Date   

Silicone Seals for Bowthruster on SM

George Green
 

I know this is a well covered topic, but where exactly can the silicone bowthruster seals be purchased?
Many thanks 

George , # 434


Re: Firefly batteries

Matt Salatino
 

I installed Fireflys on my previous boat.
many of the benefits of Lithium, except the weight.
They will also charge using your conventional chargers.
I was pleased. I replaced a 600 amp hour, standard AGM house bank with 348 amp hour Fireflys and didn’t notice any reduction in usage, as you can discharge them deeper than conventional lead acid without damage.
today’s concern is that I can now find Lithium for similar prices as Firefly.


Re: Firefly batteries

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Hi Bill,

 

When you say this:

 

All the batteries on the 0 to 12 volt side are tied together. Likewise, all of them on the 12 to 24 volt side

 

Do you mean that the low side batteries of each 24v pair are all connected together with all their negative terminals, and similarly the high side?

 

Another possible hitch is that I’ve been told by a UK supplier that FF recommends no more than four pairs, but I believe you mentioned that a 54 would normally take 12. Would you know anything about this? It is the G31s I’m talking about.

 

Hi Arno,

 

You say that 12 batteries would not fit. I note you have hull 121 and wonder if Amel may have resized the compartment in the interim from #98? According to my measurements on record it will be 2mm short on the width but assume some inaccuracy in this measurement.

 

Cheers,

Paul

 

Paul Dowd & Sharon Brown

S/Y Ya Fohi, Amel 54 #98
tel: +44 (0)7710 466619

skype: pauldowd
web:
https://my.yb.tl/yafohi

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: 08 October 2021 14:54
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Firefly batteries

 

Paul,

Our electrical system is basically all Victron and we have installed their Cerbo GX to monitor and control all the bits and pieces.  The key key piece for the batteries is the BMV Battery Monitor.  In addition to all the usual functions of bank voltage and amp usage tracking, it can monitor the difference between the "top" of the bank and the "bottom".

All the batteries on the 0 to 12 volt side are tied together. Likewise, all of them on the 12 to 24 volt side.  In the ideal world, the voltage inside each group would be exactly one half of the overall bank voltage, or (nominally) 12 volts. If a single battery was to develop an internal short that half of the battery bank would drop in voltage, and the other half would rise, increasing the difference between them.

Normally our batteries run with a 0.00V difference. Toward the end of a hard charging cycle we can see up to a 0.04V difference.  We have an alarm set to flag if the difference gets above 0.06V.  So far, it has never gone off.

I have attached the voltage graph from our last full discharge and rapid recharge.  The discharge rate was pretty steady at 50 Amps for about 10 hours.  The charge rate was all the batteries could take, or 200 Amps whichever came first. It was pretty warm that day, so the absorption voltage was a bit lower than you might expect.  The top and bottom difference increased as the batteries approached fully empty, during the steepest part of the bulk phase, and in the middle of the absorption phase, all of which is normal behavior.



Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: Firefly batteries

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Paul,

Be careful with the size of the Firefly batteries. I did not manage to get 12 batteries in the cavity. I’m not sure how many I now have as I’m not close to the boat but I do know these batteries are slightly bigger then the size Amel used initially. The Firefly’s are 120Ah and the default Amels were 105Ah.
The batteries perform well for me however I do find the voltage to be a bit lower then AGM at the same state of charge.

Cheers,
Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121 


Re: Air con circulating pump

Stefan Schaufert
 

Thanks to Brent and Scott.  
I will try a "common" 230V relay (not a solid state relay) - like on the pictures.  
It will take some time until I get and give you the result, because I have not yet replaced the pump ;-).

Best regards
Stefan
A54 #119 Lady Charlyette, currently La Palma - Canaries


Re: Firefly batteries

Bill Kinney
 

Paul,

Our electrical system is basically all Victron and we have installed their Cerbo GX to monitor and control all the bits and pieces.  The key key piece for the batteries is the BMV Battery Monitor.  In addition to all the usual functions of bank voltage and amp usage tracking, it can monitor the difference between the "top" of the bank and the "bottom".

