Date   

Re: Dehumidifier Drain Outlet

Vladan SV PAME
 

Hi Dean,

I bought this dehumidifier and waiting to be delivered. https://ecor-pro.com/product/dh1200-dryfan-12-litre-stainless-steel-desiccant-dehumidifier/

No need for drain outlet but need exhaust outlet (vent). I'm planning to install unit in cockpit locker and to make exhaust under mizzen mast, just above fresh air intake for Webasto.
I think but not sure until I try, as temporary installation kitchen exhaust hose can be used.

Best Regards,
--
Vladan

A54 #157
SV PAME


Re: Antifouling / Bottompaint

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Slavko.

20 litres

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 09 November 2021 at 05:29 Slavko Despotovic <slavko@...> wrote:

Next spring it will be first time I will do AF on my Amel. What is quantity I would need to order? I checked with Trilux 33 that requires 3 layers and will need 14 litre of AF . It was calculated on supplier site. I would be grateful for some first hand data regarding how many litres I need.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Croatia


Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

 

Mark,

My exact experience with white vinegar and I let the chunks soak for 6 months...still nothing.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Nov 8, 2021 at 10:59 AM Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:
Dean,
 
While I am usually an advocate of the "if it ain't broke don't fix it camp" I will advise you to preventatively address at least one of your heads if at all possible.  Either by treating it to reduce scale or by just replacing the hoses outright.  I say this because I had one head clog up within a few weeks of moving aboard full time earlier this year.  Changing out the hoses out when they are filled with shit-water is just about one of the worst jobs I have ever done on a boat.  Certainly the "shittiest."  Taking the hint, I pre-emptively replaced the hoses on the other head soon thereafter.  Here is what the cross-section of hose looked like on the head that I changed out BEFORE it stopped working:



The 38mm ID hose had a true ID of maybe 20mm.  And yes, that is a tampon shoved up inside the hose.  The hose was so stiff from all the calcification that I had to cut the hose into several sections in order to remove it.  Tampon did a great job absorbing the residual bleach water that was in the hose.

For fun, I knocked some of the "chunks" out and dropped them into some cups of regular white vinegar, some "industrial strength" white vinegar, and several different dilutions of 85% Food Grade Phosphoric Acid that I have onboard.  Phosphoric Acid is the active and main ingredient in products like Barnacle Buster/Sew Clean.  It's also an ingredient in many soft drinks like Coke. The vinegars had no effect on the calcium whatsoever.    The Phosphoric Acid dissolved the scale when diluted with water as much as 7:1, albeit slowly.  A 5:1 dissolved large chunks quickly.

Hope this helps!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Antifouling / Bottompaint

 

SM will be 20 liters with 3 coats at the waterline and front-facing surfaces, two coats everywhere else.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Nov 8, 2021 at 10:32 AM Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

I used 5 gallons or around 19 liters for my A54. Three coats at waterline and front facing surfaces, two coats everywhere else.

 

From: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Slavko Despotovic <slavko@...>
Reply-To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Monday, November 8, 2021 at 5:29 PM
To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Antifouling / Bottompaint

 

Next spring it will be first time I will do AF on my Amel. What is quantity I would need to order? I checked with Trilux 33 that requires 3 layers and will need 14 litre of AF . It was calculated on supplier site. I would be grateful for some first hand data regarding how many litres I need.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Croatia


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

Dean Gillies
 

Hi Ruedi,
Thanks for that.  Flushing the fridge/aircon with product is much easier than running it through the motor/generator due to water flow volumes.  Do you think this is not needed so much with the engines?

Hope your travels are going well. Wasabi looks splendid.
Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154


Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

Dean Gillies
 

Mark,
Don't I know that job from a previous boat, so I hear you loud and clear!

Luckily Stella is all freshwater flushing.  I had occasion to be servicing the heads (joker valves and macerators) earlier this year and I had a look at the hoses. There was some build up but nothing like I have seen with salt-water systems. I gave them a ream-out regardless with some rigging wire, modified at the end to look like a "brush".  Also, they are still flexible along their length. 

I was really happy with the easy access to tanks and pipes that the Amel design affords. On other boats I've had to cut through fibreglass to get at things! 

