Date   

Re: Type 2 Autopilot -noisy operation

 

FYI, the Raymarine rotary drive was a  noise box when new. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Dec 7, 2021, 15:47 Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
Hi Kevin,

You can buy the gears from Raymarine. 

I carry a set on board. 

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007, NZ


On 8/12/2021, at 10:15 AM, Alex BAIZEAU <alexandre.baizeau@...> wrote:


Hi Kevin,

It’s not supposed to be that noisy.

We had a similar issue, maybe not as noisy but still too noisy.

It turned out that one the pin/axis of one of the planetary gears was slightly dislodged from it’s position and instead of being flush with gear it was sticking out and rubbing against the metal case.

I banged it back in place and it really improved.

If i recall correctly there are two set of planetary gears in that assembly, i’m talking about the set of 4 that is the furthest away from the clutch/closest to the wheel that connects to chain.

 

Good luck

Alex.

On Tue, Dec 7, 2021 at 8:59 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:
Hey folks,

I’m attempting to troubleshoot my secondary (backup) autopilot behind the helm station.  It works but is noisy as all get out and believe it needs some loving.(Hopefully it’s not supposed to sound like this..)

I’ve included a video of the issue I’m having.  I disassembled most of the unit and thought I’d find something obvious…like broken teeth on the gear box or something like that.  I checked the clutch according to Raymarines technical guide ( 26-30 ohms.  I’ve got 27.3) so it’s not the clutch.  I suspect it’s one of the two gear boxes but thought I’d ask here to see if anyone else has had the same issue.  
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Re: 𝗖𝗵𝗿𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗺𝗮𝘀 𝗚𝗶𝗳𝘁 - 𝗔𝗺��𝗹 𝗕𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝗢𝗻𝗹𝗶𝗻�� 𝘁𝗵𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗴𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘆𝗲��𝗿.

Regards Geoff Kidd - Hopefully on track to sign as SV KEYDAH Merchant
 

Same back to you Bill from Down Under and sincere thanks for all that you and this site have offered this past year.

 

All that you and this site provide, and the terrific contribution from members, has caused my lust for Amel to even increase.

 

Best regards to All.

 

Geoff – (Soon to be) SV KEYDAH Merchant.

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Wednesday, 8 December 2021 5:46 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners]
𝗖𝗵𝗿𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗺𝗮𝘀 𝗚𝗶𝗳𝘁 - 𝗔𝗺𝗲𝗹 𝗕𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝗢𝗻𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗴𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘆𝗲𝗮𝗿.

 

All members of the Amel Yacht Owners Group. 

 

I wish you a happy holiday season and a wonderful New Year in 2022.

 

Please try the Online Amel Book free until the end of 2021 using the following passwords. 

Go to www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com click on CLIENT ACCESS 

 

If you are a current Amel Owners Yacht School Client,

Enter your Client password.

You will now see a full Client Access screen. Click on the Online Amel Book Access

 

If you are not a current client OR do not have your current client password 

Enter the temporary password henriamel (Clients should email brouse@... to retrieve current client password)

 

After you agree to the "TERMS" you will see your Client Access Screen which will be similar to this:

 

Click on the Amel Book image or on the button below. Online Book Password: xmas21

Be sure to read the very first page which looks like this:

 

Merry Christmas,

 

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

  

 

 


Re: Bowthruster - hex-nut securing he motor to down-tube is stripped out

Bill Kinney
 

David,

I feel your pain! I never ran into that particular problem in that place, but I have an idea or two for you.

Rather than using the long version of the "EZ Out" try the shorter ones, usually called "multi-spline extractors"  They are short enough they will frequently grab in a stripped hex hole without drilling, and short enough you can put a good deal of torque on them without them tipping over.

The look like this: 


The down-tube is fiberglass, so be careful with heat!  Since the bolt is not threaded in to the motor casting, applying heat there is not likely to help.

Last idea, I am not sure the exact alignment, but you can get some REALLY long drill bits.  Electricians use them when running wires.  They might make it possible to drill out the bolt in it's current location if you do not have to fit the drill head in there.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick GA, USA (For the next few hours...)


Re: Type 2 Autopilot -noisy operation

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi Kevin,

You can buy the gears from Raymarine. 

I carry a set on board. 

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007, NZ


On 8/12/2021, at 10:15 AM, Alex BAIZEAU <alexandre.baizeau@...> wrote:


Hi Kevin,

It’s not supposed to be that noisy.

We had a similar issue, maybe not as noisy but still too noisy.

It turned out that one the pin/axis of one of the planetary gears was slightly dislodged from it’s position and instead of being flush with gear it was sticking out and rubbing against the metal case.

I banged it back in place and it really improved.

If i recall correctly there are two set of planetary gears in that assembly, i’m talking about the set of 4 that is the furthest away from the clutch/closest to the wheel that connects to chain.

 

Good luck

Alex.

On Tue, Dec 7, 2021 at 8:59 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:
Hey folks,

I’m attempting to troubleshoot my secondary (backup) autopilot behind the helm station.  It works but is noisy as all get out and believe it needs some loving.(Hopefully it’s not supposed to sound like this..)

I’ve included a video of the issue I’m having.  I disassembled most of the unit and thought I’d find something obvious…like broken teeth on the gear box or something like that.  I checked the clutch according to Raymarines technical guide ( 26-30 ohms.  I’ve got 27.3) so it’s not the clutch.  I suspect it’s one of the two gear boxes but thought I’d ask here to see if anyone else has had the same issue.  
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Re: Type 2 Autopilot -noisy operation

Alex BAIZEAU
 

Hi Kevin,

It’s not supposed to be that noisy.

We had a similar issue, maybe not as noisy but still too noisy.

It turned out that one the pin/axis of one of the planetary gears was slightly dislodged from it’s position and instead of being flush with gear it was sticking out and rubbing against the metal case.

I banged it back in place and it really improved.

If i recall correctly there are two set of planetary gears in that assembly, i’m talking about the set of 4 that is the furthest away from the clutch/closest to the wheel that connects to chain.

