Date   

Re: C drive transmission failure

Jose Venegas
 

Roman and Ira,

The rust on all surfaces suggests that there was water on the transmission for a long time. In addition to making sure your lubricant level is OK, it is important to check that it does not look milky. Wearing of the third shaft seal near the propeller when the seals are oriented the “Amel way” causes water intake that mixes with the oil because the other two other seals are oriented to prevent oil loss but they allow water intake. If the seals are not replaced, and when the transmission is not used frequently, over time the water settles down and causes the corrosion of all surfaces visible on your pictures.

One good reason to keep an eye on the color of the lubricant, replacing the seals and thinking about seal orientation.

Jose Venegas
Ipanema SM2K 278
RED FROG MARINA (PANAMA)


Re: Wide open throttle

Richard Dallett
 

Hi, Dean,
I am also a bit confused. My A54 is number 68 from 2007 with a ZF25-2.0 gearbox, serial number 156 44 8.  I believe the dipstick when I bought the boat 2 months ago is too long, measuring 128 and 140 mm from mating surface to high and low marks.  I bought a 3311-301-003 from the Ft. Lauderdale dealer, but it measures 102 and 114 from the mating surface to the high and low marks, which is longer than you stated. I don't know if I should just put in 3 litres and mark that on the dipstick as a reference point. Any suggestions? I emailed ZF, but have not had a reply.

Richard
SV Mamba
A54-68


Re: Charisma’s owner a member?

 

Judy and I met Alan Spence in the Pacific. He owns Charisma and is a member of this group. He receives a weekly digest. I emailed him about your question.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   

On Thu, Jan 20, 2022 at 10:33 AM Lance Leonard <Elscubano@...> wrote:
We were walking the docks at Glen Cove Marina in Vallejo, CA and saw a Maramu. I love looking at boats similar to ours, inspiration for projects etc. If you own Charisma, or know who does we would love a tour. We are currently in Northern California while Minerva is on the hard in Maine getting a repower.
Lance Leonard 
S/V Minerva


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Ian Park
 

Olivier,
When I bought my Santorin the red stripe at the stet was below the water unloaded. The boat has been loaded for ocean crossing. Since we’re back in UK and unloaded a load of gear we have coastal cruised for 2 Covid seasons in local (UK) waters. We still have to brush/scrape the growth on the red lines above the copper coat and especially at the stern. We don’t have an arch, the hydrovane has been removed the lazarette contains only fenders (bumpers) and we are like ghtly loaded.
I will be raising water line at a he stern. I have yet to see a SN or an SM where the red stripe is visible above the water.
No criticism of your comments on overloading at all, but our beautiful boats do sit neatly on their sterns and I am getting too old to jump into northern waters twice a season to clean up the red stripes.
I guess there are a few others who are not overloaded but have come to the same conclusion.

Best wishes and thanks for all your valuable inputs.

Ian
Ocean Hobo. SN96


Re: Fixed Prop installation.

Ian Park
 

Agree…
I used a 3 arm puller on my Santorin fixed prop and it wouldn’t budge. Three minutes with a blow torch and ‘Ping’…. Off it came. No grease, in fact I used a ‘Never Seize’ on it, which made sure the it went back on easily when I tightened the nut.

Ian
Ocean Hobo 96


Charisma’s owner a member?

Lance Leonard
 

We were walking the docks at Glen Cove Marina in Vallejo, CA and saw a Maramu. I love looking at boats similar to ours, inspiration for projects etc. If you own Charisma, or know who does we would love a tour. We are currently in Northern California while Minerva is on the hard in Maine getting a repower.
Lance Leonard 
S/V Minerva


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Courtney Gorman
 

Olivier
Thank you so much for the important reminder 
Cheers 🥂 


On Jan 20, 2022, at 10:16 AM, Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...> wrote:

Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Re: Fixed Prop installation.

Bill Kinney
 

A couple of comments on installing a fixed prop (or any prop, actually!).  Be SURE that the prop sits tight on the shaft, and that the key does not hold it off. The best way to do this is to install the prop on the shaft WITHOUT the key, mark how far on the shaft it sits.  Pull it off, and the reinstall with the key in place and make sure that it goes just as far on. It is not unusual that new keys are too high, and the prop bottoms out on them before it is fully engaged with the shaft. If this is the case, file down the key until the prop sits as it should.

