Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Eamonn Washington
 

Hi

I am now also looking for the linesplan, to be able to register Travel Bug in Ireland.  Did anyone ever get them?

Thanks

Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
New Ross Boat Yard, Ireland.


Re: Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

Paul Osterberg
 

Alan
I havet Victron MPPT controllers, currently 4 of Them so havet hade good opportunity's to compare the differens between serie and parallel. Where I saw the smallest difference was on the stern arc which is less prone to shadow. When changing the rail mounted from serie to parallel the difference in production was very substantial.
Very often there are at least partly shadow on one of the rail mounted panels. For panels on the Bimini shadow will always be a big issue
Paul


Re: Fuel Polishing

Mike Johnson
 

Hi Bill,

Thank you for the comments and advice.  We also have never had a problem but in recent years have been collecting increasing amounts of debri in the filters especially following bad weather passages.

Our thoughts were to install a polishing system to ensure the fuel was clean especially when agitated and the accumulated detritus at the bottom of the tank mixes with the fuel.

Very best wishes

Mike & Peta

Solitude
SM2K 461

On 1 Sep 2021, at 04:54, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Mike,

Many people have installed, such a system, and I'll let them tell you the how's and why's.  

Our boat did two circumnavigations and accumulated over 8000 engine hours with NO primary fuel filter at all, just a water separator.  Despite the obvious success of that arrangement, I did replace the Amel installed water separator with a standard Racor primary filter because it made me feel better.  

I have had sailboats with diesel engines for over 30 years and have never had a fuel issue that a "fuel polishing" system would have fixed.  To be clear, I have also never had a common rail engine that might require a higher level of fuel filtration.

No matter if you have a fuel polishing system, or not, always be careful where you buy fuel.  If the source is even the least bit dicey, use a good quality filter funnel when filling your tank.  Keep the filter funnel clean and dry, and you're very unlikely to have a problem.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: WaterLift Muffler for Volvo

Olivier Beaute
 

Good morning Bill,

the muffler on Harmonie is most probably made of stainless steel, not aluminum (unless it has been replaced since new).
It may probably be repaired unless the leak is in a difficult place.
However, VETUS plastic mufflers are also good products as long as you make sure the sea-water flow is always strong.

Good luck for this job.

Olivier

On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 02:57:42 AM GMT+2, michael winand via groups.io <mfw642000@...> wrote:


We installed the LSG Vetas waterlock, part of the repower, happy with the performance. You can have different diameter on the entry/exit. Moved to the fuel tank side,  removed a little bit of foam around the lsg for a nice fit between the engine frame.
Michael Nebo sm251 


On Wed, 1 Sep 2021 at 10:05 am, CW Bill Rouse
<brouse@...> wrote:
That was Amel's choice on the exYanmar SMs. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...sg
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Aug 31, 2021, 6:59 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Our Amel made aluminum waterlift muffler has started a slow leak, that will not get better by itself.  It has had a long and happy life, but now a replacement is needed.

My inclination is to go with a Vetus LSG75 because it fits the existing hoses, has a large capacity, and the extra flapper valve is attractive at keeping the water where it belongs.

I know others have had to replace these units, and I'd be interested in hearing what model water lift you chose, whey, and if it has been successful for you.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD


Re: Fuel Polishing

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello Mike,

I have experience with fuel filtration systems and fuel polishing systems. The main issue with fuel in this day and age is the quality of the fuel itself; It ain’t what it used to be!!! The problem also extends to the aviation industry and whilst flying airliners, we never had a problem; the reason is simple, airliners flew 400 hours per month and used a lot of fuel. However, when I started flying corporate jets the situation was different. Typically these aircraft fly less than 500 hours per year and are parked for long periods with near empty tanks … sometimes in moist areas. The bacteria that causes diesel fuel bug is always present in the atmosphere and cannot be avoided. 

Fuel polishing is one means of minimising the possibility of diesel bug contamination and the other is to install a high quality fuel filtration system. Personally I favour basic precautions, a diesel fuel biocide of some sort, full fuel tanks and dual Racor 7550 filters. The diesel fuel pumps on the Genset and the main engine typically feed double the volume needed for operation of the engine. Meaning that 50% of the fuel drawn from the tank is returned to the tank. This is sufficient movement  to ensure that the fuel in your tank is clean. 

The standard precautions are as follows:
-   Keep your tanks full. Always filter the fuel with a good funnel if you have any doubts about its quality. 
-   Add a biocide as directed by the manufacturer. (Biobor or Grotamar are two of them)
-   Relax probably nothing will happen from then on. Of course change the filters when required and verify the sight bowls to guarantee no deposit. 

