Date   

Re: Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

Randall Walker
 

Yes my sea chest even when the valve is closed let’s in water. When I open the top I have to put it back on 
Or it will flow over. I don’t pay it much attention as I only notice it when I pull the strainer to clean. I have tried to adjust the stopcock but it does allow water to fill the standpipe.

The standpipe is a brilliant idea. But all the effort of owners to make shutoff valves should have been a no brainer for Amel to have instituted 20-30 years ago. I guess a bean counter thought not.

Randall
A54#56

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 15:00 Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Thanks Bill and everyone else.

As an aside, the stopcock on my sea chest allows a tadbit of water through even in the closed position. Has anyone ever experienced this? Could it be a bit of growth in the stopcock itself? 

Normally it's not an issue since either the stopcock is open or it "leaks" into the sea itself, but given that I'm going to replace my oil cooler soon, I'd rather not have a slow trickle of saltwater into the engine room when the hoses are disconnected.


On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 5:16 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks like this?


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:06 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Yep, I could not find C9 made by Mota



On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 10:03 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks a bit different than that. Says “C9” on it.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:00 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Matt,

Thanks for that. It is likely this cooler:
<image.png>


Tubestack diametre (Ømm) 58
Connection on cold side Ø52mm hose
Connection on hot side G3/8" (BSP) thread
Tubes material Copper-Nickel (CuNi10)
Headers material Brass
Housing material Extruded aluminium
https://www.motarecreational.com/en/g-range/10-gear-oil-cooler-short-version.html#reste_descriptions

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 9:42 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
A-50:
It’s got the word “mota” stamped on it.
<image0.jpeg>
<image1.jpeg>


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 5:22 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


For A55 owners and possibly A50 owners (an A50 owner please verify)

There is a different oil cooler that Amel used in the A55 (possibly all hull numbers). I am not sure of the brand, but the same thing applies to the end closest to the sea chest. Here is a photo of the oil cooler on the A55.
<image.png>




On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 8:55 AM Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Scott, same Bowman cooler on Yanmar SMs and 54 D3s.
It is very important to inspect the end of the cooler nearest the sea chest. This is where debris will accumulate and reduce water flow. According to Bowman the number 1 failure of the Bowman Cooler is the overtightening of the boot hose clamps on each end. The metal is soft enough that a overtightened hose clamp will squeeze the tubes closed.

Here is a short story for many Amel owners. I had a client who had purchased my Amel Book and 24/7 Support. After about 5 years he decided to sell his Amel. When it was being surveyed the surveyor insisted on running the engine at WOT, the Onan, the water maker, and 3 Air Conditioners. The engine overheated. The surveyor's conclusion was that the Amel sea chest and manifolds were inadequate. My client called and was very distressed. I suggested to him that the Bowman oil cooler had debris inside the boot nearest to the sea chest. Nobody agreed with me and thousands were spent. The sea trial was done again under the same circumstances. The engine overheated again. This time the client removed the large clamp on the end of the Boman Cooler nearest the sea chest and found it full of debris. In 5 years he had never done this, although I recommended it and it is in my book. The moral of this story is easy to figure out. The page from my book is below.




On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 4:27 AM Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

Hi Mark;

 

Thank you for sharing your experience. We removed and had all of the heat exchangers professionally cleaned in 2018. However, it is not possible to identify wear. Therefore I’d like to order a couple of the heat exchangers and replace ours and have one as spare. It is hard to read the part number on the cooler, without removing it.

 

Does anyone know if all A54s used the same part number too, or are there different parts for different hull numbers?

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark McGovern via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2021 12:41 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [Special] [AmelYachtOwners] Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons #lessons

 

In the spirit of Pat from Shenanigans "Lessons Learned" post a few week's back I thought I would share what I learned when my Bowman DC60-XCC oil cooler failed while motoring up the coast of Maine a few days ago.  Thankfully, we caught the failure relatively early in large part due to the fact that when cruising in Maine you have to remain hyper-aware at all times because of the lobster pots that are literally all over the place including in marked channels and anchorages. Because of that, both my wife and I were in the cockpit doing nothing but looking out for lobster pots and calling out their positions to whomever was at the helm. There were no podcasts, no music, no book reading, no headphone, just hyper-vigilance with two people, 4 eyes, and 4 ears on watch at all times. 

The first symptom we noticed was what sounded like a slight misfire of the engine.  It sounded like the RPM increased ever so slightly for just a second.  It was just a "blip" and was not large enough to actually even register on the tachometer.  After hearing it a few times, a minute or so apart, I asked my wife if she was hearing it. She said she was. My first thought was a clogged fuel filter despite the fact that my last fuel fill ups were from fairly busy harbors in Annapolis, MD and Onset, Massachusetts and that we had only ~60 hours on the Racor filter.  In addition, the RPMs of the engine seemed to increase not decrease like I would expect from fuel starvation from a clogged fuel filter.  In any case, I switched over to the second Racor but the occasional engine “blip” did not go away. In fact it got more frequent and it actually started to register on the tachometer just barely.  I put my head over the side to take a look at the engine exhaust.  I did not see any white or black smoke coming out of the engine exhaust.  However, I did see an oil slick trailing behind us the likes of which I have never seen before.  My immediate thought was that the engine oil cooler had failed and was leaking engine oil into the raw water system.  We had no choice but to shut the engine down ASAP.  There was only 6-7 knots of wind directly behind us but we also had a bit of favorable current so we just put out the main sail, turned off the engine and called Towboat US.  We are not at all familiar with this area and we did not see any decent anchorages looking at the charts. We were only 2 nm from our destination of Belfast, Maine and the Towboat captain said it would take him about an hour to meet us at the entrance to the harbor.  So we sailed at 1.5-2 knots with just the Main and met the Towboat captain at the entrance to the harbor where he towed us the last mile to our mooring ball where we still sit right now waiting for our replacement oil cooler to arrive from the UK.

