Date   

Re: New sails [cross-cut * Nautosphere VOYAGER v tri-radial HydraNet]

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello David,

My sails are North Sails 3Di Nordam. A bit more expensive than others but looking and performing great at the 2 year mark.

Whatever your choice other than a “fabricated” sail, I can certify that I’ll pass you with a considerable rate of overtake :-)


Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM007, Opua NZ

On 7 Dec 2021, at 15:58, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:

Greetings all,

After 5 years and ~25,000nm, our sails are starting to show their age, and so we are now scoping replacements. Mainly UV-damage to the leech area of the main and mizzen, the main- and mizzen-sails that were on the boat at purchase had no UV-protection. Which (we have discovered) is an oversight that we should have recognised and had corrected early on, especially once we started sailing full-time in the tropics (where we have now been continuously for >4 years). Being tri-radial cut, it is not so easy to re-cut the sail/s to eliminate the compromised fabric, which is a shame because, apart from the outer 30cm, the remaining fabric is still sound.

We will be continuing to cruise in the tropics for the foreseeable future. Meaning, that laminates are out of consideration.
Explanation: we have seen too many cruisers (and heard even more stories) of those paying for expensive state-of-the-art so-called "cruising laminates", only to have them start to de-laminate after only a season or two. The cause, seen more often in the tropics, seems to be that the laminating manufacturing process used to sandwich the various fabrics together, uses heat to melt and/or cure the glue, and the temperatures used are deliberately kept low in order to protect the fabric from thermal damage during manufacture, being only slightly higher than 100ºC. The in-mast temperatures reached when sails are furled, especially in the tropics, approaches or exceeds this temperature. The situation is, reportedly, worse with in-mast furling systems (as opposed to slab-reefing). This is as explained by several long-term cruising sailors with vastly more experience than us. It makes sense, and aligns with what we have seen over the past few years. Conclusion: no laminates for us.

Which leaves us with more conventional dacron-based woven sail-cloth, including hybrids that utilise high-modulus fibers such as "Ultra-PE" (Ultra-Polyethylene, such as Spectra or Dyneema yarns), which is introduced in order to improve strength and shape stability - once such sailcloth being HydraNet. I have heard that HydraNet starts to lose it's dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy. Which creates problems firstly for sail performance, and then also for in-mast furling systems. Which leads me to ...

QUESTION 1:
Does anyone have experience with Hydranet sails beyond 5-7 years? The use-case here being full-time live-aboard cruising, meaning, permanently rigged (not removed for the off season, nor on-anchor, as we have to ready to sail-away at a moments notice; and we generally avoid marinas, so the sails are on 365 days a year); mileage: 3,000 to 5,000nm a year, all-weather blue-water passage-making in the topical (hotter) and mid-latitudes (greater likelihood of encountering stronger than gale-force).

===
Next, the cut of the sail ::: traditional best practice within the AMEL community is to use a TRI-RADIAL cut - in addition to aligning the high-modulus fibres to the load (mainly vertically, roughly parallel to the leech, radiating from the head, tack and clew), this allows the use of differing weight fabric around the sail - heavier at the foot and leech where there are greater loads for fully-unfurled conditions, and needing to bear a greater load in stronger wind-condition when the sail is partially furled; and lighter sailcloth in the luff areas, less loading under fully unfurled conditions, and less likely to be exposed to high winds (because it should furled away) that would permanently deform a lighter fabric. But not easy to re-cut. Meaning that once a sail is 'blown' and starts to deform, or suffers UV-degradation along the leech, it largely becomes a throw-away item. (Proper UV protection in the first place would avoid this, either the paint-on solutions or extra covering such as an extra layer of sailcloth, or Sunbrella or, perhaps preferentially, the lighter WeatherMax.) But the outcome is the same, once UV damaged such that the strength of the outer sailcloth is degraded, even if the rest of the sail-cloth is sound, there is not much that can be done.

So, I have now questions about useful life of Tri-Radial HydraNet sails - especially if/as it starts to age, and becomes soft &/or baggy, thereby potentially introducing problems with our in-mast furlers. As a consequence of which I am now starting to look at other contemporary alternatives.

