Date   

Re: Wiper at the bottom of the companionway slider.

 

Eric

I kept a copy. It was from Mike Ondra SM 240:

image.png


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Wed, Sep 22, 2021 at 4:42 AM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Many years ago I bought the Renault rubber gasket that sits at the bottom of the companionway vertical door  to keep water out. About 8 years ago I replaced it. I am aware that it is no longer available. It is now time to replace it with something. I recall

years ago it might have been Kent, Gary, or someone else that was a licensed airplane mechanic amongst other things. He produced a very good solution using a special grade rubber like material with an interesting way to affix it.

Does anyone remember the post or have another solution.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Re: Wiper at the bottom of the companionway slider.

william reynolds
 

Alban of Amel in Marin stocks the original companionway wiper stock. 
Bill
Cloudstreet


Wiper at the bottom of the companionway slider.

Eric Freedman
 

Many years ago I bought the Renault rubber gasket that sits at the bottom of the companionway vertical door  to keep water out. About 8 years ago I replaced it. I am aware that it is no longer available. It is now time to replace it with something. I recall

years ago it might have been Kent, Gary, or someone else that was a licensed airplane mechanic amongst other things. He produced a very good solution using a special grade rubber like material with an interesting way to affix it.

Does anyone remember the post or have another solution.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Re: Anchor winch turning itself on!

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

We once had the windlass kick on all by itself shortly after anchoring. Replacing those rubber switch covers or "boots" proactively is the key. If you can't source the boots, an inexpensive push button switch may be worth buying just for the rubber cover. We recently renewed the sealant between the plastic "donuts", which were in good shape, and the windlass motor cover using 3M 4000. Keeping a cover over the windlass helps preserve those switches and the windlass in general. Also some corrosionX and/or dialectric grease on inside isn't a bad idea. But again, replacing those rubber covers before they fail is the key.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
NZ


On Wed, Sep 22, 2021, 2:21 PM Michael & Robyn <SY_RIPPLE@...> wrote:
Greetings!
We were underway last year from Chesapeake Bay to Antigua. When at 2:30 AM LT the windlass turned on and wanted to let chain out.
Our anchor pin was in so it prevented the anchor to drop and a little chain pile built up under the gypsy and stopped the turning. The clutch made the typical clicking noises. but it took a few moments to recognize what was going on.
As an immediate mitigation we turned off the cockpit controls on the 24V panel. Later we turned off the windlass switch in the front cabin port side most forward cabinet. It is recommended in the AMEL Handbook to turn the switch off while underway. From other stories I learn it to be done at anchor too. I think only later SMs have the extra switch.
After arriving in Antigua St. John's I investigated the windlass and it turned out the "Down" push-button-switch on the windlass gave contact.
We were sailing close hauled for days and had gotten salt water in through the rubber cover that had failed after 5 years of Florida UV sunlight exposure. These switches are AMEL original gadget additions to the Lofrans Tiger Windlass. The switches are too short to be directly installed on the aluminum housing. So AMEL used black plastic donuts to reduce the thickness. But the donuts are just glued into the housing with marine sealant. I don't know what make the rubber covers are.
I am working on a better solution with waterproof (IP67) stainless steel push button switches. I will add pictures when I have found a reliably solution. 
The switches are useful when installing the snubber, or after anchor up, when washing the dirt of letting the anchor dangle in the water while moving with idle speed.
-
Michael & Robyn

SY RIPPLE SM2K # 417
currently Brunswick Landing Marina GA


Re: Anchor winch turning itself on!

Joerg Esdorn
 

On the 55, there are two separate feeds for the anchor winches: one controlled from the dashboard in the cockpit, which has separate switches for the port and starboard winches. The other is controlled from the wireless remote, which itself has an on/off button.  The problem I encountered was that the on/off button on the remote was shortened out, in addition to the up button for the port winch.  To turn of both feeds, you can turn off cockpit controls, which however also turns off all other winches on deck, including the furling motors and the davits, for example.  If you don’t want to or cannot do that, you have to turn off the fuses in the bow locker.  


Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53 Kincsem
Currently cruising Brittany


Re: Anchor winch turning itself on!

