Date   

Re: Tonight’s supper…

Rachael Courtenay
 

It is my culinary interpretation of the forestay!

Indeed you are right, we are very much enjoying this time of pre-ownership, and have learnt so much already from this group. Hopefully my MARROWmu has provided a little light relief for all you sailors trying to fix things out there! 😊

Rachael


--
Rachael & Robin Courtenay
Seeking an Amel
Europe


Re: Tonight’s supper…

Bill Kinney
 

I have see boats made of fiberglass, wood, steel, aluminum, even (shudder!) cement.  But a zucchini hull is a new one!  I have no doubt if it proves cheap enough to manufacture, Group Beneteau will find a way to sell them.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Watermaker end cap removal; Dessalator D160

Mark McGovern
 

Bill,

I hope I don't have to pop these end caps off again anytime soon but I will keep the water pressure idea in mind for whenever the time comes.  It makes total sense to use water pressure from the inside of the pressure vessel to remove the end caps.

Cara's had a pretty sedentary life the past 17 years spending most of her time at the dock with just one Atlantic crossing from the previous owner and then the trip up from Martinique to the Chesapeake Bay when we bought her in 2017 so I expected events like this to happen.  I just hoped it could have waited a few weeks as I actually had planned on replacing the membranes this October when we are back in the Chesapeake.   Apparently the boat had other plans.

See you guys in a few weeks!
  
--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Tonight’s supper…

Brent Cameron
 

Trade you Arno!  LOL. 

Brent

On Aug 27, 2021, 4:25 PM -0700, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...>, wrote:
Enjoy your meal!
You are aware there are no Amels with three masts though?

Enjoy the hunt for an Amel. In some ways that is even nicer then actually owning one 😀

Cheers,

Arno Luijten
A54-121

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Tonight’s supper…

Arno Luijten
 

Enjoy your meal!
You are aware there are no Amels with three masts though?

Enjoy the hunt for an Amel. In some ways that is even nicer then actually owning one 😀

Cheers,

Arno Luijten
A54-121


Re: Watermaker end cap removal; Dessalator D160

Bill Kinney
 

Mark,

If it isn't one thing, it's another.  But more likely both at the same time....

Another method for removal of the membrane end caps that is a likely to be a bit more gentle to the parts is to attach a fresh water pressure water hose to the salt water inlet, fill the housing with water until it overflows from the brine outlet, then block the outlet with your finger.  Even a little pressure, and the caps just slide  right off. 

Note, do NOT do this with air pressure, the endcaps will launch off at high velocity!

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD.


Tonight’s supper…

Rachael Courtenay
 
Edited





Tonight’s supper!…Super MARROWmu. We don’t have the boat yet, but we carry the dream ⛵️.

If you plan to sell a SM 2000 in the coming year or so, please keep us in mind.

Many thanks.

rachael.courtenay@...


Rachael & Robin Courtenay
Seeking an Amel
Europe


Re: Engine room lining on Amel 54

 

I feel certain Roque's methods are probably the best (earlier post in this thread).

I have had several clients take another approach by brushing-on and rolling-on this product. I will ask my client(s) to post the finished photos.
image.png


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Fri, Aug 27, 2021 at 5:28 AM Roque <ediroque@...> wrote:

Hi Lior 

I decided to try "liquid rubber" last year and I am pleased with the result. A lot of work and time, though.

I spray painted using a high quality liquid rubber made for industrial use: Protex by BioLub Industries, made in Brazil. https://youtu.be/H9bMmClhXQcBut I also tested with "Plasti Dip". This Plasti Dip, or similar, you can easily find in US and the end result was satisfactory.

Before applying "Protex", I diluted with Xylol solvent, and tested on a piece of foam I had. Only after a few days with no damage, I painted a test 10cm x 10cm patch on the boat foam itself. I used a small brush for this test, but waited for a couple of months (Covid helped here!) As it has not damaged the foam at all, I made two new patches with 2 and 3 coats to compare. Two coats seamed about right to me.

The finish is not bright, and if the foam had imperfections before due to lack of linen, of course they will not completely disappear (see pic). But even in this case it protects the foam from further degradation and renders a much, much better look.

I also decided, for now, not to paint the areas where the original protection was not peeling off or cracked. But  will do before it starts.

Hope it helps

Roque
Attica A54 #117
Paraty Rio de Janeiro 

Em sex., 27 de ago. de 2021 às 04:10, Lior Keydar <lior246@...> escreveu:
Hello everybody

I have the same problem and wanted to ask if somebody found a good solution that solve the problem. 
Did you found good paint? or any material that you can stick on the foam?