Sail construction --> CROSS-CUT. Normally, due to the conventional 'best practice' within the AMEL community, I would not consider this. But there are advantages, it would seem, with cross-cut sails with respect to the 'furl-ability' of the sail. Specifically, because the nearly horizontal seams spiral up the mast as the sail is furled, and hence do not overlap during furling (as is the case for a tri-radial cut sail), cross-cut sails can accommodate a heavier cloth within a given mast profile. However, cross-cut sails do not have the advantage of being able to use heavier cloth in areas of greater load, as is the case for tri-radials - each cross-cut fore-to-aft panel uses the same-weight sail-cloth. Offset against the use of a heavier cloth across all the sail.

Type of fabric: "Nautosphere VOYAGER" is a fabric we have just heard of. It is a hybrid fabric (that is, dacron base incorporating high-modulus yarn, in this case, dyneema). Downside, it is not suitable for tri-radial construction - only for cross-cut. It's claim to fame is that the dyneema threads are woven across the bolt of fabric (that is, along the weft), meaning that the strength and dimensional stability of a cross-cut sail built using this fabric will be roughly vertical - that is, approximately parallel to the leech, which is in alignment with the primary load lines. A cross-cut sail made of this fabric can be made of heavier cloth (due to the better furl-ability), meaning greater strength initially and, all other things being equal, greater longevity. And, being a simple cross-cut, simpler construction with a lesser number of panels (and seams, than tri-radial), meaning reduced labour cost. In addition, UV damage at the leech can be more easily re-cut out. Which leads me to ...

QUESTION 2:
Does anyone have experience in cross-cut sails for the main &/or mizzen for the in-mast furling AMELs, and especially the Super Maramu.

QUESTION 3:
Does anyone have experience with, or knowledge of, "Nautosphere VOYAGER" fabric?

Thank you, in anticipation, for your shared insights and knowledge.

David
SM#396, Perigee
On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
Whangarei, New Zealand





Re: Bowthruster - hex-nut securing he motor to down-tube is stripped out

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi David

Nice to see you guys are slowly progressing closer to home. Congrats on your trip so far since we last shared drinks together on Island Pearl in Panama. We look forward to seeing you guys back in Brisbane someday.

I do not have a solution for your problem, so best wait for the smarter engineer folks to wake up in Europe & the USA with good answers to this, which I am sure will not be too hard.

The reason for this note is a suggestion ..... Go down to a local bicycle shop near you and purchase a new rubber inner tube for a large and as broad as a possible bicycle wheel. Take this, cut it across to make a long tube, then cut a slit all the way up through it to form a new long, broad single layer of rubber. Always keep this on board to wrap tightly around the base of your thruster if ever you see any leaks there in the future. It works perfectly and even with a badly damaged seal if that occurs at anytime whilst out cruising. In such an emergency it will keep every drop of water out! 

We did this in the Indian Ocean after replacing our bow thruster in the Maldives. At the time we did this in-water, and Amel sent a complete new bow thruster out from France but did not send us a new top rubber ring (the one inside the boat) and hence, although we never ever got water in there at any other time ever, between Chagos and Rodrigues we had huge 6m seas and winds and extreme conditions and en route found about 1 liter per day of seawater getting into the front bilge on that trip. All I could come up with in Rodrigues was this primitive bicycle-type solution, but it worked a treat, and we never had another single drop of seawater till reaching Durban where we were able to lift the boat for all her two-year maintenance, including replacing that all-important top seal. In fact, this system worked so well that it became my standard practice for us to wrap it around that base area of our bow thruster just after leaving the harbor on each and every ocean crossing thereafter "just in case"!  Of course, for all local, Caribbean, and Pacific Country cruising we never put it on, but for long crossings, it was a wonderful comfort to have handy.

Best regards to you both
Colin 
ex Island Pearl II
Brisbane

On Tue, Dec 7, 2021 at 11:10 AM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Greetings fellow Amelians,

Requesting help with a 'small' problem.  After an extended service interval (>3-years since last service of the Bowthuster by AMEL MQ, the unwanted delay due to cruising French Polynesia in COVID times, closed borders, and so on), we're now securely in NZ, primarily for the purposes of attending to long-overdue rounds of routine maintenance - including as a high priority the Bowthruster and C-Drive.

Three of the four 6mm hex-bolts that secure the bowthruster motor to the fiberglass (?) torque-tube have been removed without undue problems - desite some rust clearly evident (due I think to the aging neoprene compression seals) with just the regular tightness as expected, but overcome with normal force of a 15cm shifter (no heat or penetrating oil needed).

