Date   

Re: 1981 Maramu pre-survey

Roque
 

Hi Ben

 

I am sure a few Maramu owners will bring several sugestions here. 

 

Besides that, if I was buying an Amel I would certainly talk to Bill Rouse first. 

 

He will answer all your questions and then some. He will either save some money or steer you away from a headache desguised as a boat. 

 

Hope it helps

--
Roque
Attika A54 117
Paraty - Brazil


Re: A54 floor boards

Ruslan Osmonov
 

Thank you Ann-Sofie and Martin, very much appreciated. 
Special thank you to Joel, that was very informative and insightful. 


1981 Maramu pre-survey

Ben Levy
 

Good day lucky Amel owners.
I am about to buy my first Amel, an original maramu from 1981 (hull 98). I am having a 2nd viewing of the boat tomorrow and I was wondering if any maramu owner (or former owner), had any advices regarding critical components to check or any important systems to look at? I will have a professional survey done once I have signed the sell agreement but I will first have to settle on a price. The boat is in really good neck for its age but being 40, there must be some components being ready to give up on life. Anyway, any advices would be most welcome as amel yachts are one of a kind.
Cheers,
Ben


Re: A54 floor boards

amelforme
 

I should have made mention that the Amel Design Team that created the Amel 54 was capably orchestrated and entirely overseen by Amel’s then chairman. Jean Jacques Lemonnier. Jacques Carteau did manage the design details and much of the construction, but would not add his name as the designer. A very modest guy without much of an ego to get in his way.

 

All the best,

Joel

 

           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.

                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of amelforme
Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 4:58 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 floor boards

 

Ruslan, good questions all and the answers will tell a bit about how things evolved at Amel. Originally, the SM 53 had plywood floor boards that were covered with a rather thin layer of teak veneer. The “caulking lines” between the “planks” were drawn with an industrial version of the Magic Marker. Near the end of the last century, Captain Amel was fully retired and living in the south of France near Amel’s base in Hyeres. Every year he would make a visit to the shipyard in La Rochelle. As all the managers of the company were enjoying their new found full freedom of operations with Captain Amel out of sight/out of mind, each time he would visit there was more than a little apprehension about how The Captain might react to any evolutions they had made to HIS design.

Again, Captain was fully retired and had no legal sway at Amel, as if that would make a difference to this larger-than-life man.

 

All of us who knew him were familiar with his ‘my way or the highway’ disposition. He was not to be trifled with. What he said was absolute law even when he was ‘retired’. Anyway, shortly after he arrived, he made an announcement that the lifting floor boards in the saloon were henceforth going to be made of fiberglass with a molded in non-skid and a hinge to position them. He then added that they were to be French Blue in color. I was not in France at the time, but my colleagues at the shipyard who were there were in shock. No way they wanted to do this. They knew, however, they had no choice . So, the Blue Floors, as we called them, were introduced as an evolution of the Super Maramu Millennium series. I could relate a few more interesting stories about the French Blue Floors. Maybe another time…

 

The Amel 54 was the first Amel designed without the assistance of Captain Amel. It was done by a group of Amel people/The Amel Design Team, under the guidance of Jacques Carteau, Captain Amel’s right hand man and, in many respects, his eyes as well. Carteau was the guy who took the Captain’s thoughts and turned them into the design drawings almost since the beginning of Chantiers Amel. It has often been said that the Amel 54 was the last Amel boat that had entirely Captain Amels DNA in it even though he had nothing to do with it. All the department managers had been selected by Henri Amel. Jacques Carteau was the guy who drew and engineered the plans on almost every previous Amel boat. All Captain Amel disciples at the top of their craft. What a team that was to work with! Personally, these were some of the best days of my life.

 

Without the Captain looking over their shoulders, all involved were free to incorporate what our customers were asking for. Stall showers, a ‘real washer and dryer, every port openable and plenty more of them, an even better and more ergonomic galley and navigation station, a standard centerline queen able to be converted into two snug sea berths ( optionally ) and dozens more improvements and evolutions. However, it was instantly recognizable as an Amel in any harbor.

 

The Amel 54 floors have a plywood core with a textured non-skid and a faux teak pattern. It is actually a FORMICA Brand marine division product and is very durable with the exception of the strips on the side which often become unglued from the plywood.