Michael & Robyn
 

Greetings!
We were underway last year from Chesapeake Bay to Antigua. When at 2:30 AM LT the windlass turned on and wanted to let chain out.
Our anchor pin was in so it prevented the anchor to drop and a little chain pile built up under the gypsy and stopped the turning. The clutch made the typical clicking noises. but it took a few moments to recognize what was going on.
As an immediate mitigation we turned off the cockpit controls on the 24V panel. Later we turned off the windlass switch in the front cabin port side most forward cabinet. It is recommended in the AMEL Handbook to turn the switch off while underway. From other stories I learn it to be done at anchor too. I think only later SMs have the extra switch.
After arriving in Antigua St. John's I investigated the windlass and it turned out the "Down" push-button-switch on the windlass gave contact.
We were sailing close hauled for days and had gotten salt water in through the rubber cover that had failed after 5 years of Florida UV sunlight exposure. These switches are AMEL original gadget additions to the Lofrans Tiger Windlass. The switches are too short to be directly installed on the aluminum housing. So AMEL used black plastic donuts to reduce the thickness. But the donuts are just glued into the housing with marine sealant. I don't know what make the rubber covers are.
I am working on a better solution with waterproof (IP67) stainless steel push button switches. I will add pictures when I have found a reliably solution. 
The switches are useful when installing the snubber, or after anchor up, when washing the dirt of letting the anchor dangle in the water while moving with idle speed.
-
Michael & Robyn

SY RIPPLE SM2K # 417
currently Brunswick Landing Marina GA


Re: Need help from a 54 owner in La Rochelle

 

Perfect. I'll send you a private email with the details.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Tue, Sep 21, 2021 at 4:13 PM Laurens Vos <laurensrineke@...> wrote:

Hi Bill 
I can help and want to let it make for me as well. We’re now sailing along the Brittany coast and will be ack in La Rochelle on Thursday. 

Regards 
Laurens 
A54 - 92 
Fun@Sea 


Re: Need help from a 54 owner in La Rochelle

Laurens Vos
 

Hi Bill 
I can help and want to let it make for me as well. We’re now sailing along the Brittany coast and will be ack in La Rochelle on Thursday. 

Regards 
Laurens 
A54 - 92 
Fun@Sea 


Need help from a 54 owner in La Rochelle

 

Hopefully, there is a 54 owner in La Rochelle who can help me with a project. It involves allowing someone from SOFAMARIN to make some measurements in your engine room. I am attempting to have them fabricate a "plug & play" replacement for the Amel 54 Primary Saltwater Manifold.

Please let me know if you can help. I want to get the one below made in plastic similar to the 55 and 50.


--
 
Best,
 
CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: 2001 Super Maramu Headliner

 

Rick,

Regrettably fabrics, vinyl, and wallpaper styles, colors, and designs change annually. I know that Amel has not had any since before the end of the SM production because some of the last SMs has A54 vinyl wallpaper.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Tue, Sep 21, 2021 at 1:40 PM JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:
Rick, Sailrite told me there is shortage of headliners but they have similar products.
If the headliner is not sagging, that PVC takes paint quite well and it does not crack.
--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: 2001 Super Maramu Headliner

JB Duler
 

Rick, Sailrite told me there is shortage of headliners but they have similar products.
If the headliner is not sagging, that PVC takes paint quite well and it does not crack.
--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


2001 Super Maramu Headliner

Rick Stanley
 

Hey folks anyone know a source for the vinyl beige headliner material AMEL used to use? Maud says AMEL no longer carries it.

Thanks!!

Rick Stanley
S/V Althea
Rock Hall, MD


Re: Gas struts for cockpit access

Ron Hynes
 

Thanks for the information.

Ron Hynes
954.319.0944

On Sep 21, 2021, at 1:06 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:



The specs for the struts are:

 

A1A1N40-250-608/400N 316L Stainless Steel

Meaning a stroke of 250 mm with 608 mm overall

400 NM resistance

The stroke is 8 mm

The Diameter of the cylinder is 19 mm

With 8 mm hinge on each side.

 

I ordered replacements from www.easylift.com

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

<Strut (Gas Spring) - Engine Hatch 1.jpg>
<Strut (Gas Spring) - Engine Hatch 2.jpg>


Re: Gas struts for cockpit access

Mark Erdos
 

The specs for the struts are:

 

A1A1N40-250-608/400N 316L Stainless Steel

Meaning a stroke of 250 mm with 608 mm overall

400 NM resistance

The stroke is 8 mm

The Diameter of the cylinder is 19 mm

With 8 mm hinge on each side.

 

I ordered replacements from www.easylift.com

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 


Re: Anchor winch turning itself on!

Nick Newington
 

Not  an Amel story but I had a close call many years ago. My wife and I were running a charter yacht in the West indies. We had just had a full day to windward sailing from St Barts. I can not remember where exactly but we anchored off a fancy resort, maybe St Kitts or Nevis, the guests wanted to invite us to dinner ashore. We were tired and felt like a night in, so declined their kind invitation. They took the dinghy we went to bed. The crew cabin was right in the bow. It was blowing a solid trade wind offshore and at about 11pm the windlass started to haul up the anchor, we had not put on a snubber. We realised pretty quick and turned off the breaker. The anchor chain would self stow on that boat!

