Date   

Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

A friend of mine was in a typhoon many years ago in the Pacific.

After the typhoon was over the flight deck of his Aircraft Carrier was severely bent.

 

What do you get when you cross breed King Kong and a Parrot ?

I don’t know but when it talks you listen

 

Same for the ocean.

r/WarshipPorn - USS Hornet's Flight Deck is bent 90 degrees over the bows after Typhoon Halsey [4551 x 3551]

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of ngtnewington Newington via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, October 23, 2021 1:29 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

 

I do not think it realistic to cut away a solar arch at sea in rough weather. For a start you will only cut it away when you feel that you really have to by which time it is blowing a severe gale and more.

How exactly will you cut it away?

Angle grinder?

You have to be joking…

 

I have a solar arch, there are two feet each side, one is fixed to the toe rail which will not give way and the other to the sloping transom which is a potential weak point. I have beefed up the backing plate area on the port side as the shore power socket is located near  with epoxy and glass. In addition I beefed up the glass where the mizzen back stays are attached both sides. I will observe for any flexing but to really beef it up I thing a foam knee should be glued and glassed between the transom and the hull. 

With this done and assuming that  no dinghy is hoisted I think that in extreme the solar panels may fly but the minimal windage of the naked arch would survive….

Nick

Amelia

AML54-019 

Sailing Turkey



On 23 Oct 2021, at 05:50, Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries@...> wrote:

Eric

You mention designing new attachment points for your drogue, could you please elaborate and perhaps share some pictures.
Thanks

--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Only breaking waves over the arch will answer the question.

The force of the sea is immense.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of ngtnewington Newington via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, October 23, 2021 1:29 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

 

I do not think it realistic to cut away a solar arch at sea in rough weather. For a start you will only cut it away when you feel that you really have to by which time it is blowing a severe gale and more.

How exactly will you cut it away?

Angle grinder?

You have to be joking…

 

I have a solar arch, there are two feet each side, one is fixed to the toe rail which will not give way and the other to the sloping transom which is a potential weak point. I have beefed up the backing plate area on the port side as the shore power socket is located near  with epoxy and glass. In addition I beefed up the glass where the mizzen back stays are attached both sides. I will observe for any flexing but to really beef it up I thing a foam knee should be glued and glassed between the transom and the hull. 

With this done and assuming that  no dinghy is hoisted I think that in extreme the solar panels may fly but the minimal windage of the naked arch would survive….

Nick

Amelia

AML54-019 

Sailing Turkey



On 23 Oct 2021, at 05:50, Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries@...> wrote:

Eric

You mention designing new attachment points for your drogue, could you please elaborate and perhaps share some pictures.
Thanks

--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Paul,

I had the stern cleats reinforced when Kimberlite was built.

My only issue with the drogue is that the bridle rubs against the backstays.

Sometimes this put Kimberlite at about 20 degrees to the oncoming seas. If I tighten one bridle to square up the boat, it starts putting pressure on one of the backstays. We rode out the hurricane with no problems 20 off center.  I have thought long and hard how to change the angle of the bridle.  My only thought is to move the SSB antenna out of the way and see what the configuration looks like. However, it is way down my list.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2021 10:50 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

 

Eric

You mention designing new attachment points for your drogue, could you please elaborate and perhaps share some pictures.
Thanks

--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: Aletes

Brent Cameron
 

Yes. I’m also sorry to see you both go. Thanks for the tour of Aletes during the Amel get together  and your informed posts over the years. I learned a lot. Al Elsie and his family are getting a great boat that will serve them well. Happy trails!  

Brent

On Oct 23, 2021, 6:06 PM -0400, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>, wrote:

Mikwe and Tom, Sorry to see you go. All the best for your future adventures

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 24 October 2021 at 09:38 "Mike Ondra via groups.io" <mdondra@...> wrote:

Amel Friends,

 

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:

Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–

And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.

 

Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.

 

The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.

 

We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?

 

In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.

 

Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.

 

Mike and Tom

Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD

 

 




--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Aletes

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Mikwe and Tom, Sorry to see you go. All the best for your future adventures

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 24 October 2021 at 09:38 "Mike Ondra via groups.io" <mdondra@...> wrote:

Amel Friends,

 

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:

Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–

And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.

 

Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.

 

The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.

 

We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?

 

In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.

 

Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.

 

Mike and Tom

Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD

 

 


 


 


Aletes

Mike Ondra
 

Amel Friends,

 

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:

Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–

And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.

 

Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.

 

The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.

 

We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?

 

In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.

 

Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.