 

The second windlass on the Amel 54 was actually an option from the beginning. All of our demonstration boats, mine included, had dual windlasses so naturally it follows that the customers wanted another windlass too. The slight negative to the second windlass was, that on some boats, the secondary anchor would not get deployed very often. Mechanical things like maintenance and exercise in equal measure. Be sure to aggressively test the second/port side windlass during any survey of a prospective Amel 54.

 

All the best,

Joel

 

           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.

                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ruslan Osmonov
Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 floor boards

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Quick question if I may, are A54 floor boards made from wood or some faux wood? If wood curious to know why SM2K were done in GRP and later went back to wood panels. 
I like GRP on SM2K, I feel wood panels will need constant maintenance given salt water and foot traffic environment. 

On the other hand I see A54s pics with floor boards in a good shape, is there a trick at keeping them "like new"?

and one more
- I noticed that later models have one windlass, what is the reason to go from 2 to 1? I would assume the 2 windlass setup was for some good reasons to start with, but not sure why the switch back. 

Regards, 
Ruslan. 

(still looking for one)


Re: A54 floor boards

amelforme
 

Ruslan, good questions all and the answers will tell a bit about how things evolved at Amel. Originally, the SM 53 had plywood floor boards that were covered with a rather thin layer of teak veneer. The “caulking lines” between the “planks” were drawn with an industrial version of the Magic Marker. Near the end of the last century, Captain Amel was fully retired and living in the south of France near Amel’s base in Hyeres. Every year he would make a visit to the shipyard in La Rochelle. As all the managers of the company were enjoying their new found full freedom of operations with Captain Amel out of sight/out of mind, each time he would visit there was more than a little apprehension about how The Captain might react to any evolutions they had made to HIS design.

Again, Captain was fully retired and had no legal sway at Amel, as if that would make a difference to this larger-than-life man.

 

All of us who knew him were familiar with his ‘my way or the highway’ disposition. He was not to be trifled with. What he said was absolute law even when he was ‘retired’. Anyway, shortly after he arrived, he made an announcement that the lifting floor boards in the saloon were henceforth going to be made of fiberglass with a molded in non-skid and a hinge to position them. He then added that they were to be French Blue in color. I was not in France at the time, but my colleagues at the shipyard who were there were in shock. No way they wanted to do this. They knew, however, they had no choice . So, the Blue Floors, as we called them, were introduced as an evolution of the Super Maramu Millennium series. I could relate a few more interesting stories about the French Blue Floors. Maybe another time…

 

The Amel 54 was the first Amel designed without the assistance of Captain Amel. It was done by a group of Amel people/The Amel Design Team, under the guidance of Jacques Carteau, Captain Amel’s right hand man and, in many respects, his eyes as well. Carteau was the guy who took the Captain’s thoughts and turned them into the design drawings almost since the beginning of Chantiers Amel. It has often been said that the Amel 54 was the last Amel boat that had entirely Captain Amels DNA in it even though he had nothing to do with it. All the department managers had been selected by Henri Amel. Jacques Carteau was the guy who drew and engineered the plans on almost every previous Amel boat. All Captain Amel disciples at the top of their craft. What a team that was to work with! Personally, these were some of the best days of my life.

 

Without the Captain looking over their shoulders, all involved were free to incorporate what our customers were asking for. Stall showers, a ‘real washer and dryer, every port openable and plenty more of them, an even better and more ergonomic galley and navigation station, a standard centerline queen able to be converted into two snug sea berths ( optionally ) and dozens more improvements and evolutions. However, it was instantly recognizable as an Amel in any harbor.

 

The Amel 54 floors have a plywood core with a textured non-skid and a faux teak pattern. It is actually a FORMICA Brand marine division product and is very durable with the exception of the strips on the side which often become unglued from the plywood.

 

The second windlass on the Amel 54 was actually an option from the beginning. All of our demonstration boats, mine included, had dual windlasses so naturally it follows that the customers wanted another windlass too. The slight negative to the second windlass was, that on some boats, the secondary anchor would not get deployed very often. Mechanical things like maintenance and exercise in equal measure. Be sure to aggressively test the second/port side windlass during any survey of a prospective Amel 54.

 

All the best,

Joel

 

           JOEL F. POTTER ~ CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST, L.L.C.