 

Once we were safely moored, I went down to the engine room to check the oil in the Yanmar.  It was perfect.  Not a drop appeared to be missing.  After a brief “wtf?” moment, I checked the transmission dipstick.  The fluid level did not even register on the dipstick at all.  However, I could see that there was some ATF left in the transmission case.  That was a bit of a relief but not much.

 

All of this happened on a Saturday and I do not carry a spare oil cooler so I would have to wait until Monday to order a replacement.  First thing Monday morning I started to call all of the USA dealers for Bowman marine products listed on Bowman’s website.  Of those who actually answered the phone, none of them had the DC60-XCC in stock or even just the DC60 (oil cooler with no end caps). One actually told me that he didn't think DC60-XCC was a valid Bowman part number. I said “I’m looking at their catalog online right now.  It is.”

 

I then called Bowman in the UK and asked if they knew anyone in the USA who might have one of these in stock and they hesitated and said the only one who might have one is Tradewinds Power Corporation.  When I had previously called Tradewinds Power Corporation they said "our computer system is down right now" so we will need to call you back.  They never did.  

Luckily, I had also asked Bowman who in the UK would definitely have them in stock and would ship to the USA.  Without hesitation, they told me that Lancing Marine will definitely have it and they ship around the world.  So I called Lancing Marine (https://www.lancingmarine.com/) and had a wonderful experience buying from them.  Not only were their prices the lowest by far that I had seen anywhere online (79 GBP/~109 USD including new couplers) but the ordering experience was fantastic despite it being phone order only.  The person I spoke to also obviously knows these transmissions well.  His name was Mike and I'm pretty sure he is the owner and founder of the company - founded in 1970!  He gave me his opinion on the state of my transmission (he thinks it’s probably fine) and advice on how to test it to see even before the replacement cooler arrives.  On top of all that, despite it being about 3pm their time when I called, the coolers (I ordered a spare) shipped out the same day.  Last, he said that if I do need to get the transmission rebuilt, that he would highly recommend a company in the lower Chesapeake Bay called Transatlantic Diesels. He says that they know these ZF transmissions better than anyone and he has done business with them for years.  It was really just a great overall buying experience that seems to be so rare in these days of anonymous Amazon purchases.

 

The moral of the story is that for ~$109 plus shipping and an hour of my time I should have replaced the transmission oil cooler PROACTIVELY soon after I bought the boat back in July 2017.  Especially given that I did not know the age of this critical part.  Or I should have replaced one of four times that I have replaced the transmission fluid.  At the bare minimum, I should have had a spare oil cooler already on board.  The engine, and I assume the oil cooler, just surpassed the 2000 hour mark.  Researching this site after the fact I found at least two other SM owners who had the same failure at around the 2000 hour mark. Both, I believe, lost their transmissions.  Hopefully, I have not. I will know in a few days time.

 

So in the spirit of the #lessonslearned, don’t be like me.  If you are not sure how old your transmission oil cooler is, replace it.  If it’s approaching 2000 hours, replace it.  At a minimum, get yourself a spare oil cooler.  And if you can’t find it locally, get it from the nice people at Lancing Marine in the UK so that we all have at least one place in the world that keeps these things in stock.

 

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Sliders for the curtains on SM & Trans cooler on the Yanmar 4jh4hte

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

Eric,

These slide worked in the tracks in our SM:  https://www.curtain-tracks.com/recmar-3050-abs-plastic-eye-slide.html

--
Mark McGoverns
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Mainsail furler gasket.

Mark McGovern
 

Gregory,

Essentially, yes.  There is a ton of information in the thread link that I sent you earlier including part numbers and sources for the parts. 

Also, Woody from Mothership Adrift made a video of his rebuild:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-p8bdPpnmk

Last, consider setting up a signature in your account which contains your name, boat model, hull #, boat name, and your current location.  It will help members to better assist you with your question and if you put your location, you might even get some help in person.  If you are not sure how to do that here is a link to instructions:  https://groups.io/g/TentecArgonautVI/topic/how_to_create_an_e_signature/10289297?p=

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Watermaker end cap removal; Dessalator D160

Mark McGovern
 

Ian,

Brilliant idea!  I struggled for a few minutes trying to remove one end cap using an oil filter wrench and a large pair of Channellocks and while I could spin the cap in circles I was barely able to move the cap outward even just a little.  I searched "watermaker end cap" on the forum and found your post from over 14 years ago.  I did pretty much exactly as you described and the first end cap popped right out on the 3rd "slightly" forceful pull.  Below are some pics of the setup:



The hose clamp technique woulding work for the end caps with the hardware screwed into them and I didn't want to risk removing the hardware.  Given how easy the other end caps came off,  I just grabbed a screwdriver and a soft faced mallet and was able to knock them out with a few gentle wraps of the mallet on the screwdriver handle with blade of the screwdriver on the stainless steel hardware bracket as shown in the picture below:



I had all four end caps off in a matter of minutes.

And yes, for those of you who read my earlier post about my transmission oil cooler failure the other day, at least one of our saltwater membranes just failed yesterday.  TDS has been creeping up steadily the last few times I've run it and this time we were making product water with a TDS of around 1000.  When it rains it pours!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Bill,

Our track and car is the one you have depicted on the right and labeled as SN OEM/Lewmar. I guess this style track and traveller was used on both the SN and early SMs. Our track is an I-beam style and measures 38mm across and 34mm high. Unfortunately, this car is not in production, and I can't find anything that would fit this track size of I-beam style track. If you have any ideas where to find a replacement, please let me know. It is good to know that it is a Lewmar traveller. I ran into Dave Benjamin's old Maramu #29 "Exit Strategy" looking very neglected here in Alameda yesterday. It had a Harken traveller installed on top of the existing I-beam track which is very similar to mine. They appeared to have just drilled and tapped the existing track, and screwed the new track on top. It was not the most eloquent solution, but it did take Dave to the South Pacific and back, and still looks solid. Ultimately, all the boats with my system will experience this failure, and it would be nice to document a good fix for everyone. I'm afraid trying to remove the old track is going to shear all the screws and create a huge expensive mess. I'm using penetrating oil on the screws now, but 30 years of stainless screws going though and aluminum track into a steel plate is going to be a dicey job.

