Date   

Re: Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

karkauai
 

Paolo, yes, you do need chafe protection for the genoa sheet.  I would put a piece of PVC pipe and/or bamboo over the shroud, or permanently attach chafing gear to the sheet.
Kent

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


C drive transmission failure

Ira and Roman Morozov
 

We changed Volvo engine to Yanmar 4JH4 -TE 2 years ago.  We have not changed the transmission. Recently the transmission broke, we suppose that this happened because we have not done maintenance for a long time.

1. We found a gear failure in the first part of the transmission.  Picture below. Can you please tell me if anyone had the same problem?

2. We also want to evaluate the condition of the transmission in the second part.  How can we do that?  If we need to open it, how to do it? Pictures below.

Roman and Ira Morozov SM2000 #320 Ginger


Re: Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

David Vogel
 

Excellent - I see about 15 hours, 8 on the boat, and 7 in the workshop. This seems about right to my untrained eye (and experience to date). Thanks JB.

From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of JB Duler <jbduler@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, 20 January 2022 at 12:47 pm
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

David, I just did that last year. I have attached the invoice. Take that as an example. That Yanmar shop screwed up and did not tighten the hose clamps on the vent loop, that caused major damage. I don't recommend them.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

JB Duler
 

David, I just did that last year. I have attached the invoice. Take that as an example. That Yanmar shop screwed up and did not tighten the hose clamps on the vent loop, that caused major damage. I don't recommend them.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Alan Leslie
 

We raised our waterline in 2017, and as others have said, we're a bit bow up, BUT no more scrubbing under the stern!
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

Alan Leslie
 

On Sat, Jan 15, 2022 at 08:39 AM, Alan Leslie wrote:
We have GP90 connected to Navnet VX2 radar/plotter, Furuno VHF, Camino AIS by each data port on the GP 90, without problems.
Our Camino AIS is connected to the VX2, also without problems, except that initially we had to get a software upgrade for the VX2 in order to handle the AIS sentences. This has all been working fine for years.
Furuno UK confirmed to me also that the date rollover issue will not affect the transmission of accurate position data.
As far as I can tell, the date is not used anywhere, except maybe for VHF DSC call, which we don't use - there is no DSC service in the South Pacific.
So, I doubt we will have any problems. 
AND I quite like the old Navnet VX2 system - it's reliable solid, totally waterproof - been functioning on Elyse now for 17 years without any problems.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 

 I  checked with Milltech Marine, suppliers of the AMEC Camino-101 Class B AIS transponder - this what they said:

Hi Alan,

 Please see the response that AMEC has provider for us concerning the GPS rollover, specifically the 101.

 

 •             Camino-101: The GPS rollover issue will start on the Camino-101 with the wrong “year” from April 06th, 2019. Fortunately, the AIS messages the Camino-101 sends out include only position information, and seconds information (not the year/month/day/hour/minute), therefore, the wrong year is not transmitted to other vessels around you. Furthermore, the AIS class B time slot is not synchronized by UTC time. Therefore, the wrong time stamp does not affect the operation of Camino-101 itself.

 

 Thank you!

 

 Milltech Marine

 


So, it would seem that our setup with Furuno GP90, Furuno Navnet VX2, AMEC Camino-101 AIS will still all be working fine, even if the date displayed on the GP90 is incorrect.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Wrench for rudder post packing nut

David Vogel
 

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the offer re “wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person” - I have an original from Arthur (svVISTA), which I am using as a template.

+++
All,

Thank all, for the pics and files forwarded – much appreciated, and useful reference for others following this path.

Presently there are four folks interested in these wrenches.

I’ve bitten the bullet and am getting a CAD drawing make up, templated off an original – I’ll split the cost of this, if we finalise, otherwise I’ll accept the cost (<$100-, or 1/10th of a boat-unit). I may be more advantageous for those in EUROPE to go direct to AMEL, however, I am unsure of the price -- I recall reading, but cannot find it anywhere now, that the cost was in the order of EUR70-. Arthur is checking his records to see if he still has this info. If so, then I’ll report back. In the interim, can anyone else provide further info on this???