 

Good luck

Alex.

On Tue, Dec 7, 2021 at 8:59 PM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:
Hey folks,

I’m attempting to troubleshoot my secondary (backup) autopilot behind the helm station.  It works but is noisy as all get out and believe it needs some loving.(Hopefully it’s not supposed to sound like this..)

I’ve included a video of the issue I’m having.  I disassembled most of the unit and thought I’d find something obvious…like broken teeth on the gear box or something like that.  I checked the clutch according to Raymarines technical guide ( 26-30 ohms.  I’ve got 27.3) so it’s not the clutch.  I suspect it’s one of the two gear boxes but thought I’d ask here to see if anyone else has had the same issue.  
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Type 2 Autopilot -noisy operation

Kevin Schmit
 

Hey folks,

I’m attempting to troubleshoot my secondary (backup) autopilot behind the helm station.  It works but is noisy as all get out and believe it needs some loving.(Hopefully it’s not supposed to sound like this..)

I’ve included a video of the issue I’m having.  I disassembled most of the unit and thought I’d find something obvious…like broken teeth on the gear box or something like that.  I checked the clutch according to Raymarines technical guide ( 26-30 ohms.  I’ve got 27.3) so it’s not the clutch.  I suspect it’s one of the two gear boxes but thought I’d ask here to see if anyone else has had the same issue.  
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Type 2 Autopilot -noisy operation

Kevin Schmit
 

Hey folks,

I’m attempting to troubleshoot my secondary (backup) autopilot behind the helm station.  It works but is noisy as all get out and believe it needs some loving.(Hopefully it’s not supposed to sound like this..)

I’ve included a video of the issue I’m having.  I disassembled most of the unit and thought I’d find something obvious…like broken teeth on the gear box or something like that.  I checked the clutch according to Raymarines technical guide ( 26-30 ohms.  I’ve got 27.3) so it’s not the clutch.  I suspect it’s one of the two gear boxes but thought I’d ask here to see if anyone else has had the same issue.  
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Re: New sails [cross-cut * Nautosphere VOYAGER v tri-radial HydraNet]

David Vogel
 

Hi Bill,

 

Many thanks for that add – all good info, and well worth adding into our comparative spreadsheet.

 

Best,

 

David

 

 

From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Bill Rouse <brouse@...>

Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>

Date: Wednesday, 8 December 2021 at 4:41 am

To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification" <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] New sails [cross-cut * Nautosphere VOYAGER v tri-radial HydraNet]

 

I will give you my opinion regarding QUESTION 1:

A54s came with HydraNet sailcloth made by Dimension Polyant, Germany. They were constructed in a TriRadial pattern and had vertical battens. The early 54 HydraNet sails were made by Deme Sails, and later were made by Incidence Sails. I have seen numerous 54s from early (2005) to late model 54s. I have not seen HydraNet "lose its dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy." 

 

I have seen serious damage to HydraNet caused by jamming and chafing of the mainsail vertical battens. Judy and I purchased HydraNet sails in a TriRadial construction in 2012. We experienced none of what you mentioned and I believe that the current owner of BeBe is still satisfied with the sails. HydraNet in a TriRadial construction will cost about 20-50% more than a high-quality Dacron Hybrid (like Dimension Polyant ProRadial) in a TriRadial construction. I believe that you will get far more than 50% life from HydraNet. However, you should get significantly more life from sails made from ProRadial in a TriRadial construction versus Crosscut Dacron sails. Crosscut construction has comparatively large pieces of sailcloth which because of their size, stretching will cause deformity and reduction in performance of the sail beginning at about 5 years. I believe laminates are not for cruising boats. Most sailcloth manufacturers will tell you to expect delamination in 5 years or less.

 

I recommend that you consider the 3 qualities of sails offered by Incidence Sails (Amel OEM Sailmaker). I negotiated an 18% discount when you order a full set, or 15% when ordering less than a full set. The prices in the following brochure are before the above discounts. Reduce the prices in the brochure by the appropriate discount. Each quality in this brochure is worthwhile, but do not expect the beginning quality to perform as long as the best quality.

 

 Amel Super Maramu-2021.pdf

 

If owners of other Amel models are interested in the Incidence Sail information:

 Amel 55-2021.pdf

 

 Amel 54-2021.pdf

Bill

 

 

 

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

Website: www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 

View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Dec 6, 2021 at 9:14 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hello David,

 

My sails are North Sails 3Di Nordam.  A bit more expensive than others but looking and performing great at the 2 year mark.

 

Whatever your choice other than a “fabricated” sail, I can certify that I’ll pass you with a considerable rate of overtake :-)

 

 

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM007, Opua NZ

 

 

 

 

> On 7 Dec 2021, at 15:58, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:

>

> Greetings all,

>

> After 5 years and ~25,000nm, our sails are starting to show their age, and so we are now scoping replacements.  Mainly UV-damage to the leech area of the main and mizzen, the main- and mizzen-sails that were on the boat at purchase had no UV-protection.  Which (we have discovered) is an oversight that we should have recognised and had corrected early on, especially once we started sailing full-time in the tropics (where we have now been continuously for >4 years).  Being tri-radial cut, it is not so easy to re-cut the sail/s to eliminate the compromised fabric, which is a shame because, apart from the outer 30cm, the remaining fabric is still sound.

>

> We will be continuing to cruise in the tropics for the foreseeable future.  Meaning, that laminates are out of consideration.

> Explanation: we have seen too many cruisers (and heard even more stories) of those paying for expensive state-of-the-art so-called "cruising laminates", only to have them start to de-laminate after only a season or two.  The cause, seen more often in the tropics, seems to be that the laminating manufacturing process used to sandwich the various fabrics together, uses heat to melt and/or cure the glue, and the temperatures used are deliberately kept low in order to protect the fabric from thermal damage during manufacture, being only slightly higher than 100ºC.   The in-mast temperatures reached when sails are furled, especially in the tropics, approaches or exceeds this temperature.  The situation is, reportedly, worse with in-mast furling systems (as opposed to slab-reefing).  This is as explained by several long-term cruising sailors with vastly more experience than us.  It makes sense, and aligns with what we have seen over the past few years.  Conclusion: no laminates for us.

