Date   

Re: Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

 

Kent,

I really like this flexible panel installation by Delos which is sewn to the bimini top: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTa6HEo2_K8

And Solbian must have seen the video because they offer an option with zippers. They give you a choice of zipper color and panel back color:
image.png

A client is installing these:
On his SM bimini:

Panels with Junction box, cables, MC4 connectors, and lateral zippers for an easy relocation: https://www.solbian.eu/en/fixing-options/52-zipper.html

I would supply the panels with stiffening bars as for attached image, we recommend this for bimini installation to make the panel more resistant.

Glossy surface. You can decide on back-sheet color: white, black, or transparent for all the 6 panels.

On the deck in front of the windshield:

2 SP130 for deck, back adhesive, back wires, glossy surface.  https://www.solbian.eu/en/sp-series/8-sp-130.html
1  MPPT  Smart Solar 100/20 with bluetooth for bimini: https://www.solbian.eu/en/victron-energy/111-smartsolar-mppt-10030-1224v.html
1  MPPT  Smart Solar 75/15 with bluetooth for deck: https://www.solbian.eu/en/victron-energy/110-smartsolar-mppt-7515-1224v.html

Total power of bimini and deck: 732 W



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Thu, Sep 2, 2021 at 8:43 AM Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Kent, I spoke to Sunpower about their flex panels. He told me that the cells in the flex panels were the exact same cells used in their rigid panels , thus were just as effecient. For any given  dimension the rigid panel produces more watts because more sq. inches on a flex panel are devoted to the borders ,thus less productive area. He acknowledged that there would be some loss due to higher heat on a flex panel laying flat on a solid surface, he could not provide a percentage loss ,but said it was .negotiable. It is going to be high in the seventies for several days ,safe to return home.
Pat
SM Shenanigans
Sassafras River ,Md.


-----Original Message-----
From: karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Sep 2, 2021 9:07 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

Thanks, Stephan.
I have raised the cockpit enclosure so that I can stand up straight.  It doesn't allow me enough room below the boom to add another layer of solar panels.  I'm going to have to use flexible panels, or mount them someplace else. I'm not keen on mounting them on the rails, either.

Does anyone know how efficient the Solbian panels on the Amel 50 are?  Other high efficiency flexible panels?

Thanks.
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

karkauai
 

Hi Richie,
If you are willing to share what was done on Why Knot, perhaps others could pay you for all the time, effort, and money that you put into it.

It is such an onerous process that there's no reason to reinvent the wheel.

I'd be willing to pay for the info if I needed it.
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

Patrick McAneny
 

Kent, I spoke to Sunpower about their flex panels. He told me that the cells in the flex panels were the exact same cells used in their rigid panels , thus were just as effecient. For any given  dimension the rigid panel produces more watts because more sq. inches on a flex panel are devoted to the borders ,thus less productive area. He acknowledged that there would be some loss due to higher heat on a flex panel laying flat on a solid surface, he could not provide a percentage loss ,but said it was .negotiable. It is going to be high in the seventies for several days ,safe to return home.
Pat
SM Shenanigans
Sassafras River ,Md.


-----Original Message-----
From: karkauai via groups.io <karkauai@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Sep 2, 2021 9:07 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

Thanks, Stephan.
I have raised the cockpit enclosure so that I can stand up straight.  It doesn't allow me enough room below the boom to add another layer of solar panels.  I'm going to have to use flexible panels, or mount them someplace else. I'm not keen on mounting them on the rails, either.

Does anyone know how efficient the Solbian panels on the Amel 50 are?  Other high efficiency flexible panels?

Thanks.
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

Ron Hynes
 

Give some thought to mounting rigid panels above your davits. I did this about five years ago somewhat reluctantly, but it has proven to be a great solution. I set the height of the panels so that when I’m at the helm, I only see the edge, so my rear vision is not impeded. Probably the least shaded spot on the boat!

Ron Hynes
SV Swan Song, Meltem # 29
954.319.0944

On Sep 2, 2021, at 9:07 AM, karkauai via groups.io <karkauai@...> wrote:

Thanks, Stephan.
I have raised the cockpit enclosure so that I can stand up straight.  It doesn't allow me enough room below the boom to add another layer of solar panels.  I'm going to have to use flexible panels, or mount them someplace else. I'm not keen on mounting them on the rails, either.

