Date   

Re: Amel 55 - captain's seat

Justin Maguire
 

Nice! Great work. 

And we love the seat on the 50… it super comfortable. I’m 6’1” 


On Nov 29, 2021, at 04:50, Martin Birkhoff <mbirkhoff@...> wrote:



Hi all,

I am only 180 cm tall and, at 86 kg, of reasonably normal build. During the test drives with Mago del Sur (Amel 54), nothing was noticeable. Later, however, I realised that my sitting position was too high to look through the front windows in a relaxed manner. I regularly got neck pain and muscle tension. The admiral, on the other hand, complained about the rather wide gap below the backrest, which caused her back or kidney area to cool down. We both regretted that the steering seat was not height-adjustable and could not be rotated either, which reduced the seating space at the cockpit table.


At the Düsselorf Boat show we ordered a new helm seat from Besenzoni. This is the seat which is used on the Amel 50. Please note: the original Besenzoni seat-design is narrower than the one used on the Amel 50. Keep this in mind when ordering. On request, the Amel logo can be embroidered on the back of the seat.

The support of the seat on the photo is a cheap improvisation and will be exchanged for a more solid model, also of course adjustable in height.

After a lot of fiddling we have fixed the original table with a single central table support (stainless steel) on the hatch of the engine compartment. The counter base of the screw connection consists of a larger aluminium plate below the sandwich of the engine compartment hatch. Table and table leg together are removable after loosening a clamping screw. We were able to continue using all elements of the original Amel 54 table: aft support, side extension and side extension support. To be honest we will replace the original table top with a lightweight top by opportunity as the whole construction is quite heavy.

The hatch to the engine compartment can be opened with the table folded down, whereby the opening angle is somewhat smaller than originally: the table will hit the mast at a certain angle. Alternatively you can take away the table and the hatch will open as usual.

Regards
Martin

Mago del Sur - 54#40


Re: Amel 55 - captain's seat

Martin Birkhoff
 

Hi all,

I am only 180 cm tall and, at 86 kg, of reasonably normal build. During the test drives with Mago del Sur (Amel 54), nothing was noticeable. Later, however, I realised that my sitting position was too high to look through the front windows in a relaxed manner. I regularly got neck pain and muscle tension. The admiral, on the other hand, complained about the rather wide gap below the backrest, which caused her back or kidney area to cool down. We both regretted that the steering seat was not height-adjustable and could not be rotated either, which reduced the seating space at the cockpit table.


At the Düsselorf Boat show we ordered a new helm seat from Besenzoni. This is the seat which is used on the Amel 50. Please note: the original Besenzoni seat-design is narrower than the one used on the Amel 50. Keep this in mind when ordering. On request, the Amel logo can be embroidered on the back of the seat.

The support of the seat on the photo is a cheap improvisation and will be exchanged for a more solid model, also of course adjustable in height.

After a lot of fiddling we have fixed the original table with a single central table support (stainless steel) on the hatch of the engine compartment. The counter base of the screw connection consists of a larger aluminium plate below the sandwich of the engine compartment hatch. Table and table leg together are removable after loosening a clamping screw. We were able to continue using all elements of the original Amel 54 table: aft support, side extension and side extension support. To be honest we will replace the original table top with a lightweight top by opportunity as the whole construction is quite heavy.

The hatch to the engine compartment can be opened with the table folded down, whereby the opening angle is somewhat smaller than originally: the table will hit the mast at a certain angle. Alternatively you can take away the table and the hatch will open as usual.

Regards
Martin

Mago del Sur - 54#40


Re: Forward head black water tank copper fitting replacement

Andrew & Kate Lamb
 

We have replaced both lower holding tank outlets and replaced with PVC tubes – both were straight copper tubes with very little inside the tanks – both very corroded and starting to leak. I drilled a hole through the visible part and twisted to remove, with some work with long-nose pliers afterwards, but this was relatively easy to do.

We have replaced one of the inlet copper pipes – it was less corroded than the outlet pipes and was much harder to replace because there was much more copper pipe inside the holding tank and on the end inside the tank was attached a piece of 38mm hose that formed a loop into the tank. We had to remove the lower part of the copper tube first and then had to pass a grinding tool inside the pipe to cut the upper portion of pipe inside the holding tank.  Once this was done we were able to retrieve the inner copper pipe piece and attached hose. This was replaced by a long straight piece of 40mm diameter PVC tubing it was not possible to add hosing on the inside again but I was able to pass the PVC tube close to the top of the inside of the holding tank.

