Date   

Re: Suction valve on the sea chest and the vetus muffler

 

Danny,
  1. Turn off the sea chest valve.
  2. Operate anything like a saltwater electric toilet, or AC
  3. The alarm should sound within 5-10 seconds.
If the alarm doesn't sound, remove the switch, pipe, and hose and check for clogs. Clean everything and reinstall. Through trial and error adjust the sensitivity.



Maybe you missed what I posted earlier:
image.png


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sun, Dec 12, 2021 at 1:35 PM Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:
Hi Kevin, I would be interested as to how you tested the vacuum sensor
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl 
On 12/12/2021 04:47 Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:


Eric,

just curious if you ever solved this Sea Chest vacuum sensor problem?  Mine isn’t working and I was going to email Maude for a price on a new sensor.  Did you ever get it to work properly or did you end up installing a totally different sensor and system?  I was hoping to avoid spending $ on a new sensor if it’s problematic to begin with….

any advice is appreciated.
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Re: Amel - made Genoa Furler Bronze Spur Gear

 

Hanspeter,

Thanks for your email and your offer. I know the Swiss guy is 80 and not doing this anymore, but he has some parts inventory from when he was making this furler for Amel. I have had dozens of email discussions with him over the past several years.

I do not need your old Spur gear. Another SM owner is loaning us a complete overhaul kit supplied by Amel. We are attempting to find a quality and reliable machine shop to duplicate the original Spur and ship it to Amel owners when they order it from him.

I will let everyone know sometime next year when the details are worked out.
Bill



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sun, Dec 12, 2021 at 12:01 PM hanspeter baettig <hanspeter.baettig@...> wrote:
Hi Bill
Its Hanspeter, Tamango 2; Nr.16
The Swiss Guy you mentioned is not doing anymore this Spur Gear. He is more then 80 Years old. I got the last Spur Gear Amel had in stock from Albin in Martinique, last Year.
My old one was a littel worn out, but still functioned after 29 Years of lots of sailing . 4 times Atlantic crossing. 
So What should I do ?
Send the old one to you to Texas ?
Pls advice.
I’m until January in Santa Marta, Columbia
You have I think still my email
Best regards
Hanspeter
SM 16, Tamango 2

Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 08.12.2021 um 17:03 schrieb CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>:


I have recently given out the contact information of the Swiss guy who owned the machine shop that made the genoa furler for Amel. Apparently, he has gotten greedy and is quoting outrageous prices for spare parts. I need to borrow the bronze Spur Gear from someone to see if we can reverse engineer it. All SM owners are going to need this Spur Gear, especially if they have not added the ability to add grease to the genoa furler. Email me at brouse@...


<image.png>


<image.png>

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


Re: SM Batteries

 

Kent, Doesn't this explain the furling and outhaul motors not working properly?

Batteries are like anchors, there are lots of opinions and most opinions are based on limited comparative experience.

This is what I tell my clients and it is totally my opinion:
The best house battery buy is the basic DEKA Marine Master Deep Cycle DC31DT battery which will last 2 years, maybe 3. At $107 each (Lowes in the US) it seems like a bargain regardless of which battery you compare it to. Sure there are better batteries that will last longer, but none will cost you less per month. There are so many disappointments that have been reported by Amel owners, it is hard to choose something else. But when you buy these DEKAs and they fail in 2 years, remember that was the expectation. 

And don't forget about the DEKA 12-Volt 1000-Amp Marine Start Battery.

This is what 8 DC31DT batteries and 1 DEKA 12-Volt 1000-Amp Marine Start Battery will cost you at Lowes. 

Don't forget to check the water in these batteries. They will not last if you allow them to charge and discharge with low water.

67774066-f4dd-4bf7-9da3-bba60d865215.png




CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sun, Dec 12, 2021 at 11:36 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here I am again, singing the same tune...
In 2018 I bought 8 Crown "deep cycle" group 31s. They were great for about a year, then slowly began to deteriorate.  With 520 AHr and fully solar charged by early afternoon, when new I was waking up to 25.4-25.6v after about 50AHr use overnight.  This slowly deteriorated until I was running the generator before bed to avoid dropping voltage below 24.7.  I nursed them along until July 21 and bought 8 NAPA (Penn)105 AHr group 31s.  They have already failed, after working great initially, in just 5 months.

