Date   

Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Mark Erdos
 

I don’t think anyone is actively looking to overload their vessel. But, I do think a great many of us got very tired of scrubbing the waterline, me included. The only time our vessel had a good amount of anti-fouling paint out of the water was when we first purchased it and the vessel was completely 100% empty. The moment we filled the water and diesel tanks the scrubbing started as the waterline sat truly at water level. Even a 2-3 mm change in how the boat sat caused a scum buildup on the untreated hull surface. Since raising the waterline, I now an ample area of paint above the waterline at all times and thank goodness no longer need to perform this task. I would even venture to say, I often sit at the original waterline but now have paint above this area. My goal is certainly not to put enough stuff on the vessel to meet the new waterline.

 

In addition for those who plan so sail to areas where a stern anchor is used to face swells and take the wind broadside, having an extra area of bottom paint will again save you from scrubbing the lee side of the vessel as the wind will cause the vessel to list a few degrees while at anchor. Been there, done that.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Ian Townsend
 

We try to keep it light aft. We raised the stripe only an inch by putting the bottom paint up to the bottom edge of the boot stripe. And even though we have an arch and one solar panel, the boat sits well for us. And it’s still pretty 😀

Ian & Margaret
Loca Lola II
SM153

On Jan 22, 2022, at 6:23 PM, Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:

Well each to his own, but I believe it is not a good idea to put lots of weight in the bow of a boat, or the stern, or both. The mass needs to be concentrated in the middle of the boat. Loading the bow just to make the boat float on it's waterline is not a very seaman like thing to do, in my opinion.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Alan Leslie
 

Well each to his own, but I believe it is not a good idea to put lots of weight in the bow of a boat, or the stern, or both. The mass needs to be concentrated in the middle of the boat. Loading the bow just to make the boat float on it's waterline is not a very seaman like thing to do, in my opinion.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Galley fridge intermittently cooling

Barry Connor
 

Hi Ruedi,
The fridge freezer and A/C on our 54 was not cool enough. Had different people checking and adjusting gas levels then one guy suggested cleaning the raw water lines. This was a real messy job using an acid solution. Lots of gunk came out, it was clogged limiting the water flow.
After this the fridges were cooler and the A/C is colder. 
Hope this helps.
Very Best 
Barry

Barry and Penny
“SV Lady Penelope II”
Amel 54. #17
Le Marin marina 
Martinique 


On Jan 22, 2022, at 15:37, Sv Garulfo <svgarulfo@...> wrote:


Hi Ruedi,

I got to learn a lot about refrigeration since my last post. 

Intermittent cooling can be caused by a blockage in the refrigerant circuit. I find that the best way to confirm that is to measure the power consumed by the compressor. Either with an amp meter or better with a wattmeter that will show voltage, amps, watts, max amps, max watts, total watts, total amphrs. They cost a handful of dollars on Amazon / AliExpress. 

A blocked circuit will show the compressor consuming lower power (only 20W instead of 60/100W, but constantly). The evaporator will be cool (not cold) and sweaty. Stop/Start of the unit may cause the compressor to stall (stops itself, waits 30s and tries again), emitting the corresponding error code on the diagnosis LED (if you have one plugged in). The fan runs continuously during that sequence, which can be mistaken for the compressor running. Learn to recognise the various sounds. 

The blockage can be due to ice crystals or corrosion sludge.  Usually the blockage is on the capillary, the hair-thin copper tube leading to the evaporator plate, but can also happen at the entry of the evaporator, where the refrigerant expands and the temp gets super cold. 

Ice crystals form because tiny amounts of humid air can be sucked in on the vacuum side of the compressor at the quick connector.

Aluminum sludge can form because of the corrosion of the evaporator plate by the refrigerant chemicals. 

The filter drier, located after the condenser (the u shaped water circulation tube sitting on top of the compressor on our units) is meant to catch such impurities but can/will saturate at some point. 

It’s difficult to differentiate between solid and ice blockage, but if the unit cools again after you let the evaporator warm up to room temp, you can hope it’s ice based. 