All the batteries on the 0 to 12 volt side are tied together. Likewise, all of them on the 12 to 24 volt side.  In the ideal world, the voltage inside each group would be exactly one half of the overall bank voltage, or (nominally) 12 volts. If a single battery was to develop an internal short that half of the battery bank would drop in voltage, and the other half would rise, increasing the difference between them.

Normally our batteries run with a 0.00V difference. Toward the end of a hard charging cycle we can see up to a 0.04V difference.  We have an alarm set to flag if the difference gets above 0.06V.  So far, it has never gone off.

I have attached the voltage graph from our last full discharge and rapid recharge.  The discharge rate was pretty steady at 50 Amps for about 10 hours.  The charge rate was all the batteries could take, or 200 Amps whichever came first. It was pretty warm that day, so the absorption voltage was a bit lower than you might expect.  The top and bottom difference increased as the batteries approached fully empty, during the steepest part of the bulk phase, and in the middle of the absorption phase, all of which is normal behavior.



Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Amel 54 v Beneteau 55

Brent Cameron
 

I’ve had the opportunity to do long passages on both Amel Super Maramu’s and a Beneteau Sense 55 back to back and I agree that there isn’t much of a comparison.  While the 55 had a lot more room both below and above deck and would be a much better charter boat (the reason my cousin bought it), at sea they are completely different animals.   That wide open rear deck and seats at the aft corners looks marvellous at the dock but out in big seas or even motoring downwind it’s not a very fun place to be (the exhaust gets you). No way you can really sail it singlehanded as even racking the boat things are way too far away from the helm stations. The winches are used for furling the massive Genoa and that can only be done from one side so again, it’s at least a two person job. It was fast downhill as we saw 10 knots fairly consistently but the motion wasn’t great with a lot of banging of that big flat stern. The cockpit was extremely wide with no proper handholds (same in the galley) so the boat on the lean was actually dangerous as if you fell off the top side to the bottom you’d fly across 10-12’ of space before intercepting something hard to stop (hopefully) you. 

The electrical systems on the Beneteau were bare minimum and sprinkled all throughout the boat making diagnostics much tougher. We had to get into some really tight locations and empty out entire lockers to get at key things which seemed really poor planning. The inverters were really cheap and small (and lasted about as long as you’d expect).  It had three separate battery banks, including one up front for the bow thruster, none in easy spots to get at so I suspect regular inspections would suffer. Engine and generator access was poor and I can’t imagine having to work on the generator at sea. Both were undersized in my humble opinion. Same goes for the winches and brakes. The sail control lines were a mess running all over (and under the deck) and not a lot made sense as you couldn’t trace a line to what it did. With time, you’d of course learn but for new crew (and owners) it wasn’t intuitive like the Amels. You also NEED to be on deck to furl which was disappointing to say the least. 

That said, the boats are designed and intended for completely different missions. If I was doing a charter in the BVI’s or sitting at the dock or anchor for months in end, I’d pick the Beneteau as it’s a heck of a lot of boat (real estate wise) for the money.  That front owners cabin as humongous and the two private cabins are a nice touch with lots of privacy but not a proper sea bunk on the boat.  If I had to sail it out of there to get away from anything stronger than 30!knots, I’d trade two of them for an Amel in a heartbeat. For cruising around the world, for me there is no comparison. I think that a cruising couple should be able to single hand sail and that’s just not possible on the big Beneteau. You’d be sailing around with the sails furled up as a precaution and then wouldn’t be able to get at the extra speed it can carry because of the long waterline. To each their own but I know which I’d pick. 