I am in any case mindful of the desirability, where practicable, to keep sourcing from AMEL, to encourage the OEM to continue to support us and our boats. So, that always remains an option.

In the meantime, the original appears to be galvanised (zinc-coated) iron. So I’m obtaining a quote for that, in addition to stainless, and aluminium.

Background: the raw-material component for the iron version is likely to be cheapest, but to get it galvanised is likely to then increase the overall cost above stainless. However, to complicate matters, the cost of machining stainless-steel here in NZ is cheaper than iron. This is because there is more competition in the stainless-steel fabricating market. So, I don’t yet have a definitive answer – iron -vs- ss. As an aside, the cost of all raw materials here in NZ is rising across-the-board, due to supply-and-demand factors, on top of the cost of transport (sea freight, in particular). For example, reportedly, the point-to-point cost of shipping a sea container has increased 2.5x to 3.5x since the beginning of the pandemic. In addition, up-stream issues in the supply-chain is resulting in increased competition/demand at the consumer end of the pipeline, meaning suppliers are taking advantage to raise costs. That’s the unpleasant truth of it here at the moment. RESULT: the cost of stainless (10mm) in NZ is now over $1,075/sq.m = ~$75 per unit for the spanner. Plus cutting, plus freight, plus anything else. I don’t yet know where the aluminium version will sit in the scheme of things. The ‘free’ plastic version (using a bread-board), as reported on the forum, is looking increasingly attractive, but having suffered rigidity & stability problems with convention packing-nut spanners, I wonder it that would be a problem going this route. But we’ll see. In the interim, I’m reminded of the quote: “Sailing is the most expensive way of getting somewhere for free.”

I discuss aspects relating to the main-outhaul shaft puller under separate cover, when I have more info.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ

Those on file as interested for the wrench for the rudder packing nut
Mike Longcor SM#023 Trilogy Opua
Keith Tice SM#282  Bikini Calvi, France
Chris Paul SM#352 Glazig Whangarei
David Vogel SM#396 Perigee Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)" <svtrilogy53@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Monday, 17 January 2022 at 3:15 pm
To: <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ (outhaul puller PLUS wrench for the rudder-post-packing nut)

Hi David,

Thanks for this effort. I have a different set up for the main outhaul with my older SM so no need for the special puller. I am, however, very keen on the rudder packing nut wrench.

I have a trace of the Amel specific one that I copied from Rusty on Pitu that has the critical dimensions. Perhaps there's a better file on the forum or maybe another owner will let us borrow one. I never got around to having a shop make one for me. I've got a crude tool that does the job but would very much prefer a proper wrench as mine only grabs two sides of the nut (dangerous!).

Photo of the wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person if needed. I believe the wrench was made of aluminium.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022, 1:26 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

OK, I have some indicative numbers – it seems only 2 or 3 potentially for the puller for the main-outhaul.

Ross Hickey, SM#356, IntrepidKiwi
Raul Schleier, SM#344, SeaBean

I have no idea yet of the cost, as businesses here in WHargarie are just again winding up for the New year, and hence I also am just starting the contact-research on this. As there will be only 2 or 3 units, I would not expect that it will be worthwhile to go to the trouble (and cost) of establishing a CAD/CAM file for subsequent orders. Although I will research this lightly, I presently expect that whatever we do will be hand-crafted as ‘one-offs’.

I’ll keep you posted once I have an idea of the cost and timings – I’ll go first to the guy who did the copper keel grounding straps (where we did get a small economy of scale, mainly for the freight).

Regarding design details, I will template off what I have seen before on (or as referred to by) this forum, et al.

BTW, I did try a conventional gear-puller for the extracting the axle for the line-handling-winch from the main-outhaul gearbox, and it was simply not up to the task; hence why I am getting a special tool made up.

I am also looking at getting a wrench made up specifically for the packing-nut on the rudder shaft gland. Anyone interested in this???

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town Basin, Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io" <southernadventurer@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 7:54 pm
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,

We may also be interested the specific Amel main outhaul winch puller if one can be manufactured. Can you please advise of of cost and design details.