>

> Which leaves us with more conventional dacron-based woven sail-cloth, including hybrids that utilise high-modulus fibers such as "Ultra-PE" (Ultra-Polyethylene, such as Spectra or Dyneema yarns), which is introduced in order to improve strength and shape stability - once such sailcloth being HydraNet.  I have heard that HydraNet starts to lose it's dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy.  Which creates problems firstly for sail performance, and then also for in-mast furling systems.  Which leads me to ...

>

> QUESTION 1:

> Does anyone have experience with Hydranet sails beyond 5-7 years?  The use-case here being full-time live-aboard cruising, meaning, permanently rigged (not removed for the off season, nor on-anchor, as we have to ready to sail-away at a moments notice; and we generally avoid marinas, so the sails are on 365 days a year); mileage: 3,000 to 5,000nm a year, all-weather blue-water passage-making in the topical (hotter) and mid-latitudes (greater likelihood of encountering stronger than gale-force).

>

> ===

> Next, the cut of the sail ::: traditional best practice within the AMEL community is to use a TRI-RADIAL cut - in addition to aligning the high-modulus fibres to the load (mainly vertically, roughly parallel to the leech, radiating from the head, tack and clew), this allows the use of differing weight fabric around the sail - heavier at the foot and leech where there are greater loads for fully-unfurled conditions, and needing to bear a greater load in stronger wind-condition when the sail is partially furled; and lighter sailcloth in the luff areas, less loading under fully unfurled conditions, and less likely to be exposed to high winds (because it should furled away) that would permanently deform a lighter fabric.  But not easy to re-cut.  Meaning that once a sail is 'blown' and starts to deform, or suffers UV-degradation along the leech, it largely becomes a throw-away item.  (Proper UV protection in the first place would avoid this, either the paint-on solutions or extra covering such as an extra layer of sailcloth, or Sunbrella or, perhaps preferentially, the lighter WeatherMax.)  But the outcome is the same, once UV damaged such that the strength of the outer sailcloth is degraded, even if the rest of the sail-cloth is sound, there is not much that can be done. 

>

> So, I have now questions about useful life of Tri-Radial HydraNet sails - especially if/as it starts to age, and becomes soft &/or baggy, thereby potentially introducing problems with our in-mast furlers. As a consequence of which I am now starting to look at other contemporary alternatives.

>

> Sail construction --> CROSS-CUT.  Normally, due to the conventional 'best practice' within the AMEL community, I would not consider this.  But there are advantages, it would seem, with cross-cut sails with respect to the 'furl-ability' of the sail.  Specifically, because the nearly horizontal seams spiral up the mast as the sail is furled, and hence do not overlap during furling (as is the case for a tri-radial cut sail), cross-cut sails can accommodate a heavier cloth within a given mast profile.  However, cross-cut sails do not have the advantage of being able to use heavier cloth in areas of greater load, as is the case for tri-radials - each cross-cut fore-to-aft panel uses the same-weight sail-cloth.  Offset against the use of a heavier cloth across all the sail.

>

> Type of fabric: "Nautosphere VOYAGER" is a fabric we have just heard of.  It is a hybrid fabric (that is, dacron base incorporating high-modulus yarn, in this case, dyneema).  Downside, it is not suitable for tri-radial construction - only for cross-cut.  It's claim to fame is that the dyneema threads are woven across the bolt of fabric (that is, along the weft), meaning that the strength and dimensional stability of a cross-cut sail built using this fabric will be roughly vertical - that is, approximately parallel to the leech, which is in alignment with the primary load lines.  A cross-cut sail made of this fabric can be made of heavier cloth (due to the better furl-ability), meaning greater strength initially and, all other things being equal, greater longevity.  And, being a simple cross-cut, simpler construction with a lesser number of panels (and seams, than tri-radial), meaning reduced labour cost.  In addition, UV damage at the leech can be more easily re-cut out.  Which leads me to ...

>

> QUESTION 2:

> Does anyone have experience in cross-cut sails for the main &/or mizzen for the in-mast furling AMELs, and especially the Super Maramu.

>

> QUESTION 3:

> Does anyone have experience with, or knowledge of, "Nautosphere VOYAGER" fabric?

>

> Thank you, in anticipation, for your shared insights and knowledge.

>

> David

> SM#396, Perigee

> On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina

> Whangarei, New Zealand

>

>

>

>

>

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Bowthruster - damaged hex-nut [count on drilling out that bolt and re-tapping the hole + TORX]

David Vogel
 

Thanks Chris,

 

All good info.  And, having spent already 2 days on this problem with no meaningful progress, it looks like this issue is not going to be solved in the day of so of slack I have in the schedule for this haul-out.

 

And with more to add to the mix, from other interested and assisting parties, is a suggestion to replace the HEX bolts with TORX, as these are less prone to slippage and damage.

 

https://www.mcmaster.com/torx-bolts/drive-style~torx/

 

 

 

From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Chris Doucette <amaroksailing@...>

Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>

Date: Wednesday, 8 December 2021 at 8:46 am

To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators" <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bowthruster - hex-nut securing he motor to down-tube is stripped out

 

Hi David,

 

I have done a lot of work on the bow thruster these last few months..  In Fact I have rebuilt the entire thing inclusive of the motor bearings.  Basically, count on drilling out that bolt and re- tapping the hole..  It really does not matter if it ends up 9mm vs the original 8mm. But first- get it drilled out. You might have to find a short 8mm drill bit with a right angle drill adapter. Those steel screws go into a brass fitting inside the bow thruster shaft.  It  is what you will tap eventually. Replace the bolts with quality 316 SS bolts, with copious anti-seize. 