I charge at 28.5v Abs, 27v Float, and equalize at 31v (on recommendation of Crown engineer).  I have a 105A Magnum  charger/inverter, and 850W solar in 3 pairs, each pair with it's own Victron MPPP controller, and a 60 A alternator using a Balmar external regulator.

My first 3 sets of similar hybrid batteries didn't start to deteriorate until they were 30-36 months old.  This started after I installed solar.  Watching the voltages and solar output closely shows them acting as they are set to act.  Measuring amperage at the primary 25v cable from battery studs to switch, I don't find any excess current flowing with switches on or off.  All batteries measure within 0.1v after disconnecting for 6 hours. All cells have SG 1.019 +/- .001, which does not improve after 6 hrs equalizing at 31v.  All read within .2v of each other after load testing, which shows them barely in the "fair" range.  It doesn't seem to be a matter of one bad battery or cell, or unequal charging...they are all deteriorating at the same rate.

Soooo...
I need new batteries again, and am thinking about AGM golf cart batteries.  So far they are all 11.5" height, and my very early SM2000 has only 10.5" battery box height. I'm also only able to install 8+1 group31 batteries, limiting my total AHr capacity.

I'd like to make the switch to LiFePO4, but insurance is proving to be a problem.  I had hoped by the time my current batteries failed I'd be able to find insurance...alas, they've gone belly up after only a few months.

I'd love to hear any thoughts about my current ( no pun intended) problem, 6v AGMs that will fit my space, Lithium conversion insurance availability (I'm US flagged, but could register elsewhere, I guess). 
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Suction valve on the sea chest and the vetus muffler

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Kevin, I would be interested as to how you tested the vacuum sensor
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl 

On 12/12/2021 04:47 Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:


Eric,

just curious if you ever solved this Sea Chest vacuum sensor problem?  Mine isn’t working and I was going to email Maude for a price on a new sensor.  Did you ever get it to work properly or did you end up installing a totally different sensor and system?  I was hoping to avoid spending $ on a new sensor if it’s problematic to begin with….

any advice is appreciated.
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Re: Amel - made Genoa Furler Bronze Spur Gear

hanspeter baettig
 

Hi Bill
Its Hanspeter, Tamango 2; Nr.16
The Swiss Guy you mentioned is not doing anymore this Spur Gear. He is more then 80 Years old. I got the last Spur Gear Amel had in stock from Albin in Martinique, last Year.
My old one was a littel worn out, but still functioned after 29 Years of lots of sailing . 4 times Atlantic crossing. 
So What should I do ?
Send the old one to you to Texas ?
Pls advice.
I’m until January in Santa Marta, Columbia
You have I think still my email
Best regards
Hanspeter
SM 16, Tamango 2

Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 08.12.2021 um 17:03 schrieb CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>:


I have recently given out the contact information of the Swiss guy who owned the machine shop that made the genoa furler for Amel. Apparently, he has gotten greedy and is quoting outrageous prices for spare parts. I need to borrow the bronze Spur Gear from someone to see if we can reverse engineer it. All SM owners are going to need this Spur Gear, especially if they have not added the ability to add grease to the genoa furler. Email me at brouse@...


<image.png>


<image.png>

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


Re: SM Batteries

karkauai
 

Here I am again, singing the same tune...
In 2018 I bought 8 Crown "deep cycle" group 31s. They were great for about a year, then slowly began to deteriorate.  With 520 AHr and fully solar charged by early afternoon, when new I was waking up to 25.4-25.6v after about 50AHr use overnight.  This slowly deteriorated until I was running the generator before bed to avoid dropping voltage below 24.7.  I nursed them along until July 21 and bought 8 NAPA (Penn)105 AHr group 31s.  They have already failed, after working great initially, in just 5 months.

I charge at 28.5v Abs, 27v Float, and equalize at 31v (on recommendation of Crown engineer).  I have a 105A Magnum  charger/inverter, and 850W solar in 3 pairs, each pair with it's own Victron MPPP controller, and a 60 A alternator using a Balmar external regulator.

My first 3 sets of similar hybrid batteries didn't start to deteriorate until they were 30-36 months old.  This started after I installed solar.  Watching the voltages and solar output closely shows them acting as they are set to act.  Measuring amperage at the primary 25v cable from battery studs to switch, I don't find any excess current flowing with switches on or off.  All batteries measure within 0.1v after disconnecting for 6 hours. All cells have SG 1.019 +/- .001, which does not improve after 6 hrs equalizing at 31v.  All read within .2v of each other after load testing, which shows them barely in the "fair" range.  It doesn't seem to be a matter of one bad battery or cell, or unequal charging...they are all deteriorating at the same rate.