                                         The Experienced AMEL Guy

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                  Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ruslan Osmonov
Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 floor boards

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Quick question if I may, are A54 floor boards made from wood or some faux wood? If wood curious to know why SM2K were done in GRP and later went back to wood panels. 
I like GRP on SM2K, I feel wood panels will need constant maintenance given salt water and foot traffic environment. 

On the other hand I see A54s pics with floor boards in a good shape, is there a trick at keeping them "like new"?

and one more
- I noticed that later models have one windlass, what is the reason to go from 2 to 1? I would assume the 2 windlass setup was for some good reasons to start with, but not sure why the switch back. 

Regards, 
Ruslan. 

(still looking for one)


Re: A54 floor boards

Martin Birkhoff
 

Hi Ruslan,

the floor boards of our 54 are made of panels of plywood. The surfaces of the panels are coated by synthetic material. More or less undestroyable. It may happen that the edges become loose after years but they can be glued to the plywood again easily. For design reasons Amel added some wood mouldings (mahagony). After 15 years of use these mouldings do not need any maintenance. (You could treat them with furniture polish.)

As long as I know the second windlass was an extra. But I´m not sure. The strange thing when we got our boat in 2016 was: Obviously the second windlass was never connected to the batteries and it never was mounted to the deck correctly. When I dismounted the windlass I discovered a gap of 8 mm between the GRP of the deck and the gearbox of the windlass completely filled with aluminum oxide. 

Regards
Martin
Mago del Sur - 54#40
currently Mahon, Menorca


Re: A54 floor boards

Ann-Sofie, S/Y Lady Annila <ann-sofie@...>
 

We have all wooden floors on our SM 232, from 1998. There is no particular maintenance on it. We  have oiled it once or twice since 2006 when we bought Lady Annila. No trouble with footprints and we wash it with normal floor cleaning liquid  and water. 

SM2k also have wooden floor except on the steps on the ”ladder” and the lid to the floor compartments that is made of GRP.

Regards
Ann-Sofie & Jonas
S/Y Lady Annila SM232, 1998
In Portimão, Portugal


Skickat från min iPhone

05/10/2021 kl. 20:10 skrev neurolept2 <TC215@...>:


Sorry,  sent to wrong group.


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of neurolept2 <TC215@...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 15:09
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 floor boards
 
I am heading out and will be back this evening some time.


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 14:10
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 floor boards
 

Quick question if I may, are A54 floor boards made from wood or some faux wood? If wood curious to know why SM2K were done in GRP and later went back to wood panels. 
I like GRP on SM2K, I feel wood panels will need constant maintenance given salt water and foot traffic environment. 

On the other hand I see A54s pics with floor boards in a good shape, is there a trick at keeping them "like new"?

 

Regards, 
Ruslan. 

(still looking for one)


Re: A54 floor boards

neurolept2
 
Edited

Quick question if I may, are A54 floor boards made from wood or some faux wood? If wood curious to know why SM2K were done in GRP and later went back to wood panels. 
I like GRP on SM2K, I feel wood panels will need constant maintenance given salt water and foot traffic environment. 

On the other hand I see A54s pics with floor boards in a good shape, is there a trick at keeping them "like new"?

 

Regards, 
Ruslan. 

(still looking for one)

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of neurolept2 <TC215@...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 15:09
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 floor boards
 
I am heading out and will be back this evening some time.
 
 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 14:10
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 floor boards
 

Quick question if I may, are A54 floor boards made from wood or some faux wood? If wood curious to know why SM2K were done in GRP and later went back to wood panels. 
I like GRP on SM2K, I feel wood panels will need constant maintenance given salt water and foot traffic environment. 

On the other hand I see A54s pics with floor boards in a good shape, is there a trick at keeping them "like new"?

 

Regards, 
Ruslan. 

(still looking for one)


Re: Climma air conditioning unit

Barry Connor
 

Hi Paul, 
My problem was sea growth in the pipes. Had the local very knowledgeable Caraibe Refrigeration run an acid mixture round the A/C and Refrigeration pipes, took a few hours. Unbelievable difference. Don’t think it has ever been done since 2006.
Sorry they couldn’t give me any advice about your fan issue. Good that you got someone local. Where is Fortunate? 
Best 
Bazza


On Oct 5, 2021, at 10:05, Paul Brown <feeder.brown@...> wrote:

Hi

My fwd and two saloon systems are compact and my aft system is a split system all with independent fans. I have had technical advice from a service technician that inspected the issue and he believes it is a faulty relay. He suggests a new control board or if possible to have the relay replaced.