Unfortunately, the fourth bolt - the starboard-hand one oriented forward - was found to be almost completely stripped, and the limited attempt to shift it finished the job.   It now presents a round hole, which provides no ability to use an Allen key (either 6mm, or the next size up in imperial) to gain the necessary purchase.  The forward-facing location presents  challenges in terms of access needed to drill and tap in an "Easy Out".  Without drilling, the easy-out can not be inserted far enough to gain any useful purchase.  I have applied heat (MAP//Pro torch) as close as possible to the nut head.  I am also soaking the joint (and the whole motor-tube interface area) with PB Blaster (now also anticipating problems with dropping the tube away from the motor assembly).

Has anyone faced this problem with a rounded hex-bolt before, and found a solution?

Or are there any other tips and trick, hints or suggestions?

Thanking you in anticipation, and with kind regards,

David
SM#396, Perigee
On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
Whangarei, New Zealand







--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: New sails [cross-cut * Nautosphere VOYAGER v tri-radial HydraNet]

David Vogel
 

Greetings all,

After 5 years and ~25,000nm, our sails are starting to show their age, and so we are now scoping replacements. Mainly UV-damage to the leech area of the main and mizzen, the main- and mizzen-sails that were on the boat at purchase had no UV-protection. Which (we have discovered) is an oversight that we should have recognised and had corrected early on, especially once we started sailing full-time in the tropics (where we have now been continuously for >4 years). Being tri-radial cut, it is not so easy to re-cut the sail/s to eliminate the compromised fabric, which is a shame because, apart from the outer 30cm, the remaining fabric is still sound.

We will be continuing to cruise in the tropics for the foreseeable future. Meaning, that laminates are out of consideration.
Explanation: we have seen too many cruisers (and heard even more stories) of those paying for expensive state-of-the-art so-called "cruising laminates", only to have them start to de-laminate after only a season or two. The cause, seen more often in the tropics, seems to be that the laminating manufacturing process used to sandwich the various fabrics together, uses heat to melt and/or cure the glue, and the temperatures used are deliberately kept low in order to protect the fabric from thermal damage during manufacture, being only slightly higher than 100ºC. The in-mast temperatures reached when sails are furled, especially in the tropics, approaches or exceeds this temperature. The situation is, reportedly, worse with in-mast furling systems (as opposed to slab-reefing). This is as explained by several long-term cruising sailors with vastly more experience than us. It makes sense, and aligns with what we have seen over the past few years. Conclusion: no laminates for us.

Which leaves us with more conventional dacron-based woven sail-cloth, including hybrids that utilise high-modulus fibers such as "Ultra-PE" (Ultra-Polyethylene, such as Spectra or Dyneema yarns), which is introduced in order to improve strength and shape stability - once such sailcloth being HydraNet. I have heard that HydraNet starts to lose it's dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy. Which creates problems firstly for sail performance, and then also for in-mast furling systems. Which leads me to ...

QUESTION 1:
Does anyone have experience with Hydranet sails beyond 5-7 years? The use-case here being full-time live-aboard cruising, meaning, permanently rigged (not removed for the off season, nor on-anchor, as we have to ready to sail-away at a moments notice; and we generally avoid marinas, so the sails are on 365 days a year); mileage: 3,000 to 5,000nm a year, all-weather blue-water passage-making in the topical (hotter) and mid-latitudes (greater likelihood of encountering stronger than gale-force).

===
Next, the cut of the sail ::: traditional best practice within the AMEL community is to use a TRI-RADIAL cut - in addition to aligning the high-modulus fibres to the load (mainly vertically, roughly parallel to the leech, radiating from the head, tack and clew), this allows the use of differing weight fabric around the sail - heavier at the foot and leech where there are greater loads for fully-unfurled conditions, and needing to bear a greater load in stronger wind-condition when the sail is partially furled; and lighter sailcloth in the luff areas, less loading under fully unfurled conditions, and less likely to be exposed to high winds (because it should furled away) that would permanently deform a lighter fabric. But not easy to re-cut. Meaning that once a sail is 'blown' and starts to deform, or suffers UV-degradation along the leech, it largely becomes a throw-away item. (Proper UV protection in the first place would avoid this, either the paint-on solutions or extra covering such as an extra layer of sailcloth, or Sunbrella or, perhaps preferentially, the lighter WeatherMax.) But the outcome is the same, once UV damaged such that the strength of the outer sailcloth is degraded, even if the rest of the sail-cloth is sound, there is not much that can be done.