 

Andrew

 

Ronpische SM472

Canet-en-Roussillon

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Alan "Woody" Wood via groups.io
Sent: 29 November 2021 12:56
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Forward head black water tank copper fitting replacement

 

Nice job Kevin.

I’m thinking of replacing mine soon, not because of corrosion but there seems to be a blockage in it. I presumed it was calcium and tried acid but to no avail. Next step would be to drill into it but would the original fitting have had an inverse U-bend inside the tank to prevent back pressure on the feed pipe when the tank is full?

I’m not sure if I read that somewhere or just made it up in my head but it would make sense and I wouldn’t want to destroy it with the drill if there is. 

Anyone know anything about this?

- Woody


Re: Forward head black water tank copper fitting replacement

Alan "Woody" Wood
 

Nice job Kevin.

I’m thinking of replacing mine soon, not because of corrosion but there seems to be a blockage in it. I presumed it was calcium and tried acid but to no avail. Next step would be to drill into it but would the original fitting have had an inverse U-bend inside the tank to prevent back pressure on the feed pipe when the tank is full?

I’m not sure if I read that somewhere or just made it up in my head but it would make sense and I wouldn’t want to destroy it with the drill if there is. 

Anyone know anything about this?

- Woody


Re: Something for Electrical Engineers, Experts, and Wannabes like me

Dean Gillies
 

Maxwell's equations explain everything perfectly. Don't they??


Re: Forward head black water tank copper fitting replacement

Michael Winand
 

Nice work, the aft head will be in the same condition. The copper is not a good thing for black water, urine and copper will react, eating away the copper. 
Michael Nebo sm251 

On Sun, 28 Nov 2021, 10:57 pm Kevin Schmit, <kevschmit64@...> wrote:
Good morning!

I got a chance to take care of an aging problem while conveniently tied to the dock this week.  

About 6 months ago I noticed a small pinhole leak in the copper hose fitting in the forward head while installing new head hoses.  I temp repaired the pin hole problem using JB weld but I knew it was a ticking time bomb.

Sure enough, last week I noted the sound of squirting water in and around the same copper fitting.  Further investigation revealed another hole on the opposite side of the fitting.  Enough was enough, I knew it was time to conduct a proper repair.

I started by removing the old copper using a set of vice grips to twist out as much of it I could with brute force.  80% of it came out with the pliers.  I then used my drill bit step tool to grind out the remaining copper, glue and gunk.  I ground out just enough until I got clean fiberglass chips coming out of the hole.

Goal was to get a clean, dry surface in which to get the West System epoxy to grab when installing the new fitting without enlarging the hole too much.  The hole is 1.5” in diameter.

Next issue was to determine what kind of fitting to use…?  I thought about replacing the copper with bronze but I like using PVC fittings (above the water line only) with black water if possible.

I found a 1.5” to 1.5” hose barb to hose barb fitting would fit nicely.  I also like the idea that the head hose now has barbs to grab into while clamping compared to the old smooth copper fitting.

I dry fit everything together first and then made some colloidal silica thickened epoxy (peanut butter consistency), epoxy coated both the hole and the new fitting mating surfaces and then tapped into place using a small hammer.  I wanted to get the new fitting sunk in at least 3/4”.  Lastly I taped the joint with some tape just to keep any epoxy from dripping out.  After 24 hrs of cure, the repair is successful!


--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362
Currently in Brunswick, GA for the holiday


Re: pressure hot water

 

Eloi,

It could be many causes, but if there were a leak in the hot water line below the floor of the aft head, it might explain the noise and the low pressure.

This snippet from my book will help you as you troubleshoot. Note there is one line off of the manifold in the engine room (I circled in red) supplying hot water Aft. Assuming there is no leaking visible under the floor, I think I would start by removing that hose and testing the flow. Note: Amel used some sort of adhesive at the connection of these hoses to the manifold and copper pipe. Heat will help removal (air gun, or hot water), and I suggest a sealant when reconnecting. Also see the last snippet for locating a potential clog in the hot water lines.

image.png

image.png

image.png



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 10:40 AM Eloi Bamberg <eloi.bamberg@...> wrote:
Hello,

The pressure of the hot water in my aft head is way to low (shower and sink). In the galley and the forward head there is no problem. When the water flows, I hear a sound as if there where some air in the tubes, but the flow is steady. I visually controlled the copper tubes and hoses in the engin room and under the aft bed. I couldn't find any leak. Any ideas / suggestions what could be the problem?