I am hoping to have the faulty relay replaced as a new board is an expensive solution but maybe my only option.

thank you for your response 

regards Paul- Fortuna II Amel 55 #17


Re: Climma air conditioning unit

Paul Brown
 

Hi

My fwd and two saloon systems are compact and my aft system is a split system all with independent fans. I have had technical advice from a service technician that inspected the issue and he believes it is a faulty relay. He suggests a new control board or if possible to have the relay replaced.

I am hoping to have the faulty relay replaced as a new board is an expensive solution but maybe my only option.

thank you for your response 

regards Paul- Fortuna II Amel 55 #17


Re: What to do with LiFePO4 batteries when the boat is layed up?

Scott SV Tengah
 

Joerg,

Avoiding charging the batteries to 100% during normal use is a completely different conversation than whether to leave batteries at high SOC or 50% SOC during wintering/long term storage. I know that Victron and likely Mastervolt do NOT charge to 100% even during normal use. It's obvious if you look at the absorption voltages preset by Victron lithium charging profiles and then compare it to what is considered 100% charged. I surmise that it's the same with Mastervolt, so the respective battery monitors are telling you it's 100% when it's really in the low-mid 90% SOC. They do this because the additional capacity going between 90%-100% SOC is more than offset by the faster deterioration of the batteries. 

Regarding Mastervolt batteries "being different in design from other manufacturers batteries", I am a bit skeptical considering actual product teardowns indicate that they use Winston prismatic cells, just like Victron and just like the guy who spent a fraction of what we spent for our batteries. A not-so-hidden secret of these expensive batteries is that they use the same Chinese cells that others get at a 75% discount to build their own homebrew lifepo4 batteries. Of course, the internal connections, BMS system, warranty and hence safety and reliability are theoretically better and the system is more integrated, which is why I paid a premium for my Victrons. But I'd be very skeptical when the guy selling you the batteries at a huge profit tries to tell you that theirs is different somehow. I am under no illusion that the battery cells in my Victrons or your MV are made of unobtanium or handbuilt by an MIT engineer - they are Chinese Winston prismatic cells that are subject to the same limitations.

Trying to achieve a desired SOC by specifying voltage is difficult for reasons mentioned earlier. By setting a lower float voltage, I believe that all you're doing is setting the lower limit of voltage that the batteries will go to while connected to the charger. The absorption voltage/duration is really what determines the high SOC limit. Give it a try and set your float voltage to 24v and see if it still charges to 78%.

Let me try to dig up those papers for you. Here are the results of a simplified test that is much less dry.


To be fair, he's comparing 50% vs. 100% SOC but it's probably safe to assume that the damage associated with high SOC storage is not a step function. 

At the end of the day, it's our individual boats, so we must do what we think is best. I find these engineering guys sometimes cross the border into marketing, so I always trust, but verify through objective means.

On Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 7:16 PM Joerg Esdorn via groups.io <jhe1313=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have discussed the issue with a senior technician at MV support.  His explanation for the recommendation to keep the batteries at 100% with a float voltage of 27.0V was that their batteries are different in design from other manufacturers' batteries.  They are made for being kept at full charge over long periods.  I further asked him if I wanted to keep them at a lower SOC, how to achieve that.  His response was to change the float voltage to 26.5 from 27.0V rather than program an event that turns the charger off at 80% SOC.  The event will result in a lot of switching which would be avoided with the adjustment of the float voltage.   I've tried to do this and the SOC essentially goes to about 78% with the charger connected.  So presumably you could set the float voltage to even less than 26.5V and end up with a SOC lower than 78%.  

I would be very interested in seeing the research paper(s) showing what the best SOC for long term storage is.  I am very hesitant setting the SOC for the winter at lower than 80% because of the risk that something will go wrong with the charger and the battery will go to the 20% cutoff point.   I also wonder whether it's worth avoiding charging the batteries to 100%.  I bought these batteries among other things to have much more capacity available than before.  I really don't want to restrict the range of SOC I can use to get some uncertain benefit on longevity.  MV says the batteries are good for 2000 cycles.  My Easyview monitor tells me I've used up 23 of those over the last 3 months on the boat.   At that rate, I will kick the bucket before the batteries!  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 Kincsem
Currently cruising Brittany

 


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Air con circulating pump

Stefan Schaufert
 

Dear Nick,

thx a lot for your fast response.