A propeller should be driven almost entirely by friction with the shaft, not so much by the key.  Having a good tight fit on the tapered part of the shaft is essential. If the prop is at all loose the key will be damaged, and the prop is at risk of coming off.  Especially when a tabbed over washer is used as the nut lock as is typical on these metric shafts.

There has been a long standing argument between people who know more than I do about greasing the shaft (or not) when installing the prop.  I doubt it really matters much one way or the other, but I do not use grease.

Finally, never, never, never use a hammer in place of a proper puller to remove a prop. If a yard worker does this, fire him on the spot. This is bad enough on a standard shaft drive, but could be deadly on the C-Drive.  The gears, bearings and housing are not made for this kind of shock loading. If a prop is really stuck and the puller is not getting it loose, get a bigger puller.  Failing that, heat the prop (hot!) with a torch, and then tap gently to loosen it while continuing to pull straight back as hard as your tools will allow.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

Bill Kinney
 

David,

I can't comment on the valve service for the Yanmar, but I have pulled injectors on these engines, and that was a quick and easy job.  After 1000 hours they should be in excellent shape (unless you have had water in your fuel or other problem).  Testing them at a dedicated diesel shop should be pretty inexpensive, if they pass muster.

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

 

Olivier,

Thanks! I am really glad that you said this! It needed to be said.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
On Thu, Jan 20, 2022 at 8:16 AM Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Olivier Beaute
 

Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Re: C drive transmission failure

Olivier Beaute
 

Hello Roman and Ira,

this C-drive has been running without oil for a while!!!
You can get access to the inside of the lower unit if you take down the front plate (where you see the big pin that enters the GRP keelstub), bolted with ALLEN screws.
You will probably need to get in touch with AMEL in order to buy the gears and bearings, together with the prop shaft bushing and seals.
If you are in an area with good machine shops, they will probably be able to make these gears (although they are complicate as helicoïdal bevel gears).

Thank you for these pictures. This is a very good example of what not to do (neglect the service of the AMEL C-drive).

Good luck.

Olivier.


Re: Super Maramu Heaving To sail combination?

karkauai
 

Paolo, yes, you do need chafe protection for the genoa sheet.  I would put a piece of PVC pipe and/or bamboo over the shroud, or permanently attach chafing gear to the sheet.
Kent

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


C drive transmission failure

Roman Morozov
 

We changed Volvo engine to Yanmar 4JH4 -TE 2 years ago.  We have not changed the transmission. Recently the transmission broke, we suppose that this happened because we have not done maintenance for a long time.

1. We found a gear failure in the first part of the transmission.  Picture below. Can you please tell me if anyone had the same problem?

2. We also want to evaluate the condition of the transmission in the second part.  How can we do that?  If we need to open it, how to do it? Pictures below.

Roman and Ira Morozov SM2000 #320 Ginger


Re: Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

David Vogel
 

Excellent - I see about 15 hours, 8 on the boat, and 7 in the workshop. This seems about right to my untrained eye (and experience to date). Thanks JB.

From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of JB Duler <jbduler@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, 20 January 2022 at 12:47 pm
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

David, I just did that last year. I have attached the invoice. Take that as an example. That Yanmar shop screwed up and did not tighten the hose clamps on the vent loop, that caused major damage. I don't recommend them.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

JB Duler
 

David, I just did that last year. I have attached the invoice. Take that as an example. That Yanmar shop screwed up and did not tighten the hose clamps on the vent loop, that caused major damage. I don't recommend them.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Alan Leslie
 

We raised our waterline in 2017, and as others have said, we're a bit bow up, BUT no more scrubbing under the stern!
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Check your GPS / AIS devices. Some of them failed on Jan 2, 2022 due to the "GPS Rollover" bug

Alan Leslie
 

On Sat, Jan 15, 2022 at 08:39 AM, Alan Leslie wrote:
We have GP90 connected to Navnet VX2 radar/plotter, Furuno VHF, Camino AIS by each data port on the GP 90, without problems.
Our Camino AIS is connected to the VX2, also without problems, except that initially we had to get a software upgrade for the VX2 in order to handle the AIS sentences. This has all been working fine for years.
Furuno UK confirmed to me also that the date rollover issue will not affect the transmission of accurate position data.
As far as I can tell, the date is not used anywhere, except maybe for VHF DSC call, which we don't use - there is no DSC service in the South Pacific.
So, I doubt we will have any problems. 
AND I quite like the old Navnet VX2 system - it's reliable solid, totally waterproof - been functioning on Elyse now for 17 years without any problems.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 

 I  checked with Milltech Marine, suppliers of the AMEC Camino-101 Class B AIS transponder - this what they said:

Hi Alan,

 Please see the response that AMEC has provider for us concerning the GPS rollover, specifically the 101.