Thanks

Eloi
SM2K 426 RedLion


Re: 24V Alternator

 

There might be a loose wire, probably a wire on the 12v/24v excite relay, or to or from that relay and the 24v alternator. Yours probably doesn't look exactly like this but has these components. Does the 24v alternator self-excite when you quickly throttle up to 1800 RPM?
image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 10:13 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The external regulator is a Balmar MC 624
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


pressure hot water

Eloi Bamberg
 

Hello,

The pressure of the hot water in my aft head is way to low (shower and sink). In the galley and the forward head there is no problem. When the water flows, I hear a sound as if there where some air in the tubes, but the flow is steady. I visually controlled the copper tubes and hoses in the engin room and under the aft bed. I couldn't find any leak. Any ideas / suggestions what could be the problem?

Thanks

Eloi
SM2K 426 RedLion


Re: 24V Alternator

karkauai
 

The external regulator is a Balmar MC 624
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


24V Alternator

karkauai
 

Happy Holidays, everyone.
We are in W Palm Beach, FL after a boisterous sail down from the Chesapeake.  15ft bar at StAugustine with 8-10 ft seas kept us from stopping there.

On the way down the belt on our Yanmar (4JH4HTE) that powers the fresh water pump and 12V alternator broke. We had to remove the 24V alternator belt to replace the broken one. Everything seems back to normal, but since then the 24V alternator isn't producing any charge current. The belt is tight and not slipping, and all wiring at the alternator is snug.  It's a Valeo 60 A 28 V only 2 years old with a Balmar  external regulator.

Any thoughts on how or if the belt issue could have caused this?  Troubleshooting tips?

Thanks on advance.
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: MDKAL starting problem

Bill Kinney
 

I agree that a bad solenoid is a possible cause of the symptoms described.  

The solenoid used on most Onans is a "two coil" type.  One powerful "start coil" that pulls the plunger to the "run" position, and a second one that holds it there so the "Start coil" can be turned off to prevent overheating.  If the hold coil is not working properly, as soon as the "start coil" is de-energized the plunger will return to the stop position, and the engine stops.  A number of things can cause this, including just dirt making it sticky (if it doesn't open all the way, it doesn't stay open) or a bad connection.

These solenoids are available aftermarket at a small fraction of the price from Onan.  When we had an Onan onboard, this was one of our spares.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick, GA, USA


Forward head black water tank copper fitting replacement

Kevin Schmit
 

Good morning!

I got a chance to take care of an aging problem while conveniently tied to the dock this week.  

About 6 months ago I noticed a small pinhole leak in the copper hose fitting in the forward head while installing new head hoses.  I temp repaired the pin hole problem using JB weld but I knew it was a ticking time bomb.

Sure enough, last week I noted the sound of squirting water in and around the same copper fitting.  Further investigation revealed another hole on the opposite side of the fitting.  Enough was enough, I knew it was time to conduct a proper repair.

I started by removing the old copper using a set of vice grips to twist out as much of it I could with brute force.  80% of it came out with the pliers.  I then used my drill bit step tool to grind out the remaining copper, glue and gunk.  I ground out just enough until I got clean fiberglass chips coming out of the hole.

Goal was to get a clean, dry surface in which to get the West System epoxy to grab when installing the new fitting without enlarging the hole too much.  The hole is 1.5” in diameter.

Next issue was to determine what kind of fitting to use…?  I thought about replacing the copper with bronze but I like using PVC fittings (above the water line only) with black water if possible.

I found a 1.5” to 1.5” hose barb to hose barb fitting would fit nicely.  I also like the idea that the head hose now has barbs to grab into while clamping compared to the old smooth copper fitting.

I dry fit everything together first and then made some colloidal silica thickened epoxy (peanut butter consistency), epoxy coated both the hole and the new fitting mating surfaces and then tapped into place using a small hammer.  I wanted to get the new fitting sunk in at least 3/4”.  Lastly I taped the joint with some tape just to keep any epoxy from dripping out.  After 24 hrs of cure, the repair is successful!


--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362
Currently in Brunswick, GA for the holiday


MDKAL starting problem

william reynolds
 

Try manually holding the fuel solenoid engaged while cranking and hold until generator is at speed.
I have experienced this twice. Possibily low voltage to solenoid.
Bill
Cloudstreet


Re: Selling New Jordan Series Drogue

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Hi,

Who made the drogue?

Fair Winds.