So, I have now questions about useful life of Tri-Radial HydraNet sails - especially if/as it starts to age, and becomes soft &/or baggy, thereby potentially introducing problems with our in-mast furlers. As a consequence of which I am now starting to look at other contemporary alternatives.

Sail construction --> CROSS-CUT. Normally, due to the conventional 'best practice' within the AMEL community, I would not consider this. But there are advantages, it would seem, with cross-cut sails with respect to the 'furl-ability' of the sail. Specifically, because the nearly horizontal seams spiral up the mast as the sail is furled, and hence do not overlap during furling (as is the case for a tri-radial cut sail), cross-cut sails can accommodate a heavier cloth within a given mast profile. However, cross-cut sails do not have the advantage of being able to use heavier cloth in areas of greater load, as is the case for tri-radials - each cross-cut fore-to-aft panel uses the same-weight sail-cloth. Offset against the use of a heavier cloth across all the sail.

Type of fabric: "Nautosphere VOYAGER" is a fabric we have just heard of. It is a hybrid fabric (that is, dacron base incorporating high-modulus yarn, in this case, dyneema). Downside, it is not suitable for tri-radial construction - only for cross-cut. It's claim to fame is that the dyneema threads are woven across the bolt of fabric (that is, along the weft), meaning that the strength and dimensional stability of a cross-cut sail built using this fabric will be roughly vertical - that is, approximately parallel to the leech, which is in alignment with the primary load lines. A cross-cut sail made of this fabric can be made of heavier cloth (due to the better furl-ability), meaning greater strength initially and, all other things being equal, greater longevity. And, being a simple cross-cut, simpler construction with a lesser number of panels (and seams, than tri-radial), meaning reduced labour cost. In addition, UV damage at the leech can be more easily re-cut out. Which leads me to ...

QUESTION 2:
Does anyone have experience in cross-cut sails for the main &/or mizzen for the in-mast furling AMELs, and especially the Super Maramu.

QUESTION 3:
Does anyone have experience with, or knowledge of, "Nautosphere VOYAGER" fabric?

Thank you, in anticipation, for your shared insights and knowledge.

David
SM#396, Perigee
On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
Whangarei, New Zealand


Re: 220v breakers

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Hi Pat,
What is that breaker for?
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

-----Original Message-----
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 05, 2021 4:20 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] 220v breakers

Thanks all, I know the breakers are very expensive,I don’t think I will be in one place long enough to get them from Maud. I was thinking about buying another brand of 25A breaker and wire it into the panel for now. I may substitute the heater breaker,however I think it may be weak as well.
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans
St. Augustine
On Dec 5, 2021, at 8:28 AM, Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003@...> wrote:

Pat,

A couple years ago I put in a quote request to Diruptor for a fair quantity of single pole (DC) breakers to have as spares for ourselves and another Amelian. I thought the prices high and there was a 4 week wait. We ended up not placing the order.

A few weeks ago I needed a replacement and asked Amel for a quote for about half the quantity of my Diruptor request.

The quote from Amel came back at about the same price as we had received from Diruptor a couple years back and they had them in stock.

I suggest you reach out to Maud.

All the Best,

Paul Stascavage
S/V Rita Kathryn SM #466

RitaKathryn.com

Currently Exploring Brunswick GA







Re: Frigiboat spare condenser fans

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Isn’t the fan a 220 volt fan?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Mark McGovern
Sent: Monday, December 06, 2021 7:07 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Frigiboat spare condenser fans

 

Kevin,

Michael from Ripple posted about where he got some quieter fans in this post here:

https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/message/60862

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Annapolis, MD USA


Bowthruster - hex-nut securing he motor to down-tube is stripped out

David Vogel
 

Greetings fellow Amelians,

Requesting help with a 'small' problem. After an extended service interval (>3-years since last service of the Bowthuster by AMEL MQ, the unwanted delay due to cruising French Polynesia in COVID times, closed borders, and so on), we're now securely in NZ, primarily for the purposes of attending to long-overdue rounds of routine maintenance - including as a high priority the Bowthruster and C-Drive.

Three of the four 6mm hex-bolts that secure the bowthruster motor to the fiberglass (?) torque-tube have been removed without undue problems - desite some rust clearly evident (due I think to the aging neoprene compression seals) with just the regular tightness as expected, but overcome with normal force of a 15cm shifter (no heat or penetrating oil needed).