 

Mike and Tom

Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD

 

 


Re: Anchor chain galvanizing

Matt Salatino
 

That’s a great price! We paid twice as much in Guatemala.
we found, after using the chain a few times, it worked better and better through the Gypsies, and in stacking.


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Brent Cameron
 

It seems to me that one could rather easily (and without much more weight) build in or retrofit a rapid disconnect system to detach the solar panels mounted on an arch by connecting them to rails (most are already mounted on rails to fasten to the top arch frame as is) that would then slide into other rails (sort of like drawer slides) mounted to the top of the arch.  These would then be secured by locking pins in order to keep them firmly locked in place otherwise.  You could very quickly lose the whole panel setup or even set it up so that each panel could slide out independently (and presumably be stored below rather than pitched over the side - which would make it more likely that the owner would take the preventative action early as you don’t need the panels when it’s stormy anyway).  

As Nick says, I doubt that even large waves would take out the arch itself (unless it was one of those fibreglass “wing” shaped arches) so detaching the panels seems the quickest way to deal with the potential forces involved in a large storm.    With good forecasting available now with satellite pretty much anywhere in the world, I’m guessing you’d have at least 12 hours notice of anything big enough to threaten the panels no matter where you were.   

I also guess that you could also build in tubes within tubes with locking pins to easily completely detach the arch from their mounting brackets but I strongly suspect that the (presumably well braced) arch itself wouldn’t be much more problematic than the masts or stanchions and could easily survive the 15-20 big waves that Eric suffered in his horrific survival conditions.  Amel seemed happy enough with the mounting system for the Simpson Davits on some SM’s and about half of the Amel 54’s and they have a lot more “windage” and leverage than most arches. Of course, you could just weigh the odds and use a spanner and a screw driver to disconnect the entire thing and throw it over the side too…. But I’m guessing the more work/bigger loss, the less likely that someone will make the right decision when the limited time window arrises.   

In any case, I’m sure this kind of a system could be put together in an afternoon with the right materials at hand and it wouldn’t cost a lot either.  Good insurance to get the best of both worlds.  I’m with both of you on storing the dingy on davits while passaging…. NFW.   

Brent

On Oct 22, 2021, 12:45 AM -0400, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...>, wrote:
Eric,

I have read your article several times, and it is really a touchstone for me. The conditions you went through are worse than I have ever had to sail in, although I did get pounded pretty hard (for many days) on a trip back across from Hawaii to California. I saw several times the "submarine boat" you described. It was an educational experience.  Especially the time I was working to sort out a problem with the furling gear at the bow when the boat disappeared... We had rail mounted solar panels (folded down) that took a hit from waves hard enough to break stanchions. Fortunately just broken metal, not ripped fiberglass. Another lesson learned.

I once expressed an opinion that I thought having a dinghy on davits was a hazard offshore. We have seen a boat limping back to harbor with totally twisted and mangled davits when a wave filled the dinghy hanging there. A very popular internet guru responded that he had an Island Packet 38 with REALLY high freeboard and just could not image a wave large enough to poop his dinghy while it was hanging on davits... I was kind of flabbergasted. As if the ocean cares how good your imagination is...

We have decided that an intermediate approach fits our risk/benefit equation.  A simple arch with only solar panels.  No davits, no other attachments.  If we ever really expected to be in serious survival conditions offshore, I'd cut the whole thing away without a second thought.  Total cost of replacement, about $8K.  Peace of mind:  Priceless.  

I don't worry about it at all with wind, it had no issue with winds of 70 knots in Hurricane Dorian.  Waves: A totally different story.  If we were ever in a situation where waves were large enough to impact the solar panels in any way I KNOW the structure would be compromised.

I know and understand that our choice is not the best from all perspectives.  But I know that the value of having a solar system that supplies half of our power needs is significant.  Not just from a cost perspective but extending our self sufficiency, and off grid fuel independence is really a major addition to our boat's capabilities.