Brent

On Oct 8, 2021, 4:16 AM -0400, ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington@...>, wrote:
Fellow Amel owners

I am so happy I bought an Amel 54… I am doing a delivery of a Beneteau 55. You would think that she would out-sail my 54….. No way….She just does not go without lots of wind. It must be that wide stern twin rudder arrangement. It is sticky.
It does not have a pole! So down wind is painful.
Then the twin helms are so exposed I fear falling overboard, no wonder life jackets and harnesses are de-rigeur…do not get me started on the engineering, the finish, the motion at sea….
“Love knows not it’s own depth until the hour of separation” is as true with lovers as with boats….
Nick
Temporarily separated from Amelia
AML 54-019






--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Firefly batteries

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Thank you Bill and all others who have responded. The feedback has been very helpful, and it is quite likely that I will go for the Fireflys. I had in mind 12 x G31s so nice to have that corroboration. Bill you mention briefly about your monitoring system. Could you possibly elaborate a bit on exactly what that is?

 

Cheers,

Paul

 

Paul Dowd & Sharon Brown

S/Y Ya Fohi, Amel 54 #98
tel: +44 (0)7710 466619

skype: pauldowd
web:
https://my.yb.tl/yafohi

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: 08 October 2021 06:09
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Firefly batteries

 

Paul,

We have a full set of Firefly batteries, and love them.  We periodically do a complete discharge to dead flat, and a rapid recharge as Firefly recommends as a "restoration charge."  Every time we we have done this we carefully monitor the amount of power discharged.  Each time the amount of power they have delivered has been above the original specification sheet value, and it is still the same as the day we installed them. The last I looked, it seemed that Firefly bumped up the rated specification of the batteries from 116A-hr to 120A-hr which is more in line with what we measure. We take good care of them, but while out on the hook, we certainly do not bring them fully charged every day.  They don't care.

For the way we use our boat, they give us all the benefit that a set of Lithiums would, at a significant discount.  They never have had any trouble with powering the bow thruster, or high loads out of the inverter.  At a steady 50 amp draw the voltage stays remarkably steady all the way down to about 15% SOC.

Some issues to watch for:

Firefly recommends that the batteries be charged at between 0.2 and 0.5C My recollection of a 54 is that you have 12 G31 batteries.  That would give you a bank of 720 A-hrs.  Charging that large a back at a rate of 0.2*720 = 144 Amps might be a challenge with a standard charging setup.  Our older SM has a 480 A-hr battery bank.  We have a DC generator that outputs 150 amps at 24 volts, so it fits well within the minimums recommended.  If you can't reach the recommended minimums, they request you talk to their technical staff for an alternative procedure.  I don't know what this is, but  it might be worth investigating up front if it might be an issue for you.

Early in their production run Firefly had difficulty with the occasional battery developing a shorted cell.  Left undetected, this can bring down the entire bank  in short order because of charge imbalances.  It is not a problem unique to these batteries, any type of lead acid battery can have this problem, but it seemed Firefly had more than their fair share.  We had this happen to us, and Firefly was 100% helpful and completely took care of us under warrantee. Our current monitoring system doesn't allow this to happen without us knowing about it very quickly.

We have 615W of solar. Our normal daily power usage is about 3kW-hrs, and solar can make about half this. During our normal charging cycle while at anchor in good weather we end up in the morning at about 75% SOC.  Over a sunny day, the solar panels bring the batteries up to about 90%.  The next morning, the batteries drop to about 60-65% SOC.  The generator starts in the early morning, runs for 80 to 90 minutes, and brings the bank up to 93% where it shuts down, and the solar panels have the bank at 100% by 3PM.  And the same two day cycle repeats.

We find we get excellent utilization for the power available from our solar panels, and the generator runs most of its time at high load, where it is most efficient.  For us, minimizing expensive generator run time is important.

We have looked very hard, and sharpened our pencils a lot, and for us we just don't see a benefit to Li batteries that justify the higher costs.  But every boat works differently, and everybody has different needs.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: Retractable bow thruster maintenance on a Sharki

Davi Rozgonyi
 

Google nikimat bow thruster. There is a complete walk thru with dozens of pics. Of course, bill's material too... 


Re: Retractable bow thruster maintenance on a Sharki

Paul Peschel
 

Thanks so much for all your valuable feedback! Is there any kind of handbook / documentation for the bow thruster available?