Ross Hickey
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently cruising Turkey
+++


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Raul Schleier <raul.schleier@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 5:21 pm
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,
I’d be keen to join in on this if I’m not too late. I just pulled mine borrowing a home made puller from my dock neighbour. I’m planning to service the outhaul shaft regularly from now onwards so that it doesn’t stick but I will still likely need a puller some day.
We’re just down the creek in Marsden Cove Marina if we’re not out
Email: raul “at” seabean.nz
SM2k#344, SeaBean
+++



Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad
On Wednesday, January 5, 2022, 2:00 AM, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Calling all SM owners in NZ.

Having done a small run of the copper grounding straps for the grey-water bilge, and been happy with the results, I am now planning on getting some AMEL-specific tools machined - for example, the puller for the main-outhaul line-handling winch/motor/gearbox assembly.

It may be possible to come to some kind of economy-of-scale arrangement with the fabricator/s. Even if not, if you have any hints or tips on where to go / who to use, I would be interested to hear; or, if you're wanting to bolster your tool-kit with that special nick-knack ...

If you’re interested in getting involved, please get back to me via this forum; I would then plan to take the discussion off-line for resolving the nitty-gritty.

Thanks, and best to all,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town-Basin, Whangarei






--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey


Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

David Vogel
 

Greetings,

Anyone have the cost-breakdown of the major (1,00HR/4yr) service on the YANMAR 4JH3-HTE?

I am interested primarily in the hours of labour expended by an experienced marine mechanic.

Scope of Works is (roughly, and not in sequence):

    + Remove and re-install fuel injectors (off-site: check pressure & spray atomising pattern, adjust
 on condition)

    + Drain oil, inspect the engine oil cooler*, clean on condition (*may need a new gasket)

    + Check clearance on intake and exhaust valves, adjust on condition (may include lapping if necessary)

    + Drain the fuel filter, and replace the fuel filter element

    + Inspect all hoses, replace on condition

    + Inspect seawater pump, replace impeller plus service as required

    + Drain engine coolant, clean & check the cooling water passages, replace engine coolant

    + Inspect mixing elbow; repair, replace on condition

    + Turbo-charger: Wash blower; Inspect outlet/exhaust turbine, clean on condition

I do the routine stuff myself these days, but interested in the the time taken for valves and injectors in particular, if folks got these jobs done as 'one offs'. I am getting various quotes and, in assessing these, I'm interested in folks' _actual_ experience.

Thanks, and with kind regards,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ


Re: Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

karkauai
 

Hi Kevin,
I have hove-to several times in 45-50+ winds and 12-15 ft seas.  I have about 6 ft of Genoa foot out, and 1/3 of the mizzen foot, with the mizzen traveler all the way to windward, and the helm all the way to windward.  I have a new full cockpit enclosure, and carry an inflated RIB on the stern cabin deck.  She rides perpendicular to the wind and waves, sliding directly downwind at about 1.2kts creating an upwind slick that prevents the waves from breaking on the boat. She makes no forward way.

In March 2020 we sailed straight from Antigua to the Chesapeake because of Covid.  Normally a 10-11 day passage, it took us 17 days   We encountered 3 gales with 40+ Northerly winds and were hove-to for a total of 7 days.  She was comfortable enough to get some rest and make hot meals.  Only one small wave slapped the hull in 7 days.

You'll have to experiment since your sails and windage will be a little different from Kristy's.

Kent
SM243

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

PAOLO CUNEO
 

Hi all,
I experimented heaving to for self training and experimenting more than out of a real necessity. I used the combination headsail rolled up  to a small triangle/mizzen and the combination was acceptable but not entirely stable and, sometimes, the boat was more broadside then desirable. Incidentally, has anybody noticed any chafe on the backed  Genoa sheet after a long period hove to?
Apart from that, I found quite interesting the alternative suggested by David of
Perigee of using solely 1/3 backed mizzen and I’ll try it out on the next opportunity
Paolo Cuneo
SM 454 Whisper



Inviato da iPad

--
Paolo Cuneo
SM 454 Whisper


Re: New sails [cross-cut * Nautosphere VOYAGER v tri-radial HydraNet]