Does anyone know how efficient the Solbian panels on the Amel 50 are?  Other high efficiency flexible panels?

Thanks.
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: lithium battery warning

karkauai
 

Here's the latest from Jackline policy representative on Lithium.

"Markel's underwriters are not currently receptive to insuring boats with Lithium batteries.  If we learn of lithium installations on boats they already insure, we must bring that to their attention for review which could result in a cancellation.  They are very sensitive to the exposures they have of both physical damage losses and the even larger potential for resulting liabilities should a failure occur to a lithium set up.  They recently started to consider coverage for some lower valued vessels using LifePO4 batteries with a BMS by a US manufacturer, if professionally installed in the states.  However, Kristy’s hull value is higher than that current threshold.  Unfortunately, Markel is not going to consider any changes to their position until 2022 at the earliest.  It is my hope that they will become more flexible on the matter since many cruisers are looking to make the upgrade.

 

If you wish to move forward with the upgrade, we will need to seek quotes from an alternate carriers."

I've asked her to look for another carrier, will report what she finds.

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Solar panels stainless steel mounted vs soft panels

karkauai
 

Thanks, Stephan.
I have raised the cockpit enclosure so that I can stand up straight.  It doesn't allow me enough room below the boom to add another layer of solar panels.  I'm going to have to use flexible panels, or mount them someplace else. I'm not keen on mounting them on the rails, either.

Does anyone know how efficient the Solbian panels on the Amel 50 are?  Other high efficiency flexible panels?

Thanks.
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Fuel Polishing

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Mike

We had similar advice about not needing a fuel polisher but still went ahead anyway and installed a "Reverso FPS 80" (from the USA) into our SM2K in 2016 ahead of our circumnavigation. This was in addition to a double Racor filter fuel filter with a quick flick-over switch. Certainly, I would agree with others here that, of the two items, the double Racor filter is more important, but in the end, we were so pleased to also have a good fuel polisher which we used quite frequently, particularly when cruising some countries like Indonesia where fuel was so dirty that we first funneled it all through our Westmarine external filter, then sucked it into our tanks through the fuel polisher.

If you still choose to install a polisher, then, fortunately, on the SM2K, it is not hard to install since there are two nice large stainless inspection ports bolted on the top fwd and aft of your fuel tank. We removed these and employed a skillful stainless welder guy to carefully weld the precise length and angle of stainless pipe/tube to/through each inspection port cap so that the bottom of the fwd pipe sat at the correct low fuel uptake height in the tank, and the aft return flow one sat a little higher (you need to get the specs from the fuel polisher supplier). Your angles here are important too to ensure that it remains easy to still unbolt and remove the inspection hatches with the long pipes attached.

Note that a polisher pickup and return point must be completely separate from your engine pickup/return ports. You should certainly never use the normal engine fuel intake port on the tank. 

In our case, we placed the actual "Reverso FPS 80" wall mount unit on the rear engine bay above the fuel filters where there is sufficient room and from where the plumbing is easy to run to your intake and return ports on top of the fuel tank.

Best of luck with the project.

Colin Streeter
ex Amel SM2K - SV Island Pearl II
Brisbane, Australia



On Thu, Sep 2, 2021 at 9:20 PM Billy Newport <billy@...> wrote:
I had my boats tank cleaned last October. There was quite a bit of black stuff on the bottom of the tank. A dock side service just pumped out the fuel, filtered it and then pumped diesel back to the tank, swirled it and shopvaced it out through a racor. Eventually the tank was spotless and the cleaned fuel pumped back in.

I had a clogged filter prior to this, bad enough that the engine wouldn't go over 2k rpms.

Billy



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Fuel Polishing

Mike Johnson
 

Hi Billy,

Thanks for the info. Treating our fuel with biocide means all those dead diesel bugs end up at the bottom of the tank:-)

Our rough passage resulted in the debri being lifted into the fuel which was picked up by the pre engine filters.

