Date   

Original Maramu Propeller replacement #replacement

Michael Konz
 

Hi !
I'm looking to replace the propeller on my Maramu #148 from 1984. I received the following dimensions from Amel:

20x16 C7 RH35 Droite

I had replaced the original Perkins engine in 2013 with a Yanmar 4JH5E and the appropriate gearbox. Propeller wasn't changed at that time.
I am not sure about the C7 part of the specifications. There is a C7 from Allpa, but it is specified for fast powerboats. On the other hand C7 is also a specification for the material.

I also found a prop from Vetus with the correct dimensions but of type PRB: P3B20X16R which looks very similar to my existing propeller.

So I am a bit confused. As the boat is in the water and doesn't come out before next March I can't check the old propeller at the moment.
Has anyone experience with replacing the propeller on the Maramu ?

Michael, SY Sioned


Re: Trust, but verify...

Bill Kinney
 

Arno,

Unfortunately, these mechanics on this project were not at all amateurs, although their work was certainly substandard.  They were full time mechanics working for a major marine service firm. I don't want to point the finger at any specific organization, because that would dilute the message (and get me in trouble with the forum rules!)

This wasn't a case of something that was Amel specific being misunderstood.  Nor was it a case of hiring somebody who was a "shadetree mechanic."  The organization that did this install does MANY engine installs in a year in a major east coast yachting center.  I have no idea how many of them they get this badly wrong.  That's really not my point.  I really just want to push out the fact that these things happen, even with "well qualified" and referenced checked mechanics, and everybody need to be sure they have a way to protect themselves. Some of us have the technical background and skillset to mange the technical sides of these projects. Many others (most?) do not.  For those who are not comfortable evaluating the technical side of a complex boat upgrade project, there is a need to plan ahead to get a second opinion.

It is certainly fortunate to be in a position to be able to do everything yourself, but it is unrealistic to expect that to be an option for all owners.

In discussions I have had about this with people in the industry, the conclusion I have come to is that the really good, and smart, mechanics and other tradesmen, quickly learn to move "up market."  There is a LOT of opportunity for capable and competent people in the super yacht end of the business where the money and working conditions are a LOT better. Just as an example, one of the the best marine refrigeration and electrical businesses in Annapolis no longer works with private clients at all, only professional yacht managers are considered desirable clients.  I certainly understand WHY, but it is still a pain for us with boats that have annual maintenance budgets of less than 6 figures.  We are left with the second string...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Trust, but verify...

Arno Luijten
 

Bill (Rouse),

In my experience many of the so called marine technicians are are one trick ponys. They think because they have seen one installation, they have seen them all. Especially on an Amel this quite risky give the number of "different way of solving" solutions that are incorporated. This becomes real risk if you (as an owner) are not familiar with the technical details of your boat. Amel boats are build with a lot of idiosyncratic solutions and you need to at least understand them to make sure 3rd parties will not mess up. The whole point being that you as an owner are in the end sailing away with the boat trusting your safety to the boat (systems). Once a few hundred (or thousand) miles away it really is your problem if things were "fixed" improperly.

For me I try to do as much as possible myself, keeping the boat as much as possible unmodified, unless the alteration is improving the quality of the boat and even then I try to fit the changes into the original plan as tidy as possible even if that is more work.
As soon as someone says about some original part of the installation: "I don;t understand why they did this like this because my way is much better" you should be on high alert. I'm not saying Amel did everything perfect when they build our boat but most of it makes good sense either from technical perspective, because of limiting the build cost or simply because at the time of build it was the right solution given the available materials/solutions.

For the example of the exhaust hose is was clearly done by an amateur calling himself professional. It reminds me of my own saying that if you suck as car-mechanic you can always become a marine mechanic. At least that is what is seems to be sometimes.

Cheers,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Trust, but verify...

 

Bill

I have not seen a photo of this installation, but I have reviewed photos of about 6 repowered Amels in the past 12 months and none made this mistake. 