You can also gently knock on the evaporator around the thinnest section of the embedded evaporator tube, with a rubber tool or snapping your fingers and hope to dislodge the blockage. You’ll hear a hissing sound and the evaporator will frost promptly. 

Ice cristal issues may be resolved by changing the filter drier, vacuuming the system thoroughly and refilling with refrigerant.

Solid blockage types are trickier and usually need a change of evaporator/capillary, since they are located after the filter and before the capillary.

So there is a risk that changing just the filter drier may not solve the issue.  

While you have someone onboard working at welding/brazing a new filter drier, ask them to remove the quick connectors and weld the circuit.  Those quick connectors make it really easy to install the fridge initially but will fail and lead to refrigerant loss, humidity infiltration, and workhours of fridge engineers, some (many?) of them using the occasion to sell complete new fridges.
They are also an environmental nonsense because the will lead to people topping up with refrigerant again and again instead of addressing the issue. R134a refrigerant is better that freon but still an extremely potent greenhouse gaz.

A fully closed circuit instead of quick connectors vastly reduces risks of refrigerant leaks. 


Access to the galley fridge/freezer compressor has been explained by Arno.


Hope this helps navigating the interesting world of refrigeration/AC engineers, whose charging of 100$ per hour in Tahiti for drinking your coffee (before 10am, your beer afterward) while everybody waits hours for the system to settle/be vaccummed/refill slowly/settles/etc, strongly encourages you to google a thing or two about fridges and potentially invest in gauges (25$), a vacuum pump (more expensive), canisters of refrigerant (only available to license holders in eco friendly countries) and maybe even an 02/propane brazing kit.


Best,


Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Rapa, French Polynesia 







On 22 Jan 2022, at 05:11, Rudolf Waldispuehl <Rudolf@...> wrote:

Hi Amelia’s, (@ Arno & Mohammad)

 

The Galley fridge on my A54 is only intermittently cooling and sometimes it stops completely until I can restart it. A fridge-guy told me; - it is the filter blocked inside the unit and it is a common problem on boat fridges. He mentioned, he need to take out the compressor to change the filter (just a 2€ part). But to take out the compressor on my A54#55, it seems I need to dismantle a big parts of the galley because the “service opening” is too small for the compressor replacement.

 

Does anyone know where this filter is located by any chance?

 

@ Arno/Mohammad, I have found in older treats that you had similar problems and you both changed the compressor. How was it gone and how to change the compressor without too much hazzle? The opening is too small, even if I’m able to remove the big wood panel galley front.

How was it in your case?

 

Thanks and best regards

Ruedi

 

SY WASABI

AMEL54 #55

Puerto Almerimar

 

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Freitag, 25. September 2020 um 05:13
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Galley fridge intermittently cooling

 

Hi Thomas,

Ice crystals would occur if the filling of the system was not done properly. There is a filter in the system that binds any moisture that may be left at filling time. Normally they replace this filter when refilling. Once a system is working properly there is no interference with the atmosphere so moisture cannot enter. If the system is leaking you may see moisture enter the system after so much gas has escaped that at run-time the low pressure side gets below atmospheric pressure (depending on where the leak is). If you still have the original compressors (you can see this by looking at the way the speed control works). The newer units use a rotary switch if I'm correct. If you still run the originals chances are you have a gas leakage, most probably at the quick-fittings. These are the screw connectors that connect the evaporator to the compressor.
In my case the problem was a leaking heat-exchanger (the tube on top of the compressor) that rotted away due to the salt water in the circuit. In the end I replaced all the compressors.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi all. Some thoughts on loading. When delivered unladen the SM anti fouling line is high in the bow and low in the stern. Given the duck tail stern with low floatation compared to the full and powerful forward sections it would seem the designers gave us a very strong hint that we should load heavy items forward in the anchor locker, the two big foredeck lockers, the two under berth lockers in the fore cabin, and other storage areas forward of the keel, while reserving the after storage areas for light weight items. 
I cannt believe the antifoul line is an error maintained for the entire production run of the SM. In which case it would seem the designers expectations are as I set out above. 
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 23/01/2022 09:15 karkauai via groups.io <karkauai@...> wrote:


I added 50ft of chain to the bow locker, and moved my tools and some other heavier items forward.  She sails better, particularly upwind, with less banging into the seas.  She seems faster, too, but I can't document that.  2 years after making those changes, I changed the waterline to reflect the way she sits.  It makes a huge difference in cleaning the hull.  Our waterline now starts where the old waterline was, and comes aft to finish a few inches above where the original line was on the stern.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Bill Kinney
 

Photos as requested...

Of the completed project:
 

The original latch and hinges were reused.  Everything else--except the mahogany outer boards--is new.  



The original box-shaped evaporator was replaced with one of the same size, but was formed into an L-shaped that ran along two walls.  The original compressor and condenser were kept.



The lid's insulation extends down inside the box to engage with the seals. The top of the lid is 1/2" plywood.  Just about everything else is 4mm plywood coated in epoxy resin, and then covered with polyurethane paint.



Close up of the double seals.


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

 

I want to share this with you to hopefully lighten your day, although it will probably do nothing to lighten your Amel or change your waterline stripe.

Judy came into my office yesterday and asked why I was chuckling. I told her it was the raising the waterline stripe thing, its apparent wrong longitudinal angle, fouling, more or less weight, etc. I also read Olivier's posting out loud to Judy. She laughed and said, "it's like most other boating things, there is a fact and there are inevitably lots of opinions, including yours!".

I believe the closest Amel owners are going to get to a genuine "fact" will come from Olivier Beaute.
--
 
Best,
 
CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

karkauai
 

I added 50ft of chain to the bow locker, and moved my tools and some other heavier items forward.  She sails better, particularly upwind, with less banging into the seas.  She seems faster, too, but I can't document that.  2 years after making those changes, I changed the waterline to reflect the way she sits.  It makes a huge difference in cleaning the hull.  Our waterline now starts where the old waterline was, and comes aft to finish a few inches above where the original line was on the stern.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Galley fridge intermittently cooling

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi Ruedi,

I got to learn a lot about refrigeration since my last post. 

Intermittent cooling can be caused by a blockage in the refrigerant circuit. I find that the best way to confirm that is to measure the power consumed by the compressor. Either with an amp meter or better with a wattmeter that will show voltage, amps, watts, max amps, max watts, total watts, total amphrs. They cost a handful of dollars on Amazon / AliExpress. 

A blocked circuit will show the compressor consuming lower power (only 20W instead of 60/100W, but constantly). The evaporator will be cool (not cold) and sweaty. Stop/Start of the unit may cause the compressor to stall (stops itself, waits 30s and tries again), emitting the corresponding error code on the diagnosis LED (if you have one plugged in). The fan runs continuously during that sequence, which can be mistaken for the compressor running. Learn to recognise the various sounds. 

The blockage can be due to ice crystals or corrosion sludge.  Usually the blockage is on the capillary, the hair-thin copper tube leading to the evaporator plate, but can also happen at the entry of the evaporator, where the refrigerant expands and the temp gets super cold. 

Ice crystals form because tiny amounts of humid air can be sucked in on the vacuum side of the compressor at the quick connector.

Aluminum sludge can form because of the corrosion of the evaporator plate by the refrigerant chemicals. 

The filter drier, located after the condenser (the u shaped water circulation tube sitting on top of the compressor on our units) is meant to catch such impurities but can/will saturate at some point. 

It’s difficult to differentiate between solid and ice blockage, but if the unit cools again after you let the evaporator warm up to room temp, you can hope it’s ice based. 

You can also gently knock on the evaporator around the thinnest section of the embedded evaporator tube, with a rubber tool or snapping your fingers and hope to dislodge the blockage. You’ll hear a hissing sound and the evaporator will frost promptly. 

Ice cristal issues may be resolved by changing the filter drier, vacuuming the system thoroughly and refilling with refrigerant.