Thanks
Lior A54 #18


--
Roque
Attika A54 117
Paraty - Brazil 


Re: Engine room lining on Amel 54

Roque
 

Hi Lior 

I decided to try "liquid rubber" last year and I am pleased with the result. A lot of work and time, though.

I spray painted using a high quality liquid rubber made for industrial use: Protex by BioLub Industries, made in Brazil. https://youtu.be/H9bMmClhXQcBut I also tested with "Plasti Dip". This Plasti Dip, or similar, you can easily find in US and the end result was satisfactory.

Before applying "Protex", I diluted with Xylol solvent, and tested on a piece of foam I had. Only after a few days with no damage, I painted a test 10cm x 10cm patch on the boat foam itself. I used a small brush for this test, but waited for a couple of months (Covid helped here!) As it has not damaged the foam at all, I made two new patches with 2 and 3 coats to compare. Two coats seamed about right to me.

The finish is not bright, and if the foam had imperfections before due to lack of linen, of course they will not completely disappear (see pic). But even in this case it protects the foam from further degradation and renders a much, much better look.

I also decided, for now, not to paint the areas where the original protection was not peeling off or cracked. But  will do before it starts.

Hope it helps

Roque
Attica A54 #117
Paraty Rio de Janeiro 

Em sex., 27 de ago. de 2021 às 04:10, Lior Keydar <lior246@...> escreveu:

Hello everybody

I have the same problem and wanted to ask if somebody found a good solution that solve the problem. 
Did you found good paint? or any material that you can stick on the foam?

Thanks
Lior A54 #18


--
Roque
Attika A54 117
Paraty - Brazil 


Re: Lofrans Tigres windlass parts

Ralf Schroeder
 

Hi John,
I have bought some spare parts for my old lofrans und now my new lofrans tigres bei www.svb.de.
There are in the portfolio some pieces for clutch clone and other components.

Best wishes

Ralf
Baghira, Sharki #42


Re: Engine room lining on Amel 54

Lior Keydar
 

Hello everybody

I have the same problem and wanted to ask if somebody found a good solution that solve the problem. 
Did you found good paint? or any material that you can stick on the foam?

Thanks
Lior A54 #18


Lofrans Tigres windlass parts

JB Duler
 

Hello,

I am looking for parts (clutch cone for gypsy, coupling, drive shaft) that are not included in the parts kit.
The Lofrans customer service has not answered my emails. Maybe like other European suppliers they are on vacation in August?
Does anybody know of a good source for parts (Europe/UK or in the US)
Thks,
JB

(sorry I posted the previous message in the yachts for sale section)
--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

Stephen Davis
 

Pat,

It sounds like you have the next generation of track and car, which is Antal. My track is 1 1/4" high, which is different than yours. I finally managed to match my track and car after extensive internet searching, and it is Lewmar Solent size 2. Lewmar made this product from 85 to 91, and the SN and Sm's to somewhere near my hull number have this setup. There are absolutely no spares available worldwide, and nothing else is going to fit this track.

I found an older Maramu in this marina yesterday, and they did tap a new Harken traveller system  on top of the existing track. While not beautiful, it seems to work OK, and I'll consider this option. It also raises the system up high enough that you can remove the car for maintenance.

Thanks again for your help.

Steve


Re: Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

Patrick McAneny
 

Steve, I did not take a picture, but it does not look like yours , Mine is not shaped like a T track as the genoa track is. That track is 3/4 " high ,track edge is 1/4" thick by 11/2" wide and Antal  makes cars for that. What is the dimensions of your track ? Rather than remove the old track ,you could tap into it, and bolt new track on top of it. 
Good Luck,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Davis <flyboyscd@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 26, 2021 2:55 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

Hi Pat,

Thanks for your help. I’m curious to see what you traveller system looks like. Most SMs I’ve looked at did not have my traveller system, but most of those were higher hull numbers than yours. I know the next generation of travelers they used was an Antal system, but not so sure about mine. If you could send me a picture of yours it would be great. 