Regards

Mike & PETA

Solitude
SM2k 461



On 2 Sep 2021, at 12:20, Billy Newport <billy@...> wrote:

I had my boats tank cleaned last October. There was quite a bit of black stuff on the bottom of the tank. A dock side service just pumped out the fuel, filtered it and then pumped diesel back to the tank, swirled it and shopvaced it out through a racor. Eventually the tank was spotless and the cleaned fuel pumped back in.

I had a clogged filter prior to this, bad enough that the engine wouldn't go over 2k rpms.

Billy


Re: Deck gel coat or paint

Patrick McAneny
 

Ian, What you have described is accurate and confirmed . It is tan gel coat followed by white  gel coat . There must have been a reason that the second ,thicker coat was not tinted tan. My tan gel coat must have been applied on the thin side, thus I have several areas where it is gone . 
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Ian Park <parkianj@...>
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Sep 2, 2021 5:38 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Deck gel coat or paint

There was a post about this earlier this year. I think it was Olivier who responded.
The tan part is gel coat and was applied first by workers new to the application of resins. Hence some areas were a bit thinner than others. The next application was white gel coat applied by employees who were properly experienced in getting the gel coat right together with the proper lay up process. The original black stripes were applied by female employees as it was found they were far more accurate than males!! (maybe a useful hint there).
You could check the posts, but I’m sure that was what was said.
I’m pretty sure that the Ivory non slip on the decks is a separate application to the gel layer beneath it.

Ian ‘Ocean Hobo’ SN 96 en route to North Wales






Re: Fuel Polishing

Billy Newport
 

I had my boats tank cleaned last October. There was quite a bit of black stuff on the bottom of the tank. A dock side service just pumped out the fuel, filtered it and then pumped diesel back to the tank, swirled it and shopvaced it out through a racor. Eventually the tank was spotless and the cleaned fuel pumped back in.

I had a clogged filter prior to this, bad enough that the engine wouldn't go over 2k rpms.

Billy


Re: Deck gel coat or paint

Ian Park
 

There was a post about this earlier this year. I think it was Olivier who responded.
The tan part is gel coat and was applied first by workers new to the application of resins. Hence some areas were a bit thinner than others. The next application was white gel coat applied by employees who were properly experienced in getting the gel coat right together with the proper lay up process. The original black stripes were applied by female employees as it was found they were far more accurate than males!! (maybe a useful hint there).
You could check the posts, but I’m sure that was what was said.
I’m pretty sure that the Ivory non slip on the decks is a separate application to the gel layer beneath it.

Ian ‘Ocean Hobo’ SN 96 en route to North Wales


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Richie Whyte
 

Hi Eamonn
I went through this process last year and it took nearly 9 months to get it completed. That was during the height of COVID but there may be a way to radically reduce the time required. If the differences between the SM and SM2K are purely equipment - the calculations done for my boat will be the same as for yours (better informed chime in by all means). I registered my SM2K#261 ‘Why Knot’ formerly GUMA with Dublin port but the calculations are done centrally by the Marine Survey Office in the Department of Transport. The marine surveyor took the Amel drawings and built a 3D model, subtracted the allowed volumes such as engine room and produced a final volume and converted that volume into the final tonnage figure. He probably works in the same room or down the corridor from the guy that you will deal with - if he isn’t the same guy. So connecting these two people should eliminate a world of hurt for everyone as all that work is done already. The chap that I dealt with was Greg Houlihan. I found him to be very accommodating but what he can do is limited by the law in this area and that lead to delays in our case. I should mention that our boat was not in the country and because there was no travel a lot of stuff was handled by 3rd parties and a lot of photos. It should be easier in your case anyway but if they accept the work done for my boat you should be plain sailing.

Richie


Why Knot
SM2K#261
Kos, Greece


Re: Volvo TMD22 Engine Mounts

Bill Kinney
 

We are pushing 9000 total hours.  She just keeps working, probably because we run her regularly and take good care of her.  Diesels seem to have as many health issues as humans do with being “couch potatoes.”