Installation of a fuel polishing system involves quite a bit of work and sizable quantities of cash. A friend of mine, now stuck in France due to international travel restrictions, asked me to oversee the installation of a fuel polishing system on his boat this year. The installation is successful however his case was different; he had a COVID 19 sized diesel fuel bug problem in his tanks. His boat has large capacity fuel exceeding 1500 L and had been on the hard in Tahiti for an extended period of time due to an unfortunate incident at sea. .. with tanks having a remaining quantity of about 300 liters each. These are perfect conditions for the development of diesel fuel bug. 

System description: consists of Racor fuel polishing pump, a separate Racor 7550 Fuel filter as the pump does not have a sight bowl (although depicted as having a sight bowl on the Racor website, this is not the case ) and you will never be certain of your fuel unless you can visually check from time to time. It also required the design and installation of a cross feeding manifold and distribution valves. This allowed for fuel transfer; a situation which was impossible with the original design. 

On my SM, I opted for the dual Racor filters and I feed through only one of the filters at a time and switch over after each filter change. There is a lot more faffing with the fuel polishing system than with a good fuel filtration system. 

Good luck with your decision and if you require, I’d be glad to talk to you over the Internet. 

Kind regards


Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera , SM007, Opua NZ


On 1 Sep 2021, at 15:54, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Mike,

Many people have installed, such a system, and I'll let them tell you the how's and why's.  

Our boat did two circumnavigations and accumulated over 8000 engine hours with NO primary fuel filter at all, just a water separator.  Despite the obvious success of that arrangement, I did replace the Amel installed water separator with a standard Racor primary filter because it made me feel better.  

I have had sailboats with diesel engines for over 30 years and have never had a fuel issue that a "fuel polishing" system would have fixed.  To be clear, I have also never had a common rail engine that might require a higher level of fuel filtration.

No matter if you have a fuel polishing system, or not, always be careful where you buy fuel.  If the source is even the least bit dicey, use a good quality filter funnel when filling your tank.  Keep the filter funnel clean and dry, and you're very unlikely to have a problem.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Volvo TMD22 Engine Mounts,

Ian Park
 

Bill
Did you also replace the C Drive rubber bushing. If you had a lot of vibration it will have been affected too. It is a half hour job.
I don’t think mine had ever been replaced and was the cause of my mystery vibration.
It’s now on my check list when I change the prop shaft bushings.

Ian Ocean Hobo, SN96, the Scilly Isles, UK


Re: Fuel Polishing

Bill Kinney
 

Mike,

Many people have installed, such a system, and I'll let them tell you the how's and why's.  

Our boat did two circumnavigations and accumulated over 8000 engine hours with NO primary fuel filter at all, just a water separator.  Despite the obvious success of that arrangement, I did replace the Amel installed water separator with a standard Racor primary filter because it made me feel better.  

I have had sailboats with diesel engines for over 30 years and have never had a fuel issue that a "fuel polishing" system would have fixed.  To be clear, I have also never had a common rail engine that might require a higher level of fuel filtration.

No matter if you have a fuel polishing system, or not, always be careful where you buy fuel.  If the source is even the least bit dicey, use a good quality filter funnel when filling your tank.  Keep the filter funnel clean and dry, and you're very unlikely to have a problem.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Amel plastic dishes and cups

Mark McGovern
 

Bill,

I kid!  The inner 13 year old in me couldn't resist the softball you threw at us. 

I have no idea what they are worth but you will likely find many Amel owners who would love to buy them from you.  If we didn't have a pretty good set of them already aboard Cara, I would be one of them.  You should also let the Amel Facebook group know that you have these available as well.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Amel plastic dishes and cups

Mark McGovern
 


--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

Bill Kinney
 

Another perspective:  

We have 630 Watts of solar panels on an arch that supply roughly half of our electrical needs. A good reliable, efficient system that greatly reduces our genset runtime. 