Good to know that the phosphoric acid products work on those lumpy bits.

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA 
A54-154


Dehumidifier Drain Outlet

Dean Gillies
 

I have always run a dehumidifier on my boats for all the usual reasons.
Since I bought Stella, I have always wintered her out of the water. I've removed the depth-sounder transducer and drained the dehumidifier to the outside. Easy.

This year, she is wintering in the water. This presents an interesting dilemna regarding where to drain the dehumidifier.

I could send it down the sink where it ends up in the bilge as standing water waiting for the bilge pump to trigger and hopefully evacuate most of it.  I don't like leaving water in the engine room when the boat is not being used and a failure of the bilge pump could end up with a few hundred litres of water in the engine room. Not ideal! I could hook up my bilge alarm to my Victron Cerbo system which could then send me an email allowing me to contact the marina staff to intervene.

I could easily send it into the freshwater tank where a few hundred litres over the winter would not make that much of a dent.  That would mean leaving empty space in the freshwater tank, which I usually avoid when wintering to minimise the potential for bacteria to develop in the tank space.

Any other clever ideas out there? (other than don't run a dehumidifier!) 

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154




Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

WASABI - Rudolf Waldispuehl
 

Hi Dean

 

I used to use just freshwater but I found out that the tubes getting barnacles and other growth in it due to the constant flow of Saltwater from the fridge pump.

Since 2 year I buy just about 10lt of normal household (cleaning) vinegar. Very cheap about .70 cents per liter at grocery (Mercadona). It is not aggressive and helps to clean out the tubes.

 

I fill up the Aircon and Fridge lines and let it work over night. After that I flush out everything with fresh-water from the shore and let it in over winter.

There is quite a lot of lime(calc)-dirt coming out with the vinegar. Sometimes I add a bit off antifreeze which is corroding protective as Nick mentioned.

 

Best regards and good preparation

Ruedi

WASABI A54-#55

 

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Dean Gillies <stella@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Montag, 8. November 2021 um 15:42
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Betreff: [AmelYachtOwners] Descaling the Seawater Lines

 

Hi all,
I'm preparing Stella for in-water wintering in southern Spain and will be filling all seawater lines with freshwater as I've always done in the past for non-freezing winterisation.  

I'm wondering about the wisdom of treating the seawater lines with some kind of de-scaling treatment. I've previously cleaned my ONAN heat exchanger with dilute Hydrochloric Acid (Muriatic Acid) but that seems a bit over the top to flush right through the seawater systems. I know some folks like barnacle buster and such-like.  I don't have any symptoms of poor water flow anywhere, so my gut feel says "if it ain't broke ...".  Am I missing something?

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154
   


Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

Mark McGovern
 

Nick,

The hose in the above picture lived most of it's life flushing salt water.  I converted the boat to fresh water flush in 2018 about a year after buying the boat.  It has been flushed exclusively with fresh water since that time.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

Nick Newington
 

Hi Mark,
As a matter of interest are you using sea water or fresh water for the flush?
Kind regards
Nick
S/Y Amelia 
Leros
AML 54-019


On 8 Nov 2021, at 18:59, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

Dean,
 
While I am usually an advocate of the "if it ain't broke don't fix it camp" I will advise you to preventatively address at least one of your heads if at all possible.  Either by treating it to reduce scale or by just replacing the hoses outright.  I say this because I had one head clog up within a few weeks of moving aboard full time earlier this year.  Changing out the hoses out when they are filled with shit-water is just about one of the worst jobs I have ever done on a boat.  Certainly the "shittiest."  Taking the hint, I pre-emptively replaced the hoses on the other head soon thereafter.  Here is what the cross-section of hose looked like on the head that I changed out BEFORE it stopped working:

<IMG_20210612_180500841.jpg>


The 38mm ID hose had a true ID of maybe 20mm.  And yes, that is a tampon shoved up inside the hose.  The hose was so stiff from all the calcification that I had to cut the hose into several sections in order to remove it.  Tampon did a great job absorbing the residual bleach water that was in the hose.