Soooo...
I need new batteries again, and am thinking about AGM golf cart batteries.  So far they are all 11.5" height, and my very early SM2000 has only 10.5" battery box height. I'm also only able to install 8+1 group31 batteries, limiting my total AHr capacity.

I'd like to make the switch to LiFePO4, but insurance is proving to be a problem.  I had hoped by the time my current batteries failed I'd be able to find insurance...alas, they've gone belly up after only a few months.

I'd love to hear any thoughts about my current ( no pun intended) problem, 6v AGMs that will fit my space, Lithium conversion insurance availability (I'm US flagged, but could register elsewhere, I guess). 
--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Amel - made Genoa Furler Bronze Spur Gear

 

Our goals are:
  1. To document and confirm the size of the Spur gear and document the other parts included in the Amel-sourced rebuild kit
  2. To find a machine shop that can:
    1. Duplicate the Bronze Spur Gear
    2. Sell & Ship the Spur Gear to Amel owners when ordered
At this time I am not sure that the steel worm gear was included in the kit, and I am not sure that the worm is needed in the kit because all of the worn parts I have seen are limited to bearings and the Spur Gear. I believe most of the other parts included in the Amel-sourced rebuild kit can be sourced by an Amel owner at various places local to the owner.
image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sun, Dec 12, 2021 at 10:08 AM Craig Briggs <sangaris68@...> wrote:
Bill,
That sounds great - thanks for coordinating.
My understanding is the SM and SN furlers were identical except for 24v vs 12v motors. Can you (or others) confirm that?
Many thanks,
Craig Briggs - s/v Sangaris / SN68  Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: Amel - made Genoa Furler Bronze Spur Gear

Craig Briggs
 

Bill,
That sounds great - thanks for coordinating.
My understanding is the SM and SN furlers were identical except for 24v vs 12v motors. Can you (or others) confirm that?
Many thanks,
Craig Briggs - s/v Sangaris / SN68  Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: Santorin helm seat support pipe loose

Craig Briggs
 

Wow - many thanks, Ian!
On my SN the support post is just a single length of pipe with no holes or bolts at the bottom. It just goes straight into the pyramid grp base.
I think our SN's are similar vintage, so it's possible a former owner of your boat may have cut the original post and added the two-piece "sleeve" over it and the two bottom bolts. Hard to tell from the picture, but it looks like there's a smaller diameter post showing at the bottom, which may be the original Amel one-piece post.
I haven't yet tackled tightening this from the bottom, but the sleeve would be a much easier solution to making the height adjustable, rather than replacing the entire post, as I initially had been thinking. Appreciate your pics.
--
Craig Briggs - s/v Sangaris / SN68  Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: Amel - made Genoa Furler Bronze Spur Gear

 

A member of this Group and SM owner is loaning us a new and never-used SM Genoa repair kit that was once offered by Amel. 2 other SM owners have volunteered to get the Spur Gear duplicated at a machine shop that will be able to accept orders and ship them as needed. I will post the information and contact information in a new thread.

Every SM owner should consider purchasing the bronze Spur Gear for the SM Genoa. When the current gear wears out, one of the other options will be to replace the Genoa Furler completely with one made by FACNOR at a cost of about 10.000 euro. 

--
 
Best,
 
CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: Understanding breakers

Patrick McAneny
 

Nick,Brent&Mark, I appreciate you all taking time to give such a detailed explanation of the charging system.  I implied that I didn’t understand but I did understand that only 220 was coming in thus out of the breaker, and I have a basic understanding of breakers.My confusion was that I did not know ,if the 220 came directly from the genset via a relay connected to the breaker.
The heater breaker has in the pass also tripped when two heaters were on. So it could be a case of two old breakers. I did see some corrosion on the terminals at the charger, I will clean that today.
last night we discovered that the water heater is not heating ,now I probably need a new element. I don’t think I am leaving anytime real soon.
Thanks again all,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


Re: Santorin helm seat support pipe loose

Ian Park
 

Craig, 
Don’t know if other Santorin seat posts are like mine, but here is photo. 



The second bolt at the base of the post was put there by me. There was a slight lateral wobble, so I added another bolt. The other single bolt hole had elongated. 