 

 •             Camino-101: The GPS rollover issue will start on the Camino-101 with the wrong “year” from April 06th, 2019. Fortunately, the AIS messages the Camino-101 sends out include only position information, and seconds information (not the year/month/day/hour/minute), therefore, the wrong year is not transmitted to other vessels around you. Furthermore, the AIS class B time slot is not synchronized by UTC time. Therefore, the wrong time stamp does not affect the operation of Camino-101 itself.

 

 Thank you!

 

 Milltech Marine

 


So, it would seem that our setup with Furuno GP90, Furuno Navnet VX2, AMEC Camino-101 AIS will still all be working fine, even if the date displayed on the GP90 is incorrect.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Wrench for rudder post packing nut

David Vogel
 

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the offer re “wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person” - I have an original from Arthur (svVISTA), which I am using as a template.

+++
All,

Thank all, for the pics and files forwarded – much appreciated, and useful reference for others following this path.

Presently there are four folks interested in these wrenches.

I’ve bitten the bullet and am getting a CAD drawing make up, templated off an original – I’ll split the cost of this, if we finalise, otherwise I’ll accept the cost (<$100-, or 1/10th of a boat-unit). I may be more advantageous for those in EUROPE to go direct to AMEL, however, I am unsure of the price -- I recall reading, but cannot find it anywhere now, that the cost was in the order of EUR70-. Arthur is checking his records to see if he still has this info. If so, then I’ll report back. In the interim, can anyone else provide further info on this???

I am in any case mindful of the desirability, where practicable, to keep sourcing from AMEL, to encourage the OEM to continue to support us and our boats. So, that always remains an option.

In the meantime, the original appears to be galvanised (zinc-coated) iron. So I’m obtaining a quote for that, in addition to stainless, and aluminium.

Background: the raw-material component for the iron version is likely to be cheapest, but to get it galvanised is likely to then increase the overall cost above stainless. However, to complicate matters, the cost of machining stainless-steel here in NZ is cheaper than iron. This is because there is more competition in the stainless-steel fabricating market. So, I don’t yet have a definitive answer – iron -vs- ss. As an aside, the cost of all raw materials here in NZ is rising across-the-board, due to supply-and-demand factors, on top of the cost of transport (sea freight, in particular). For example, reportedly, the point-to-point cost of shipping a sea container has increased 2.5x to 3.5x since the beginning of the pandemic. In addition, up-stream issues in the supply-chain is resulting in increased competition/demand at the consumer end of the pipeline, meaning suppliers are taking advantage to raise costs. That’s the unpleasant truth of it here at the moment. RESULT: the cost of stainless (10mm) in NZ is now over $1,075/sq.m = ~$75 per unit for the spanner. Plus cutting, plus freight, plus anything else. I don’t yet know where the aluminium version will sit in the scheme of things. The ‘free’ plastic version (using a bread-board), as reported on the forum, is looking increasingly attractive, but having suffered rigidity & stability problems with convention packing-nut spanners, I wonder it that would be a problem going this route. But we’ll see. In the interim, I’m reminded of the quote: “Sailing is the most expensive way of getting somewhere for free.”

I discuss aspects relating to the main-outhaul shaft puller under separate cover, when I have more info.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ

Those on file as interested for the wrench for the rudder packing nut
Mike Longcor SM#023 Trilogy Opua
Keith Tice SM#282  Bikini Calvi, France
Chris Paul SM#352 Glazig Whangarei
David Vogel SM#396 Perigee Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)" <svtrilogy53@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Monday, 17 January 2022 at 3:15 pm
To: <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ (outhaul puller PLUS wrench for the rudder-post-packing nut)

Hi David,

Thanks for this effort. I have a different set up for the main outhaul with my older SM so no need for the special puller. I am, however, very keen on the rudder packing nut wrench.