However, 3 out of  6 had been repowered with the starting battery negative wire connected to the engine block. In other words, a non-isolated engine, putting the C-Drive at risk. I also saw about 4 new generators installed with all but 1 having an isolation kit installed. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Sun, Oct 24, 2021, 5:43 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
One of the things that Bill Rouse has repeatedly brought to the front and center for all of us has been the need to monitor and watch what workman on your boat are doing.  Just making sure that the work is being done as advertised, with reasonable dispatch, and that you are getting what you paying for. I suspect all of us have at one time or another gotten less than perfect work from a marine tradesman.  I know I have.  Unfortunately it is not always possible for us to really be 100% sure of what is being done.  None of us are experts in EVERYTHING about a boat.  This is such a warning story...

I was recently driving with an Amel owner to their boat to work on some of their systems.  They had recently had completed a repower, and there were some complaints about the work that had been done.  One comment set off alarm bells for me.  There was some frustration expressed that the routing of the exhaust hose had been changed, and no longer looped up high, as Amel did, "to keep it out of the way." 

As soon as I was aboard, I checked the engine room, and found this:



If you have any familiarity with marine engine exhaust systems, this picture should horrify you.  An almost FLAT path for water from the exhaust thru-hull fitting to the engine. The low point of the exhaust hose is less than 10" above the static waterline. What little rise there is off to the starboard side, and when heeled over hard on port tack, it would likely be underwater, or VERY close to it.  Granted, there are two flapper valves in this system.  One at the exhaust thruhull, and one built into the waterlock muffler, but those are really designed to knock back a surge of water from a wave impact, not supply a watertight seal for hours at a time.

This use of a "gooseneck" routing for the exhaust hose is NOT an Amel special thing. It is part of ANY proper, standard marine engine install.  The installation manual for this particular engine listed a requirement of at least 40cm of elevation above the waterline at all angles of heel.  Other resources on exhaust systems suggest a minimum requirement of 45cm. In any event, the installation manual specific to the engine was ignored, and standard industry practice was either ignored or not known.

So this is a hot mess, but luckily was caught before real damage could occur, and is easily fixed, albeit with the addition of a lot of expensive exhaust hose that should have been included in the engine install. Another repower that I recently helped put right had even bigger issues. But with the understanding that not everybody can be knowledgable in all things... what's the alternative?  

I really haven't thought about this before, but since a very large percentage of the repowers I have seen have gone pear-shaped in sometimes major ways, I have a suggestion...

For projects as large and expensive as a repower it seems a good idea to have a contract clause that the work is subject to an independent survey before final sign off and payment. This means you have to find a surveyor skilled in the evaluation of the systems involved, and you have no absolute guarantee that they will know any better, but at least you get a second pair of (hopefully) knowledgable eyes. Most of us wouldn't spend US$30K or US$40K on a used car without getting an independent mechanic to evaluate it.  It seems like the same level of care should be extended to major boat modifications.

I'd very much like to hear how other people manage the technical end of major projects.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Trust, but verify...

Bill Kinney
 

One of the things that Bill Rouse has repeatedly brought to the front and center for all of us has been the need to monitor and watch what workman on your boat are doing.  Just making sure that the work is being done as advertised, with reasonable dispatch, and that you are getting what you paying for. I suspect all of us have at one time or another gotten less than perfect work from a marine tradesman.  I know I have.  Unfortunately it is not always possible for us to really be 100% sure of what is being done.  None of us are experts in EVERYTHING about a boat.  This is such a warning story...

I was recently driving with an Amel owner to their boat to work on some of their systems.  They had recently had completed a repower, and there were some complaints about the work that had been done.  One comment set off alarm bells for me.  There was some frustration expressed that the routing of the exhaust hose had been changed, and no longer looped up high, as Amel did, "to keep it out of the way." 

As soon as I was aboard, I checked the engine room, and found this:



If you have any familiarity with marine engine exhaust systems, this picture should horrify you.  An almost FLAT path for water from the exhaust thru-hull fitting to the engine. The low point of the exhaust hose is less than 10" above the static waterline. What little rise there is off to the starboard side, and when heeled over hard on port tack, it would likely be underwater, or VERY close to it.  Granted, there are two flapper valves in this system.  One at the exhaust thruhull, and one built into the waterlock muffler, but those are really designed to knock back a surge of water from a wave impact, not supply a watertight seal for hours at a time.