 

Once you get it all out- be sure that the bearing in the base of the motor is going to be shot! I took everything appart in the motor also to change the bearings and snap washers, cleaned, brushed off rust, chemically treated the rust, and sealed that large steel base with epoxy and paint.  It looks like new and will not rust as it did. Re-tapped all the screw holes in the brass part. Almost all done here - bow thruster painting is underway and then assembling. 

 

Chris

 

Amarok, SM 385 

 

 

 

On Mon, Dec 6, 2021 at 8:10 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:

Greetings fellow Amelians,

 

Requesting help with a 'small' problem.  After an extended service interval (>3-years since last service of the Bowthuster by AMEL MQ, the unwanted delay due to cruising French Polynesia in COVID times, closed borders, and so on), we're now securely in NZ, primarily for the purposes of attending to long-overdue rounds of routine maintenance - including as a high priority the Bowthruster and C-Drive.

 

Three of the four 6mm hex-bolts that secure the bowthruster motor to the fiberglass (?) torque-tube have been removed without undue problems - desite some rust clearly evident (due I think to the aging neoprene compression seals) with just the regular tightness as expected, but overcome with normal force of a 15cm shifter (no heat or penetrating oil needed).

 

Unfortunately, the fourth bolt - the starboard-hand one oriented forward - was found to be almost completely stripped, and the limited attempt to shift it finished the job.   It now presents a round hole, which provides no ability to use an Allen key (either 6mm, or the next size up in imperial) to gain the necessary purchase.  The forward-facing location presents  challenges in terms of access needed to drill and tap in an "Easy Out".  Without drilling, the easy-out can not be inserted far enough to gain any useful purchase.  I have applied heat (MAP//Pro torch) as close as possible to the nut head.  I am also soaking the joint (and the whole motor-tube interface area) with PB Blaster (now also anticipating problems with dropping the tube away from the motor assembly).

 

Has anyone faced this problem with a rounded hex-bolt before, and found a solution?

 

Or are there any other tips and trick, hints or suggestions?

 

Thanking you in anticipation, and with kind regards,

 

David

SM#396, Perigee

On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina

Whangarei, New Zealand

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Bowthruster - hex-nut securing he motor to down-tube is stripped out

Chris Doucette
 

Hi David,

I have done a lot of work on the bow thruster these last few months..  In Fact I have rebuilt the entire thing inclusive of the motor bearings.  Basically, count on drilling out that bolt and re- tapping the hole..  It really does not matter if it ends up 9mm vs the original 8mm. But first- get it drilled out. You might have to find a short 8mm drill bit with a right angle drill adapter. Those steel screws go into a brass fitting inside the bow thruster shaft.  It  is what you will tap eventually. Replace the bolts with quality 316 SS bolts, with copious anti-seize. 

Once you get it all out- be sure that the bearing in the base of the motor is going to be shot! I took everything appart in the motor also to change the bearings and snap washers, cleaned, brushed off rust, chemically treated the rust, and sealed that large steel base with epoxy and paint.  It looks like new and will not rust as it did. Re-tapped all the screw holes in the brass part. Almost all done here - bow thruster painting is underway and then assembling. 

Chris

Amarok, SM 385 



On Mon, Dec 6, 2021 at 8:10 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Greetings fellow Amelians,

Requesting help with a 'small' problem.  After an extended service interval (>3-years since last service of the Bowthuster by AMEL MQ, the unwanted delay due to cruising French Polynesia in COVID times, closed borders, and so on), we're now securely in NZ, primarily for the purposes of attending to long-overdue rounds of routine maintenance - including as a high priority the Bowthruster and C-Drive.

Three of the four 6mm hex-bolts that secure the bowthruster motor to the fiberglass (?) torque-tube have been removed without undue problems - desite some rust clearly evident (due I think to the aging neoprene compression seals) with just the regular tightness as expected, but overcome with normal force of a 15cm shifter (no heat or penetrating oil needed).

Unfortunately, the fourth bolt - the starboard-hand one oriented forward - was found to be almost completely stripped, and the limited attempt to shift it finished the job.   It now presents a round hole, which provides no ability to use an Allen key (either 6mm, or the next size up in imperial) to gain the necessary purchase.  The forward-facing location presents  challenges in terms of access needed to drill and tap in an "Easy Out".  Without drilling, the easy-out can not be inserted far enough to gain any useful purchase.  I have applied heat (MAP//Pro torch) as close as possible to the nut head.  I am also soaking the joint (and the whole motor-tube interface area) with PB Blaster (now also anticipating problems with dropping the tube away from the motor assembly).

Has anyone faced this problem with a rounded hex-bolt before, and found a solution?

Or are there any other tips and trick, hints or suggestions?

Thanking you in anticipation, and with kind regards,

David
SM#396, Perigee
On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
Whangarei, New Zealand






𝗖𝗵𝗿𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗺𝗮𝘀 𝗚𝗶𝗳𝘁 - 𝗔𝗺𝗲𝗹 𝗕𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝗢𝗻𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗴𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘆𝗲𝗮𝗿.

 

All members of the Amel Yacht Owners Group. 

I wish you a happy holiday season and a wonderful New Year in 2022.

Please try the Online Amel Book free until the end of 2021 using the following passwords. 

Go to www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com click on CLIENT ACCESS 


If you are a current Amel Owners Yacht School Client,

Enter your Client password.

You will now see a full Client Access screen. Click on the Online Amel Book Access


If you are not a current client OR do not have your current client password 

Enter the temporary password henriamel (Clients should email brouse@... to retrieve current client password)


After you agree to the "TERMS" you will see your Client Access Screen which will be similar to this:

image.png


Click on the Amel Book image or on the button below. Online Book Password: xmas21
Be sure to read the very first page which looks like this:

image.png
Merry Christmas,

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
  


Re: New sails [cross-cut * Nautosphere VOYAGER v tri-radial HydraNet]

Nick Newington
 

Hi David,

I bought Amelia an Amel 54 (2006) in 2017. She came with the original Hydranet sails,  has sailed two transatlantic and a fair bit of general cruising, including some extremely windy weather in Greece.  They have lasted very well.  Only now am I thinking that a new mainsail is a good idea. Mostly because of the fact that it is battened and is getting tricky to furl…..I would not consider any other sail material…..