I have a trace of the Amel specific one that I copied from Rusty on Pitu that has the critical dimensions. Perhaps there's a better file on the forum or maybe another owner will let us borrow one. I never got around to having a shop make one for me. I've got a crude tool that does the job but would very much prefer a proper wrench as mine only grabs two sides of the nut (dangerous!).

Photo of the wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person if needed. I believe the wrench was made of aluminium.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022, 1:26 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

OK, I have some indicative numbers – it seems only 2 or 3 potentially for the puller for the main-outhaul.

Ross Hickey, SM#356, IntrepidKiwi
Raul Schleier, SM#344, SeaBean

I have no idea yet of the cost, as businesses here in WHargarie are just again winding up for the New year, and hence I also am just starting the contact-research on this. As there will be only 2 or 3 units, I would not expect that it will be worthwhile to go to the trouble (and cost) of establishing a CAD/CAM file for subsequent orders. Although I will research this lightly, I presently expect that whatever we do will be hand-crafted as ‘one-offs’.

I’ll keep you posted once I have an idea of the cost and timings – I’ll go first to the guy who did the copper keel grounding straps (where we did get a small economy of scale, mainly for the freight).

Regarding design details, I will template off what I have seen before on (or as referred to by) this forum, et al.

BTW, I did try a conventional gear-puller for the extracting the axle for the line-handling-winch from the main-outhaul gearbox, and it was simply not up to the task; hence why I am getting a special tool made up.

I am also looking at getting a wrench made up specifically for the packing-nut on the rudder shaft gland. Anyone interested in this???

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town Basin, Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io" <southernadventurer@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 7:54 pm
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,

We may also be interested the specific Amel main outhaul winch puller if one can be manufactured. Can you please advise of of cost and design details.

Ross Hickey
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently cruising Turkey
+++


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Raul Schleier <raul.schleier@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 5:21 pm
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,
I’d be keen to join in on this if I’m not too late. I just pulled mine borrowing a home made puller from my dock neighbour. I’m planning to service the outhaul shaft regularly from now onwards so that it doesn’t stick but I will still likely need a puller some day.
We’re just down the creek in Marsden Cove Marina if we’re not out
Email: raul “at” seabean.nz
SM2k#344, SeaBean
+++



Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad
On Wednesday, January 5, 2022, 2:00 AM, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Calling all SM owners in NZ.

Having done a small run of the copper grounding straps for the grey-water bilge, and been happy with the results, I am now planning on getting some AMEL-specific tools machined - for example, the puller for the main-outhaul line-handling winch/motor/gearbox assembly.

It may be possible to come to some kind of economy-of-scale arrangement with the fabricator/s. Even if not, if you have any hints or tips on where to go / who to use, I would be interested to hear; or, if you're wanting to bolster your tool-kit with that special nick-knack ...

If you’re interested in getting involved, please get back to me via this forum; I would then plan to take the discussion off-line for resolving the nitty-gritty.

Thanks, and best to all,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town-Basin, Whangarei






--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey


Hours of effort for 4YRLY/1,000HR service (YANMAR 4JH3-HTE)

David Vogel
 

Greetings,

Anyone have the cost-breakdown of the major (1,00HR/4yr) service on the YANMAR 4JH3-HTE?

I am interested primarily in the hours of labour expended by an experienced marine mechanic.

Scope of Works is (roughly, and not in sequence):

    + Remove and re-install fuel injectors (off-site: check pressure & spray atomising pattern, adjust
 on condition)

    + Drain oil, inspect the engine oil cooler*, clean on condition (*may need a new gasket)

    + Check clearance on intake and exhaust valves, adjust on condition (may include lapping if necessary)

    + Drain the fuel filter, and replace the fuel filter element

    + Inspect all hoses, replace on condition

    + Inspect seawater pump, replace impeller plus service as required

    + Drain engine coolant, clean & check the cooling water passages, replace engine coolant

    + Inspect mixing elbow; repair, replace on condition

    + Turbo-charger: Wash blower; Inspect outlet/exhaust turbine, clean on condition

I do the routine stuff myself these days, but interested in the the time taken for valves and injectors in particular, if folks got these jobs done as 'one offs'. I am getting various quotes and, in assessing these, I'm interested in folks' _actual_ experience.

Thanks, and with kind regards,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ

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