Steve


Re: Watermaker end cap removal; Dessalator D160

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Mark and Ian. The attach a cord and tug is the best removal method I have used.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 27 August 2021 at 09:32 Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

Ian,

Brilliant idea!  I struggled for a few minutes trying to remove one end cap using an oil filter wrench and a large pair of Channellocks and while I could spin the cap in circles I was barely able to move the cap outward even just a little.  I searched "watermaker end cap" on the forum and found your post from over 14 years ago.  I did pretty much exactly as you described and the first end cap popped right out on the 3rd "slightly" forceful pull.  Below are some pics of the setup:



The hose clamp technique woulding work for the end caps with the hardware screwed into them and I didn't want to risk removing the hardware.  Given how easy the other end caps came off,  I just grabbed a screwdriver and a soft faced mallet and was able to knock them out with a few gentle wraps of the mallet on the screwdriver handle with blade of the screwdriver on the stainless steel hardware bracket as shown in the picture below:



I had all four end caps off in a matter of minutes.

And yes, for those of you who read my earlier post about my transmission oil cooler failure the other day, at least one of our saltwater membranes just failed yesterday.  TDS has been creeping up steadily the last few times I've run it and this time we were making product water with a TDS of around 1000.  When it rains it pours!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons

Randall Walker
 

Yes my sea chest even when the valve is closed let’s in water. When I open the top I have to put it back on 
Or it will flow over. I don’t pay it much attention as I only notice it when I pull the strainer to clean. I have tried to adjust the stopcock but it does allow water to fill the standpipe.

The standpipe is a brilliant idea. But all the effort of owners to make shutoff valves should have been a no brainer for Amel to have instituted 20-30 years ago. I guess a bean counter thought not.

Randall
A54#56

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 15:00 Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Thanks Bill and everyone else.

As an aside, the stopcock on my sea chest allows a tadbit of water through even in the closed position. Has anyone ever experienced this? Could it be a bit of growth in the stopcock itself? 

Normally it's not an issue since either the stopcock is open or it "leaks" into the sea itself, but given that I'm going to replace my oil cooler soon, I'd rather not have a slow trickle of saltwater into the engine room when the hoses are disconnected.


On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 5:16 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks like this?


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:06 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Yep, I could not find C9 made by Mota



On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 10:03 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looks a bit different than that. Says “C9” on it.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 6:00 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Matt,

Thanks for that. It is likely this cooler:
<image.png>


Tubestack diametre (Ømm) 58
Connection on cold side Ø52mm hose
Connection on hot side G3/8" (BSP) thread
Tubes material Copper-Nickel (CuNi10)
Headers material Brass
Housing material Extruded aluminium
https://www.motarecreational.com/en/g-range/10-gear-oil-cooler-short-version.html#reste_descriptions

On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 9:42 AM Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
A-50:
It’s got the word “mota” stamped on it.
<image0.jpeg>
<image1.jpeg>


~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Aug 26, 2021, at 5:22 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


For A55 owners and possibly A50 owners (an A50 owner please verify)

There is a different oil cooler that Amel used in the A55 (possibly all hull numbers). I am not sure of the brand, but the same thing applies to the end closest to the sea chest. Here is a photo of the oil cooler on the A55.
<image.png>




On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 8:55 AM Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Scott, same Bowman cooler on Yanmar SMs and 54 D3s.
It is very important to inspect the end of the cooler nearest the sea chest. This is where debris will accumulate and reduce water flow. According to Bowman the number 1 failure of the Bowman Cooler is the overtightening of the boot hose clamps on each end. The metal is soft enough that a overtightened hose clamp will squeeze the tubes closed.

Here is a short story for many Amel owners. I had a client who had purchased my Amel Book and 24/7 Support. After about 5 years he decided to sell his Amel. When it was being surveyed the surveyor insisted on running the engine at WOT, the Onan, the water maker, and 3 Air Conditioners. The engine overheated. The surveyor's conclusion was that the Amel sea chest and manifolds were inadequate. My client called and was very distressed. I suggested to him that the Bowman oil cooler had debris inside the boot nearest to the sea chest. Nobody agreed with me and thousands were spent. The sea trial was done again under the same circumstances. The engine overheated again. This time the client removed the large clamp on the end of the Boman Cooler nearest the sea chest and found it full of debris. In 5 years he had never done this, although I recommended it and it is in my book. The moral of this story is easy to figure out. The page from my book is below.




On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 4:27 AM Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

Hi Mark;

 

Thank you for sharing your experience. We removed and had all of the heat exchangers professionally cleaned in 2018. However, it is not possible to identify wear. Therefore I’d like to order a couple of the heat exchangers and replace ours and have one as spare. It is hard to read the part number on the cooler, without removing it.

 

Does anyone know if all A54s used the same part number too, or are there different parts for different hull numbers?