James Alton
 

David,

  Your cruising grounds sound splendid, enjoy!  I wanted to add a bit more about why I decided to go with crosscut Hydranet instead of going with the Tri-radial.  First I want to agree with Bill Kinney that from design standpoint the Tri-radial construction makes sense because the fibers are better aligned with the loads.  Bill also makes the point about there being more seams with the Tri-radial but actually it seems to me that there are a LOT more seams and many of them run in a near vertical orientation whereas with the crosscut the seams are mostly fore and aft.  Each seam represents a thicker/stiffer area in the sail which increases the furled diameter and is going to somewhat increase the force required to furl and unfurl a main or mizzen.  Also near vertical seams won't slide as easily across the plastic lip of the mast extrusion opening as fore/aft seams.  I personally like the fact that with my new furled main and mizzen that I can easily slide a finger in between the sail and the mast cavity. With my old Dacron sails there was even more room.   I have heard it said many times on this board that one of the great things that Amel did when they designed the furling systems on our boats was to provide a nice large mast cavity which essentially eliminates jams when furling.  I can say that with my original Dacron cross cut main and mizzen that even with some furling mistakes that we have never had a jam and I attribute that to the small furled diameter of the original crosscut sails and the large amount of room remaining in the mast cavity.  So the Tri- radial design makes perfect sense to me, battens can add area, sail shape and performance but with just the two of us making long passages, the reliability of the furling is of more importance to us.  So this is the reason we are staying with the original Amel sail design though I understand that it won't be for everyone.  Best of luck in making the best decision for you.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno 
Maramu #220


-----Original Message-----
From: David Vogel <david.vogel@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jan 18, 2022 4:59 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] New sails [cross-cut * Nautosphere VOYAGER v tri-radial HydraNet]

Hi all,

Thanks to you all for your answers and additional inputs – all very good info.

We’re still considering our options, and will do some cruising up and down the East coast of the NZ North Islands while we deliberate.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ



On 7/12/21, 3:58 pm, "David Vogel" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io on behalf of david.vogel@...> wrote:

    Greetings all,
   
    After 5 years and ~25,000nm, our sails are starting to show their age, and so we are now scoping replacements.  Mainly UV-damage to the leech area of the main and mizzen, the main- and mizzen-sails that were on the boat at purchase had no UV-protection.  Which (we have discovered) is an oversight that we should have recognised and had corrected early on, especially once we started sailing full-time in the tropics (where we have now been continuously for >4 years).  Being tri-radial cut, it is not so easy to re-cut the sail/s to eliminate the compromised fabric, which is a shame because, apart from the outer 30cm, the remaining fabric is still sound.
   
    We will be continuing to cruise in the tropics for the foreseeable future.  Meaning, that laminates are out of consideration.
    Explanation: we have seen too many cruisers (and heard even more stories) of those paying for expensive state-of-the-art so-called "cruising laminates", only to have them start to de-laminate after only a season or two.  The cause, seen more often in the tropics, seems to be that the laminating manufacturing process used to sandwich the various fabrics together, uses heat to melt and/or cure the glue, and the temperatures used are deliberately kept low in order to protect the fabric from thermal damage during manufacture, being only slightly higher than 100ºC.  The in-mast temperatures reached when sails are furled, especially in the tropics, approaches or exceeds this temperature.  The situation is, reportedly, worse with in-mast furling systems (as opposed to slab-reefing).  This is as explained by several long-term cruising sailors with vastly more experience than us.  It makes sense, and aligns with what we have seen over the past few years.  Conclusion: no laminates for us.
   
    Which leaves us with more conventional dacron-based woven sail-cloth, including hybrids that utilise high-modulus fibers such as "Ultra-PE" (Ultra-Polyethylene, such as Spectra or Dyneema yarns), which is introduced in order to improve strength and shape stability - once such sailcloth being HydraNet.  I have heard that HydraNet starts to lose it's dimensional stability after a few years (maybe as short as 3-4 years), firstly becoming soft to handle, and then baggy.  Which creates problems firstly for sail performance, and then also for in-mast furling systems.  Which leads me to ...
   