We really, really REALLY appreciate the ability to fold down our bimini/dodger at a moments notice, and we do--a lot.  On a cloudy day, at night on passage to watch the stars, for visibility while maneuvering in close quarters, for communication while anchoring, while fishing.  For this reason we would never encumber our dodger with solar panels.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA




Re: Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

karkauai
 

I have 600 watts (two series pairs) in hard panels on the stern arch that give a maximum of 16A at 24v on sunny days.  I also have 250W of soft panels on the Bimini which produce a maximum of 3A in bright sun (in Maine now),but in less than ideal conditions, they hardly produce anything.  I recommend that you stick with hard panels.  I'm thinking of replacing them with more hard panels if I can figure out how to mount them above the Bimini.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Amel plastic dishes and cups

william reynolds
 

I just located a new in the box set of Amel logoed cups and dishes. Anyone have have any idea what they are worth?
Bill Reynolds
Cloudstreet


Volvo TMD22 Engine Mounts

Bill Kinney
 

Another lesson learned:  Do NOT wait to replace your engine mounts. Bad things can happen. Engine vibration and noise creeps up on you, very slowly.  You don't notice that it is a little bit worse today than it was last month.  And next month is worse again.

During our time with Harmonie we had never replaced the mounts on our TMD22, but I suspected it might be time when I did finally notice the engine vibrations increasing a bit.  Today, I changed them out. It wasn't as difficult a job as I feared, one full day of hard work did the trick, mostly. What's left is cleaning up and painting things that have gotten a bit rough looking. I have some video footage I'll share of the process, but I thought I'd give you an advance visual of how bad things were. These are hydraulic mounts.  They are full of a viscous oil that damps vibration.  Three of the four mounts had lost ALL of their oil. The one on the right is a new mount, the one on the left had just been removed.  The oil chamber was completely blown out.



I suspect that the failure of the engine mounts lead to increased vibration and misalignment which likely lead to, or at least contributed to, the failure of the rear seal of our transmission last year.  On the ZF25M transmissions replacing the rear seal requires a full disassembly of the ENTIRE unit, and is not practical. By the time you buy all the seals, gaskets, bearings, and other parts that should be replaced, a new transmission is the more economical answer.  

So, two lessons:  
  1. Changing the mounts is not that hard, with a bit of creativity, and inexpensive tools, you can lift, pull, push, and shove the engine without outside assistance.  
  2. Change them BEFORE they get this bad!
I don't know how old these were where we bought Harmonie, but I am putting these on a 5 year replacement schedule, sooner if I even THINK I notice an issue.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: WaterLift Muffler for Volvo

michael winand
 

We installed the LSG Vetas waterlock, part of the repower, happy with the performance. You can have different diameter on the entry/exit. Moved to the fuel tank side,  removed a little bit of foam around the lsg for a nice fit between the engine frame.
Michael Nebo sm251 


On Wed, 1 Sep 2021 at 10:05 am, CW Bill Rouse
<brouse@...> wrote:
That was Amel's choice on the exYanmar SMs. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...sg
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Aug 31, 2021, 6:59 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Our Amel made aluminum waterlift muffler has started a slow leak, that will not get better by itself.  It has had a long and happy life, but now a replacement is needed.

My inclination is to go with a Vetus LSG75 because it fits the existing hoses, has a large capacity, and the extra flapper valve is attractive at keeping the water where it belongs.

I know others have had to replace these units, and I'd be interested in hearing what model water lift you chose, whey, and if it has been successful for you.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD


Re: WaterLift Muffler for Volvo

 

That was Amel's choice on the Yanmar SMs. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Aug 31, 2021, 6:59 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Our Amel made aluminum waterlift muffler has started a slow leak, that will not get better by itself.  It has had a long and happy life, but now a replacement is needed.

My inclination is to go with a Vetus LSG75 because it fits the existing hoses, has a large capacity, and the extra flapper valve is attractive at keeping the water where it belongs.

I know others have had to replace these units, and I'd be interested in hearing what model water lift you chose, whey, and if it has been successful for you.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD


WaterLift Muffler for Volvo

Bill Kinney
 

Our Amel made aluminum waterlift muffler has started a slow leak, that will not get better by itself.  It has had a long and happy life, but now a replacement is needed.

My inclination is to go with a Vetus LSG75 because it fits the existing hoses, has a large capacity, and the extra flapper valve is attractive at keeping the water where it belongs.

I know others have had to replace these units, and I'd be interested in hearing what model water lift you chose, whey, and if it has been successful for you.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD


Re: Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

Alan Leslie
 

Paul, 
You don't mention anything about what kind of regulator you use (used) with your solar setup, if you used one at all.
You imply that panels in series are not efficient, but I'm guessing your 2 x 18V (nominal 12V) panels in series were connected directly to the battery bank, and no that is not efficient.
If you now have 36V panels, wired them in series and used a MPPT type controller/regulator, then that is very efficient.
But if you just wired them in parallel directly to the battery and don't have a MPPT conttroller/regulator you will be missing out on a lot.