This use of a "gooseneck" routing for the exhaust hose is NOT an Amel special thing. It is part of ANY proper, standard marine engine install.  The installation manual for this particular engine listed a requirement of at least 40cm of elevation above the waterline at all angles of heel.  Other resources on exhaust systems suggest a minimum requirement of 45cm. In any event, the installation manual specific to the engine was ignored, and standard industry practice was either ignored or not known.

So this is a hot mess, but luckily was caught before real damage could occur, and is easily fixed, albeit with the addition of a lot of expensive exhaust hose that should have been included in the engine install. Another repower that I recently helped put right had even bigger issues. But with the understanding that not everybody can be knowledgable in all things... what's the alternative?  

I really haven't thought about this before, but since a very large percentage of the repowers I have seen have gone pear-shaped in sometimes major ways, I have a suggestion...

For projects as large and expensive as a repower it seems a good idea to have a contract clause that the work is subject to an independent survey before final sign off and payment. This means you have to find a surveyor skilled in the evaluation of the systems involved, and you have no absolute guarantee that they will know any better, but at least you get a second pair of (hopefully) knowledgable eyes. Most of us wouldn't spend US$30K or US$40K on a used car without getting an independent mechanic to evaluate it.  It seems like the same level of care should be extended to major boat modifications.

I'd very much like to hear how other people manage the technical end of major projects.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Aletes

Alexey Mateosyan
 

Mike and Tom, 

that was pleasure for me to meet with you and spend all this time on Aletes, really great experience, I learnt a lot about the boat, thank you for everything that you share with me. You are always welcome on board of Aletes. 

--
Best regards,
Aleksei


Re: Hardtop for Amel 54 and SM

Andrzej Lankiewicz
 

Hello

I would like such a teardy roof in my Amel 54, please contact me

A54#129


W dniu niedz., 24.10.2021 o 18:23 VICTOR MOLERO <victor.moleroxx@...> napisał(a):

Hello all.
Please accept my apologies for the delay in responding to the request for pictures and more information about the hard top that we did for our Super Maramu. 
The first thing that I would like to underline is that the design and process of our hard top is the intellectual property of our very good friend Sophie, from Lady Anilla, and that we would never have been able to even consider building the hardtop ourselves without the advice of Jonas, her husband. I want to emphasize the credit to them with everything related to our work. 
The second thing to consider is that we did this in Corfú, Greece, during lockdown for Covid, so supplies were more expensive to get. The only thing that we did out of Greece is the canvas work that took place in Cádiz (Spain).
I am enclosing a file with the dimensions, cost and pictures of the one that we did. We are very happy with the result. 
Should anyone need something else, I'll be happy to help.
Best.
Victor 


Re: Hardtop for Amel 54 and SM

VICTOR MOLERO
 

Hello all.
Please accept my apologies for the delay in responding to the request for pictures and more information about the hard top that we did for our Super Maramu. 
The first thing that I would like to underline is that the design and process of our hard top is the intellectual property of our very good friend Sophie, from Lady Anilla, and that we would never have been able to even consider building the hardtop ourselves without the advice of Jonas, her husband. I want to emphasize the credit to them with everything related to our work. 
The second thing to consider is that we did this in Corfú, Greece, during lockdown for Covid, so supplies were more expensive to get. The only thing that we did out of Greece is the canvas work that took place in Cádiz (Spain).
I am enclosing a file with the dimensions, cost and pictures of the one that we did. We are very happy with the result. 
Should anyone need something else, I'll be happy to help.
Best.
Victor 


Re: Aletes

 

Mike, you and Tom will be missed but never forgotten!

Thanks for your superb participation in this Group and thanks for all of the things you have shared. I am sure that many Amel owners who have benefitted from what you have shared agree with this.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sat, Oct 23, 2021 at 3:38 PM Mike Ondra via groups.io <mdondra=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Amel Friends,

 

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:

Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–

And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.

 

Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.

 

The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.

 

We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?

 

In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.

 

Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.