Amel 54 v Beneteau 55

Nick Newington
 

Fellow Amel owners

I am so happy I bought an Amel 54… I am doing a delivery of a Beneteau 55. You would think that she would out-sail my 54….. No way….She just does not go without lots of wind. It must be that wide stern twin rudder arrangement. It is sticky.
It does not have a pole! So down wind is painful.
Then the twin helms are so exposed I fear falling overboard, no wonder life jackets and harnesses are de-rigeur…do not get me started on the engineering, the finish, the motion at sea….
“Love knows not it’s own depth until the hour of separation” is as true with lovers as with boats….
Nick
Temporarily separated from Amelia
AML 54-019


Re: Firefly batteries

Bill Kinney
 

Paul,

We have a full set of Firefly batteries, and love them.  We periodically do a complete discharge to dead flat, and a rapid recharge as Firefly recommends as a "restoration charge."  Every time we we have done this we carefully monitor the amount of power discharged.  Each time the amount of power they have delivered has been above the original specification sheet value, and it is still the same as the day we installed them. The last I looked, it seemed that Firefly bumped up the rated specification of the batteries from 116A-hr to 120A-hr which is more in line with what we measure. We take good care of them, but while out on the hook, we certainly do not bring them fully charged every day.  They don't care.

For the way we use our boat, they give us all the benefit that a set of Lithiums would, at a significant discount.  They never have had any trouble with powering the bow thruster, or high loads out of the inverter.  At a steady 50 amp draw the voltage stays remarkably steady all the way down to about 15% SOC.

Some issues to watch for:

Firefly recommends that the batteries be charged at between 0.2 and 0.5C My recollection of a 54 is that you have 12 G31 batteries.  That would give you a bank of 720 A-hrs.  Charging that large a back at a rate of 0.2*720 = 144 Amps might be a challenge with a standard charging setup.  Our older SM has a 480 A-hr battery bank.  We have a DC generator that outputs 150 amps at 24 volts, so it fits well within the minimums recommended.  If you can't reach the recommended minimums, they request you talk to their technical staff for an alternative procedure.  I don't know what this is, but  it might be worth investigating up front if it might be an issue for you.

Early in their production run Firefly had difficulty with the occasional battery developing a shorted cell.  Left undetected, this can bring down the entire bank  in short order because of charge imbalances.  It is not a problem unique to these batteries, any type of lead acid battery can have this problem, but it seemed Firefly had more than their fair share.  We had this happen to us, and Firefly was 100% helpful and completely took care of us under warrantee. Our current monitoring system doesn't allow this to happen without us knowing about it very quickly.

We have 615W of solar. Our normal daily power usage is about 3kW-hrs, and solar can make about half this. During our normal charging cycle while at anchor in good weather we end up in the morning at about 75% SOC.  Over a sunny day, the solar panels bring the batteries up to about 90%.  The next morning, the batteries drop to about 60-65% SOC.  The generator starts in the early morning, runs for 80 to 90 minutes, and brings the bank up to 93% where it shuts down, and the solar panels have the bank at 100% by 3PM.  And the same two day cycle repeats.

We find we get excellent utilization for the power available from our solar panels, and the generator runs most of its time at high load, where it is most efficient.  For us, minimizing expensive generator run time is important.

We have looked very hard, and sharpened our pencils a lot, and for us we just don't see a benefit to Li batteries that justify the higher costs.  But every boat works differently, and everybody has different needs.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Firefly batteries

Jamie Wendell
 

Paul, I had them installed several years ago and they all failed to deliver for me after a couple of years. The issue was always voltage drop under high loads like bow thrusters, etc. Eventually, I could not keep them charged properly - I had low-voltage alarms almost every night.
I do not want to dissuade you from taking that route, as I know others have used them successfully.
Maybe I am a unique situation with higher than average loads, but I am just reporting my bad experience. I ditched them for LiFePO4 batteries 2 years ago. Without any doubt, the lithiums have been excellent, with the most significant feature being (to me) that they retain a constant voltage throughout the discharge cycle.
I will never return to any type of lead-acid batteries. Keep in mind that Fireflys are a type of lead-acid battery, albeit with the added benefit of carbon foam.
Hope that gives you my perspective.
Jamie
Phantom, A54 #44