Cheers
Alan


Re: Meltem

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thanks for this JB. Good to know my 20 year old SM 299 is not even half way yet. Your comments about the quality of the interior wood work and the finish are what we in later models are still experiencing. Interesting that you have 1500 lts of water SM 1000 and 850 fuel SM 600

Thanks again

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 01 September 2021 at 02:12 JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:

I am in the process of restoring a 1975 Meltem. I will be documenting the process in a website I am building. More like archeology than restoration, carefully removing everything that can be removed, cleaning, repairing and mounting back.


The good news for all of you, Amel owners: you can expect a long, long life from your Amel. Well worth your investment!


After 46 years, the construction is impeccable (hull, stratification, bulkheads, hardware attachments) with no major cracks. The Meltem is still rock solid. And so are the subsequent yachts (Maramu, Super Maramu and others).


We have 1,500 liters of fresh water in the keel: no gelcoat cracks, keel bolts intact.


We have 850 liters of diesel in two stainless steel tanks. As the old folks say, they don't make them like that anymore.


Everything used by Amel craftsmen has stood the test of time: varnished wood, custom stainless steel hardware,  cabinet doors, kitchen sink or bathroom features (storage cabinets, first aid cabinets, shower heads, shower pan). The African mahogany used (for the table, the bunks, the lee boards etc) is in perfect shape.


Goiots ports, aluminum hatches: all impeccable (just new gaskets) and not leaking.


We tore apart the electrical and plumbing systems: all stainless bolts and screws were first quality and easy to remove. The hoses (I forgot the name of the French company making them) were still impeccable.


The hydraulic steering is not leaking and is perfect.


The frames holding the engine (it was upgraded to a massive 125hp Yanmar by the previous owner) are rock solid.


Amel yard had that sense of perfection only found with the early Mac computers (as Steve Job used to say, there is pride in that perfectly hidden screw no consumer  will ever see). Every panel is easy to remove, every piece of wood still fits perfectly, every door closes. And you still have that homey feeling of warm quarters and curved doors.


The bad news: as Bill Rouse loves to say, every problem or failure we encountered was due to a modification by a boatyard (most of them are mere handymen). 


We had the misfortune to have work done at a yard in Port Napoleon over last winter. Just about everything they touched (plumbing, electrical, carpentry) created troubles immediately or we found the problems before it was too late. 


Leaks were patched up pouring epoxy, plywood repairs were epoxied to the hull (I assumed it is faster than using bolts), cheap plastic Chinese shower heads we broke the first night. As the yard said “we don’t repair here, we change”. If you own an Amel stay away from that place then!


I jumped into the trash to recover the old bronze shower heads, screwed them back with a new o ring et voila!


I crawled into deep lockers to investigate: the yard did not bother pulling the old wires. They just drilled new holes, ran wires and hoses with nothing to protect from chafing! So different from the Amel yard where every hole through plywood of GRP was coated to prevent water damage and fitted with anti chafing material.


Lessons: don’t let yards mess up your Amel. If you let them do it, they’ll drill more holes in the hull and will install inferior products simply because it is what their wholesaler has in stock. 


Follow strictly Bill Rouse’s suggestions and take things into your own hands. If you do, you will still enjoy your Amel thirty years from now (if not you, someone else will) :-)

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


A54 Fridge gas strut and other gas struts

David Crisp
 

In the spirit of sharing info' and sources.....

This summer I replaced the gas strut of our galley work top fridge/freezer as the original one had worn out and didn't support the lid.  I sourced a replacement from Metrol in Northampton, UK. Specifically this one: https://motioncontrol.metrol.com/variable-force-stainless-steel-gas-strut-ns-ss-v-8-150.html    I wanted to use the existing anchor points (rather than the ones supplied) so had to drill out the holes in the ends of the struts an extra millimetre, easy enough.  Excellent result. :-)
A copy of the invoice is attached so you can reference part numbers.

The nice thing about these guys is you can build up a custom design so for those folks I've seen asking about other struts such as for the engine compartment I think this could be a solution.

They ship globally.

Hope this is of help.

--
David Crisp
SV Wilna Grace
Amel 54 #58


Re: Meltem

Denis Foster
 

Interesting the 4LHTE has almost 60% more displacement and a little less output in Hp/Kw. It was also used in Discovery 55.
Probably a little heavy and bulky compared to the 4JH series.

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 31 août 2021 à 16:58, JB Duler <jbduler@...> a écrit :


Denis, I have the 125hp turbocharged 4Jh3-DTE Yanmar with 2,200 hours. It was installed in 2000.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med

1921 - 1940 of 61678