Solid blockage types are trickier and usually need a change of evaporator/capillary, since they are located after the filter and before the capillary.

So there is a risk that changing just the filter drier may not solve the issue.  

While you have someone onboard working at welding/brazing a new filter drier, ask them to remove the quick connectors and weld the circuit.  Those quick connectors make it really easy to install the fridge initially but will fail and lead to refrigerant loss, humidity infiltration, and workhours of fridge engineers, some (many?) of them using the occasion to sell complete new fridges.
They are also an environmental nonsense because the will lead to people topping up with refrigerant again and again instead of addressing the issue. R134a refrigerant is better that freon but still an extremely potent greenhouse gaz.

A fully closed circuit instead of quick connectors vastly reduces risks of refrigerant leaks. 


Access to the galley fridge/freezer compressor has been explained by Arno.


Hope this helps navigating the interesting world of refrigeration/AC engineers, whose charging of 100$ per hour in Tahiti for drinking your coffee (before 10am, your beer afterward) while everybody waits hours for the system to settle/be vaccummed/refill slowly/settles/etc, strongly encourages you to google a thing or two about fridges and potentially invest in gauges (25$), a vacuum pump (more expensive), canisters of refrigerant (only available to license holders in eco friendly countries) and maybe even an 02/propane brazing kit.


Best,


Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Rapa, French Polynesia 







On 22 Jan 2022, at 05:11, Rudolf Waldispuehl <Rudolf@...> wrote:

Hi Amelia’s, (@ Arno & Mohammad)

 

The Galley fridge on my A54 is only intermittently cooling and sometimes it stops completely until I can restart it. A fridge-guy told me; - it is the filter blocked inside the unit and it is a common problem on boat fridges. He mentioned, he need to take out the compressor to change the filter (just a 2€ part). But to take out the compressor on my A54#55, it seems I need to dismantle a big parts of the galley because the “service opening” is too small for the compressor replacement.

 

Does anyone know where this filter is located by any chance?

 

@ Arno/Mohammad, I have found in older treats that you had similar problems and you both changed the compressor. How was it gone and how to change the compressor without too much hazzle? The opening is too small, even if I’m able to remove the big wood panel galley front.

How was it in your case?

 

Thanks and best regards

Ruedi

 

SY WASABI

AMEL54 #55

Puerto Almerimar

 

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Freitag, 25. September 2020 um 05:13
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Galley fridge intermittently cooling

 

Hi Thomas,

Ice crystals would occur if the filling of the system was not done properly. There is a filter in the system that binds any moisture that may be left at filling time. Normally they replace this filter when refilling. Once a system is working properly there is no interference with the atmosphere so moisture cannot enter. If the system is leaking you may see moisture enter the system after so much gas has escaped that at run-time the low pressure side gets below atmospheric pressure (depending on where the leak is). If you still have the original compressors (you can see this by looking at the way the speed control works). The newer units use a rotary switch if I'm correct. If you still run the originals chances are you have a gas leakage, most probably at the quick-fittings. These are the screw connectors that connect the evaporator to the compressor.
In my case the problem was a leaking heat-exchanger (the tube on top of the compressor) that rotted away due to the salt water in the circuit. In the end I replaced all the compressors.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Galley fridge intermittently cooling

Randall Walker
 

Ruedi.
Its a long shot, but if your water pump is very old you could have a lack of cooling water running through the fridge and two freezers.
I could hear the fridge running, but the cooling pump had stopped working, even though the pump controller in the engine compartment had tried to turn the pump on.
I had this happen and found turning off the fridge and freezers for a couple of hours, then after this I turned them back on and they worked fine. Finding this meant the compressor would cool the fridge and freezers.
So I dismantled the shur flo pump, cleaned the brushes, reassembled the unit and was back in business.
So I suspect the compressor freezes up, and no longer cools the fridge.But the fridge is running
That has been my experience.
I have purchased two new pumps, one is a backup. For when I return to the boat I will also pump some diluted hydrochloric acid through the cooling lines as well.