Steve


Re: 𝗦𝗮𝗶𝗹𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗔𝗺el

 

Joerg,

You made me smile with that question. You know me well enough to know that I did not discuss battens with Incidence. 😀


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 10:29 AM Joerg Esdorn via groups.io <jhe1313=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Great work, Bill.  Much appreciated.   I am most impressed with the quality of construction of the Incidences Sails and I‘ve bought a lot of sails over the years from all the major makers like North, Doyle, Quantum etc.  The Incidences sails are holding up beautifully and I‘ve yet to have so much as a thread opening up!  

One thing I would like to investigate is whether to have my next main and mizzen built with full length vertical battens like was suggested in a recent post on this site.  I see that Elvstrom is building these types of sails for all the Halberg Rassy boats with furling mains.  Bill, have you discussed that option with Incidences by any chance?  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53 Kincsem
Currently in La Rochelle 


Re: Mainsail furler gasket.

 

image.png


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 2:15 PM Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:
Thx guys!
This is a great set of advices!
so,
1. Drop down the motor
2. disconnect the gearbox 
3. take it out for inspection
4. replace the seal.
5. put things in place

thx again!
gd


Source in the USA Marine transmission oil cooler

Eric Freedman
 

 

 

From: Sales & Engineering
Sent: Thursday, April 11, 2013 8:39 AM
To: 'Sailorman' <kimberlite@...>
Subject: RE: Marine transmission oil cooler

 

Eric,

 

Thank you for the inquiry.  The unit that you have there appears to be one of the DC Series coolers; I think it is the DC60.  We do not have that unit in stock but have he next size up, I’m not sure if you have the room to go with a longer cooler or not.  Following is the pricing for both units, please let me know if you have any questions or need further information.

 

Model #DC90-XAA

Price $153.60

*Unit has 3/8” BSPP oil connections and 22mm I.D. x 32mm O.D. straight hose bibs.

Delivery – In stock and can ship same day from our Watertown, MA location.

 

DC60-???

Price $137.00

*Pricing is good for any configuration.

Delivery – Allow 4 to 6 weeks

 

See attached catalog for dimensional data and connection sizes and configuration.

 

 

Best Regards,

Bob Bangs

Sales Representative

Therma-Flow, Inc.

Phone:  1-617-924-3877

Fax:  1-617-924-7271

E-mail:  rbangs@...

Website:  www.heatexchangershop.com

 

 

 


From: Sailorman [mailto:kimberlite@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 11, 2013 12:20 AM
To: Sailorman
Subject: FW: Marine transmission oil cooler

 

 

 

Dear Sir,

I have a transmission oil cooler mounted on a Yanmar engine that I am working on.

I finally found the manufacturer in England, Bowman, and I understand that you represent them.

The dimensions are approximately 150mmx50mm with 27mm inlet and outlet.

 

My customer is anxious to launch his boat and we need this part. I have attached  photos.

Would you please quote me the trade price and availability?

Thank you

Eric

Northport Marine restoration.

 

 


I am using the Free version of SPAMfighter.
SPAMfighter has removed 1060 of my spam emails to date.

Do you have a slow PC? Try a free scan!


Re: Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

 

Steve,

Start by measuring your track. If your track size is Lewmar Size 3 (21mmX35mm), this may help you. Most of the SMs I have been on are Lewmar Size 3 track on the main traveler



image.png


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 1:55 PM Stephen Davis <flyboyscd@...> wrote:

Hi Pat,

Thanks for your help. I’m curious to see what you traveller system looks like. Most SMs I’ve looked at did not have my traveller system, but most of those were higher hull numbers than yours. I know the next generation of travelers they used was an Antal system, but not so sure about mine. If you could send me a picture of yours it would be great. 


Steve


Re: Sliders for the curtains on SM & Trans cooler on the Yanmar 4jh4hte

Eric Freedman
 

Hi Alexandre,

That would be great. I found a rebuild kit for the generator raw water pump in my spares.

I will email you back channel.

Kindest Regards,

Eric

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Alexandre Uster von Baar via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2021 5:46 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sliders for the curtains on SM & Trans cooler on the Yanmar 4jh4hte

 

Good morning Eric, 

 

I might have some plastic slider left.  

 

Sincerely, Alexandre

 

 

 

On Thursday, August 26, 2021, 12:17:39 AM AST, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

 

 

I wrote to Maud and asked for the plastic sliders foe the curtains on the windows, hatches , and shower curtains.

Maud mentioned they no longer stock them.

Does anyone have a source for them?

 

When I received my new engine, I was surprised that Yanmar has an option for an oil cooler attached to the engine.

It is so nice. I was always worried about the rubber end caps on the oil cooler on the 4jh3.

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott SV Tengah
Sent: Wednesday, August 25, 2021 9:53 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons #lessons

 

Chris - 

You're on a 54, right? Is it the same part number as on a SM?
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Flexible Solar Panels

Porter McRoberts
 

We have 3 LG 315 watt rigid panels. Mounted on a stern arch. Exactly 4 years of operation. We’ve sailed mostly tropics, but about 12 months in NZ. 8 month on the hard with low consumption cycling. We have 12 105Ah 12v AGM batteries. We’ve banked 4250 Kw hours. For a daily average of 2,911 watts per day. 
The reality is the solar installation took our generator run times from about 3-4 hours a day divided into a morning and evening run into an average of 45 min a day. Often every other day. Not having to generate 4.2 megawatts has been wonderful!

Best of luck!

Porter McRoberts 
S/V IBIS A54-152
Fiji
WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206
Www.fouribis.net

On Aug 27, 2021, at 12:02 AM, Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia <charlesmatthewday@...> wrote:

As Michelle and I are preparing to do our electrical system upgrade (arch, rigid panels, inverter/charger, LiFePO4 batteries), I came across several new CIGS flexible panels.  The white papers on these panels are interesting.  Their advertised wattage is lower, but they are much more tolerant to decreased performance due to high  temperatures.  Therefore, your daily output may actually be higher than traditional flex silica panels.