To the forum:
Does anyone else use Domaire pumps?
If so, how satisfied are you?

Best regards
Stefan
A54 #119 Lady Charlyette, currently La Palma - Canaries


Re: Climma air conditioning unit

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Bill,

If he would have the chiller system, that unit would not carry a fan. So either his fan unit in the saloon is broken or he has the stand alone units.
I seem to remember the early 55’s had the same system as the 54 and SM. The later models had a central chiller unit.
Remains the fact that he should get technical expertise as there many potentials causes for this problem.

Kind regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: What to do with LiFePO4 batteries when the boat is layed up?

Joerg Esdorn
 

I have discussed the issue with a senior technician at MV support.  His explanation for the recommendation to keep the batteries at 100% with a float voltage of 27.0V was that their batteries are different in design from other manufacturers' batteries.  They are made for being kept at full charge over long periods.  I further asked him if I wanted to keep them at a lower SOC, how to achieve that.  His response was to change the float voltage to 26.5 from 27.0V rather than program an event that turns the charger off at 80% SOC.  The event will result in a lot of switching which would be avoided with the adjustment of the float voltage.   I've tried to do this and the SOC essentially goes to about 78% with the charger connected.  So presumably you could set the float voltage to even less than 26.5V and end up with a SOC lower than 78%.  

I would be very interested in seeing the research paper(s) showing what the best SOC for long term storage is.  I am very hesitant setting the SOC for the winter at lower than 80% because of the risk that something will go wrong with the charger and the battery will go to the 20% cutoff point.   I also wonder whether it's worth avoiding charging the batteries to 100%.  I bought these batteries among other things to have much more capacity available than before.  I really don't want to restrict the range of SOC I can use to get some uncertain benefit on longevity.  MV says the batteries are good for 2000 cycles.  My Easyview monitor tells me I've used up 23 of those over the last 3 months on the boat.   At that rate, I will kick the bucket before the batteries!  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 Kincsem
Currently cruising Brittany

 


Re: Climma air conditioning unit

Barry Connor
 

Hi Paul,
I am just getting my saloon ac checked this arvo.
Mine is water cooled, the only fan is at the back of the cooling condenser that blows the air into the cabin. 
I could ask and have the guy give me the voltage if this helps. 
Please advise 
Best Bazza


On Oct 4, 2021, at 11:29, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Paul,

Most Amel owners in this Group have either Climma Compact or Climma Split ACs. I believe that you have a Climma Chiller System.

The only reason I interject this into the thread is that you may get some replies from other owners who are not aware that yours is significantly different than theirs. Maybe you were also not aware?

It sounds like you need to seek support from a trained tech because 160 volts can kill. If you are in Europe, start with customerservice@.... I found them quite helpful.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 6:43 AM Paul Brown <feeder.brown@...> wrote:
Hello, can anyone assist please:

My Amel 55 has a Climma AC unit in the saloon and fwd cabin that appears to have 160v across its fan relay which is causing the fan motor to be energised without the unit being switched on. In other words there is a hum coming from the fan motor (the fan is not spinning) which would probably burn the motor out if the unit is not switched off at its circuit breaker. The issue appears to be within the control board.

I appreciate your assistance in advance.

regards Paul - Fortuna II Amel 55 #17


Re: Climma air conditioning unit

 

Paul,

Most Amel owners in this Group have either Climma Compact or Climma Split ACs. I believe that you have a Climma Chiller System.

The only reason I interject this into the thread is that you may get some replies from other owners who are not aware that yours is significantly different than theirs. Maybe you were also not aware?

It sounds like you need to seek support from a trained tech because 160 volts can kill. If you are in Europe, start with customerservice@.... I found them quite helpful.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 6:43 AM Paul Brown <feeder.brown@...> wrote:
Hello, can anyone assist please:

My Amel 55 has a Climma AC unit in the saloon and fwd cabin that appears to have 160v across its fan relay which is causing the fan motor to be energised without the unit being switched on. In other words there is a hum coming from the fan motor (the fan is not spinning) which would probably burn the motor out if the unit is not switched off at its circuit breaker. The issue appears to be within the control board.