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark McGovern via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2021 12:41 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [Special] [AmelYachtOwners] Bowman DC60-XCC Transmission Oil Cooler Failure; ZF Hurth ZF 25; Yanmar 4JH3-HTE #lessons #lessons

 

In the spirit of Pat from Shenanigans "Lessons Learned" post a few week's back I thought I would share what I learned when my Bowman DC60-XCC oil cooler failed while motoring up the coast of Maine a few days ago.  Thankfully, we caught the failure relatively early in large part due to the fact that when cruising in Maine you have to remain hyper-aware at all times because of the lobster pots that are literally all over the place including in marked channels and anchorages. Because of that, both my wife and I were in the cockpit doing nothing but looking out for lobster pots and calling out their positions to whomever was at the helm. There were no podcasts, no music, no book reading, no headphone, just hyper-vigilance with two people, 4 eyes, and 4 ears on watch at all times. 

The first symptom we noticed was what sounded like a slight misfire of the engine.  It sounded like the RPM increased ever so slightly for just a second.  It was just a "blip" and was not large enough to actually even register on the tachometer.  After hearing it a few times, a minute or so apart, I asked my wife if she was hearing it. She said she was. My first thought was a clogged fuel filter despite the fact that my last fuel fill ups were from fairly busy harbors in Annapolis, MD and Onset, Massachusetts and that we had only ~60 hours on the Racor filter.  In addition, the RPMs of the engine seemed to increase not decrease like I would expect from fuel starvation from a clogged fuel filter.  In any case, I switched over to the second Racor but the occasional engine “blip” did not go away. In fact it got more frequent and it actually started to register on the tachometer just barely.  I put my head over the side to take a look at the engine exhaust.  I did not see any white or black smoke coming out of the engine exhaust.  However, I did see an oil slick trailing behind us the likes of which I have never seen before.  My immediate thought was that the engine oil cooler had failed and was leaking engine oil into the raw water system.  We had no choice but to shut the engine down ASAP.  There was only 6-7 knots of wind directly behind us but we also had a bit of favorable current so we just put out the main sail, turned off the engine and called Towboat US.  We are not at all familiar with this area and we did not see any decent anchorages looking at the charts. We were only 2 nm from our destination of Belfast, Maine and the Towboat captain said it would take him about an hour to meet us at the entrance to the harbor.  So we sailed at 1.5-2 knots with just the Main and met the Towboat captain at the entrance to the harbor where he towed us the last mile to our mooring ball where we still sit right now waiting for our replacement oil cooler to arrive from the UK.

 

Once we were safely moored, I went down to the engine room to check the oil in the Yanmar.  It was perfect.  Not a drop appeared to be missing.  After a brief “wtf?” moment, I checked the transmission dipstick.  The fluid level did not even register on the dipstick at all.  However, I could see that there was some ATF left in the transmission case.  That was a bit of a relief but not much.

 

All of this happened on a Saturday and I do not carry a spare oil cooler so I would have to wait until Monday to order a replacement.  First thing Monday morning I started to call all of the USA dealers for Bowman marine products listed on Bowman’s website.  Of those who actually answered the phone, none of them had the DC60-XCC in stock or even just the DC60 (oil cooler with no end caps). One actually told me that he didn't think DC60-XCC was a valid Bowman part number. I said “I’m looking at their catalog online right now.  It is.”

 

I then called Bowman in the UK and asked if they knew anyone in the USA who might have one of these in stock and they hesitated and said the only one who might have one is Tradewinds Power Corporation.  When I had previously called Tradewinds Power Corporation they said "our computer system is down right now" so we will need to call you back.  They never did.  

Luckily, I had also asked Bowman who in the UK would definitely have them in stock and would ship to the USA.  Without hesitation, they told me that Lancing Marine will definitely have it and they ship around the world.  So I called Lancing Marine (https://www.lancingmarine.com/) and had a wonderful experience buying from them.  Not only were their prices the lowest by far that I had seen anywhere online (79 GBP/~109 USD including new couplers) but the ordering experience was fantastic despite it being phone order only.  The person I spoke to also obviously knows these transmissions well.  His name was Mike and I'm pretty sure he is the owner and founder of the company - founded in 1970!  He gave me his opinion on the state of my transmission (he thinks it’s probably fine) and advice on how to test it to see even before the replacement cooler arrives.  On top of all that, despite it being about 3pm their time when I called, the coolers (I ordered a spare) shipped out the same day.  Last, he said that if I do need to get the transmission rebuilt, that he would highly recommend a company in the lower Chesapeake Bay called Transatlantic Diesels. He says that they know these ZF transmissions better than anyone and he has done business with them for years.  It was really just a great overall buying experience that seems to be so rare in these days of anonymous Amazon purchases.