Unfortunately, the fourth bolt - the starboard-hand one oriented forward - was found to be almost completely stripped, and the limited attempt to shift it finished the job. It now presents a round hole, which provides no ability to use an Allen key (either 6mm, or the next size up in imperial) to gain the necessary purchase. The forward-facing location presents challenges in terms of access needed to drill and tap in an "Easy Out". Without drilling, the easy-out can not be inserted far enough to gain any useful purchase. I have applied heat (MAP//Pro torch) as close as possible to the nut head. I am also soaking the joint (and the whole motor-tube interface area) with PB Blaster (now also anticipating problems with dropping the tube away from the motor assembly).

Has anyone faced this problem with a rounded hex-bolt before, and found a solution?

Or are there any other tips and trick, hints or suggestions?

Thanking you in anticipation, and with kind regards,

David
SM#396, Perigee
On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
Whangarei, New Zealand


Re: Frigiboat spare condenser fans

Mark McGovern
 

Kevin,

Michael from Ripple posted about where he got some quieter fans in this post here:

https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/message/60862

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Annapolis, MD USA


Re: Frigiboat spare condenser fans

 

Kevin,

Have you tried the US Climma distributor, Coastal Climate Control? info@...


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Dec 6, 2021 at 5:02 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:
Amelians,

I'm looking to purchase several spare refrigerator fans.  Does anyone have a good US source to purchase these 5” fans?


--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Frigiboat spare condenser fans

Kevin Schmit
 

Amelians,

I'm looking to purchase several spare refrigerator fans.  Does anyone have a good US source to purchase these 5” fans?


--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Re: Maintenance spreadsheet or software

EricOpdeweegh
 

Hi Mike,

I can open the xls file from Bill

Would like to see how you set up your maintenance record but can’t open it. The file seems to be damaged

 

Could you send it again?

 

Thanks and Best Regards

 

Eric Opdeweegh

Sv Abayomi SM 158

 

 

Van: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> Namens Mike Ondra via groups.io
Verzonden: maandag 6 december 2021 00:39
Aan: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Onderwerp: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Maintenance spreadsheet or software

 

 

Here is an Excel maintenance log we’ve used on Aletes. The pluses and minuses used to expand and contract the individual system components.

 

 

Mike

Former caretaker of Aletes sm240



Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails.

Explore. Dream. Discover.

- Mark Twain



On Dec 5, 2021, at 4:29 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:



Here's the spreadsheet I used on my 1995 Amel SM.  Once you set up all the parameters (e.g. engine hrs or calendar time between oil changes) it automatically tells you the next scheduled check.  It worked well for me.  If you have questions, call or text me at 206-375-2787.  

Bill Shaproski 

Pacific Cool SM 141

 

On Sun, Dec 5, 2021 at 2:08 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:

I posted this on FB as well so my apologies for the duplicate post….

-- I’m looking to improve my preventative & scheduled maintenance of my on board systems on our Amel SM.  Does anyone use an .XL based spreadsheet to track, plan and schedule necessary maintenance on all the different systems?  I’m envisioning a multi tab spreadsheet that separates by each system(ie generator, propulsion engine, running rigging, electric furlers etc…). It would be cool if it provided auto reminders of upcoming items needing attention.  I anxious to hear what others are using to try to stay ahead of scheduled preventative maintenance.

 

Kevin & Kristen Schmit

KIANA
SM #362
Currently in Riviera Beach, FL


 

--

Bill Shaproski

Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Maintenance spreadsheet or software

EricOpdeweegh
 

Thank you Bill Shaproski,

 

That is nice to try out as we have SM158

 

Regards

Eric Opdeweegh

Sv Abayomi SM 158

 

 

 

 

 

Van: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> Namens Bill Shaproski
Verzonden: zondag 5 december 2021 23:29
Aan: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Onderwerp: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Maintenance spreadsheet or software

 

Here's the spreadsheet I used on my 1995 Amel SM.  Once you set up all the parameters (e.g. engine hrs or calendar time between oil changes) it automatically tells you the next scheduled check.  It worked well for me.  If you have questions, call or text me at 206-375-2787.  

Bill Shaproski 

Pacific Cool SM 141

 

On Sun, Dec 5, 2021 at 2:08 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:

I posted this on FB as well so my apologies for the duplicate post….