    QUESTION 1:
    Does anyone have experience with Hydranet sails beyond 5-7 years?  The use-case here being full-time live-aboard cruising, meaning, permanently rigged (not removed for the off season, nor on-anchor, as we have to ready to sail-away at a moments notice; and we generally avoid marinas, so the sails are on 365 days a year); mileage: 3,000 to 5,000nm a year, all-weather blue-water passage-making in the topical (hotter) and mid-latitudes (greater likelihood of encountering stronger than gale-force).
   
    ===
    Next, the cut of the sail ::: traditional best practice within the AMEL community is to use a TRI-RADIAL cut - in addition to aligning the high-modulus fibres to the load (mainly vertically, roughly parallel to the leech, radiating from the head, tack and clew), this allows the use of differing weight fabric around the sail - heavier at the foot and leech where there are greater loads for fully-unfurled conditions, and needing to bear a greater load in stronger wind-condition when the sail is partially furled; and lighter sailcloth in the luff areas, less loading under fully unfurled conditions, and less likely to be exposed to high winds (because it should furled away) that would permanently deform a lighter fabric.  But not easy to re-cut.  Meaning that once a sail is 'blown' and starts to deform, or suffers UV-degradation along the leech, it largely becomes a throw-away item.  (Proper UV protection in the first place would avoid this, either the paint-on solutions or extra covering such as an extra layer of sailcloth, or Sunbrella or, perhaps preferentially, the lighter WeatherMax.)  But the outcome is the same, once UV damaged such that the strength of the outer sailcloth is degraded, even if the rest of the sail-cloth is sound, there is not much that can be done. 
   
    So, I have now questions about useful life of Tri-Radial HydraNet sails - especially if/as it starts to age, and becomes soft &/or baggy, thereby potentially introducing problems with our in-mast furlers. As a consequence of which I am now starting to look at other contemporary alternatives.
   
    Sail construction --> CROSS-CUT.  Normally, due to the conventional 'best practice' within the AMEL community, I would not consider this.  But there are advantages, it would seem, with cross-cut sails with respect to the 'furl-ability' of the sail.  Specifically, because the nearly horizontal seams spiral up the mast as the sail is furled, and hence do not overlap during furling (as is the case for a tri-radial cut sail), cross-cut sails can accommodate a heavier cloth within a given mast profile.  However, cross-cut sails do not have the advantage of being able to use heavier cloth in areas of greater load, as is the case for tri-radials - each cross-cut fore-to-aft panel uses the same-weight sail-cloth.  Offset against the use of a heavier cloth across all the sail.
   
    Type of fabric: "Nautosphere VOYAGER" is a fabric we have just heard of.  It is a hybrid fabric (that is, dacron base incorporating high-modulus yarn, in this case, dyneema).  Downside, it is not suitable for tri-radial construction - only for cross-cut.  It's claim to fame is that the dyneema threads are woven across the bolt of fabric (that is, along the weft), meaning that the strength and dimensional stability of a cross-cut sail built using this fabric will be roughly vertical - that is, approximately parallel to the leech, which is in alignment with the primary load lines.  A cross-cut sail made of this fabric can be made of heavier cloth (due to the better furl-ability), meaning greater strength initially and, all other things being equal, greater longevity.  And, being a simple cross-cut, simpler construction with a lesser number of panels (and seams, than tri-radial), meaning reduced labour cost.  In addition, UV damage at the leech can be more easily re-cut out.  Which leads me to ...
   
    QUESTION 2:
    Does anyone have experience in cross-cut sails for the main &/or mizzen for the in-mast furling AMELs, and especially the Super Maramu.
   
    QUESTION 3:
    Does anyone have experience with, or knowledge of, "Nautosphere VOYAGER" fabric?
   
    Thank you, in anticipation, for your shared insights and knowledge.
   
    David
    SM#396, Perigee
    On-the-hard, Riverside Drive Marina
    Whangarei, New Zealand
   
   
   
   
   
   








Re: Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

David Vogel
 

Greets,

Having tried various combinations with headsail out (various %s, and backed), we always seem to fall off and end up too far off the wind, and may be also broadside to the waves, resulting in more rolling motion. And making way.