Eric

Kimberlite Amel SM 376 376 Kimberlite

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Davi Rozgonyi
Sent: Sunday, November 21, 2021 4:57 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Selling New Jordan Series Drogue

 

Hey hey y'all, anyone need a brand new, never used, never even on a boat (stored in a heated garage in the USA) Jordan Series Drogue at 25 percent off? If you don't know what it is, Google it, because you need it if you go offshore or passages without a doubt--it's the best of the best for survival situations as I know a few on this forum can attest. I had one made for our Super maramu a few years back, but then we fell in love with Greece and aren't likely to ever leave 😁🇬🇷 The specs are: 147 cones, hybrid dyneema rode, made for up to 40,000 pounds displacement. Fits (and currently lives in) a suitcase in Colorado, FedEx shipping is about 400 bucks in the US I think. I paid 2200 plus 400 shipping, you can have it for 1700 plus shipping or pickup if you can arrange it. Pics for reference, not my shots... 

 


Re: Onan MDKAL Generator starts but shuts off #YouTube_Live_Stream

Bill Kinney
 

Kevin,

When the generator is forced into running, does it produce power?  If YES then flashing the field is not likely to help--the problem is elsewhere.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick, GA, USA


Re: Seacock Replacement Ball Valve in Head

Mark McGovern
 

Mark,

For the forward head ball valve removal, I carefully used an oscillating multitool, then a mini-hacksaw that has a portion of the blade sticking out past the frame and finally a plain hacksaw blade by hand to get the outboard most part as best I could.  

I had a lot of difficulty getting my 16" adjustable wrench to get a good grip on the flats of the valve.  It is clearly the wrong tool for this job.  I switched up to my largest Channellock (20").  I put one jaw on the "stub" where the valve handle goes (with the valve handle removed, of course) and the other gripping the middle of the valve body (the round part, not the flat).  It came loose on the first try with what seemed like a ridiculous amount of force.  So much force that I feared ripping a hole in the boat.  I imagine that a pipe wrench will also work well here as the serrated jaws will bite into the valve. 

Here's a pic of the old valve on the left and the new Groco valve I replaced it with on the right.  Note the copious amount of gelcoat all the way up the back of the old valve. 



Oddly, the aft head had absolutely no fiberglass or gelcoat on the ball valve.  It appears to be the original valve or if it was replaced by one of the three previous owners of Cara, it was replaced with the exact same type of valve.

Good luck!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Annapolis, MD USA


Re: Seacock Replacement Ball Valve in Head

John Facci
 

Hi Mark,
I used a multi tool (vibrating blade). The main problem I had (other than getting the hose back on) was unscrewing the valve. It wouldn't budge and I was worried my 'large' shifting spanner was going to break. I ended up borrowing a huge pipe wrench from the marina. I used plumbing tape for sealant.

Regards
John
SM #332
Brisbane Australia


Re: Seacock Replacement Ball Valve in Head

 

Mark,

A Dremel worked fine for me.
You may not be able to remove the hose before you remove the valve. As an alternative, loosen the clamps on the hose barb on top of the valve, then unscrew the hose barb from the valve. 

Also, have a method to heat the hose, which you will likely need to do.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Sat, Nov 27, 2021, 15:36 Rob Andrews <robsclan@...> wrote:
Hey Mark,
I did mine a few months ago and just used a 4 inch angle grinder (very carefully).  I could reach most of the way around with that and then finished off with a loose hacksaw blade.  They were the tools I had on hand and it worked without drama.
Rob.
--
Rob & Dee
SV Jaygo.
SM#224
Brisbane, Australia


Re: Onan MDKAL Generator starts but shuts off #YouTube_Live_Stream

Mark Erdos
 

Hi Kevin,

 

Glad to see you are back in Panama.

 

It sounds like a fuel flow issue. If you bypassed the fuel shutoff solenoid and it works, have you tried replacing it. Dumb question but worth asking. Is the fuel pump good? I believe it is an electric pump – easy to check. Is the stop solenoid working correctly?

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Cole
Sent: Saturday, November 27, 2021 11:39 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Onan MDKAL Generator starts but shuts off #YouTube_Live_Stream

 

Our generator has been sleeping for a year and a half; we can start the generator but as soon as we release the start switch it does not stay running; we bypassed fuel shut off solenoid and generator will mechanically run; we have changed the oil, replaced exhaust temp switch, coolant temp switch, confirmed all K relays work except K4.  Wondering if we should flash the field and what method we should use.  Thank you, Kevin
Super Maramu, Anahita #276, Shelter Bay Marina, Panama 

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