For fun, I knocked some of the "chunks" out and dropped them into some cups of regular white vinegar, some "industrial strength" white vinegar, and several different dilutions of 85% Food Grade Phosphoric Acid that I have onboard.  Phosphoric Acid is the active and main ingredient in products like Barnacle Buster/Sew Clean.  It's also an ingredient in many soft drinks like Coke. The vinegars had no effect on the calcium whatsoever.    The Phosphoric Acid dissolved the scale when diluted with water as much as 7:1, albeit slowly.  A 5:1 dissolved large chunks quickly.

Hope this helps!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

Mark McGovern
 

Dean,
 
While I am usually an advocate of the "if it ain't broke don't fix it camp" I will advise you to preventatively address at least one of your heads if at all possible.  Either by treating it to reduce scale or by just replacing the hoses outright.  I say this because I had one head clog up within a few weeks of moving aboard full time earlier this year.  Changing out the hoses out when they are filled with shit-water is just about one of the worst jobs I have ever done on a boat.  Certainly the "shittiest."  Taking the hint, I pre-emptively replaced the hoses on the other head soon thereafter.  Here is what the cross-section of hose looked like on the head that I changed out BEFORE it stopped working:



The 38mm ID hose had a true ID of maybe 20mm.  And yes, that is a tampon shoved up inside the hose.  The hose was so stiff from all the calcification that I had to cut the hose into several sections in order to remove it.  Tampon did a great job absorbing the residual bleach water that was in the hose.

For fun, I knocked some of the "chunks" out and dropped them into some cups of regular white vinegar, some "industrial strength" white vinegar, and several different dilutions of 85% Food Grade Phosphoric Acid that I have onboard.  Phosphoric Acid is the active and main ingredient in products like Barnacle Buster/Sew Clean.  It's also an ingredient in many soft drinks like Coke. The vinegars had no effect on the calcium whatsoever.    The Phosphoric Acid dissolved the scale when diluted with water as much as 7:1, albeit slowly.  A 5:1 dissolved large chunks quickly.

Hope this helps!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Belfast, ME USA


Re: Antifouling / Bottompaint

Scott SV Tengah
 

I used 5 gallons or around 19 liters for my A54. Three coats at waterline and front facing surfaces, two coats everywhere else.

 

From: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Slavko Despotovic <slavko@...>
Reply-To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Monday, November 8, 2021 at 5:29 PM
To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Antifouling / Bottompaint

 

Next spring it will be first time I will do AF on my Amel. What is quantity I would need to order? I checked with Trilux 33 that requires 3 layers and will need 14 litre of AF . It was calculated on supplier site. I would be grateful for some first hand data regarding how many litres I need.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Croatia


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Antifouling / Bottompaint

Slavko Despotovic
 

Next spring it will be first time I will do AF on my Amel. What is quantity I would need to order? I checked with Trilux 33 that requires 3 layers and will need 14 litre of AF . It was calculated on supplier site. I would be grateful for some first hand data regarding how many litres I need.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Croatia


Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

Dean Gillies
 

Thanks Nick. 
What you do is pretty much what I've done previously. I've been using the pink "Starbrite" anti-freeze.

We had a great passage down here from Scotland and the boat performed superbly.  Brexit and VAT concerns have now dissolved into the warm breezes of the Med :-)

Good luck with your lifting tomorrow.
Cheers, Dean
 


Re: Descaling the Seawater Lines

Nick Newington
 

Hi Dean,
I just flush with fresh water and then use some antifreeze in the mix and let it sit. It has good anti corrosion properties. I do this for the engine and generator and the aircon and fridge cooling. The watermaker gets it’s sodium metabisulphate solution.

If there are crustaceans in the cooling then clearly it will not dissolve the shells..

Nick
S/Y Amelia
Leros and hauling out tomorrow

AML54-019

On 8 Nov 2021, at 16:42, Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I'm preparing Stella for in-water wintering in southern Spain and will be filling all seawater lines with freshwater as I've always done in the past for non-freezing winterisation.  

I'm wondering about the wisdom of treating the seawater lines with some kind of de-scaling treatment. I've previously cleaned my ONAN heat exchanger with dilute Hydrochloric Acid (Muriatic Acid) but that seems a bit over the top to flush right through the seawater systems. I know some folks like barnacle buster and such-like.  I don't have any symptoms of poor water flow anywhere, so my gut feel says "if it ain't broke ...".  Am I missing something?