Does anyone here have any real world experience that can validate/invalidate the lab tests? 

Matt
SV Talia
Hampton, VA


Re: Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

 

Scott, I have not known that valve to leak. It generally gets exercised more than any other on an Amel


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 2:00 PM Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Thanks Bill and everyone else.

As an aside, the stopcock on my sea chest allows a tadbit of water through even in the closed position. Has anyone ever experienced this? Could it be a bit of growth in the stopcock itself? 

Normally it's not an issue since either the stopcock is open or it "leaks" into the sea itself, but given that I'm going to replace my oil cooler soon, I'd rather not have a slow trickle of saltwater into the engine room when the hoses are disconnected.


On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 5:16 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks like this?


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:06 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Yep, I could not find C9 made by Mota


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 10:03 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks a bit different than that. Says “C9” on it.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:00 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Matt,

Thanks for that. It is likely this cooler:
<image.png>


Tubestack diametre (Ømm) 58
Connection on cold side Ø52mm hose
Connection on hot side G3/8" (BSP) thread
Tubes material Copper-Nickel (CuNi10)
Headers material Brass
Housing material Extruded aluminium
https://www.motarecreational.com/en/g-range/10-gear-oil-cooler-short-version.html#reste_descriptions

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 9:42 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
A-50:
It’s got the word “mota” stamped on it.
<image0.jpeg>
<image1.jpeg>


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 5:22 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


For A55 owners and possibly A50 owners (an A50 owner please verify)

There is a different oil cooler that Amel used in the A55 (possibly all hull numbers). I am not sure of the brand, but the same thing applies to the end closest to the sea chest. Here is a photo of the oil cooler on the A55.
<image.png>



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 8:55 AM Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Scott, same Bowman cooler on Yanmar SMs and 54 D3s.
It is very important to inspect the end of the cooler nearest the sea chest. This is where debris will accumulate and reduce water flow. According to Bowman the number 1 failure of the Bowman Cooler is the overtightening of the boot hose clamps on each end. The metal is soft enough that a overtightened hose clamp will squeeze the tubes closed.

Here is a short story for many Amel owners. I had a client who had purchased my Amel Book and 24/7 Support. After about 5 years he decided to sell his Amel. When it was being surveyed the surveyor insisted on running the engine at WOT, the Onan, the water maker, and 3 Air Conditioners. The engine overheated. The surveyor's conclusion was that the Amel sea chest and manifolds were inadequate. My client called and was very distressed. I suggested to him that the Bowman oil cooler had debris inside the boot nearest to the sea chest. Nobody agreed with me and thousands were spent. The sea trial was done again under the same circumstances. The engine overheated again. This time the client removed the large clamp on the end of the Boman Cooler nearest the sea chest and found it full of debris. In 5 years he had never done this, although I recommended it and it is in my book. The moral of this story is easy to figure out. The page from my book is below.



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 4:27 AM Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

Hi Mark;

 

Thank you for sharing your experience. We removed and had all of the heat exchangers professionally cleaned in 2018. However, it is not possible to identify wear. Therefore I’d like to order a couple of the heat exchangers and replace ours and have one as spare. It is hard to read the part number on the cooler, without removing it.

 

Does anyone know if all A54s used the same part number too, or are there different parts for different hull numbers?

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark McGovern via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2021 12:41 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [Special] [AmelYachtOwners] Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons #lessons

 

In the spirit of Pat from Shenanigans "Lessons Learned" post a few week's back I thought I would share what I learned when my Bowman DC60-XCC oil cooler failed while motoring up the coast of Maine a few days ago.  Thankfully, we caught the failure relatively early in large part due to the fact that when cruising in Maine you have to remain hyper-aware at all times because of the lobster pots that are literally all over the place including in marked channels and anchorages. Because of that, both my wife and I were in the cockpit doing nothing but looking out for lobster pots and calling out their positions to whomever was at the helm. There were no podcasts, no music, no book reading, no headphone, just hyper-vigilance with two people, 4 eyes, and 4 ears on watch at all times. 

The first symptom we noticed was what sounded like a slight misfire of the engine.  It sounded like the RPM increased ever so slightly for just a second.  It was just a "blip" and was not large enough to actually even register on the tachometer.  After hearing it a few times, a minute or so apart, I asked my wife if she was hearing it. She said she was. My first thought was a clogged fuel filter despite the fact that my last fuel fill ups were from fairly busy harbors in Annapolis, MD and Onset, Massachusetts and that we had only ~60 hours on the Racor filter.  In addition, the RPMs of the engine seemed to increase not decrease like I would expect from fuel starvation from a clogged fuel filter.  In any case, I switched over to the second Racor but the occasional engine “blip” did not go away. In fact it got more frequent and it actually started to register on the tachometer just barely.  I put my head over the side to take a look at the engine exhaust.  I did not see any white or black smoke coming out of the engine exhaust.  However, I did see an oil slick trailing behind us the likes of which I have never seen before.  My immediate thought was that the engine oil cooler had failed and was leaking engine oil into the raw water system.  We had no choice but to shut the engine down ASAP.  There was only 6-7 knots of wind directly behind us but we also had a bit of favorable current so we just put out the main sail, turned off the engine and called Towboat US.  We are not at all familiar with this area and we did not see any decent anchorages looking at the charts. We were only 2 nm from our destination of Belfast, Maine and the Towboat captain said it would take him about an hour to meet us at the entrance to the harbor.  So we sailed at 1.5-2 knots with just the Main and met the Towboat captain at the entrance to the harbor where he towed us the last mile to our mooring ball where we still sit right now waiting for our replacement oil cooler to arrive from the UK.

 

Once we were safely moored, I went down to the engine room to check the oil in the Yanmar.  It was perfect.  Not a drop appeared to be missing.  After a brief “wtf?” moment, I checked the transmission dipstick.  The fluid level did not even register on the dipstick at all.  However, I could see that there was some ATF left in the transmission case.  That was a bit of a relief but not much.