Turned out to be salt water in the foot switch.

The guests came back well after midnight! The boat would have been well out to sea.

Never again.

Nick

Amelia Aml 54-019
Leros

On 21 Sep 2021, at 16:23, JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:

It is recommended to leave the circuit breaker off until you are about to drop anchor.

A friend was delivering a 60/70' motor yacht from San Francisco to Seattle, as you may know beating against the nasty waves and the wind of the  Pacific Ocean. Very cold so everybody was inside.
The windlass turned itself on, probably a lose connection after pounding the waves for one thousand miles. They probably did not notice for hours (pounding the waves on a motor yacht is noisy).

The ensuing fire melted the GRP bow.

They were able to put the fire off and barely made it to a safe harbor.
--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Anchor winch turning itself on!

JB Duler
 

It is recommended to leave the circuit breaker off until you are about to drop anchor.

A friend was delivering a 60/70' motor yacht from San Francisco to Seattle, as you may know beating against the nasty waves and the wind of the  Pacific Ocean. Very cold so everybody was inside.
The windlass turned itself on, probably a lose connection after pounding the waves for one thousand miles. They probably did not notice for hours (pounding the waves on a motor yacht is noisy).

The ensuing fire melted the GRP bow.

They were able to put the fire off and barely made it to a safe harbor.
--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Mainsail furler top seal

Gregory Dmitriev
 

Bill,
please mention that the internal diameter of the seal is still the same - 45mm.
It was just the issue of the external diameter 60->58.


Re: Anchor winch turning itself on!

Bernd Spanner
 

I always open the circuit breaker when sailing i.o. to avoid unwanted windlass movement. Imagine it dropps the hook when sailing with 8 knots in waters not deeper then the chains length or even in shallow waters.
The only time I want to have the windlass ready is when I want to drop anchor or as a backup when entering a harbor in case of engine or rudder failure.
--
Bernd
SN 119 / Cascais, Portugal


Re: Anchor winch turning itself on!

 

Let me add a note that will happen to any SM, 54, 55, or 50 owners, sooner or later.

The windlass Control box is a black plastic box that has 2 solenoids inside the box, 1 for UP, and 1 for DOWN. The contact points on these solenoids will burn and possibly stick sooner with those owners who operate any brand Windlass and put the motor under strain. You know what this is. You can hear the motor straining. It happens much later to those owners who do not put the motor under strain.

This is a typical A54, A55, A50 bow compartment electrical box, containing the windlass control boxes:
image.png
This is a later model SM Windlass Control Box (earlier models had 2 exposed solenoids:
image.png

This is an opened windlass control box with burned contacts that stuck in the DOWN position causing a windlass ran-away.
image.png
Lesson Learned #1: When you hear your windlass motor straining, pause momentarily and the windlass control box will last a very long time.

Lesson Learned #2: Always tie your anchor chain to prevent anchor deployment and only untie it when you are ready to anchor, or you are maneuvering in close quarters like a marina. You never know when you may lose all engine propulsion and need to drop the anchor.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Tue, Sep 21, 2021 at 2:40 AM Joerg Esdorn via groups.io <jhe1313=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Wow, quite a reaction.  Yes, indeed, the anchor winches on my 55 are made by Quick.  They are excellent winches in my experience, having hauled various mooring anchors, rocks and other stuff in many places in the Med, in addition to my 55kg anchor and 100 m of chain!  They are not gadgets, they are serious pieces of equipment.   I appreciate the redundancy a second windlass provides.  What happened to me had nothing to do with Quick.  The remote is very well designed from an engineering perspective but it‘s been heavily used and opened many times to remove batteries in the fall and reinstall them in the spring.   So what happened to me is not a reason to point fingers at Quick or Amel.   It can happen to anyone with any make of windlass.  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53 Kincsem
Currently cruising Britany 


Re: What to do with LiFePO4 batteries when the boat is layed up?

Joerg Esdorn
 

Thanks very much everyone.  Based on Thomas’ suggestion, I‘ve now programmed an event for my 60A charger which switches it to float at 80% state of charge.  The voltage of the batteries at 80% with the charger off and minimal load (2A) is a little less than 26.8V.  So this may be the way to go - but I have an email into MV support to confirm.  Their advice quoted above strictly speaking only applies if all loads are off which won‘t be the case for me since the bilge pump and galvanic insulator will be on although the loads are minimal for a 600Ah battery bank.   It may also not be necessary to have this event if the charger never goes back to bulk with such a small load.  

Scott, given that MV recommends to charge the batteries to more than 80% at least every 3 month, I suspect that it‘s not good for them to be kept at 50% as you suggest.   

Joerg

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