Bill Kinney
Sm160,  Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Nick Newington
 

I do not think it realistic to cut away a solar arch at sea in rough weather. For a start you will only cut it away when you feel that you really have to by which time it is blowing a severe gale and more.
How exactly will you cut it away?
Angle grinder?
You have to be joking…

I have a solar arch, there are two feet each side, one is fixed to the toe rail which will not give way and the other to the sloping transom which is a potential weak point. I have beefed up the backing plate area on the port side as the shore power socket is located near  with epoxy and glass. In addition I beefed up the glass where the mizzen back stays are attached both sides. I will observe for any flexing but to really beef it up I thing a foam knee should be glued and glassed between the transom and the hull. 
With this done and assuming that  no dinghy is hoisted I think that in extreme the solar panels may fly but the minimal windage of the naked arch would survive….
Nick
Amelia
AML54-019 
Sailing Turkey


On 23 Oct 2021, at 05:50, Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries@...> wrote:

Eric
You mention designing new attachment points for your drogue, could you please elaborate and perhaps share some pictures.
Thanks
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Paul Harries
 

Eric
You mention designing new attachment points for your drogue, could you please elaborate and perhaps share some pictures.
Thanks
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Anchor chain galvanizing

Bill Kinney
 

The last time we had old and tired chain I looked around for a place that could galvanize at a reasonable price.  For what ever reason, I could not find anybody, so we bought new chain.  

We did get an excellent price on that chain, but as we learned later, it was electrogalvanized, not hot dipped.  Electrogalvanizing leaves a VERY thin, although smooth and pretty, layer of zinc on the surface of the chain.  it is generally NOT recommended for applications in "severely corrosive" applications. Soaking carbon steel in salt water certainly has to rate as a "severely corrosive" application.

Now, a bit less than 3 years later, our chain has lost much of its protective zinc layer and is starting to rust.  This time I did manage to find a place reasonably local to where we are who quoted about $300 for 300 feet of chain and our anchor.  This was Baltimore Galvanizing. Since we were in Annapolis at the time, this was a reasonable distance to manage.  The price was attractive since the best price we could find for 300 feet of 3/8 inch (10 mm) G4 grade chain was about $1500 delivered.

We disassembled our Mantus 105 lb anchor, and loaded the three pieces along with the chain on a scrap pallet we scrounged up from the engine dealer at the boat yard. We were fortunate that a visiting friend showed up with a pickup truck to help with the delivery to the plant.  A week later, the work was completed.

For the anchor, we just ordered new, galvanized structural bolts to replace the originals. The originals from Mantus were standard Grade 5 galvanized bolts.  The structural bolts we used were also hot dip galvanized, and the A325 grade has identical strength rating as the Grade 5 originals.  The difference is that the structural bolts have an unthreaded shoulder which makes them stronger in shear loading.

The chain itself was, as expected, significantly rougher in texture than before.  The zinc coating was thick, and well adhered.  There were about a dozen places in the length where a few links had stuck together, but a wack with a hammer fixed these easily as we loaded the chain onto the boat.  The rougher texture meant that the chain does not "flow" as easily as it did before, and piles up in a steeper cone in the chain locker.  No where near high enough to be an issue in the Super Maramu chain locker, but on an Amel54 it might be a problem.

The coating on the anchor was also thicker and rougher than the factory original.  Not as pretty, but hopefully longer lasting!  Our anchor really wasn't in desperate need of new galvanizing, but since we were paying the shop minimum job price, it was included at no additional cost.

Even with the cost of renting a pickup truck to move the chain one way, we spent less than 1/3 the cost of what new chain would have been.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
 

There is a lot to be said about good seamanship. All things not secured properly will move in any big sea. This is the reason containers fall off ships. I have also seen containers pushed in by the force of waves.

We also have a solar arch along with well over a hundred other Amels. Many of which have sailed thousands of sea miles. The only time the solar arch is used with the dinghy hoisted is in sheltered waters otherwise the dinghy is folded and stowed in the lazerette when sailing offshore.

When offshore extra tie downs are passed on the solar arch to ensure it is secured well and to limit movement. I too would not hesitate to cut it free if sea state and weather were likely to compromise the safety of our vessel.

We are very happy with the solar arch and the self sufficiency it provides us when cruising.

Kind regards
Ross and Donna
SV Intrepid Kiwi
Currently cruising Turkey


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Friday, October 22, 2021, 7:42 AM, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Eric,

I have read your article several times, and it is really a touchstone for me. The conditions you went through are worse than I have ever had to sail in, although I did get pounded pretty hard (for many days) on a trip back across from Hawaii to California. I saw several times the "submarine boat" you described. It was an educational experience.  Especially the time I was working to sort out a problem with the furling gear at the bow when the boat disappeared... We had rail mounted solar panels (folded down) that took a hit from waves hard enough to break stanchions. Fortunately just broken metal, not ripped fiberglass. Another lesson learned.

I once expressed an opinion that I thought having a dinghy on davits was a hazard offshore. We have seen a boat limping back to harbor with totally twisted and mangled davits when a wave filled the dinghy hanging there. A very popular internet guru responded that he had an Island Packet 38 with REALLY high freeboard and just could not image a wave large enough to poop his dinghy while it was hanging on davits... I was kind of flabbergasted. As if the ocean cares how good your imagination is...

