, we will be back in Leros from mid September.

Ulrich
S/Y „Soleil Bleu“ A54#088.
<>

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Am 25.08.2021 um 14:27 schrieb ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io>:

I am thinking it is time to buy a new mainsail.
My inclination is to go for a direct replacement of the existing;
Hydranet
4 vertical battens 176cm long


I am also thinking of Q sails in Turkey, now that the Greek/Turkish border has opened. Should be VA T free!

Anyone have any good or bad experiences with Q sails?

Nick
AML 54-019
Kalymnos Gr





Re: New mainsail for 54

jlm@jlmertz.fr
 

Do not hesitate one second !😁

Q sails is very professional and reliable

Price is ok

I can recommend Q sails

JLMERTZ

COTTONBAY



Le 25/08/2021 à 14:27, ngtnewington Newington via groups.io a écrit :
I am thinking it is time to buy a new mainsail.
My inclination is to go for a direct replacement of the existing; 
Hydranet
4 vertical battens 176cm long


I am also thinking of Q sails in Turkey, now that the Greek/Turkish border has opened. Should be VA T free!

Anyone have any good or bad experiences with Q sails?

Nick
AML 54-019 
Kalymnos Gr






Re: Bali Hai Abandoned

Brent Cameron
 

The details are a little foggy but I recall that the rear solar panels that were mounted to the mizzen backstays came loose and were acting a huge wind vane weather cocking the boat into the wind. I believe that they couldn’t get the engine running for some reason and that the Genoa furler had gotten jammed as well. The skipper (nice guy, met him in Bermuda a couple of years previous to this) had broken some ribs in the attempt to get the boat under control and was in no condition to go aft to cut away the solar panel as it was mounted high on the mizzen backstays.  From the video you can see a bit of this. I never did get on Bali Hai so don’t know exactly how the panels were mounted but I recall discussions here or elsewhere about this detail. 

Having had broken ribs and a collapsed lung, I’m very aware of how incapacitating that is. Throw in getting tossed around in huge swells by a boat that is not under control and it would be hell on earth.  As we all know, if you lose the back stay, you will likely soon lose the mizzen and then the triatic which is holding up the main mast. A bunch of masts in the water and held to the boat in those conditions would be not easy to deal with in full health with a big crew.   I’d never dream of judging a skipper in those conditions who decided the lives of his crew (and himself) were more important than salvaging the boat with rescue at hand. It’s sad that the boat isn’t been found yet (to my knowledge) but it could have been much worse. 

I think severe seasickness is somehow like childbirth for women. You think you are going to die and swear that you will never go through it again and then somehow you gloss all over it and head right back into the breach (no pun intended) again. :-) (Speaking only as someone who has watched a woman he put in that situation 5 times go through it) . Every time that I get badly seasick, I swear I’m done with it but as soon as my stomach gets under control (even before the voyage is over), I’m raring to go back out again!  The mind plays wonderful tricks on us to get us to do things we love to do! 

Brent Cameron
Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

On Aug 25, 2021, 5:40 AM -0700, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>, wrote:

Hi again JB. Just to.pick up on your promise to never go to sea again. A friend and I on a light displacement 6 tonne 42 ft racer cruiser got caught in a weather bomb 200 miles out from New Zealand on a return voyage from the Pacific. We sailed through it with a storm jib half rolled. 70 knot Wind. Breaking seas higher than our mast. One broke right over the boat at least two meters deep. Another hit the stern and drove the stern sideways 45 degrees with a huge whump.We survived and swore to never sail again. Memory is a funny thing and like you a year later we were off again. My mate was rock solid. Would sail anywhere with him

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 19:01 JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:

It is very difficult to judge the crew based on third party reports. Anybody who has experienced extreme seasickness will tell you that they would have preferred to die.

We were caught in the same area in 1994, on a Swan 47, in the path of Huricane Gordon. We experienced 50 foot waves due to the combination of gulf stream current and wind in opposite directions. As we fell down a monstrous wave we broke the hydraulic of the back stay and the hydraulic boom vang. We rigged cable running backs we had ready to deploy. Then the furled genoa exploded and we had shredded pieces flying on the fore stay, the noise was unbelievable. It was pretty close to living hell.

We had a little storm sail on a second fore stay, just to surf the waves and to avoid being rolled over.

We were four of us, very experienced but very seasick. Vomit over over the galley and saloon, spilled pasta and tuna we had tried to cook. The smell was unbearable.

I tried to call the Coast Guard multiple times (a PanPan instead of Mayday, just to inform them of the situation and to talk to somebody). We could never connect with them, we were too far with only the VHF.

Since our SSB was down, and without news, my company triggered a search by the Coast Guards. We did not know that.

The Coasties saved the crew of a big Hinckley that was scared to death. The boat was lost.
The Coasties saved a couple off Hatteras. The sailboat was found the following year going in circles in the same area.

As for us they abandoned the search and informed my company that we had probably sunk with no chance to survive (we did! otherwise I would not here today to tell you the story).
I am told that when you die everybody says that you were the greatest and kindliest man on earth. So everybody mourned us.

After we finally landed in Fort Lauderdale we promised ourselves that we would never be again on a sailboat. EVER. But the following year we were together crossing the Pacific on a race to Hawaii.

Be kind to others if they get rescued, everybody has a different level of stamina, or just willingness to live.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Annapolis Open Boat Saturday 10/16 4-8pm

amelforme
 

Hi Paul. Here is the view from the broker’s side of boat shows. I have presented boats in about 130 boat shows over a 45 year period. The best day to attend is the VIP day, usually at the beginning of the show. A premium ticket price culls the herd somewhat so waiting time to get aboard the most interesting boats is usually not very long. Sales staff usually pay extra attention to VIP day lookers AND to folks who show up on Monday if that is when the show ends. Especially if it is raining… Soggy Monday lookers are usually getting close to decision time.

 

Never hurts to send an email to any boat builder you have a solid interest in asking what their policy is to register for a showing. Be fair. If there is no way you would consider a new boat purchase, don’t pretend you would and spend hours with sales staff. We sales people develop a sixth sense about this in such an opportunity rich environment and can generally pinpoint those who would play ‘Stroke the Broker”. Represent your interests honestly and you can expect the broker to be equally as honest with his presentation.

 

Boat shows are a wonderful place to look at gear-equipment as well. Plan on a day just to visit all the booths. You can learn a lot from vendors who are knowledgeable about what they are peddling.

 

Have fun.

 

All the best,

Joel

 

           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.

                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 9:13 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Annapolis Open Boat Saturday 10/16 4-8pm

 

Thinking of attending, any advice on best day to visit? Nothing on Amel site, is it necessary to prebook tour?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer

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