 

Mike and Tom

Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD

 

 


Re: Aletes

karkauai
 

Mike and Tom, thank you for your posts and humor and friendship.  You will be missed here and on the water.  All the best in your new pursuits.

Aleksie, welcome to the family!  You will find lots of great help here, and new friends ready to share their expertise, experience, and ideas.

Be safe.
Have fun 
Sail fast.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy
Heading S in a few weeks, hopefully thru the Canal by Spring

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Aletes

Patrick McAneny
 

Tom & Mike,
Diane and I have enjoyed getting to know you guys over all these years , you know where we live ,stop by anytime you are down this way ,we can get you back out for a sail on Shenanigans and the Sassafras.
Take Care,
Pat & Diane
SM Shenanigans
Sassafras River ,Md.


-----Original Message-----
From: Nicolas Klene via groups.io <laixoi@...>
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Oct 24, 2021 6:36 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Aletes

Mike and Tom all the best for your new life , any present, past or futur Amel owner will always be welcome on DarNico to share their wisdom and a good moment , once family …always family ! Keep well
Nicolas 
DarNico 
Amel 53 #471 
Still in Marseille 🇫🇷

Le 23 oct. 2021 à 21:38, Mike Ondra via groups.io <mdondra@...> a écrit :


Amel Friends,
 
The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:
Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–
And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.
 
Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.
 
The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.
 
We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?
 
In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.
 
Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.
 
Mike and Tom
Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD
 
 

--
Nicolas Klene
DarNico
SM2K # 471
In Marseille


Re: Aletes

Nicolas Klene
 

Mike and Tom all the best for your new life , any present, past or futur Amel owner will always be welcome on DarNico to share their wisdom and a good moment , once family …always family ! Keep well
Nicolas 
DarNico 
Amel 53 #471 
Still in Marseille 🇫🇷

Le 23 oct. 2021 à 21:38, Mike Ondra via groups.io <mdondra@...> a écrit :



Amel Friends,

 

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:

Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–

And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.

 

Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.

 

The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.

 

We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?

 

In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.

 

Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.

 

Mike and Tom

Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD

 

 


--
Nicolas Klene
DarNico
SM2K # 471
In Marseille


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Paul Harries
 

Such a dodger is a logical solution.
Has anyone tried incorporating the panels in such a way so as to produce a heatsink? An Aluminum dodger roof might be one solution as it would make a decent heat sink for cooling. Another option would be to consider a low flow water cooling system on the panel underside, far more complicated. From what I have read in the absence of panel cooling power generation would be compromised, please correct any stupid misconceptions I have.
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

A friend of mine was in a typhoon many years ago in the Pacific.

After the typhoon was over the flight deck of his Aircraft Carrier was severely bent.

 

What do you get when you cross breed King Kong and a Parrot ?

I don’t know but when it talks you listen

 

Same for the ocean.

r/WarshipPorn - USS Hornet's Flight Deck is bent 90 degrees over the bows after Typhoon Halsey [4551 x 3551]

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of ngtnewington Newington via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, October 23, 2021 1:29 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

 

I do not think it realistic to cut away a solar arch at sea in rough weather. For a start you will only cut it away when you feel that you really have to by which time it is blowing a severe gale and more.

How exactly will you cut it away?

Angle grinder?

You have to be joking…

 

I have a solar arch, there are two feet each side, one is fixed to the toe rail which will not give way and the other to the sloping transom which is a potential weak point. I have beefed up the backing plate area on the port side as the shore power socket is located near  with epoxy and glass. In addition I beefed up the glass where the mizzen back stays are attached both sides. I will observe for any flexing but to really beef it up I thing a foam knee should be glued and glassed between the transom and the hull. 

With this done and assuming that  no dinghy is hoisted I think that in extreme the solar panels may fly but the minimal windage of the naked arch would survive….

Nick

Amelia

AML54-019 

Sailing Turkey



On 23 Oct 2021, at 05:50, Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries@...> wrote:

Eric

You mention designing new attachment points for your drogue, could you please elaborate and perhaps share some pictures.
Thanks

--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Only breaking waves over the arch will answer the question.