Randall
A54#56

On Sat, Jan 22, 2022 at 10:12 AM Rudolf Waldispuehl <Rudolf@...> wrote:

Hi Amelia’s, (@ Arno & Mohammad)

 

The Galley fridge on my A54 is only intermittently cooling and sometimes it stops completely until I can restart it. A fridge-guy told me; - it is the filter blocked inside the unit and it is a common problem on boat fridges. He mentioned, he need to take out the compressor to change the filter (just a 2€ part). But to take out the compressor on my A54#55, it seems I need to dismantle a big parts of the galley because the “service opening” is too small for the compressor replacement.

 

Does anyone know where this filter is located by any chance?

 

@ Arno/Mohammad, I have found in older treats that you had similar problems and you both changed the compressor. How was it gone and how to change the compressor without too much hazzle? The opening is too small, even if I’m able to remove the big wood panel galley front.

How was it in your case?

 

Thanks and best regards

Ruedi

 

SY WASABI

AMEL54 #55

Puerto Almerimar

 

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Freitag, 25. September 2020 um 05:13
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Galley fridge intermittently cooling

 

Hi Thomas,

Ice crystals would occur if the filling of the system was not done properly. There is a filter in the system that binds any moisture that may be left at filling time. Normally they replace this filter when refilling. Once a system is working properly there is no interference with the atmosphere so moisture cannot enter. If the system is leaking you may see moisture enter the system after so much gas has escaped that at run-time the low pressure side gets below atmospheric pressure (depending on where the leak is). If you still have the original compressors (you can see this by looking at the way the speed control works). The newer units use a rotary switch if I'm correct. If you still run the originals chances are you have a gas leakage, most probably at the quick-fittings. These are the screw connectors that connect the evaporator to the compressor.
In my case the problem was a leaking heat-exchanger (the tube on top of the compressor) that rotted away due to the salt water in the circuit. In the end I replaced all the compressors.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Galley fridge intermittently cooling

WASABI - Rudolf Waldispuehl
 

Hi Amelia’s, (@ Arno & Mohammad)

 

The Galley fridge on my A54 is only intermittently cooling and sometimes it stops completely until I can restart it. A fridge-guy told me; - it is the filter blocked inside the unit and it is a common problem on boat fridges. He mentioned, he need to take out the compressor to change the filter (just a 2€ part). But to take out the compressor on my A54#55, it seems I need to dismantle a big parts of the galley because the “service opening” is too small for the compressor replacement.

 

Does anyone know where this filter is located by any chance?

 

@ Arno/Mohammad, I have found in older treats that you had similar problems and you both changed the compressor. How was it gone and how to change the compressor without too much hazzle? The opening is too small, even if I’m able to remove the big wood panel galley front.

How was it in your case?

 

Thanks and best regards

Ruedi

 

SY WASABI

AMEL54 #55

Puerto Almerimar

 

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Freitag, 25. September 2020 um 05:13
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Galley fridge intermittently cooling

 

Hi Thomas,

Ice crystals would occur if the filling of the system was not done properly. There is a filter in the system that binds any moisture that may be left at filling time. Normally they replace this filter when refilling. Once a system is working properly there is no interference with the atmosphere so moisture cannot enter. If the system is leaking you may see moisture enter the system after so much gas has escaped that at run-time the low pressure side gets below atmospheric pressure (depending on where the leak is). If you still have the original compressors (you can see this by looking at the way the speed control works). The newer units use a rotary switch if I'm correct. If you still run the originals chances are you have a gas leakage, most probably at the quick-fittings. These are the screw connectors that connect the evaporator to the compressor.
In my case the problem was a leaking heat-exchanger (the tube on top of the compressor) that rotted away due to the salt water in the circuit. In the end I replaced all the compressors.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