Many of the things the people say you “must” do to keep a diesel running for a long life we do not do.  We do not run at high output, unless we have to.  When running under power we usually run for many hours at a steady 2200rpm, rarely running faster. Except for very minor issues, she has never let us down, and never with anything we could not fix ourselves on the fly.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie 
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Port side 2500w sockets died

Billy Newport
 

Never mind, the 16A fuse in the engine room is between all 220V sources and the comfort bus and it had tripped. The dishwater uses almost 2kw and maybe we turned on a microwave etc and it tripped.


Re: Port side 2500w sockets died

Billy Newport
 

The 230VAC for the first and second (non comfort) are all working. It's just the comfort side which is dark.


Port side 2500w sockets died

Billy Newport
 

Tonight the sockets on the comfort side of the 220VAC panel all died. No lights on the AC panel when i turn on breakers. The inverter voltage light is on. I tried cycling the inverter, no joy. I tried turning off the inverter and starting the genset, no lights.
I checked all fuses in the 220VAC fuse box above the sinks and they all look good. IDA is passing over tonight so I'll check stuff in the engine room tomorrow. Any one have an idea for fault diagnosis? Any more fuses to check in the engine room?

Thanks
Billy
Amel 55#56


Re: Deck gel coat or paint

Bryce Procter
 

Speaking with Ken Powers of SV Aquarius recently he mentioned a SM that had restriped in an off white and had a significant reduction in both deck and cabin temps. I would suggest ivory as white would be too much of a stark contrast.

Bryce Procter
Seamaster ll
SM2K #467


Re: Volvo TMD22 Engine Mounts

EricOpdeweegh
 

Hi Bill, 

Thanks for the head-up
How many hours do you have on your TMD22?

Rgards 
Eric 
Sv Abayomi 
SM 158
Currently in Flushing NL

Op 1 sep. 2021 om 04:06 heeft Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> het volgende geschreven:

Another lesson learned:  Do NOT wait to replace your engine mounts. Bad things can happen. Engine vibration and noise creeps up on you, very slowly.  You don't notice that it is a little bit worse today than it was last month.  And next month is worse again.

During our time with Harmonie we had never replaced the mounts on our TMD22, but I suspected it might be time when I did finally notice the engine vibrations increasing a bit.  Today, I changed them out. It wasn't as difficult a job as I feared, one full day of hard work did the trick, mostly. What's left is cleaning up and painting things that have gotten a bit rough looking. I have some video footage I'll share of the process, but I thought I'd give you an advance visual of how bad things were. These are hydraulic mounts.  They are full of a viscous oil that damps vibration.  Three of the four mounts had lost ALL of their oil. The one on the right is a new mount, the one on the left had just been removed.  The oil chamber was completely blown out.

<Engine Mounts.jpg>


I suspect that the failure of the engine mounts lead to increased vibration and misalignment which likely lead to, or at least contributed to, the failure of the rear seal of our transmission last year.  On the ZF25M transmissions replacing the rear seal requires a full disassembly of the ENTIRE unit, and is not practical. By the time you buy all the seals, gaskets, bearings, and other parts that should be replaced, a new transmission is the more economical answer.  

So, two lessons:  
  1. Changing the mounts is not that hard, with a bit of creativity, and inexpensive tools, you can lift, pull, push, and shove the engine without outside assistance.  
  2. Change them BEFORE they get this bad!
I don't know how old these were where we bought Harmonie, but I am putting these on a 5 year replacement schedule, sooner if I even THINK I notice an issue.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Fuel Polishing

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi Danny,

Agree with you as well. Before setting off on my RTW, I had the residual fuel polished. Absolutely no CARP in my fuel 7 years later. I also use biocide religiously and keep my fuel tank topped up.  

It is surprising the total amount of fuel the diesel motors pump out of your tank and The percentage returned to the tank. Most people don’t realise it!!

Cheers, we should be out of lockdown at midnight tonight

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, FM007, OPUA New Zealand


On 2 Sep 2021, at 07:35, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:



Hi JP, I agree with you on the fuel polishing. But I have something to share as to the amount of fuel being pumped and returning to the fuel tank. Some years ago I was trouble shooting a fuel problem. To eliminate all the fuel delivery I got a 5 litre can filled with fuel and put a short suction pipe into it. I was startled at how quickly it emptied, in minutes. I know the question will come, how many minutes. I don't remember but perhaps 10, certainly not as many as 20.