 

All of this happened on a Saturday and I do not carry a spare oil cooler so I would have to wait until Monday to order a replacement.  First thing Monday morning I started to call all of the USA dealers for Bowman marine products listed on Bowman’s website.  Of those who actually answered the phone, none of them had the DC60-XCC in stock or even just the DC60 (oil cooler with no end caps). One actually told me that he didn't think DC60-XCC was a valid Bowman part number. I said “I’m looking at their catalog online right now.  It is.”

 

I then called Bowman in the UK and asked if they knew anyone in the USA who might have one of these in stock and they hesitated and said the only one who might have one is Tradewinds Power Corporation.  When I had previously called Tradewinds Power Corporation they said "our computer system is down right now" so we will need to call you back.  They never did.  

Luckily, I had also asked Bowman who in the UK would definitely have them in stock and would ship to the USA.  Without hesitation, they told me that Lancing Marine will definitely have it and they ship around the world.  So I called Lancing Marine (https://www.lancingmarine.com/) and had a wonderful experience buying from them.  Not only were their prices the lowest by far that I had seen anywhere online (79 GBP/~109 USD including new couplers) but the ordering experience was fantastic despite it being phone order only.  The person I spoke to also obviously knows these transmissions well.  His name was Mike and I'm pretty sure he is the owner and founder of the company - founded in 1970!  He gave me his opinion on the state of my transmission (he thinks it’s probably fine) and advice on how to test it to see even before the replacement cooler arrives.  On top of all that, despite it being about 3pm their time when I called, the coolers (I ordered a spare) shipped out the same day.  Last, he said that if I do need to get the transmission rebuilt, that he would highly recommend a company in the lower Chesapeake Bay called Transatlantic Diesels. He says that they know these ZF transmissions better than anyone and he has done business with them for years.  It was really just a great overall buying experience that seems to be so rare in these days of anonymous Amazon purchases.

 

The moral of the story is that for ~$109 plus shipping and an hour of my time I should have replaced the transmission oil cooler PROACTIVELY soon after I bought the boat back in July 2017.  Especially given that I did not know the age of this critical part.  Or I should have replaced one of four times that I have replaced the transmission fluid.  At the bare minimum, I should have had a spare oil cooler already on board.  The engine, and I assume the oil cooler, just surpassed the 2000 hour mark.  Researching this site after the fact I found at least two other SM owners who had the same failure at around the 2000 hour mark. Both, I believe, lost their transmissions.  Hopefully, I have not. I will know in a few days time.

 

So in the spirit of the #lessonslearned, don’t be like me.  If you are not sure how old your transmission oil cooler is, replace it.  If it’s approaching 2000 hours, replace it.  At a minimum, get yourself a spare oil cooler.  And if you can’t find it locally, get it from the nice people at Lancing Marine in the UK so that we all have at least one place in the world that keeps these things in stock.

 

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: 𝗦𝗮𝗶𝗹𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗔𝗺el

Laurens Vos
 
Edited

Joerg that would be my question as well.
I had already contact with Stade sails, which Martin Birkhof advised in an other post.
He is very enthusiastic about his full length battens sail from Stade.
Yesterday I checked the website from Incidences but couldn’t find anything about full length battens sails.
I had contact with them last year when I asked for a proposal for a new main and mizzen on our A54.
When taking about battens they where even negative about short battens as in our Démé sails.
So I’m not sure if they will be positive about full length battens in their sails.
It could be a good idea to bring them a visit as we’re both in La Rochelle 

Laurens 
A54 - 92 
Fun@Sea 
La Rochelle 


Re: Mainsail furler gasket.

Gregory Dmitriev
 

Thx guys!
This is a great set of advices!
so,
1. Drop down the motor
2. disconnect the gearbox 
3. take it out for inspection
4. replace the seal.
5. put things in place

thx again!
gd


Re: Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

Randall Walker
 

I think Lancing will be wondering why there is a surge in orders for these coolers. They sound like people to deal with.
After purchasing my 54.
I had just left for Gibraltar, a three day run down the Spanish coast. It was my first trip and shakedown. I had an experienced sailor along for the run. When it overheated he would not take my word that it had to be anything but the main water impeller. So I humoured him and took out the perfectly new one as I had 5 spares onboard. The pump and impeller were just replaced by Volvo. The motor continued to overheat, and now I have oil pushing out of the transmission. I made it safely to Gib and did several engine flushes and finish with the oil coolers.

This is why we have a great forum. It’s full of people who know and are willing to pass it along.
I don’t now but will have a spare soon.

Randall
A54#56

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 11:16 Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks like this?


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:06 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Yep, I could not find C9 made by Mota



On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 10:03 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks a bit different than that. Says “C9” on it.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:00 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Matt,

Thanks for that. It is likely this cooler:
<image.png>


Tubestack diametre (Ømm) 58
Connection on cold side Ø52mm hose
Connection on hot side G3/8" (BSP) thread
Tubes material Copper-Nickel (CuNi10)
Headers material Brass
Housing material Extruded aluminium
https://www.motarecreational.com/en/g-range/10-gear-oil-cooler-short-version.html#reste_descriptions

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 9:42 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
A-50:
It’s got the word “mota” stamped on it.
<image0.jpeg>
<image1.jpeg>


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 5:22 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


For A55 owners and possibly A50 owners (an A50 owner please verify)

There is a different oil cooler that Amel used in the A55 (possibly all hull numbers). I am not sure of the brand, but the same thing applies to the end closest to the sea chest. Here is a photo of the oil cooler on the A55.
<image.png>




On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 8:55 AM Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Scott, same Bowman cooler on Yanmar SMs and 54 D3s.
It is very important to inspect the end of the cooler nearest the sea chest. This is where debris will accumulate and reduce water flow. According to Bowman the number 1 failure of the Bowman Cooler is the overtightening of the boot hose clamps on each end. The metal is soft enough that a overtightened hose clamp will squeeze the tubes closed.