James Alton
 

Oliver,

   Thanks for your post and for the reminder to be careful in deviating original design parameters such as changing the vessel trim.  Our Maramu is pretty well sitting  on her lines now.  There are  a few heavy items that I have moved into the forward locker which has helped but mostly the boat is unmodified from the original design and as such just seems to trim pretty much right on.  I do plan to install a solar arch in the future as it is so useful to a cruising boat but I am working on adjusting the weight being added and calculating the moments so that I can insure that I don't alter the trim of the boat.  I recently went to Lithium house batteries in the engine room which removed about 120 pounds there.  To help insure reliability I wanted to keep a very reliable German gel battery in the mix just in case lightning or something else caused a failure in the Lithium.  The 8D (around 180 pounds) gel is installed in the Port forward cabin locker which will offset most of the arch installation.  This battery originally was installed in the engine room so I was able to move that weight quite a ways forward.  By moving my heavy engine spares such as a spare starter and other heavy items to the stb. forward cabin I should be able to completely cancel a trim change that would be induced by adding the arch which will be my goal.  I think that with some planning it is possible to add some modern items to the boat while retaining the original trim.
   Thanks Oliver for the many years of sharing your in depth knowledge of these boats,  you have helped me a lot and I sure that many others feel the same.


James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
Marmaris, Turkey


-----Original Message-----
From: Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jan 20, 2022 5:16 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Raising Boot Stripe

Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Alan Leslie
 

I don't want to rain on anyone's party, but......
Elyse sat stern down before the solar arch was put on.....I don't think I've ever seen an SM that floated on it's lines, they are all stern down, unless someone has lasered the waterline and painted it to the new slope. We raised the waterline by the same amount all round (simpler) which is why she now looks more bow up than before.
I think the issue particularly with SM2Ks is the bigger generator and the extra batteries to balance the boat so it doesn't list to port. All these heavy items are aft of the pitch centre and so it sits stern down....because Amel didn't change the waterline to reflect the additional weight.
Regarding putting extra weight in the bow of the boat to counter the "extra weight" aft, that's not a good idea - it increases the moment about the pitch centre and leads to....pitching.
We try to sail with the water tank nearly full - why?, because that weight is below the waterline, on the centre line and more or less at the pitch centre, so it adds to stability, (basically increases the keel ballast) particularly sailing upwind - and we have done a lot of that.
So, all in all, we are happy that we raised the waterline a bit - to keep the stern clean.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Brent Cameron
 

Olivier of the Amel 54 Vela Nautica did a great series of two videos doing pretty much the same thing a few years ago.  He reported similar results.  Here is the link to the first one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caZtybwa0-Y&t=4s.  It certainly isn’t for the faint of heart.  

Brent Cameron
Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

On Jan 21, 2022, 11:04 PM -0600, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...>, wrote:
This past year, I got totally frustrated with our OEM under settee freezer.  It was so poorly insulated that food thawed if it was against the wall of the box.  It consumed huge amounts of power. It was just terrible. The freezer is critical for us.  We are full time aboard on our boat, and we much prefer remote locations. So food storage is important.  In addition we need a place to store the fish we catch. A crappy freezer was not something we wanted to live with.

The poured foam factory insulation was of good quality, but was completely exposed to the air.  Even though it was nominally "closed cell" foam it was FULL of water from 25 years of condensation. The foam thickness was also marginal for a proper freezer, even assuming it was water free.

We took the whole thing out, cut it apart, threw out virtually everything, and started from scratch.  Using Panasonic vacuum insulating panels I built a completely new box.  4mm epoxy coated plywood as the box and with a double sealed lid. The design was a challenge because the vacuum panels are available in a very limited set of sizes. Many design iterations were needed before it was something I was ready to build. A one inch thickness of these vacuum panels is equal to about 10 inches of the best poured foam.  I couldn't quite come up with a design that was 100% vacuum insulated, but pretty close. In most places I used a double thickness of 1/2 inch panels just to guard against a failed vacuum panel.  Panasonics specifications say that they expect at least half the insulating capacity to remain after 12 years.  I'll take it!

The end result has vastly exceeded our expectations.  For the first time--ever--we have gone two days without running the generator. The seal on the lid is so tight that even after after 6 months of normal operation there is NO frost on the evaporator.  Seriously. None. I have no idea when we will actually need to defrost this thing. A year?  Two???