Our last attempt upon arrival NZ, I tried 1/3 mizzen out, and backed, with no main or genoa – this seemed to work, but it was only for about an hour in stable wind-se conditions, so cannot yet recommend, but this is where I will start next time.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
NZ



From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 19 January 2022 at 5:08 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

I haven’t had the opportunity to try it yet but thought I’d ask other SM owners what sail combo works best when Heaving To?
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Re: Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

Alan Leslie
 

Our SM has an inner forestay, we use the staysail and mizzen.
If you don't have a staysail, a partially furled headsail to produce similar windage to the mizzen would work. Too big a headsail will make the bow blow off and turn you around in circles.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

Greg Thomas
 

Scott,
I had a quick search and couldn't find any extra details for advanced configuration of the Prolific driver. Unfortunately, usb-to-serial adapters are notorious for messing up the hardware handshaking lines.
Rather than modifying your DB9 cable, and in light of the limited hardware resources in your current location, you might be able to make a temporary patch between the Female DB9 socket on the serial-to-usb adapter, and the Male DB9 plug on the end of your cable?
You'd need three wires going pin-to-pin between the two DB9 connectors (Gnd pin5, Rx pin2 and Tx pin2) and then two wires to do the loop-back from pin4-to-pin6 and pin7-to-pin8 on the USB end.
It only needs to work once.


Re: Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

Scott SV Tengah
 

Thanks, I looked at the Windows 10 device manager driver configuration for the Prolific USB-to-Serial Comm Port  (port settings) and it does allow me to set flow control.

 

I tried the 3 options:

 

  1. None
  2. Hardware
  3. Xon/Xoff

 

And unfortunately, none of them allowed the Furuno upload utility to connect to my GP150. Any ideas?

 

From: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Greg Thomas <gregthomasesq@...>
Reply-To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, January 18, 2022 at 12:39 PM
To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

 

Scott,
You may be able to configure the driver for the RS232-USB adapter to emulate the DTR->DSR and RTS->CTS loop-back functionality?


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

Greg Thomas
 

Scott,
You may be able to configure the driver for the RS232-USB adapter to emulate the DTR->DSR and RTS->CTS loop-back functionality?


Re: Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

Scott SV Tengah
 

Correct, it has to do with flow control You have to jumper, on the PC side:

 

pins 4 (DTR) and 6 (DSR)

pins 7 (RTS) and 8 (CTS)

 

I did not attempt it because we are in the Tuamotus right now and I use output from my GP-150 to feed opencpn and navigate via satellite overlays. The data from the GP-150 is noticeably superior to any other GPS device onboard and I need all the precision I can get in some of these bommie fields!

 

I believe it requires some pretty precision soldering on the DB9 connector. Unless you think there’s a different way to achieve it? Keep in mind the DB9 then goes through a serial-usb converter before going to my computer, so no guarantee that the converter will correctly translate the modified signals.

 

From: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Dean Gillies <stella@...>
Reply-To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, January 18, 2022 at 11:44 AM
To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

 

Scott,
"It turns out you need to jumper 2 pairs of pins in the DB9/serial/rs232 port"

I'm assuming that the problem is hardware flow control, which can be bypassed in the wiring with various techniques. Which pins did you jump to make it work?
thanks
Dean 
SV Stella
A54-154


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

Dean Gillies
 

Scott,
"It turns out you need to jumper 2 pairs of pins in the DB9/serial/rs232 port"

I'm assuming that the problem is hardware flow control, which can be bypassed in the wiring with various techniques. Which pins did you jump to make it work?
thanks
Dean 
SV Stella
A54-154


Re: Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

Courtney Gorman
 

Mizzen and staysail if you have one or Mizzen and head sail if you don’t 
Cheers 🥂 


On Jan 18, 2022, at 12:08 PM, Kevin Schmit <kevschmit64@...> wrote:

I haven’t had the opportunity to try it yet but thought I’d ask other SM owners what sail combo works best when Heaving To?
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362


Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

Kevin Schmit
 

I haven’t had the opportunity to try it yet but thought I’d ask other SM owners what sail combo works best when Heaving To?
--
Kevin & Kristen Schmit
KIANA
SM #362

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