We have decided that an intermediate approach fits our risk/benefit equation.  A simple arch with only solar panels.  No davits, no other attachments.  If we ever really expected to be in serious survival conditions offshore, I'd cut the whole thing away without a second thought.  Total cost of replacement, about $8K.  Peace of mind:  Priceless.  

I don't worry about it at all with wind, it had no issue with winds of 70 knots in Hurricane Dorian.  Waves: A totally different story.  If we were ever in a situation where waves were large enough to impact the solar panels in any way I KNOW the structure would be compromised.

I know and understand that our choice is not the best from all perspectives.  But I know that the value of having a solar system that supplies half of our power needs is significant.  Not just from a cost perspective but extending our self sufficiency, and off grid fuel independence is really a major addition to our boat's capabilities.

Bill Kinney
Sm160,  Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA

--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Hi Bill,

I like what Ian Jenkins did with his boat . When I am in the Caribbean this season, I hope to be able to have the

A similar dodger made with solar panels.

 

With respect to fuel independence, we can carry 325 gallons all in tanks.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Bill Kinney
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2021 12:42 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

 

Eric,

I have read your article several times, and it is really a touchstone for me. The conditions you went through are worse than I have ever had to sail in, although I did get pounded pretty hard (for many days) on a trip back across from Hawaii to California. I saw several times the "submarine boat" you described. It was an educational experience.  Especially the time I was working to sort out a problem with the furling gear at the bow when the boat disappeared... We had rail mounted solar panels (folded down) that took a hit from waves hard enough to break stanchions. Fortunately just broken metal, not ripped fiberglass. Another lesson learned.

I once expressed an opinion that I thought having a dinghy on davits was a hazard offshore. We have seen a boat limping back to harbor with totally twisted and mangled davits when a wave filled the dinghy hanging there. A very popular internet guru responded that he had an Island Packet 38 with REALLY high freeboard and just could not image a wave large enough to poop his dinghy while it was hanging on davits... I was kind of flabbergasted. As if the ocean cares how good your imagination is...

We have decided that an intermediate approach fits our risk/benefit equation.  A simple arch with only solar panels.  No davits, no other attachments.  If we ever really expected to be in serious survival conditions offshore, I'd cut the whole thing away without a second thought.  Total cost of replacement, about $8K.  Peace of mind:  Priceless.  

I don't worry about it at all with wind, it had no issue with winds of 70 knots in Hurricane Dorian.  Waves: A totally different story.  If we were ever in a situation where waves were large enough to impact the solar panels in any way I KNOW the structure would be compromised.

I know and understand that our choice is not the best from all perspectives.  But I know that the value of having a solar system that supplies half of our power needs is significant.  Not just from a cost perspective but extending our self sufficiency, and off grid fuel independence is really a major addition to our boat's capabilities.

Bill Kinney
Sm160,  Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Bilge pump gear

 

Great!

I did this about 8 years ago and could not remember the circlip. Thanks for the photos.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Fri, Oct 22, 2021 at 4:49 AM Nicole e Nilson Noronha <marfimmadri@...> wrote:
Thank you very much for your help 
We tried but no success with de mallet.
There’s this little “lock” inside that we didn’t know (pictures attached).
We asked a mechanic and he helped us.
Thank you so much, this group, the amel book and Bill’s help have been a life saver since we bought our first Amel last June.
Fair winds

Nicole & Nilson

SV Marfim Madri 
Amel 54 #075
Santa Cruz de Tenerife 




Re: FW: Comparing Amel Super Maramu to the Amel 54 & 55

Alain Durante <info@...>
 

Bonjour Rod,

 

I am the owner of a beautiful Amel 54 and she will be for sale soon.*

The boat is located in south of France.

 

Let me know if you might be interested?

 

Cordialement,

 

Alain Durante

Amel 54 / Meige

 

 

De : main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> De la part de David Dickman via groups.io
Envoyé : jeudi 21 octobre 2021 22:15
À : main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Objet : Re: [AmelYachtOwners] FW: Comparing Amel Super Maramu to the Amel 54 & 55

 

hi Rod,

   I am just getting ready to purchase an Amel and would really appreciate seeing the article if possible.