My best guess is it uses much less than half the power it used to. Even though the temperature in the box is higher than it was formally set to, nothing ever gets soft, much less thaws. All this, and because of the improved insulation efficiency we have ended up with a much bigger usable volume of freezer space. Since freezers are the biggest power suck on our boat--by far--this has had a huge positive impact on our power budget. Win/Win/Win

It was NOT an easy project, but it seems to be 100% worth the hassle. It is also not risk free.  I only have the specifications to believe that the vacuum panels will last a reasonable amount of time. If they fail early, I'll have a lot of work to redo. Call back in five years...

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Alan Leslie
 

Interesting Bill !
We struggled with the original freezer when we first bought Elyse...it just didn't really work well.
I guess we were spoilt on our previous boat which had an engine driven compressor which meant we could get down to -18C no problem. It was well insulated and we had a small electric frig unit with it's own plate in the freezer to keep it going.
Now, on Elyse, I enlisted the talents of Darren the Frigy at Gulf Harbour (he built our engine driven unit), he installed a plate in the freezer box that runs all along the aft side of the box, across the front and half way down the forward side. He connected that to a new frig compressor unit (larger capacity than the OEM) and that has been running for 7 years now and keeps the freezer at -16C at the end where there is no plate !
I'm sure it would be even better (more economical) if we replaced the insulation as well....maybe a future project!

Cheers

Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Justin Maguire
 

Pictures!


On Jan 21, 2022, at 21:04, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

This past year, I got totally frustrated with our OEM under settee freezer.  It was so poorly insulated that food thawed if it was against the wall of the box.  It consumed huge amounts of power. It was just terrible. The freezer is critical for us.  We are full time aboard on our boat, and we much prefer remote locations. So food storage is important.  In addition we need a place to store the fish we catch. A crappy freezer was not something we wanted to live with.

The poured foam factory insulation was of good quality, but was completely exposed to the air.  Even though it was nominally "closed cell" foam it was FULL of water from 25 years of condensation. The foam thickness was also marginal for a proper freezer, even assuming it was water free.

We took the whole thing out, cut it apart, threw out virtually everything, and started from scratch.  Using Panasonic vacuum insulating panels I built a completely new box.  4mm epoxy coated plywood as the box and with a double sealed lid. The design was a challenge because the vacuum panels are available in a very limited set of sizes. Many design iterations were needed before it was something I was ready to build. A one inch thickness of these vacuum panels is equal to about 10 inches of the best poured foam.  I couldn't quite come up with a design that was 100% vacuum insulated, but pretty close. In most places I used a double thickness of 1/2 inch panels just to guard against a failed vacuum panel.  Panasonics specifications say that they expect at least half the insulating capacity to remain after 12 years.  I'll take it!

The end result has vastly exceeded our expectations.  For the first time--ever--we have gone two days without running the generator. The seal on the lid is so tight that even after after 6 months of normal operation there is NO frost on the evaporator.  Seriously. None. I have no idea when we will actually need to defrost this thing. A year?  Two???

My best guess is it uses much less than half the power it used to. Even though the temperature in the box is higher than it was formally set to, nothing ever gets soft, much less thaws. All this, and because of the improved insulation efficiency we have ended up with a much bigger usable volume of freezer space. Since freezers are the biggest power suck on our boat--by far--this has had a huge positive impact on our power budget. Win/Win/Win

It was NOT an easy project, but it seems to be 100% worth the hassle. It is also not risk free.  I only have the specifications to believe that the vacuum panels will last a reasonable amount of time. If they fail early, I'll have a lot of work to redo. Call back in five years...


A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Bill Kinney
 

This past year, I got totally frustrated with our OEM under settee freezer.  It was so poorly insulated that food thawed if it was against the wall of the box.  It consumed huge amounts of power. It was just terrible. The freezer is critical for us.  We are full time aboard on our boat, and we much prefer remote locations. So food storage is important.  In addition we need a place to store the fish we catch. A crappy freezer was not something we wanted to live with.