Thus have ordered a new Hydranet mainsail from Q sails in Turkey. It has been completed and is waiting for my return to Turkey in the spring. I decided to order it without the vertical battens…..As a matter of courtesy to Q sails, they quoted a competitive price and at all times kept me informed of a slight delay in the supply of the material from Germany due to supply problems further up the chain. The sail was ready two weeks later than scheduled….no big deal. 

It will be interesting to lay the new on top of the old one to see just how much area I lose. If I am happy then I will get a new mizzen and genoa from them.

My penny’s worth

Nick

S/Y Amelia
AML 54-019 Leros



On 7 Dec 2021, at 15:41, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

I will give you my opinion regarding QUESTION 1:
A54s came with HydraNet sailcloth made by Dimension Polyant, Germany. They were constructed in a TriRadial pattern and had vertical battens. The early 54 HydraNet sails were made by Deme Sails, and later were made by Incidence Sails. I have seen numerous 54s from early (2005) to late model 54s. I have not seen HydraNet "lose its dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy." 

I have seen serious damage to HydraNet caused by jamming and chafing of the mainsail vertical battens. Judy and I purchased HydraNet sails in a TriRadial construction in 2012. We experienced none of what you mentioned and I believe that the current owner of BeBe is still satisfied with the sails. HydraNet in a TriRadial construction will cost about 20-50% more than a high-quality Dacron Hybrid (like Dimension Polyant ProRadial) in a TriRadial construction. I believe that you will get far more than 50% life from HydraNet. However, you should get significantly more life from sails made from ProRadial in a TriRadial construction versus Crosscut Dacron sails. Crosscut construction has comparatively large pieces of sailcloth which because of their size, stretching will cause deformity and reduction in performance of the sail beginning at about 5 years. I believe laminates are not for cruising boats. Most sailcloth manufacturers will tell you to expect delamination in 5 years or less.

I recommend that you consider the 3 qualities of sails offered by Incidence Sails (Amel OEM Sailmaker). I negotiated an 18% discount when you order a full set, or 15% when ordering less than a full set. The prices in the following brochure are before the above discounts. Reduce the prices in the brochure by the appropriate discount. Each quality in this brochure is worthwhile, but do not expect the beginning quality to perform as long as the best quality.


If owners of other Amel models are interested in the Incidence Sail information:


Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
  
View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Dec 6, 2021 at 9:14 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
Hello David,

My sails are North Sails 3Di Nordam.  A bit more expensive than others but looking and performing great at the 2 year mark.

Whatever your choice other than a “fabricated” sail, I can certify that I’ll pass you with a considerable rate of overtake :-)


Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM007, Opua NZ




> On 7 Dec 2021, at 15:58, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
> 
> Greetings all,
> 
> After 5 years and ~25,000nm, our sails are starting to show their age, and so we are now scoping replacements.  Mainly UV-damage to the leech area of the main and mizzen, the main- and mizzen-sails that were on the boat at purchase had no UV-protection.  Which (we have discovered) is an oversight that we should have recognised and had corrected early on, especially once we started sailing full-time in the tropics (where we have now been continuously for >4 years).  Being tri-radial cut, it is not so easy to re-cut the sail/s to eliminate the compromised fabric, which is a shame because, apart from the outer 30cm, the remaining fabric is still sound.
> 
> We will be continuing to cruise in the tropics for the foreseeable future.  Meaning, that laminates are out of consideration.
> Explanation: we have seen too many cruisers (and heard even more stories) of those paying for expensive state-of-the-art so-called "cruising laminates", only to have them start to de-laminate after only a season or two.  The cause, seen more often in the tropics, seems to be that the laminating manufacturing process used to sandwich the various fabrics together, uses heat to melt and/or cure the glue, and the temperatures used are deliberately kept low in order to protect the fabric from thermal damage during manufacture, being only slightly higher than 100ºC.   The in-mast temperatures reached when sails are furled, especially in the tropics, approaches or exceeds this temperature.  The situation is, reportedly, worse with in-mast furling systems (as opposed to slab-reefing).  This is as explained by several long-term cruising sailors with vastly more experience than us.  It makes sense, and aligns with what we have seen over the past few years.  Conclusion: no laminates for us.
> 
> Which leaves us with more conventional dacron-based woven sail-cloth, including hybrids that utilise high-modulus fibers such as "Ultra-PE" (Ultra-Polyethylene, such as Spectra or Dyneema yarns), which is introduced in order to improve strength and shape stability - once such sailcloth being HydraNet.  I have heard that HydraNet starts to lose it's dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy.  Which creates problems firstly for sail performance, and then also for in-mast furling systems.  Which leads me to ...
> 
> QUESTION 1:
> Does anyone have experience with Hydranet sails beyond 5-7 years?  The use-case here being full-time live-aboard cruising, meaning, permanently rigged (not removed for the off season, nor on-anchor, as we have to ready to sail-away at a moments notice; and we generally avoid marinas, so the sails are on 365 days a year); mileage: 3,000 to 5,000nm a year, all-weather blue-water passage-making in the topical (hotter) and mid-latitudes (greater likelihood of encountering stronger than gale-force).
> 
> ===
> Next, the cut of the sail ::: traditional best practice within the AMEL community is to use a TRI-RADIAL cut - in addition to aligning the high-modulus fibres to the load (mainly vertically, roughly parallel to the leech, radiating from the head, tack and clew), this allows the use of differing weight fabric around the sail - heavier at the foot and leech where there are greater loads for fully-unfurled conditions, and needing to bear a greater load in stronger wind-condition when the sail is partially furled; and lighter sailcloth in the luff areas, less loading under fully unfurled conditions, and less likely to be exposed to high winds (because it should furled away) that would permanently deform a lighter fabric.  But not easy to re-cut.  Meaning that once a sail is 'blown' and starts to deform, or suffers UV-degradation along the leech, it largely becomes a throw-away item.  (Proper UV protection in the first place would avoid this, either the paint-on solutions or extra covering such as an extra layer of sailcloth, or Sunbrella or, perhaps preferentially, the lighter WeatherMax.)  But the outcome is the same, once UV damaged such that the strength of the outer sailcloth is degraded, even if the rest of the sail-cloth is sound, there is not much that can be done.  
> 
> So, I have now questions about useful life of Tri-Radial HydraNet sails - especially if/as it starts to age, and becomes soft &/or baggy, thereby potentially introducing problems with our in-mast furlers. As a consequence of which I am now starting to look at other contemporary alternatives.
> 
> Sail construction --> CROSS-CUT.  Normally, due to the conventional 'best practice' within the AMEL community, I would not consider this.  But there are advantages, it would seem, with cross-cut sails with respect to the 'furl-ability' of the sail.  Specifically, because the nearly horizontal seams spiral up the mast as the sail is furled, and hence do not overlap during furling (as is the case for a tri-radial cut sail), cross-cut sails can accommodate a heavier cloth within a given mast profile.  However, cross-cut sails do not have the advantage of being able to use heavier cloth in areas of greater load, as is the case for tri-radials - each cross-cut fore-to-aft panel uses the same-weight sail-cloth.  Offset against the use of a heavier cloth across all the sail.
> 
> Type of fabric: "Nautosphere VOYAGER" is a fabric we have just heard of.  It is a hybrid fabric (that is, dacron base incorporating high-modulus yarn, in this case, dyneema).  Downside, it is not suitable for tri-radial construction - only for cross-cut.  It's claim to fame is that the dyneema threads are woven across the bolt of fabric (that is, along the weft), meaning that the strength and dimensional stability of a cross-cut sail built using this fabric will be roughly vertical - that is, approximately parallel to the leech, which is in alignment with the primary load lines.  A cross-cut sail made of this fabric can be made of heavier cloth (due to the better furl-ability), meaning greater strength initially and, all other things being equal, greater longevity.  And, being a simple cross-cut, simpler construction with a lesser number of panels (and seams, than tri-radial), meaning reduced labour cost.  In addition, UV damage at the leech can be more easily re-cut out.  Which leads me to ...
> 
> QUESTION 2:
> Does anyone have experience in cross-cut sails for the main &/or mizzen for the in-mast furling AMELs, and especially the Super Maramu.
> 
> QUESTION 3:
> Does anyone have experience with, or knowledge of, "Nautosphere VOYAGER" fabric?
> 
> Thank you, in anticipation, for your shared insights and knowledge.
> 
> David
> SM#396, Perigee
> On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
> Whangarei, New Zealand
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 