Re: Firefly batteries

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Installed ours in May 2019. I give them a thumbs up. It's comforting to know that they can be in a partial SOC without causing significant damage or drastically shortening their lifespan. Will be interesting to see how long they actually do last, cycling pretty much every day. They're technically an AGM battery, carbon foam AGM. Ideally they get topped up to 100% once a week. And should get a periodic "restoration charge", which we've only done a couple times because it's only really feasible with shore power. We weren't quite ready for a switch to lithium so we went with these.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
NZ


On Fri, Oct 8, 2021, 8:30 AM Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown <paul.dowd@...> wrote:

Hi all,

 

I am curious to know if anyone has any experience with Firefly batteries, and if so whether they are recommended.

 

Cheers,

Paul

 

Paul Dowd & Sharon Brown

S/Y Ya Fohi, Amel 54 #98
tel: +44 (0)7710 466619

skype: pauldowd
web:
https://my.yb.tl/yafohi

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: 1981 Maramu pre-survey

Steve Hoefel
 

James,

   Have owned my Maramu for 19 years in Greek waters.  Can’t seem to escape heaven.  My heater has not worked for the last three years, I am going to check out this glow plug recommendation.  Like most systems on a Maramu, I think the heater is essentially bulletproof.  Thermostat for the heater is in the aft cabin above the bunk.   Maramus forever…

 

v/r

Steve

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 


Re: 1981 Maramu pre-survey

James Alton
 

Mark,

   Many thanks for the inspiration to look into rebuilding our D4.  I hope to remove and inspect it over the weekend.    Would you happen to know if service parts are still available for these older D4 heaters?  

   BTW, there seem to be quite a few Sharki's in the Preveza Greece area, really nice boats!

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220


-----Original Message-----
From: marklesparkle59 <marklesparkle59@...>
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Oct 7, 2021 8:54 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] 1981 Maramu pre-survey

Hi James, my 1983 D4 still works,we just had to change the glow plug and off it went after at least 6 years un used. The exhaust has been repaired at some stage with a car repair kit. But it works well.
Mark Porter 
Sea Hobo Sharki #96

Mark Porter

On Thu, 7 Oct 2021, 17:54 James Alton via groups.io, <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Steve,
   Another very Happy Maramu owner here.  I was wondering if you would be willing to spare some of your experience  with the Maramu diesel heater?  My wife and I will wintering in the Med this year so things will be much improved if we can get a heater running on our boat.  Our boat appears to have the original Eberspacher D4 diesel heater.  I have no experience with this type of heater so any advice is appreciated.  I have not tried the heater yet to see if it works.  Perhaps the first question is whether  a 1987 heater potentially serviceable/desirable or should I be ordering a new unit?  I don't mind doing some service work but I would like to ultimately end up with a reliable unit.  If a new unit, can anyone suggest the best option for a Maramu?  Thanks for any help.
Thanks,
James Alton
Maramu #220 Sueno
   


On Thu, Oct 7, 2021 at 5:34 PM, Steve Hoefel
<shoefel48@...> wrote:
Own Maramu #25 and have the same behind the mast in-mast furling on the boat you are considering.  Bamar is the company that did the installation, mine is manually raised via lines running to the cockpit.  Denis hit most of the subjects I saw, but an additional three would be:
  1. Check Diesel Heater in the cockpit above the deep locker
  2. Replacement refrigerator is smaller than the 4.2cu feet original.  Water or air cooled.  I didn’t see a compressor in the engine room so probably air cooled.  Where is the compressor?
  3. During your on the water survey check/discuss the passive prop shaft generator
 
Good luck with the sale.  Maramus forever!!
 