Ian


On 4 Nov 2021, at 13:38, Craig Briggs via groups.io <sangaris@...> wrote:

Thanks Ian and Bernd ! 
Ian - is there a locking device to stop the swivel?  Can you remove the seat from the insert just by picking it up?
 Also, does your padded seat back slip over the original fiberglass one? Good idea.
--
Craig - SN68 Sangaris


Aft hatch wind scoop

Ian Townsend
 
Edited

AFT HATCH WIND SCOOP. Does anyone have a recommendation for a wind scoop type product that works effectively with the angled aft hatch of an SM? We tried the traditional wind scoop but it really doesn't fit properly. I think it requires something with a frame or support. 


Ian
SM153
Loca Lola II


Re: Understanding breakers

Roque
 

On Sat, Dec 11, 2021 at 11:12 AM, Patrick McAneny wrote:

IHi Pat.

About your questions:

Please explain the function of the breaker, I am uncertain about what it is powering..”

Simply put, it cuts the 220v connection to the charger. Not much unlike when you turn a light switch off in a house. It “unplugs” your charger from power source. There is no need for a relay or anything else.

As you know, they can be turned on and off manually, but they also pop automatically when something is wrong: a defective breaker or a problem elsewhere.

The fact that you used the heater breaker and it also popped, would suggest a problem elsewhere. Of course, you could have two defective breakers at the same time, but I think the heater would have made it pop too.  

“If I had a problem with the charger, would it not be constant and pop the breakers immediately?”

Not always, it depends on the kind of problem and at what point the current becomes greater than 25A for long enough.

“It is only 25A and the charger is putting out 75A so the current to the battery does not flow thru it”

For your purpose here, think of “one side” of the charger gets 220v. The “other side” of the charger provides 24 to the batteries. They don’t mix.  The breaker is on the “220 side”.

Basically, your charger puts 75A at 24v (huge cables). This means 1800 watts (75 x 24). Now, to “get” those same 1800watts from the 220 volts source, the current will be only around 8A at the “220v side” (8 x 220) Hence the smaller cables.

The numbers are not technically precise, because you have losses, peaks, etc. But the general idea is that.

 

Hope it helps
Roque
Attika A54 117
Paraty - Brazil


Re: Understanding breakers

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

Pat,

I will try to respond directly to your post with your parts in BOLD:

I have posted that I have a couple of breakers that pop. The charger is what most concerns me,it ran for ten minutes this morning then popped off. I switched it over to the heater breaker also 25A and it popped after a few minutes,but now is fine for the last 20 minutes. Both breakers are 20 years old and could be weak. If I had a problem with the charger , would it not be constant and pop the breakers immediately.? 

If you had a short in the circuit supplying power to the charger it would trip the breaker almost immediately.  However, if the Diruptor 25 amp circuit breaker is a thermal breaker (and I believe that they are) and the amount of current through the breaker was only a small amount over the rating (say 30 amps) than it would take time for the heat to build up in the bimetallic strip inside the breaker and cause it to trip.  Other and more likely things besides higher than rated current flow can cause overheating and delayed tripping of a thermal breaker, mainly corrosion or a loose connection in the circuit

What does the breaker exactly do? 

As Brett's post explained, the breaker is designed to protect the wires in the circuit in the event that on overcurrent situation arises.  It essentially prevents electrical fires from starting.  A good explanation of typical circuit breakers can be found here:  https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/circuit-breaker.htm

It is only 25A and the charger is putting out 75A so the current to the battery does not flow thru it.

Correct.  The 25 Amp breaker is in the circuit that is providing 220 volts of AC power to the Charger.  It is NOT in the circuit that goes FROM the Charger TO the batteries.

Does it close a relay between the genset and the charger? 

No.  It is directly wired to the battery charger.  There is nothing in between it and the battery charger except for wires.  

The only "connection" to the Genset happens BEFORE the main AC power panel.  The main AC power Panel is powered by EITHER the Genset OR Shore Power.  The flow of 220 volt AC power goes something like this:  Genset OR Shore Power -->  40 AMP RCD Breaker  -->  Main AC Power Panel  --> 25 Amp Circuit Breaker for 100 Amp Battery Charger  -->  100 Amp Battery Charger

But why would that be 25A?