There is a massive fuel circulation going on constantly. Good installed filtration is very important, I have double racors. However filth still accumulates in the fuel and tank.  I got a dock side trailer mounted fuel polishing service to do mine. I was utterly startled at how much filth he got out of the fuel. He had three grades of filter, he said if he began with the fine one it would have clogged in minutes. So the process was coarse, medium, fine and there was buckets of filth brought out by each grade. Looking into the tank there was visible muck around the bottom but the fuel as a whole looked clear. I had no accumulation of sediment in the racor sight bowls and there were no engine issues.

I think periodic fuel cleaning with a dockside system makes sense, but having said that, in the absence of any fuel issues I have only done it once about five years ago.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 01 September 2021 at 17:09 Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hello Mike,

I have experience with fuel filtration systems and fuel polishing systems. The main issue with fuel in this day and age is the quality of the fuel itself; It ain’t what it used to be!!! The problem also extends to the aviation industry and whilst flying airliners, we never had a problem; the reason is simple, airliners flew 400 hours per month and used a lot of fuel. However, when I started flying corporate jets the situation was different. Typically these aircraft fly less than 500 hours per year and are parked for long periods with near empty tanks … sometimes in moist areas. The bacteria that causes diesel fuel bug is always present in the atmosphere and cannot be avoided. 

Fuel polishing is one means of minimising the possibility of diesel bug contamination and the other is to install a high quality fuel filtration system. Personally I favour basic precautions, a diesel fuel biocide of some sort, full fuel tanks and dual Racor 7550 filters. The diesel fuel pumps on the Genset and the main engine typically feed double the volume needed for operation of the engine. Meaning that 50% of the fuel drawn from the tank is returned to the tank. This is sufficient movement  to ensure that the fuel in your tank is clean. 

The standard precautions are as follows:
-   Keep your tanks full. Always filter the fuel with a good funnel if you have any doubts about its quality. 
-   Add a biocide as directed by the manufacturer. (Biobor or Grotamar are two of them)
-   Relax probably nothing will happen from then on. Of course change the filters when required and verify the sight bowls to guarantee no deposit. 

Installation of a fuel polishing system involves quite a bit of work and sizable quantities of cash. A friend of mine, now stuck in France due to international travel restrictions, asked me to oversee the installation of a fuel polishing system on his boat this year. The installation is successful however his case was different; he had a COVID 19 sized diesel fuel bug problem in his tanks. His boat has large capacity fuel exceeding 1500 L and had been on the hard in Tahiti for an extended period of time due to an unfortunate incident at sea. .. with tanks having a remaining quantity of about 300 liters each. These are perfect conditions for the development of diesel fuel bug. 

System description: consists of Racor fuel polishing pump, a separate Racor 7550 Fuel filter as the pump does not have a sight bowl (although depicted as having a sight bowl on the Racor website, this is not the case ) and you will never be certain of your fuel unless you can visually check from time to time. It also required the design and installation of a cross feeding manifold and distribution valves. This allowed for fuel transfer; a situation which was impossible with the original design. 

On my SM, I opted for the dual Racor filters and I feed through only one of the filters at a time and switch over after each filter change. There is a lot more faffing with the fuel polishing system than with a good fuel filtration system. 

Good luck with your decision and if you require, I’d be glad to talk to you over the Internet. 

Kind regards


Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera , SM007, Opua NZ

 

On 1 Sep 2021, at 15:54, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Mike,

Many people have installed, such a system, and I'll let them tell you the how's and why's.  

Our boat did two circumnavigations and accumulated over 8000 engine hours with NO primary fuel filter at all, just a water separator.  Despite the obvious success of that arrangement, I did replace the Amel installed water separator with a standard Racor primary filter because it made me feel better.  

I have had sailboats with diesel engines for over 30 years and have never had a fuel issue that a "fuel polishing" system would have fixed.  To be clear, I have also never had a common rail engine that might require a higher level of fuel filtration.

No matter if you have a fuel polishing system, or not, always be careful where you buy fuel.  If the source is even the least bit dicey, use a good quality filter funnel when filling your tank.  Keep the filter funnel clean and dry, and you're very unlikely to have a problem.