The force of the sea is immense.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of ngtnewington Newington via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, October 23, 2021 1:29 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

 

I do not think it realistic to cut away a solar arch at sea in rough weather. For a start you will only cut it away when you feel that you really have to by which time it is blowing a severe gale and more.

How exactly will you cut it away?

Angle grinder?

You have to be joking…

 

I have a solar arch, there are two feet each side, one is fixed to the toe rail which will not give way and the other to the sloping transom which is a potential weak point. I have beefed up the backing plate area on the port side as the shore power socket is located near  with epoxy and glass. In addition I beefed up the glass where the mizzen back stays are attached both sides. I will observe for any flexing but to really beef it up I thing a foam knee should be glued and glassed between the transom and the hull. 

With this done and assuming that  no dinghy is hoisted I think that in extreme the solar panels may fly but the minimal windage of the naked arch would survive….

Nick

Amelia

AML54-019 

Sailing Turkey



On 23 Oct 2021, at 05:50, Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries@...> wrote:

Eric

You mention designing new attachment points for your drogue, could you please elaborate and perhaps share some pictures.
Thanks

--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Paul,

I had the stern cleats reinforced when Kimberlite was built.

My only issue with the drogue is that the bridle rubs against the backstays.

Sometimes this put Kimberlite at about 20 degrees to the oncoming seas. If I tighten one bridle to square up the boat, it starts putting pressure on one of the backstays. We rode out the hurricane with no problems 20 off center.  I have thought long and hard how to change the angle of the bridle.  My only thought is to move the SSB antenna out of the way and see what the configuration looks like. However, it is way down my list.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2021 10:50 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] All that stuff hanging off the stern-- Gel batteries, solar panels and inverter - an experience

 

Eric

You mention designing new attachment points for your drogue, could you please elaborate and perhaps share some pictures.
Thanks

--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Re: Aletes

Brent Cameron
 

Yes. I’m also sorry to see you both go. Thanks for the tour of Aletes during the Amel get together  and your informed posts over the years. I learned a lot. Al Elsie and his family are getting a great boat that will serve them well. Happy trails!  

Brent

On Oct 23, 2021, 6:06 PM -0400, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>, wrote:

Mikwe and Tom, Sorry to see you go. All the best for your future adventures

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 24 October 2021 at 09:38 "Mike Ondra via groups.io" <mdondra@...> wrote:

Amel Friends,

 

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:

Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–

And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.

 

Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.

 

The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.

 

We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?

 

In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.

 

Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.

 

Mike and Tom

Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD

 

 




--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Aletes

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Mikwe and Tom, Sorry to see you go. All the best for your future adventures

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 24 October 2021 at 09:38 "Mike Ondra via groups.io" <mdondra@...> wrote:

Amel Friends,

 

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:

Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–

And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.

 

Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.

 

The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.

 

We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?

 

In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.

 

Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.

 

Mike and Tom

Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD

 

 


 


 


Aletes

Mike Ondra
 

Amel Friends,

 

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things:

Of shoes-and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–

And why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.

 

Indeed, the time has come to say goodbye to Aletes. We have had a wonderful 16 years with her – exciting adventures and countless memories shared with so many friends. Time at sea with great comrades unburdens the mind and nourishes the soul.

 

The support of the Amel family has been a true blessing in owning and maintaining this marvelous and complex vessel. We thank all of you who have shared your knowledge and experience. A finer bunch of sailors there is not.

 

We will sorely miss Aletes as we close this chapter of boat ownership. Who knows what may come next? Anyone need crew?

 

In any case, we have learned that the sea is not boiling hot, and pigs don’t have wings – although some fish do.

 

Ps: The new owner is Aleksie Mayeosyan with plans of sailing with his family down the East Coast of the U.S. and on to Mexico, Panama, and the Pacific. He can pick up the Aletes story from here.

 

Mike and Tom

Former caretakers of Aletes SM#240, Rock Hall, MD

 

 


Re: Anchor chain galvanizing

Matt Salatino
 

That’s a great price! We paid twice as much in Guatemala.
we found, after using the chain a few times, it worked better and better through the Gypsies, and in stacking.

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