The poured foam factory insulation was of good quality, but was completely exposed to the air.  Even though it was nominally "closed cell" foam it was FULL of water from 25 years of condensation. The foam thickness was also marginal for a proper freezer, even assuming it was water free.

We took the whole thing out, cut it apart, threw out virtually everything, and started from scratch.  Using Panasonic vacuum insulating panels I built a completely new box.  4mm epoxy coated plywood as the box and with a double sealed lid. The design was a challenge because the vacuum panels are available in a very limited set of sizes. Many design iterations were needed before it was something I was ready to build. A one inch thickness of these vacuum panels is equal to about 10 inches of the best poured foam.  I couldn't quite come up with a design that was 100% vacuum insulated, but pretty close. In most places I used a double thickness of 1/2 inch panels just to guard against a failed vacuum panel.  Panasonics specifications say that they expect at least half the insulating capacity to remain after 12 years.  I'll take it!

The end result has vastly exceeded our expectations.  For the first time--ever--we have gone two days without running the generator. The seal on the lid is so tight that even after after 6 months of normal operation there is NO frost on the evaporator.  Seriously. None. I have no idea when we will actually need to defrost this thing. A year?  Two???

My best guess is it uses much less than half the power it used to. Even though the temperature in the box is higher than it was formally set to, nothing ever gets soft, much less thaws. All this, and because of the improved insulation efficiency we have ended up with a much bigger usable volume of freezer space. Since freezers are the biggest power suck on our boat--by far--this has had a huge positive impact on our power budget. Win/Win/Win

It was NOT an easy project, but it seems to be 100% worth the hassle. It is also not risk free.  I only have the specifications to believe that the vacuum panels will last a reasonable amount of time. If they fail early, I'll have a lot of work to redo. Call back in five years...


Re: Several Important things that you will want

Bill Kinney
 

Our Main and Genoa were both made by Island Planet Sails with Pro Radial cloth at a 50% savings over Hydranet.  We have been VERY happy with them.

We have 3 years on the main, and 2 on the genoa.

If your genoa has a lot of miles--especially if it is an older cross cut dacron sail--replacing it is the best thing you can do to improve the  performance of your boat.  Night and day.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: Several Important things that you will want

 

These are the dimensions of the design mock-up. The production model should match. This size was required to get all of the things included that were requested.

image.png


On Fri, Jan 21, 2022 at 6:53 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Bill,

I can confirm Christian's comments that the plastic manifold as supplied by SOFOMARIN is significantly bulkier than the original copper manifold from Amel. It requires both more horizontal length and vertical height than the original copper manifold installed by Amel on his boat.  It can be made to work with some jiggering of the location of things on that bulkhead, but it is not a "drop in" replacement, at least on his boat.  I see nothing about the manifold on his boat that suggests anything was done post-factory to make it shorter than OEM.  It is possible that the filter location was changed, but that seems unlikely.

I have no idea how it fits on newer or older boats. There seem to have been a lot of factory installed variations around this part of the boat.

Bill Kinney


Insurance Comparison

Bill Kinney
 

We have found that the number of insurance underwriters is (slowly!) growing again after so many beat a hasty retreat from the market after the disaster that was the 2019 hurricane season in the Caribbean.

We are especially difficult customers since we live aboard full time, are USA flagged, and have no fixed home port.  But we did manage to get at least two new quotes this year.  Unfortunately, one was prohibitive in cost, and the second, while apparently price competitive, was, to our standard, a terrible policy.  We do have one more iron in the fire, but at this point it looks like we will be sticking with our current underwriters as the best value, albeit not cheap.

You can see our evaluation here: https://fetchinketch.net/boat_thoughts/insurance-good-bad-and-ugly/

We have deliberately avoided using names in this discussion. Policies are highly individualized, and the same company might quote you something very different than they did us. This is more about letting you know what to look for when you read a policy. The last thing you need is to find out that your coverage is way more restricted than you thought AFTER you have a claim...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA

2481 - 2500 of 64183