-- I’m looking to improve my preventative & scheduled maintenance of my on board systems on our Amel SM.  Does anyone use an .XL based spreadsheet to track, plan and schedule necessary maintenance on all the different systems?  I’m envisioning a multi tab spreadsheet that separates by each system(ie generator, propulsion engine, running rigging, electric furlers etc…). It would be cool if it provided auto reminders of upcoming items needing attention.  I anxious to hear what others are using to try to stay ahead of scheduled preventative maintenance.

 

Kevin & Kristen Schmit

KIANA
SM #362
Currently in Riviera Beach, FL


 

--

Bill Shaproski

Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Bosch washing machine for Amel 54

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Ruedi,

Sorry for the late reply.
No, my OEM Bosch is still going after my intervention which mainly consisted of painting the thing from the inside and respraying the front panel. But I’m not surprised with the remark of Bill Rouse. One of the most overrated brands from Germany must be Bosch. I have so many bad experiences with Bosch, it is no longer funny. Typically when my car had some failure is was due to a Bosch part (and I drive only non-German cars). Also the way the washing machine on the Amel has been constructed is very, very run of the mill. There is nothing special about them other then they still used a fully stainless drum as opposed to the Korean brands that seem to think is is a good idea to have the part that holds the drum to the actual shaft made of aluminium. Korean washers need an anode!
SV Delos found this out the hard way.

So I don’t think you would do poorly with Beko. They have been around for a quite while in Europe and my guess is they have improved over time in contradiction to Bosch that only wants to save money.

Cheers,

Arno
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Abandonned SM in Atlantic

Nick Newington
 

“Always step up into the life raft”
Still, nice salvage job for the adventurous. 
Mind you December in the North Atlantic is no place for sissies…


On 6 Dec 2021, at 12:19, EricOpdeweegh <sv.abayomi@...> wrote:



Sure looks like the Bali Hai,

 

https://chesapeakebaymagazine.com/video-sailboat-rescue-170-miles-offshore/

 

 

Eric Opdeweegh

Sv Abayomi SM 158

 

 

 

Van: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> Namens Brent Cameron via groups.io
Verzonden: maandag 6 december 2021 11:22
Aan: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Onderwerp: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Abandonned SM in Atlantic

 

Sounds like it might be Bali Hai (the Super Maramu not the Santorin). She was abandoned last year during a coast guard rescue  few hundred miles off Cape Hatteras.   I hope they find her again. 


Brent

On Dec 6, 2021, 4:59 AM -0500, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...>, wrote:

No midway between Martinique and Azores. No name?

Spotted by Imoca Nexans on return to Europe trip. 

 

Rgds

 

Dénis

 

Envoyé de mon iPhone



Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:53, Bruno COTTE <cotte.bruno@...> a écrit :

 All informations have been transmitted to Cap gris nez un charge of the rescue . 

Envoyé de mon iPhone



Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:48, Peter Forbes <ppsforbes@...> a écrit :

 O we have a lat long?

Carango 54 - 035

Lymington

UK



On 6 Dec 2021, at 09:31, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...> wrote:



<378FF862-E3CD-4EC4-96A8-63B7FDC2939F.jpeg>


Hello,

A SM with a broken or missing main boom has been spoted.

Has anyone some information on this topic?

Regards

Denis
Ex Meltem 32
<378FF862-E3CD-4EC4-96A8-63B7FDC2939F.jpeg>


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Abandonned SM in Atlantic

EricOpdeweegh
 

Sure looks like the Bali Hai,

 

https://chesapeakebaymagazine.com/video-sailboat-rescue-170-miles-offshore/

 

 

Eric Opdeweegh

Sv Abayomi SM 158

 

 

 

Van: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> Namens Brent Cameron via groups.io
Verzonden: maandag 6 december 2021 11:22
Aan: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Onderwerp: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Abandonned SM in Atlantic

 

Sounds like it might be Bali Hai (the Super Maramu not the Santorin). She was abandoned last year during a coast guard rescue  few hundred miles off Cape Hatteras.   I hope they find her again. 


Brent

On Dec 6, 2021, 4:59 AM -0500, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...>, wrote:

No midway between Martinique and Azores. No name?

Spotted by Imoca Nexans on return to Europe trip. 