Re: New sails [cross-cut * Nautosphere VOYAGER v tri-radial HydraNet]

 

I will give you my opinion regarding QUESTION 1:
A54s came with HydraNet sailcloth made by Dimension Polyant, Germany. They were constructed in a TriRadial pattern and had vertical battens. The early 54 HydraNet sails were made by Deme Sails, and later were made by Incidence Sails. I have seen numerous 54s from early (2005) to late model 54s. I have not seen HydraNet "lose its dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy." 

I have seen serious damage to HydraNet caused by jamming and chafing of the mainsail vertical battens. Judy and I purchased HydraNet sails in a TriRadial construction in 2012. We experienced none of what you mentioned and I believe that the current owner of BeBe is still satisfied with the sails. HydraNet in a TriRadial construction will cost about 20-50% more than a high-quality Dacron Hybrid (like Dimension Polyant ProRadial) in a TriRadial construction. I believe that you will get far more than 50% life from HydraNet. However, you should get significantly more life from sails made from ProRadial in a TriRadial construction versus Crosscut Dacron sails. Crosscut construction has comparatively large pieces of sailcloth which because of their size, stretching will cause deformity and reduction in performance of the sail beginning at about 5 years. I believe laminates are not for cruising boats. Most sailcloth manufacturers will tell you to expect delamination in 5 years or less.

I recommend that you consider the 3 qualities of sails offered by Incidence Sails (Amel OEM Sailmaker). I negotiated an 18% discount when you order a full set, or 15% when ordering less than a full set. The prices in the following brochure are before the above discounts. Reduce the prices in the brochure by the appropriate discount. Each quality in this brochure is worthwhile, but do not expect the beginning quality to perform as long as the best quality.


If owners of other Amel models are interested in the Incidence Sail information:


Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Mon, Dec 6, 2021 at 9:14 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
Hello David,

My sails are North Sails 3Di Nordam.  A bit more expensive than others but looking and performing great at the 2 year mark.

Whatever your choice other than a “fabricated” sail, I can certify that I’ll pass you with a considerable rate of overtake :-)


Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM007, Opua NZ




> On 7 Dec 2021, at 15:58, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
>
> Greetings all,
>
> After 5 years and ~25,000nm, our sails are starting to show their age, and so we are now scoping replacements.  Mainly UV-damage to the leech area of the main and mizzen, the main- and mizzen-sails that were on the boat at purchase had no UV-protection.  Which (we have discovered) is an oversight that we should have recognised and had corrected early on, especially once we started sailing full-time in the tropics (where we have now been continuously for >4 years).  Being tri-radial cut, it is not so easy to re-cut the sail/s to eliminate the compromised fabric, which is a shame because, apart from the outer 30cm, the remaining fabric is still sound.
>
> We will be continuing to cruise in the tropics for the foreseeable future.  Meaning, that laminates are out of consideration.
> Explanation: we have seen too many cruisers (and heard even more stories) of those paying for expensive state-of-the-art so-called "cruising laminates", only to have them start to de-laminate after only a season or two.  The cause, seen more often in the tropics, seems to be that the laminating manufacturing process used to sandwich the various fabrics together, uses heat to melt and/or cure the glue, and the temperatures used are deliberately kept low in order to protect the fabric from thermal damage during manufacture, being only slightly higher than 100ºC.   The in-mast temperatures reached when sails are furled, especially in the tropics, approaches or exceeds this temperature.  The situation is, reportedly, worse with in-mast furling systems (as opposed to slab-reefing).  This is as explained by several long-term cruising sailors with vastly more experience than us.  It makes sense, and aligns with what we have seen over the past few years.  Conclusion: no laminates for us.
>
> Which leaves us with more conventional dacron-based woven sail-cloth, including hybrids that utilise high-modulus fibers such as "Ultra-PE" (Ultra-Polyethylene, such as Spectra or Dyneema yarns), which is introduced in order to improve strength and shape stability - once such sailcloth being HydraNet.  I have heard that HydraNet starts to lose it's dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy.  Which creates problems firstly for sail performance, and then also for in-mast furling systems.  Which leads me to ...
>
> QUESTION 1:
> Does anyone have experience with Hydranet sails beyond 5-7 years?  The use-case here being full-time live-aboard cruising, meaning, permanently rigged (not removed for the off season, nor on-anchor, as we have to ready to sail-away at a moments notice; and we generally avoid marinas, so the sails are on 365 days a year); mileage: 3,000 to 5,000nm a year, all-weather blue-water passage-making in the topical (hotter) and mid-latitudes (greater likelihood of encountering stronger than gale-force).
>
> ===
> Next, the cut of the sail ::: traditional best practice within the AMEL community is to use a TRI-RADIAL cut - in addition to aligning the high-modulus fibres to the load (mainly vertically, roughly parallel to the leech, radiating from the head, tack and clew), this allows the use of differing weight fabric around the sail - heavier at the foot and leech where there are greater loads for fully-unfurled conditions, and needing to bear a greater load in stronger wind-condition when the sail is partially furled; and lighter sailcloth in the luff areas, less loading under fully unfurled conditions, and less likely to be exposed to high winds (because it should furled away) that would permanently deform a lighter fabric.  But not easy to re-cut.  Meaning that once a sail is 'blown' and starts to deform, or suffers UV-degradation along the leech, it largely becomes a throw-away item.  (Proper UV protection in the first place would avoid this, either the paint-on solutions or extra covering such as an extra layer of sailcloth, or Sunbrella or, perhaps preferentially, the lighter WeatherMax.)  But the outcome is the same, once UV damaged such that the strength of the outer sailcloth is degraded, even if the rest of the sail-cloth is sound, there is not much that can be done. 
>
> So, I have now questions about useful life of Tri-Radial HydraNet sails - especially if/as it starts to age, and becomes soft &/or baggy, thereby potentially introducing problems with our in-mast furlers. As a consequence of which I am now starting to look at other contemporary alternatives.
>
> Sail construction --> CROSS-CUT.  Normally, due to the conventional 'best practice' within the AMEL community, I would not consider this.  But there are advantages, it would seem, with cross-cut sails with respect to the 'furl-ability' of the sail.  Specifically, because the nearly horizontal seams spiral up the mast as the sail is furled, and hence do not overlap during furling (as is the case for a tri-radial cut sail), cross-cut sails can accommodate a heavier cloth within a given mast profile.  However, cross-cut sails do not have the advantage of being able to use heavier cloth in areas of greater load, as is the case for tri-radials - each cross-cut fore-to-aft panel uses the same-weight sail-cloth.  Offset against the use of a heavier cloth across all the sail.
>
> Type of fabric: "Nautosphere VOYAGER" is a fabric we have just heard of.  It is a hybrid fabric (that is, dacron base incorporating high-modulus yarn, in this case, dyneema).  Downside, it is not suitable for tri-radial construction - only for cross-cut.  It's claim to fame is that the dyneema threads are woven across the bolt of fabric (that is, along the weft), meaning that the strength and dimensional stability of a cross-cut sail built using this fabric will be roughly vertical - that is, approximately parallel to the leech, which is in alignment with the primary load lines.  A cross-cut sail made of this fabric can be made of heavier cloth (due to the better furl-ability), meaning greater strength initially and, all other things being equal, greater longevity.  And, being a simple cross-cut, simpler construction with a lesser number of panels (and seams, than tri-radial), meaning reduced labour cost.  In addition, UV damage at the leech can be more easily re-cut out.  Which leads me to ...
>
> QUESTION 2:
> Does anyone have experience in cross-cut sails for the main &/or mizzen for the in-mast furling AMELs, and especially the Super Maramu.
>
> QUESTION 3:
> Does anyone have experience with, or knowledge of, "Nautosphere VOYAGER" fabric?
>
> Thank you, in anticipation, for your shared insights and knowledge.
>
> David
> SM#396, Perigee
> On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
> Whangarei, New Zealand
>
>
>
>
>







Re: Onan Kubota generator circa 1999

Slavko Despotovic
 

Hi,

here what is on my Amel SM 279. I hope this helps.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Croatia


Re: Onan Kubota generator circa 1999

Kevin Smith
 


Just a thought

Try running the generator with out the air filter and look at the color of the smoke ....

Kevin


eom


Re: Onan Kubota generator circa 1999

Slavko Despotovic
 

Hi Mike,

I am going to the boat today so I can check the engine model number. I am attaching the front plate od my generator. As far the manual it is three cylinder  engine. 
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279 Bonne Anse in Croatia


Re: Bowthruster - hex-nut securing he motor to down-tube is stripped out

Dominique Sery
 

Hello David,

I had a similar problem. I used a Torx bit (slightly larger size) inserted with force with a hammer.
I then used a ratchet wrench and the recalcitrant screw came.
I don't know if this would work for you but it did for me.