Here is a short story for many Amel owners. I had a client who had purchased my Amel Book and 24/7 Support. After about 5 years he decided to sell his Amel. When it was being surveyed the surveyor insisted on running the engine at WOT, the Onan, the water maker, and 3 Air Conditioners. The engine overheated. The surveyor's conclusion was that the Amel sea chest and manifolds were inadequate. My client called and was very distressed. I suggested to him that the Bowman oil cooler had debris inside the boot nearest to the sea chest. Nobody agreed with me and thousands were spent. The sea trial was done again under the same circumstances. The engine overheated again. This time the client removed the large clamp on the end of the Boman Cooler nearest the sea chest and found it full of debris. In 5 years he had never done this, although I recommended it and it is in my book. The moral of this story is easy to figure out. The page from my book is below.




On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 4:27 AM Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

Hi Mark;

 

Thank you for sharing your experience. We removed and had all of the heat exchangers professionally cleaned in 2018. However, it is not possible to identify wear. Therefore I’d like to order a couple of the heat exchangers and replace ours and have one as spare. It is hard to read the part number on the cooler, without removing it.

 

Does anyone know if all A54s used the same part number too, or are there different parts for different hull numbers?

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark McGovern via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2021 12:41 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [Special] [AmelYachtOwners] Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons #lessons

 

In the spirit of Pat from Shenanigans "Lessons Learned" post a few week's back I thought I would share what I learned when my Bowman DC60-XCC oil cooler failed while motoring up the coast of Maine a few days ago.  Thankfully, we caught the failure relatively early in large part due to the fact that when cruising in Maine you have to remain hyper-aware at all times because of the lobster pots that are literally all over the place including in marked channels and anchorages. Because of that, both my wife and I were in the cockpit doing nothing but looking out for lobster pots and calling out their positions to whomever was at the helm. There were no podcasts, no music, no book reading, no headphone, just hyper-vigilance with two people, 4 eyes, and 4 ears on watch at all times. 

The first symptom we noticed was what sounded like a slight misfire of the engine.  It sounded like the RPM increased ever so slightly for just a second.  It was just a "blip" and was not large enough to actually even register on the tachometer.  After hearing it a few times, a minute or so apart, I asked my wife if she was hearing it. She said she was. My first thought was a clogged fuel filter despite the fact that my last fuel fill ups were from fairly busy harbors in Annapolis, MD and Onset, Massachusetts and that we had only ~60 hours on the Racor filter.  In addition, the RPMs of the engine seemed to increase not decrease like I would expect from fuel starvation from a clogged fuel filter.  In any case, I switched over to the second Racor but the occasional engine “blip” did not go away. In fact it got more frequent and it actually started to register on the tachometer just barely.  I put my head over the side to take a look at the engine exhaust.  I did not see any white or black smoke coming out of the engine exhaust.  However, I did see an oil slick trailing behind us the likes of which I have never seen before.  My immediate thought was that the engine oil cooler had failed and was leaking engine oil into the raw water system.  We had no choice but to shut the engine down ASAP.  There was only 6-7 knots of wind directly behind us but we also had a bit of favorable current so we just put out the main sail, turned off the engine and called Towboat US.  We are not at all familiar with this area and we did not see any decent anchorages looking at the charts. We were only 2 nm from our destination of Belfast, Maine and the Towboat captain said it would take him about an hour to meet us at the entrance to the harbor.  So we sailed at 1.5-2 knots with just the Main and met the Towboat captain at the entrance to the harbor where he towed us the last mile to our mooring ball where we still sit right now waiting for our replacement oil cooler to arrive from the UK.

 

Once we were safely moored, I went down to the engine room to check the oil in the Yanmar.  It was perfect.  Not a drop appeared to be missing.  After a brief “wtf?” moment, I checked the transmission dipstick.  The fluid level did not even register on the dipstick at all.  However, I could see that there was some ATF left in the transmission case.  That was a bit of a relief but not much.

 

All of this happened on a Saturday and I do not carry a spare oil cooler so I would have to wait until Monday to order a replacement.  First thing Monday morning I started to call all of the USA dealers for Bowman marine products listed on Bowman’s website.  Of those who actually answered the phone, none of them had the DC60-XCC in stock or even just the DC60 (oil cooler with no end caps). One actually told me that he didn't think DC60-XCC was a valid Bowman part number. I said “I’m looking at their catalog online right now.  It is.”

 

I then called Bowman in the UK and asked if they knew anyone in the USA who might have one of these in stock and they hesitated and said the only one who might have one is Tradewinds Power Corporation.  When I had previously called Tradewinds Power Corporation they said "our computer system is down right now" so we will need to call you back.  They never did.  

Luckily, I had also asked Bowman who in the UK would definitely have them in stock and would ship to the USA.  Without hesitation, they told me that Lancing Marine will definitely have it and they ship around the world.  So I called Lancing Marine (https://www.lancingmarine.com/) and had a wonderful experience buying from them.  Not only were their prices the lowest by far that I had seen anywhere online (79 GBP/~109 USD including new couplers) but the ordering experience was fantastic despite it being phone order only.  The person I spoke to also obviously knows these transmissions well.  His name was Mike and I'm pretty sure he is the owner and founder of the company - founded in 1970!  He gave me his opinion on the state of my transmission (he thinks it’s probably fine) and advice on how to test it to see even before the replacement cooler arrives.  On top of all that, despite it being about 3pm their time when I called, the coolers (I ordered a spare) shipped out the same day.  Last, he said that if I do need to get the transmission rebuilt, that he would highly recommend a company in the lower Chesapeake Bay called Transatlantic Diesels. He says that they know these ZF transmissions better than anyone and he has done business with them for years.  It was really just a great overall buying experience that seems to be so rare in these days of anonymous Amazon purchases.

 

The moral of the story is that for ~$109 plus shipping and an hour of my time I should have replaced the transmission oil cooler PROACTIVELY soon after I bought the boat back in July 2017.  Especially given that I did not know the age of this critical part.  Or I should have replaced one of four times that I have replaced the transmission fluid.  At the bare minimum, I should have had a spare oil cooler already on board.  The engine, and I assume the oil cooler, just surpassed the 2000 hour mark.  Researching this site after the fact I found at least two other SM owners who had the same failure at around the 2000 hour mark. Both, I believe, lost their transmissions.  Hopefully, I have not. I will know in a few days time.