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154
   


Descaling the Seawater Lines

Dean Gillies
 

Hi all,
I'm preparing Stella for in-water wintering in southern Spain and will be filling all seawater lines with freshwater as I've always done in the past for non-freezing winterisation.  

I'm wondering about the wisdom of treating the seawater lines with some kind of de-scaling treatment. I've previously cleaned my ONAN heat exchanger with dilute Hydrochloric Acid (Muriatic Acid) but that seems a bit over the top to flush right through the seawater systems. I know some folks like barnacle buster and such-like.  I don't have any symptoms of poor water flow anywhere, so my gut feel says "if it ain't broke ...".  Am I missing something?

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154
   


Re: Climma Heat

 

Stefan,

Regarding the Climma 9 Compact unit, I have the value of the Klixon at RS 121, but I am not sure what RS 121 stands for. I do not have the value of the fuse. Do you have the values, and/or can you confirm the RS 121 value?

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Nov 8, 2021 at 5:35 AM Stefan Jeukendrup <sjeukendrup@...> wrote:
Hi Alexei,

To answer your specific questions: 
With 220V on the element you should see it cycling: When switching on the element should light up  like a bread toaster element. Then depending on airflow and air temperature it reaches the  temperature where the Klixon switches opens the circuit. Then the element and Klixon is cooled  by the airflow and after a while the Klixon closes it's contact again, without click.

5A at 220V = 1100Watts seems OK for a Climma 9HE which is specified to provide  9000btu/hour for cooling and heating.

Enclosed are pictures of:
*Thermostat Texas Instruments Klixon
*Overtemperature protection fuse

Both are in series with the heating element but not necessarily in the exact locations I indicated before. As said before these devices are made in many different temperature ranges so be sure you replace with the exact same ones.


Stefan Jeukendrup
svMalaka Queen
SM2k #348 @Newry, Northern Ireland




Op 8 nov. 2021 04:56 schreef Alexey Mateosyan <alexey.mateosyan@...>:
Hi Stefan,

Thank you for your answer to Mike's post (thank you Mike). For my case, it looks like that the problem is with overheating protection. And since:
1. max airflow is really huge, and climma in aft works even with medium flow
2. I see 220v on electrical heating element constantly
3. On the other hand I can't hear any relay clicking, at the moment when heating is gone
4. Current in the heating circuit is dropped from 5a to 0, at that moment
I think that the root cause is inside the heater itself, i.e. it could be one of those two things on the picture (since they are sitting in series with the heating element and basically can break the circuit), the below one looks like thermistor, and the one above:
Is this the klixon thermostat marked on the picture?

How did you clean it, if it is the thing?

--
Best regards,
Aleksei @ Aletes SM2K#240


Re: Mooring cleat nut size

Dean Gillies
 

Hi Clive,
Interesting tools, I have not seen those before.
However, I have ordered a 24mm Box Spanner from Amazon 
https://www.amazon.co.uk/KS-Tools-518-0879-CLASSIC-spanner/dp/B001NYV3IA
Looks like it should do the trick.

Hi Scott,
Thankfully only one loose, and yes, the easy one. 
The stern cleats get most work of course when mooring stern-to the majority of the time.

Best regards
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154 


Re: Antifouling / Bottompaint

Scott SV Tengah
 

Alan,

Did your Sea Barrier 3000 look decent last week? How long has it been since the last application?

We are in French Polynesia now but are intending to head to NZ in either 1 or 2 years and we'll be needing a repaint at that point. I love my Micron 99 but a quick search revealed that Sea Barrier 3000 is FAR less expensive.

https://wynnfraser.co.nz/product/950-AL-Sea-Barrier-SB-3000-Blue-Antifoul-10L


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Mooring cleat nut size

Scott SV Tengah
 

We re-bedded all of our cleats save for 2 that we could not really access.

24mm deep socket, extension and breaker bar got the job done. If it makes you feel better, the lazarette ones are, by far, the easiest to access.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

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