 

Rgds

 

Dénis

 

Envoyé de mon iPhone



Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:53, Bruno COTTE <cotte.bruno@...> a écrit :

 All informations have been transmitted to Cap gris nez un charge of the rescue . 

Envoyé de mon iPhone



Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:48, Peter Forbes <ppsforbes@...> a écrit :

 O we have a lat long?

Carango 54 - 035

Lymington

UK



On 6 Dec 2021, at 09:31, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...> wrote:



<378FF862-E3CD-4EC4-96A8-63B7FDC2939F.jpeg>


Hello,

A SM with a broken or missing main boom has been spoted.

Has anyone some information on this topic?

Regards

Denis
Ex Meltem 32
<378FF862-E3CD-4EC4-96A8-63B7FDC2939F.jpeg>


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Abandonned SM in Atlantic

Brent Cameron
 

Sounds like it might be Bali Hai (the Super Maramu not the Santorin). She was abandoned last year during a coast guard rescue  few hundred miles off Cape Hatteras.   I hope they find her again. 

Brent

On Dec 6, 2021, 4:59 AM -0500, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...>, wrote:
No midway between Martinique and Azores. No name?
Spotted by Imoca Nexans on return to Europe trip. 

Rgds

Dénis

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:53, Bruno COTTE <cotte.bruno@...> a écrit :

 All informations have been transmitted to Cap gris nez un charge of the rescue . 

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:48, Peter Forbes <ppsforbes@...> a écrit :

 O we have a lat long?

Carango 54 - 035
Lymington
UK

On 6 Dec 2021, at 09:31, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...> wrote:



<378FF862-E3CD-4EC4-96A8-63B7FDC2939F.jpeg>


Hello,

A SM with a broken or missing main boom has been spoted.

Has anyone some information on this topic?

Regards

Denis
Ex Meltem 32
<378FF862-E3CD-4EC4-96A8-63B7FDC2939F.jpeg>


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Abandonned SM in Atlantic

Denis Foster
 

No midway between Martinique and Azores. No name?
Spotted by Imoca Nexans on return to Europe trip. 

Rgds

Dénis

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:53, Bruno COTTE <cotte.bruno@...> a écrit :

All informations have been transmitted to Cap gris nez un charge of the rescue . 

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:48, Peter Forbes <ppsforbes@...> a écrit :

O we have a lat long?

Carango 54 - 035
Lymington
UK

On 6 Dec 2021, at 09:31, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...> wrote:




Hello,

A SM with a broken or missing main boom has been spoted.

Has anyone some information on this topic?

Regards

Denis
Ex Meltem 32


Re: Abandonned SM in Atlantic

Peter Forbes
 

Great news - it would be sad to loose an Amel.

Yet again says a lot for Amel survivability - stay with the Amel.

Peter Forbes
Carango
07836 209730

On 6 Dec 2021, at 09:53, Bruno COTTE <cotte.bruno@...> wrote:

All informations have been transmitted to Cap gris nez un charge of the rescue . 

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:48, Peter Forbes <ppsforbes@...> a écrit :

O we have a lat long?

Carango 54 - 035
Lymington
UK

On 6 Dec 2021, at 09:31, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...> wrote:




Hello,

A SM with a broken or missing main boom has been spoted.

Has anyone some information on this topic?

Regards

Denis
Ex Meltem 32


Re: Abandonned SM in Atlantic

Bruno COTTE
 

All informations have been transmitted to Cap gris nez un charge of the rescue . 

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 6 déc. 2021 à 10:48, Peter Forbes <ppsforbes@...> a écrit :

O we have a lat long?

Carango 54 - 035
Lymington
UK

On 6 Dec 2021, at 09:31, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...> wrote:




Hello,

A SM with a broken or missing main boom has been spoted.

Has anyone some information on this topic?

Regards

Denis
Ex Meltem 32


Re: Abandonned SM in Atlantic

Peter Forbes
 

O we have a lat long?

Carango 54 - 035
Lymington
UK

On 6 Dec 2021, at 09:31, Denis Foster <deniswfoster@...> wrote:




Hello,

A SM with a broken or missing main boom has been spoted.

Has anyone some information on this topic?

Regards

Denis
Ex Meltem 32


Abandonned SM in Atlantic

Denis Foster
 


Hello,

A SM with a broken or missing main boom has been spoted.

Has anyone some information on this topic?

Regards

Denis
Ex Meltem 32

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