 

So in the spirit of the #lessonslearned, don’t be like me.  If you are not sure how old your transmission oil cooler is, replace it.  If it’s approaching 2000 hours, replace it.  At a minimum, get yourself a spare oil cooler.  And if you can’t find it locally, get it from the nice people at Lancing Marine in the UK so that we all have at least one place in the world that keeps these things in stock.

 

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Re: Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

Scott SV Tengah
 

Thanks Bill and everyone else.

As an aside, the stopcock on my sea chest allows a tadbit of water through even in the closed position. Has anyone ever experienced this? Could it be a bit of growth in the stopcock itself? 

Normally it's not an issue since either the stopcock is open or it "leaks" into the sea itself, but given that I'm going to replace my oil cooler soon, I'd rather not have a slow trickle of saltwater into the engine room when the hoses are disconnected.


On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 5:16 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks like this?


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:06 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Yep, I could not find C9 made by Mota


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 10:03 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks a bit different than that. Says “C9” on it.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:00 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Matt,

Thanks for that. It is likely this cooler:
<image.png>


Tubestack diametre (Ømm) 58
Connection on cold side Ø52mm hose
Connection on hot side G3/8" (BSP) thread
Tubes material Copper-Nickel (CuNi10)
Headers material Brass
Housing material Extruded aluminium
https://www.motarecreational.com/en/g-range/10-gear-oil-cooler-short-version.html#reste_descriptions

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 9:42 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
A-50:
It’s got the word “mota” stamped on it.
<image0.jpeg>
<image1.jpeg>


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 5:22 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


For A55 owners and possibly A50 owners (an A50 owner please verify)

There is a different oil cooler that Amel used in the A55 (possibly all hull numbers). I am not sure of the brand, but the same thing applies to the end closest to the sea chest. Here is a photo of the oil cooler on the A55.
<image.png>



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 8:55 AM Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Scott, same Bowman cooler on Yanmar SMs and 54 D3s.
It is very important to inspect the end of the cooler nearest the sea chest. This is where debris will accumulate and reduce water flow. According to Bowman the number 1 failure of the Bowman Cooler is the overtightening of the boot hose clamps on each end. The metal is soft enough that a overtightened hose clamp will squeeze the tubes closed.

Here is a short story for many Amel owners. I had a client who had purchased my Amel Book and 24/7 Support. After about 5 years he decided to sell his Amel. When it was being surveyed the surveyor insisted on running the engine at WOT, the Onan, the water maker, and 3 Air Conditioners. The engine overheated. The surveyor's conclusion was that the Amel sea chest and manifolds were inadequate. My client called and was very distressed. I suggested to him that the Bowman oil cooler had debris inside the boot nearest to the sea chest. Nobody agreed with me and thousands were spent. The sea trial was done again under the same circumstances. The engine overheated again. This time the client removed the large clamp on the end of the Boman Cooler nearest the sea chest and found it full of debris. In 5 years he had never done this, although I recommended it and it is in my book. The moral of this story is easy to figure out. The page from my book is below.



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 4:27 AM Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

Hi Mark;

 

Thank you for sharing your experience. We removed and had all of the heat exchangers professionally cleaned in 2018. However, it is not possible to identify wear. Therefore I’d like to order a couple of the heat exchangers and replace ours and have one as spare. It is hard to read the part number on the cooler, without removing it.

 

Does anyone know if all A54s used the same part number too, or are there different parts for different hull numbers?

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark McGovern via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2021 12:41 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [Special] [AmelYachtOwners] Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons #lessons

 

In the spirit of Pat from Shenanigans "Lessons Learned" post a few week's back I thought I would share what I learned when my Bowman DC60-XCC oil cooler failed while motoring up the coast of Maine a few days ago.  Thankfully, we caught the failure relatively early in large part due to the fact that when cruising in Maine you have to remain hyper-aware at all times because of the lobster pots that are literally all over the place including in marked channels and anchorages. Because of that, both my wife and I were in the cockpit doing nothing but looking out for lobster pots and calling out their positions to whomever was at the helm. There were no podcasts, no music, no book reading, no headphone, just hyper-vigilance with two people, 4 eyes, and 4 ears on watch at all times. 

The first symptom we noticed was what sounded like a slight misfire of the engine.  It sounded like the RPM increased ever so slightly for just a second.  It was just a "blip" and was not large enough to actually even register on the tachometer.  After hearing it a few times, a minute or so apart, I asked my wife if she was hearing it. She said she was. My first thought was a clogged fuel filter despite the fact that my last fuel fill ups were from fairly busy harbors in Annapolis, MD and Onset, Massachusetts and that we had only ~60 hours on the Racor filter.  In addition, the RPMs of the engine seemed to increase not decrease like I would expect from fuel starvation from a clogged fuel filter.  In any case, I switched over to the second Racor but the occasional engine “blip” did not go away. In fact it got more frequent and it actually started to register on the tachometer just barely.  I put my head over the side to take a look at the engine exhaust.  I did not see any white or black smoke coming out of the engine exhaust.  However, I did see an oil slick trailing behind us the likes of which I have never seen before.  My immediate thought was that the engine oil cooler had failed and was leaking engine oil into the raw water system.  We had no choice but to shut the engine down ASAP.  There was only 6-7 knots of wind directly behind us but we also had a bit of favorable current so we just put out the main sail, turned off the engine and called Towboat US.  We are not at all familiar with this area and we did not see any decent anchorages looking at the charts. We were only 2 nm from our destination of Belfast, Maine and the Towboat captain said it would take him about an hour to meet us at the entrance to the harbor.  So we sailed at 1.5-2 knots with just the Main and met the Towboat captain at the entrance to the harbor where he towed us the last mile to our mooring ball where we still sit right now waiting for our replacement oil cooler to arrive from the UK.