The 25 Amp breaker on the AC Panel is operating at a nominal 220 volts.  The circuit provides 220 volts of AC power to the Charger.  The circuit breaker allows UP TO 25 Amps to flow through the circuit.  It might be easier to think of Power in Watts especially when dealing with both AC and DC circuits.  Watts = Volts x Amps.  So the AC circuit powering the battery charger can handle 220 Volts x 25 Amps = 5500 Watts.
 
The Battery Charger converts the 220 volts AC to nominal 24 volts DC.  It outputs a nominal 24 volts UP TO 100 Amps.  So the maximum wattage is 24 Volts x 100 Amps = 2400 Watts.  This is significantly lower than the maximum of 5500 watts of power supplied which makes sense. 

Note that the circuit providing 24v power to the batteries is a completely different circuit than the AC circuit that provide power to the Battery Charger.

I am thinking that I could get another 25A 220v breaker from a hardware store and substitute it and if it doesn’t pop ,then it confirms I have a bad breaker. I will contact Maude,but we want to leave Fla. for Bahamas before we would get it, if she even has one. The charger has now ran for 45 minutes no problem. Please explain the function of the breaker, I am uncertain about what it is powering..

The fact that two different breakers trip in a similar manner makes it unlikely that you have a faulty circuit breaker.  This is not 100% certain given that both breakers are 20 years old, but the chances of both breakers failing in the same manner at the same time is pretty small.  Given that it took some time for the breaker to open rather than tripping almost immediately, means it is NOT a massive overcurrent like a short circuit.  The most likely cause of a breaker tripping like this in a marine environment is either corrosion on the wire terminals or a loose connection at one or more of the terminals.  Corrosion or a loose connection will both cause heat to build up in the connection and eventually in the thermal circuit breaker itself causing it to trip.

You may have inadvertently fixed the original cause of the problem when you swapped out the breaker either by fixing the loose connection or mechanically removing some corrosion on the wires.  However, I would also take a look at the connections of the 220v wire inside the battery charger just to be sure.

I hope that this helps.  "Real life" electrical engineers or electricians here feel free to correct any mistakes in my understanding or explanation.

Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Brunswick, GA USA


Re: Anchor Windlass leak/short?

Dan Carlson
 

Thanks Bill, Giovanni, Jean-Pierre, Thomas,

The comments were all helpful and what it crystalized for me is that my hunch is that there potentially is more than just the foot switch going on and I want to trouble shoot it more thoroughly before just applying a band-aide. 

And of course with all intermittent problems, when I set about to try to test a few things this morning (after we had plenty of rain last night and yesterday's sail had out lots of salt spray on the deck) there were no sparks when operating the Windlass!  

But now I will be prepared for next time to check a few things out.  


Thanks and regards Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387



On Fri, Dec 10, 2021, 4:37 PM Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:
Hey Dan- you are speculating on if there is a foot switch leak but that is knowable. Just open the windlass, inspect the switches and connections, and replace the gasket, which you can make yourself.

You should carry spares of the rubber foot switches and covers but if you dont they can be found online. As you are no doubt aware, they were an Amel modification for the Tigres.

Tom and Kirstin
SM2K 422
Tahiti


Re: Understanding breakers

Brent Cameron
 

Just as Nick says….  The 75A is coming from the DC output side of the charger while the 25A breaker on the 220V AC side of the charger is what is powering it.  75A at 24 V (DC) is 1800 Watts so as Nick says, your 220 V (AC) should be supplying something more than that but certainly not the 5,500 Watts that COULD be supplied by your circuit with a 25A breaker at 220V.   The charger will be using rectifiers, diodes, fans, etc which all consume power to convert the 220VAC to 24VDC but nothing like the full 25A on your breaker.  The ammeter will show you WHERE the power is being consumed so (or if your breaker is simply tripping at only say 10A instead of at the 25A it should be at.   

If you put it around ONE of the AC leads going to or from that breaker in behind your 220VAC panel, it will show you the amps being consumed on that circuit.  It shouldn’t be anything like 25A (Nick’s right that it should be close to 10A worst case). If its 10A or so, then you have a faulty breaker.  If it is at or above 25A, there could be something wrong with your charger, or perhaps something else that got connected to that circuit or even a short circuit on the wiring on the other side of the breaker (a leak to ground by a corroded connection, etc.).  You could test out whether it is the charger or not by unplugging it and plugging in some other 220V device (say a toaster or a coffee pot) with a known consumption (such as 1500W). Divide that known consumption by 220V and you will see how many amps it SHOULD be drawing (7A in the case of 1500W) and if it is that then you know it is likely the charger.  If it’s something more than that, you’ll have do do some tracing of the wires to the charger and ground to see where the problem lies.  The nice thing about those clamp on ammeters is that they don’t require you to disconnect any wires or subject yourself to any danger as long as you stay away from touching bare wires or terminal connections.  