 

Thanks,

    David

 

On Thu, Oct 21, 2021 at 8:02 AM Rod Rance <rjrance@...> wrote:

What a great read Joel, thank you so much for sharing this - I think you have helped me decide (confirm) which Amel I want - 54
Rod Rance, Amel Fan - Future owner ;)


Re: Bilge pump gear

Nicole e Nilson Noronha <marfimmadri@...>
 

Thank you very much for your help 
We tried but no success with de mallet.
There’s this little “lock” inside that we didn’t know (pictures attached).
We asked a mechanic and he helped us.
Thank you so much, this group, the amel book and Bill’s help have been a life saver since we bought our first Amel last June.
Fair winds

Nicole & Nilson

SV Marfim Madri 
Amel 54 #075
Santa Cruz de Tenerife 




Re: European Fire Extinguishers

Ian Park
 

I replaced all my extinguishers last year and went for ‘water mist’ extinguishers, including the engine room. They operate by obliterating any space for oxygen. They can be used on cooking fat fires instead of a blanket. Three main criteria were that they don’t leave powder residue, just water, they don’t damage electrics and they are easier to recharge.
I have no evidence from real time situations, but the principles seem sound.

Ian. ‘Ocean Hobo’ SN96. UK


Re: FW: Comparing Amel Super Maramu to the Amel 54 & 55

Scott SV Tengah
 

I agree that Amel made a big mistake using the Bamar MEJ furlers on the 54. Both our staysail and Genoa furlers failed shortly after we bought the boat. The top seal was poorly designed, dries out and the furlers each had half a liter or more of water in them.

The replacement Bamar EJF are better, although not perfect. The Genoa EJF furler failed a few months after install due to a manufacturing defect (replaced by Bamar under warranty, thankfully) and they inexplicably have aluminum sandwiched right next to stainless, which causes the pretty black paint to bubble right off.

Jamie did it right by biting the bullet, opening his wallet wide and replacing his Bamar with Reckmann. That said, our EJF have performed flawlessly since Feb 2019 despite the paint bubbling.

Bruno - I am curious what other electrical safety measures Amel introduced with the 55 that do not exist on the earlier boats? Many of us have modified the electrical system on our boats quite a bit to accommodate lithium, so I'd love to hear what else we can do to improve the safety of our systems. I added three fuses, one 450amp for each 12v pair, to the battery bank. It has already saved us once when a marine electrician forgot to turn off the main switches when repairing the bow thruster. 

We looked at the 55 during our boat buying process and the layout change did not suit OUR needs. We are mostly double handed but sometimes bring friends aboard. And they aren't always couples, so having the bunk beds was really important. And we didn't want the master suite up front. Of course, this is a personal preference. That boat is beautiful, though.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Running rigging A54 / SM

mario.rognoni@...
 

Laurent,

Thank you for sourcing the supplier of the AMEL’s running rigging. I would be interested in replacing the main sheet and the mizzen sheet with cordage of the same quality and in the same colors. As to the rest of the running rigging, it depends on the price.

Best regards,

Mario Rognoni
“Arethuse“ 
A54 #130


Re: FW: Comparing Amel Super Maramu to the Amel 54 & 55

Bruno COTTE
 

Of course the 55 is a little bit more complicated due mainly to the electrical  circuit which has more safety elements than on 54 ( relays etc …) it is obviously also more modern as a younger model which also takes into account experience on previous boats . If you are capable to understand and repair electrical potential problems for me the 55 is the best … depending also of the main engine …
All engines are good but capability to find spares easily or a good mechanical advise if needed is not easy with some brands …
The weakest point of the 55 is the price which is close to the double of a 54… 

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 22 oct. 2021 à 04:42, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> a écrit :


Jamie,

I agree completely. The SM is great, the 54 better, and if Amel had used Reckmann, maybe the 54 would be best.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Thu, Oct 21, 2021, 5:30 PM Jamie Wendell <mysticshadow54@...> wrote:

Reading this thread, I thought I might add a few words here, as I have an Amel 54 which I absolutely love. While I like some of the "features" of the 55 (and yes even the 50 which would be out of my realm), I cannot think of a better boat than the 54. The SM would be a close second to me, but the interior layout of the 54 pushed me there when I saw my first 54 in the US Virgins about 6 years ago. I have never seen another boat with those separated seats in the saloon - really fantastic - kind of like "theatre seats."
I will also say that in the 3 rallies to and from the Caribbean I have been in, we were first across the finish line in the BVIs in one case and second (to a Gunboat 60) in another trip. I have had crew tell me they have never sailed that fast. Most boats in that size range cannot keep up.
So, not to disrupt the analysis, ANY Amel would be the best you can do IMHO.
Jamie
Phantom, A54#44

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