 

The moral of the story is that for ~$109 plus shipping and an hour of my time I should have replaced the transmission oil cooler PROACTIVELY soon after I bought the boat back in July 2017.  Especially given that I did not know the age of this critical part.  Or I should have replaced one of four times that I have replaced the transmission fluid.  At the bare minimum, I should have had a spare oil cooler already on board.  The engine, and I assume the oil cooler, just surpassed the 2000 hour mark.  Researching this site after the fact I found at least two other SM owners who had the same failure at around the 2000 hour mark. Both, I believe, lost their transmissions.  Hopefully, I have not. I will know in a few days time.

 

So in the spirit of the #lessonslearned, don’t be like me.  If you are not sure how old your transmission oil cooler is, replace it.  If it’s approaching 2000 hours, replace it.  At a minimum, get yourself a spare oil cooler.  And if you can’t find it locally, get it from the nice people at Lancing Marine in the UK so that we all have at least one place in the world that keeps these things in stock.

 

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Sliders for the curtains on SM & Trans cooler on the Yanmar 4jh4hte

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

Eric,

These slide worked in the tracks in our SM:  https://www.curtain-tracks.com/recmar-3050-abs-plastic-eye-slide.html

--
Mark McGoverns
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Mainsail furler gasket.

Mark McGovern
 

Gregory,

Essentially, yes.  There is a ton of information in the thread link that I sent you earlier including part numbers and sources for the parts. 

Also, Woody from Mothership Adrift made a video of his rebuild:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-p8bdPpnmk

Last, consider setting up a signature in your account which contains your name, boat model, hull #, boat name, and your current location.  It will help members to better assist you with your question and if you put your location, you might even get some help in person.  If you are not sure how to do that here is a link to instructions:  https://groups.io/g/TentecArgonautVI/topic/how_to_create_an_e_signature/10289297?p=

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Watermaker end cap removal; Dessalator D160

Mark McGovern
 

Ian,

Brilliant idea!  I struggled for a few minutes trying to remove one end cap using an oil filter wrench and a large pair of Channellocks and while I could spin the cap in circles I was barely able to move the cap outward even just a little.  I searched "watermaker end cap" on the forum and found your post from over 14 years ago.  I did pretty much exactly as you described and the first end cap popped right out on the 3rd "slightly" forceful pull.  Below are some pics of the setup:



The hose clamp technique woulding work for the end caps with the hardware screwed into them and I didn't want to risk removing the hardware.  Given how easy the other end caps came off,  I just grabbed a screwdriver and a soft faced mallet and was able to knock them out with a few gentle wraps of the mallet on the screwdriver handle with blade of the screwdriver on the stainless steel hardware bracket as shown in the picture below:



I had all four end caps off in a matter of minutes.

And yes, for those of you who read my earlier post about my transmission oil cooler failure the other day, at least one of our saltwater membranes just failed yesterday.  TDS has been creeping up steadily the last few times I've run it and this time we were making product water with a TDS of around 1000.  When it rains it pours!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Mainsheet traveller Broken on SM#72

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Bill,

Our track and car is the one you have depicted on the right and labeled as SN OEM/Lewmar. I guess this style track and traveller was used on both the SN and early SMs. Our track is an I-beam style and measures 38mm across and 34mm high. Unfortunately, this car is not in production, and I can't find anything that would fit this track size of I-beam style track. If you have any ideas where to find a replacement, please let me know. It is good to know that it is a Lewmar traveller. I ran into Dave Benjamin's old Maramu #29 "Exit Strategy" looking very neglected here in Alameda yesterday. It had a Harken traveller installed on top of the existing I-beam track which is very similar to mine. They appeared to have just drilled and tapped the existing track, and screwed the new track on top. It was not the most eloquent solution, but it did take Dave to the South Pacific and back, and still looks solid. Ultimately, all the boats with my system will experience this failure, and it would be nice to document a good fix for everyone. I'm afraid trying to remove the old track is going to shear all the screws and create a huge expensive mess. I'm using penetrating oil on the screws now, but 30 years of stainless screws going though and aluminum track into a steel plate is going to be a dicey job.

Steve

1421 - 1440 of 61098