Sincerely
Dominique
A54#16 Irko
Ashore, Kilada, Greece


Re: Onan Kubota generator circa 1999

Robert Thomson
 

I have similar problem. Did you ever resolve it?
--
Bob Thomson
SY Memo
2001 Amel SM2000
Ser No 326


Re: Frigiboat spare condenser fans

 

It is a 12 volt fan. The fan output from the Danfoss compressor controller is 12v. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Mon, Dec 6, 2021, 19:52 Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Isn’t the fan a 220 volt fan?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Mark McGovern
Sent: Monday, December 06, 2021 7:07 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Frigiboat spare condenser fans

 

Kevin,

Michael from Ripple posted about where he got some quieter fans in this post here:

https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/message/60862

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Annapolis, MD USA


Re: Bowthruster - workarounds for leaking outer compression seals

David Vogel
 

Hi Colin,

Nice to hear for you, and good to see you’re still active on the forum.

Thanks for that tip. Wish we’d known about that, as we started taking water through the bow-thruster seal on the passage Tahiti – Fiji in a 30G45 type night with largish and very confused seas. The problem with the Bowthruster seals was not totally unexpected, but the quantity of water was alarming at the worst of it. And then it didn’t stop when we regained less challenging conditions.

Our temporary solution, that is still in use, is to remove the metal pin, and then manually re-tension the lifting stainless steel wire with a short piece of line from the lifting wire and tied off to the wooden cross-member at the aft (open) end of the Bowthruster compartment. This lifts the BT motor by about 1cm, which re-compresses the external seals and, voila, problem solved, at least for the time being. But I like your idea too. Please clarify. Is the whole rubber strip wrapped around the 60mm tube, down at the bottom where it passes through the hull (next to the neoprene seal that gets squeezed when the Bowthruster is in the down position)?

Point for future reference: we have been out there and doing it for 4 almost years since our last bow-thruster service. Yes, we should have done it when we last hauled out, but it was well less than 2 years since the previous bow-thruster service at that time, and all appeared to be perfect so back then it was a case of “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. But then, COVID put a year’s dent in the maintenance schedule …

… anyway, I have recently read somewhere else but, to re-iterate, when-ever at anchor (in smooth waters) or especially in the marina, it may pay to “pull the pin” and ease the bow-thruster down a centimetre or two, to take the pressure off the neoprene seals. Leaving the Bowthruster up-and-locked and the seals compressed for extended periods no doubt contributed to the water ingress that we experienced.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, New Zealand


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Colin - ex SV Island Pearl <colin.d.streeter@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, 7 December 2021 at 4:01 pm
To: <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bowthruster - hex-nut securing he motor to down-tube is stripped out

Hi David

Nice to see you guys are slowly progressing closer to home. Congrats on your trip so far since we last shared drinks together on Island Pearl in Panama. We look forward to seeing you guys back in Brisbane someday.

I do not have a solution for your problem, so best wait for the smarter engineer folks to wake up in Europe & the USA with good answers to this, which I am sure will not be too hard.

The reason for this note is a suggestion ..... Go down to a local bicycle shop near you and purchase a new rubber inner tube for a large and as broad as a possible bicycle wheel. Take this, cut it across to make a long tube, then cut a slit all the way up through it to form a new long, broad single layer of rubber. Always keep this on board to wrap tightly around the base of your thruster if ever you see any leaks there in the future. It works perfectly and even with a badly damaged seal if that occurs at anytime whilst out cruising. In such an emergency it will keep every drop of water out! 

We did this in the Indian Ocean after replacing our bow thruster in the Maldives. At the time we did this in-water, and Amel sent a complete new bow thruster out from France but did not send us a new top rubber ring (the one inside the boat) and hence, although we never ever got water in there at any other time ever, between Chagos and Rodrigues we had huge 6m seas and winds and extreme conditions and en route found about 1 liter per day of seawater getting into the front bilge on that trip. All I could come up with in Rodrigues was this primitive bicycle-type solution, but it worked a treat, and we never had another single drop of seawater till reaching Durban where we were able to lift the boat for all her two-year maintenance, including replacing that all-important top seal. In fact, this system worked so well that it became my standard practice for us to wrap it around that base area of our bow thruster just after leaving the harbor on each and every ocean crossing thereafter "just in case"!  Of course, for all local, Caribbean, and Pacific Country cruising we never put it on, but for long crossings, it was a wonderful comfort to have handy.

Best regards to you both
Colin 
ex Island Pearl II
Brisbane

On Tue, Dec 7, 2021 at 11:10 AM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Greetings fellow Amelians,

Requesting help with a 'small' problem.  After an extended service interval (>3-years since last service of the Bowthuster by AMEL MQ, the unwanted delay due to cruising French Polynesia in COVID times, closed borders, and so on), we're now securely in NZ, primarily for the purposes of attending to long-overdue rounds of routine maintenance - including as a high priority the Bowthruster and C-Drive.

Three of the four 6mm hex-bolts that secure the bowthruster motor to the fiberglass (?) torque-tube have been removed without undue problems - desite some rust clearly evident (due I think to the aging neoprene compression seals) with just the regular tightness as expected, but overcome with normal force of a 15cm shifter (no heat or penetrating oil needed).

Unfortunately, the fourth bolt - the starboard-hand one oriented forward - was found to be almost completely stripped, and the limited attempt to shift it finished the job.   It now presents a round hole, which provides no ability to use an Allen key (either 6mm, or the next size up in imperial) to gain the necessary purchase.  The forward-facing location presents  challenges in terms of access needed to drill and tap in an "Easy Out".  Without drilling, the easy-out can not be inserted far enough to gain any useful purchase.  I have applied heat (MAP//Pro torch) as close as possible to the nut head.  I am also soaking the joint (and the whole motor-tube interface area) with PB Blaster (now also anticipating problems with dropping the tube away from the motor assembly).

Has anyone faced this problem with a rounded hex-bolt before, and found a solution?

Or are there any other tips and trick, hints or suggestions?

Thanking you in anticipation, and with kind regards,

David
SM#396, Perigee
On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
Whangarei, New Zealand







--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445

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