I appreciate your assistance in advance.

regards Paul - Fortuna II Amel 55 #17


Re: Air con circulating pump

Nick Newington
 

Hi Stephan, yes it is but it is weird, I thought it was a 240v pump but actually it is 24v and they provide a power adapter that converts 240v ac to 24v so I put the power pack in a box. The power pack overheated. So I opened the box and it worked fine after that. 
This summer it was very hot and the sea water was 28 degrees in Volos Greece. Ran three aircon units fine all day…not sure that the power supply thing is ideal….a bit Mickey Mouse.

Nick 
Amelia 
AML54-019 
Leros Gr


On 2 Oct 2021, at 18:46, Stefan Schaufert <mail@...> wrote:

Dear Nick,

is your Dormaire pump still working (fine)?

Best regards
Stefan
A54 #119 Lady Charlyette, currently La Palma - Canaries


Re: lithium battery warning

Brent Cameron
 

As Scott has said the Lithium nickel cobalt batteries used in cars are NOT the same thing as the Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) batteries that are primarily being installed in boats (I am aware of a few DYI’ers that have tried to install used Tesla batteries in boats - thankfully nobody has tried this iban Amel to my knowledge). 

The batteries used in cars (and laptops) need to be charged (and discharged) at more than 1C (i.e. more than the rates Capacity of the battery) to ensure a quick charge so they have a more aggressive chemistry that can result in fires when internally short circuited. The Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries can’t charge at that rate (typically up to 0.5C) but then when connected to solar panels and generators they can’t be anyway so no need for better performance. Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries were primarily used in street lamps before people started using them in RV’s, Solar farms and boats. None of these applications need high charge or discharge rates and the bow thruster is probably the only thing on our boats that could cause them to get close to 1C but according to Amel we should be running the generator when running the bow thruster anyway. 

There are videos of some crazy Chinese battery assemblers shooting Lithium Iron phosphate batteries to try to get them to catch fire and they can’t do it (they do get hot). I say assemblers as many of these cheap Chinese batteries use used street lamp cells and put them in cases with cheap BMS systems so caveat emptor. 

It is certainly possible to put together your own cells and BMS and create a battery system as good as Victron or Mastervolt (or BattleBorn) but it isn’t just a matter of finding the cheapest cells and BMS units and self assembling so is probably best left to those who love to spend days reading spec sheets and really understand electricity. Ken Powers is an electrical engineer as I recall and as Scott said had challenges when supervising the installation by a Thai electrician. These things can discharge a huge amount of current (even at 0.5C that’s 225Amps of a typical 450Amp battery bank). You can certainly weld plate at those amperages!   

Those of us with a bit more grey hair that have been sailing for a while will remember the teething problems with AGM batteries as well. You can’t treat these like drop in replacements (no matter what the marketing materials say) for AGM or Lead Acid batteries. Yes they can be dangerous but then so can 600Amps of Lead Acid or AGM and you shouldn’t change the wiring with those if you don’t know what you are doing there either. 

Fortunately the biggest danger we face from poor Lithium iron phosphate battery installations that isn’t also there with Lead Acid and AGM is to your wallet from wrecking them. As always if you change the wiring on your boat, please make sure that you know what you are doing. 

Brent
On Oct 4, 2021, 6:42 AM -0400, main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io, wrote:



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Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Climma air conditioning unit

Paul Brown
 

Hello, can anyone assist please:

My Amel 55 has a Climma AC unit in the saloon and fwd cabin that appears to have 160v across its fan relay which is causing the fan motor to be energised without the unit being switched on. In other words there is a hum coming from the fan motor (the fan is not spinning) which would probably burn the motor out if the unit is not switched off at its circuit breaker. The issue appears to be within the control board.

I appreciate your assistance in advance.

regards Paul - Fortuna II Amel 55 #17


Re: lithium battery warning

Lior Keydar
 

Scott,

On this homepage, there is a good comparison of the different Lithium batteries: https://www.roypowusa.com/?page_id=37164

I have also the Mastervolt 110A alternator and the Alpha Pro III. I configured it with the lithium profile and float voltage of 26.7V. Its charges permanently at around 80A.
I will also connect it permanently with the master bus to the laptop to monitor the charging and also be able to change fast the configuration in case that something goes wrong (for example reduce the charge voltage or turn it off). I think that the main risk is in case that the regulator being defective. 

Best,
Lior, SHARONA, A54 #18


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