Steve Hoefel
s/v Trident Star
Maramu #25
Sent from Mail for Windows
 


Re: Firefly batteries

Michael Winand
 

Hi Paul,  we installed firefly batteries 2 years ago,  happy with them,  I have experience with wet cell batteries,  firefly are easier to maintain.  I can't compare them with gels or agm styles. 
We have a large frame 175amp alternator,  1kw solar, 5kw quattro,  we only use the genset if we have limited sunshine. 
Can run 1 aircon during the day on a hot summer day. 
Michael Nebo sm251 

On Fri, 8 Oct 2021, 5:30 am Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown, <paul.dowd@...> wrote:

Hi all,

 

I am curious to know if anyone has any experience with Firefly batteries, and if so whether they are recommended.

 

Cheers,

Paul

 

Paul Dowd & Sharon Brown

S/Y Ya Fohi, Amel 54 #98
tel: +44 (0)7710 466619

skype: pauldowd
web:
https://my.yb.tl/yafohi

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: Firefly batteries

Mark Erdos
 

If you search this group you will find extensive postings regarding Fireflys from sv Harmonie. Or you can look on their website: https://fetchinketch.net

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
Sent: Thursday, October 7, 2021 9:30 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Firefly batteries

 

Hi all,

 

I am curious to know if anyone has any experience with Firefly batteries, and if so whether they are recommended.

 

Cheers,

Paul

 

Paul Dowd & Sharon Brown

S/Y Ya Fohi, Amel 54 #98
tel: +44 (0)7710 466619

skype: pauldowd
web:
https://my.yb.tl/yafohi

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Firefly batteries

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Hi all,

 

I am curious to know if anyone has any experience with Firefly batteries, and if so whether they are recommended.

 

Cheers,

Paul

 

Paul Dowd & Sharon Brown

S/Y Ya Fohi, Amel 54 #98
tel: +44 (0)7710 466619

skype: pauldowd
web:
https://my.yb.tl/yafohi

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: Air con circulating pump

Brent Cameron
 

It’s not hard to find relays that can be energized by 240VAC signals and that can switch 24VDC devices. You just want to be sure that the switching capacity isn’t exceeded (eg trying to use a 10Amp relay to control a 20Amp motor).  You also need to understand if the circuit is normally open or normally closed (or the relay is energized to close contacts to start/run the motor or vis versa). My guess would be Normally Open which also means the relay can be depowered when not needed and will use no power when the motor isn’t running).   You also want to be sure that the relay can handle the start currents of the motor as they can be considerably higher than the run current.   

Brent

On Oct 7, 2021, 1:41 PM -0400, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...>, wrote:

The engineers in the group or a marine electrician (ha!) will have to give their opinion, but I think all you need a relay that has a coil that is capable of handling 240vac. The relay would be controlled by the 240vac signal that normally would power the pump, but rather than powering the pump, it energizes the relay and connects 24vdc from the batteries to power your 24vdc pump.

 

You’ll have to check, but I presume a relay that can handle 240v in its coil can also handle 24v. Just make sure the contact current capacity is enough for your pump.  

 

The 240v is AC and the 24v is DC, but I’m not sure that makes a difference.

 

From: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Nicolas Klene via groups.io" <laixoi@...>
Reply-To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, October 7, 2021 at 4:29 PM
To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Air con circulating pump

 

Hi Stefan

 

I am installing the same pump as you  with that “box” as a 220v/24v transformer which I find flimsy! 

If Scott can tell us a way to connect it to the 24v with a relay , I would be very interested !!

Thanks in advance Scott .

Nicolas 

SV DarNico

Amel 53 #471



Le 7 oct. 2021 à 15:04, Stefan Schaufert <mail@...> a écrit :

Dear Scott,

would it be no problem switching the 24V DC with 240V AC by a relay?
I am not sure about that, but I decided against this idea.
Some research in the web told me, even a solid state relay (usually only available for AC-AC if you need it for 240V to 24V)) only switch it on, but not off again, even if I did not understand that ;-(.
But I am not an electric engineer and have to believe what I find for this issue.
What would your solution look like for that?

Best regards
Stefan
A54 #119 Lady Charlyette, currently La Palma - Canaries


--
Nicolas Klene
DarNico
SM2K # 471
In Marseille


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada

2921 - 2940 of 63296