Brent

On Dec 11, 2021, 12:08 PM -0500, Nick Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington@...>, wrote:
Pat,

It is really simple. The 25A breaker is on the AC panel. The battery charger is powered with 220v AC. It converts the AC to DC and charges the batteries with DC.  Typically 70A  DC output from the charger will demand about say 10A AC at 220v from the generator or shore power….there will be some inefficiency in the form of heat and fans etc. If it were 100% efficient 70A at 25v is 1750 Watts, to produce 1750w the charger will need 1750 divided by 220v which is 7.95A…but it is not 100% efficient so. Allow a bit of heat and waste call it 10A. To charge the batteries at 70A the charger will need about 10A 220v AC ...

 The breaker is set at 25A in case there is some kind of short or other problem it will trip. If it trips at 10A then it is faulty as it should only trip at 25A. 

You must not mix up the AC and DC in your mind. They are completely separate.

Kind regards

Nick

S/Y Amelia 
Amel 54-019

Leros

On 11 Dec 2021, at 16:12, Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32@...> wrote:

Brent, I am a little confused,my normal state of mind. I know that it is a 220v 25 A breaker, yet if I understand you ,75a 24v is passing thru it ? I have a 100 A charger ,but the victory typically shows 70A going to the battery.The charger has two heavy gauge wires coming out of it that I now assume is the supply from the genset.The wire from the breaker seems undersized to carry 75 amps even at 24v ,that is why I thought maybe it closed a relay. I will try to purchase that amp meter ,Thanks for your detailed post.
Pat
Shenanigans


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Suction valve on the sea chest and the vetus muffler

 

Kevin,

Here is a snippet from page 373 of the Amel Book:

image.png


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sat, Dec 11, 2021 at 9:47 AM Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:
Eric,

just curious if you ever solved this Sea Chest vacuum sensor problem?  Mine isn’t working and I was going to email Maude for a price on a new sensor.  Did you ever get it to work properly or did you end up installing a totally different sensor and system?  I was hoping to avoid spending $ on a new sensor if it’s problematic to begin with….

any advice is appreciated.
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Re: Understanding breakers

Nick Newington
 

Pat,

It is really simple. The 25A breaker is on the AC panel. The battery charger is powered with 220v AC. It converts the AC to DC and charges the batteries with DC.  Typically 70A  DC output from the charger will demand about say 10A AC at 220v from the generator or shore power….there will be some inefficiency in the form of heat and fans etc. If it were 100% efficient 70A at 25v is 1750 Watts, to produce 1750w the charger will need 1750 divided by 220v which is 7.95A…but it is not 100% efficient so. Allow a bit of heat and waste call it 10A. To charge the batteries at 70A the charger will need about 10A 220v AC ...

 The breaker is set at 25A in case there is some kind of short or other problem it will trip. If it trips at 10A then it is faulty as it should only trip at 25A. 

You must not mix up the AC and DC in your mind. They are completely separate.

Kind regards

Nick

S/Y Amelia 
Amel 54-019

Leros

On 11 Dec 2021, at 16:12, Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32@...> wrote:

Brent, I am a little confused,my normal state of mind. I know that it is a 220v 25 A breaker, yet if I understand you ,75a 24v is passing thru it ? I have a 100 A charger ,but the victory typically shows 70A going to the battery.The charger has two heavy gauge wires coming out of it that I now assume is the supply from the genset.The wire from the breaker seems undersized to carry 75 amps even at 24v ,that is why I thought maybe it closed a relay. I will try to purchase that amp meter ,Thanks for your detailed post.
Pat
Shenanigans


Re: Understanding breakers

Patrick McAneny
 

Brent, I am a little confused,my normal state of mind. I know that it is a 220v 25 A breaker, yet if I understand you ,75a 24v is passing thru it ? I have a 100 A charger ,but the victory typically shows 70A going to the battery.The charger has two heavy gauge wires coming out of it that I now assume is the supply from the genset.The wire from the breaker seems undersized to carry 75 amps even at 24v ,that is why I thought maybe it closed a relay. I will try to purchase that amp meter ,Thanks for your detailed post.
Pat
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