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


 


 


locked Engine Room Exhaust Fan / Blower - lessons learnt #lessons

David Vogel
 
Edited

One thing to keep an eye on, is the 220VAC engine room exhaust fan.

This unit sits in series with a 24VDC exhaust fan, which runs when the service (12V) alternator for the main engine is creating output.

The 220VAC exhaust fan runs when the ONAN GenSet is outputting 220V AC.

I recently discovered a failing capacitor on the 220V exhaust fan, revealed by intermittent running – the worst kind of fault, as it is not always obvious you have a problem. Sometimes the fan would run, sometimes not. I only recognised that I first had an issue when I walked past the deck-level exhaust outlet one day while the genset was running, and I didn’t have the usual plume of warm air blowing past my leg. With the genset running and the fan not, the fan could usually be encouraged to spin up if hand-started – useful to know, as I wasn’t anywhere near any kind of shop at the time, didn’t have a spare capacitor on-board, and with no other cruisers either within an island to two to check whether they had a spare on board.

Back in civilisation, capacitor quickly sourced at less than USD15- equivalent, and 10 minutes to wire it in. Problem solved.

But now I wonder about a few other failures I have experienced over recent years. And whether they might be related to the intermittent exhaust fan, which may have been failing for some time longer than I suspected. For example, the prolonged heat-soak of elevated temperatures in the engine room (measured up to and occasionally exceeding 50ºC whilst in the tropics), may have been a contributory factor to …

+ failure of the nitrile seals on the fuel-tank inspection hatches – portably due for replacement anyway, in light of other’s experiences with these at ~ 15 years of age, but is there something more going on here than simple chemical or age-related deterioration;

+ failure of some of the adhesive for the engine room foam sound insulation (top only, not sides);

+ premature failure (3 yrs) of ceramic water-maker membranes – one was cracked; these membranes are rated to 40ºC, but what happens if they are hot-hot-hot, and colder sea-water is pushed through them, perhaps resulting in thermal-shock-cooling;

+ early failure of the water-maker membrane pressure-vessel end-caps: this was due to erosion of the black delrin material around the stainless-steel bobbin (inter-connector). I wonder if differential heating/cooling of the delrin end-caps versus stainless steel, allowed a seeping of the HP-water past the O-rings, which then compromised the seal, creating leakage, leading to corrosion/erosion. Thinking along the lines of the space-shuttle Solid-Rocket-Boosters here, less violent, and over a greater time-frame, but the result is kind of the same. Perhaps not usually a problem when the engine-room temperature is held within normal range, but excessive temperature differentials creates a problem. Anyway, no–one wants HP salt-water spraying over the inverter, battery-chargers, switch-boxes, or other electronic or electrical components situated nearby. (Note: Dessalator is no longer issuing INOX interconnectors; replacements are now plastic.)

+ premature failure of water-maker HP hoses, running near-by to the genset, and showing signs of early degradation at the highest point they run in the engine room (external sheath falling apart, weeping) - after only 18-months installed;

+ early failure in the manual bulge-pump diaphragm – I could never could understand why this should fail after only 18-months, but maybe this too now makes sense;

+ failing seals on the salt-water supply pumps for the heads – portably age-relater, but … ;

+ failure of the ONAN Genset Main Control Board, a component known to fail, but was elevated engine-room temperature over a prolonged period a contributory factor?

There is no confirmed cause-and-effect relationship for any of these, but there does appear to be a pattern here, so food for thought.

In any event, I now mindfully check that there is warm air blowing out of the engine-room fresh-air exhaust outlet. Not every start, but whenever I happen to be on-deck when the genset (or engine) is running. I now also routinely check that the engine room blower is providing a healthy quantity of fresh air.

I am also considering:

+ installing an engine room temperature sensor & alarm (relatively easy to put onto the N2K bus, I hope); and

+ installing a timer circuit for the DC exhaust fan, to maintain air movement through the engine room immediately after machinery shut-down, in order to reduce residual temperatures and consequent heat-soak.

David
SM#396, Perigee
Savusavu, Fiji

1881 - 1900 of 61671