 

Once we were safely moored, I went down to the engine room to check the oil in the Yanmar.  It was perfect.  Not a drop appeared to be missing.  After a brief “wtf?” moment, I checked the transmission dipstick.  The fluid level did not even register on the dipstick at all.  However, I could see that there was some ATF left in the transmission case.  That was a bit of a relief but not much.

 

All of this happened on a Saturday and I do not carry a spare oil cooler so I would have to wait until Monday to order a replacement.  First thing Monday morning I started to call all of the USA dealers for Bowman marine products listed on Bowman’s website.  Of those who actually answered the phone, none of them had the DC60-XCC in stock or even just the DC60 (oil cooler with no end caps). One actually told me that he didn't think DC60-XCC was a valid Bowman part number. I said “I’m looking at their catalog online right now.  It is.”

 

I then called Bowman in the UK and asked if they knew anyone in the USA who might have one of these in stock and they hesitated and said the only one who might have one is Tradewinds Power Corporation.  When I had previously called Tradewinds Power Corporation they said "our computer system is down right now" so we will need to call you back.  They never did.  

Luckily, I had also asked Bowman who in the UK would definitely have them in stock and would ship to the USA.  Without hesitation, they told me that Lancing Marine will definitely have it and they ship around the world.  So I called Lancing Marine (https://www.lancingmarine.com/) and had a wonderful experience buying from them.  Not only were their prices the lowest by far that I had seen anywhere online (79 GBP/~109 USD including new couplers) but the ordering experience was fantastic despite it being phone order only.  The person I spoke to also obviously knows these transmissions well.  His name was Mike and I'm pretty sure he is the owner and founder of the company - founded in 1970!  He gave me his opinion on the state of my transmission (he thinks it’s probably fine) and advice on how to test it to see even before the replacement cooler arrives.  On top of all that, despite it being about 3pm their time when I called, the coolers (I ordered a spare) shipped out the same day.  Last, he said that if I do need to get the transmission rebuilt, that he would highly recommend a company in the lower Chesapeake Bay called Transatlantic Diesels. He says that they know these ZF transmissions better than anyone and he has done business with them for years.  It was really just a great overall buying experience that seems to be so rare in these days of anonymous Amazon purchases.

 

The moral of the story is that for ~$109 plus shipping and an hour of my time I should have replaced the transmission oil cooler PROACTIVELY soon after I bought the boat back in July 2017.  Especially given that I did not know the age of this critical part.  Or I should have replaced one of four times that I have replaced the transmission fluid.  At the bare minimum, I should have had a spare oil cooler already on board.  The engine, and I assume the oil cooler, just surpassed the 2000 hour mark.  Researching this site after the fact I found at least two other SM owners who had the same failure at around the 2000 hour mark. Both, I believe, lost their transmissions.  Hopefully, I have not. I will know in a few days time.

 

So in the spirit of the #lessonslearned, don’t be like me.  If you are not sure how old your transmission oil cooler is, replace it.  If it’s approaching 2000 hours, replace it.  At a minimum, get yourself a spare oil cooler.  And if you can’t find it locally, get it from the nice people at Lancing Marine in the UK so that we all have at least one place in the world that keeps these things in stock.

 

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Pat,

Thanks for your help. I’m curious to see what you traveller system looks like. Most SMs I’ve looked at did not have my traveller system, but most of those were higher hull numbers than yours. I know the next generation of travelers they used was an Antal system, but not so sure about mine. If you could send me a picture of yours it would be great. 


Steve


Re: Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

Patrick McAneny
 

Steve , The track may well be from Antal , if you measure the track ,you may find a direct replacement car on their website ,without replacing the track. I will be going out to my boat this afternoon after it cools down a bit ,I will measure my track ,to compare to what you have . Our boats are only 51 apart , so the track is probably the same.
Pat
SM Shenanigans #123


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Davis <flyboyscd@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 26, 2021 12:11 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

We just broke the attachment point on our mainsheet traveller during our passage from Seattle to San Francisco. We  have SM #72 with the original style track and traveller. Amel changed to a different style system shortly after our boat was built, and changed again with the SM2000. I cannot find any markings on the traveller indicating who’s product it is, and also who would of made the track. I guess the choices would be Goiot, Lewmar, or Antal. Do any of you experts out there know who made these early systems? I bet Olivier, Bill R, or Joel would know. 
We are on our way south, and need to get this sorted out quickly. I suspect due to the age of everything, I may need to replace the track with something more modern. Have any of you ever removed your track from one of the older hulls like mine? How difficult was it to get the screws out. My understanding is the screws are tapped into a steel plate inside the deck. Is this assumption correct? I’m guessing with stainless screws through an aluminum track into a steel plate, I’m likely to shear most of the screws off trying to get them out. 
Any advice on how to repair or replace my traveller system would be greatly appreciated. I’m trying to get the help of a rigger, but all the ones I’m finding seem to be busy for months, and I may be on my own with this. I’ll attach a few pictures of the broken traveller, and what it looked like prior to failure. The attached blocks with soft shackles are something I added recently when the sheaves on the stainless attachment piece fell apart. 

Regards,
Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Alameda, CA


Re: Mainsail furler gasket.

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Amel suggested replacement every 2 years. Our Furler motor failed due to water intrusion  2 months after we purchased kokomo. The motor could not be repaired.

Respectfully;


Mohammad Shirloo
+1-323-633-2222 Cell
+1-424-644-0908 Fax


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Gregory Dmitriev via groups.io <41greg.marine@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2021 6:38:55 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Mainsail furler gasket.
 
Hi guys,
Does somebody know how important can be the damage of this gasket?


Re: Mainsail furler gasket.

Mark McGovern
 

It can be a complete disaster causing the tapered roller bearing inside the furler to rust and fail completely.  This can cause the furler to seize and make it impossible to unfurl the main sail or worse, make it impossible to furl it in.  To see if yours is damaged, drop it down to manual mode.  It should be relatively easy to turn.  If it is not, you need to tear down and rebuild the furler like I had to do.

See this post I made:  https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/message/47988

And here is the entire thread on the topic:  https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/topic/29770769#47988


--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA

1361 - 1380 of 61023