Date   

Re: Raising Boot Stripe

James Alton
 

Oliver,

   Thanks for your post and for the reminder to be careful in deviating original design parameters such as changing the vessel trim.  Our Maramu is pretty well sitting  on her lines now.  There are  a few heavy items that I have moved into the forward locker which has helped but mostly the boat is unmodified from the original design and as such just seems to trim pretty much right on.  I do plan to install a solar arch in the future as it is so useful to a cruising boat but I am working on adjusting the weight being added and calculating the moments so that I can insure that I don't alter the trim of the boat.  I recently went to Lithium house batteries in the engine room which removed about 120 pounds there.  To help insure reliability I wanted to keep a very reliable German gel battery in the mix just in case lightning or something else caused a failure in the Lithium.  The 8D (around 180 pounds) gel is installed in the Port forward cabin locker which will offset most of the arch installation.  This battery originally was installed in the engine room so I was able to move that weight quite a ways forward.  By moving my heavy engine spares such as a spare starter and other heavy items to the stb. forward cabin I should be able to completely cancel a trim change that would be induced by adding the arch which will be my goal.  I think that with some planning it is possible to add some modern items to the boat while retaining the original trim.
   Thanks Oliver for the many years of sharing your in depth knowledge of these boats,  you have helped me a lot and I sure that many others feel the same.


James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
Marmaris, Turkey


-----Original Message-----
From: Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jan 20, 2022 5:16 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Raising Boot Stripe

Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Alan Leslie
 

I don't want to rain on anyone's party, but......
Elyse sat stern down before the solar arch was put on.....I don't think I've ever seen an SM that floated on it's lines, they are all stern down, unless someone has lasered the waterline and painted it to the new slope. We raised the waterline by the same amount all round (simpler) which is why she now looks more bow up than before.
I think the issue particularly with SM2Ks is the bigger generator and the extra batteries to balance the boat so it doesn't list to port. All these heavy items are aft of the pitch centre and so it sits stern down....because Amel didn't change the waterline to reflect the additional weight.
Regarding putting extra weight in the bow of the boat to counter the "extra weight" aft, that's not a good idea - it increases the moment about the pitch centre and leads to....pitching.
We try to sail with the water tank nearly full - why?, because that weight is below the waterline, on the centre line and more or less at the pitch centre, so it adds to stability, (basically increases the keel ballast) particularly sailing upwind - and we have done a lot of that.
So, all in all, we are happy that we raised the waterline a bit - to keep the stern clean.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Brent Cameron
 

Olivier of the Amel 54 Vela Nautica did a great series of two videos doing pretty much the same thing a few years ago.  He reported similar results.  Here is the link to the first one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caZtybwa0-Y&t=4s.  It certainly isn’t for the faint of heart.  

Brent Cameron
Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

On Jan 21, 2022, 11:04 PM -0600, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...>, wrote:
This past year, I got totally frustrated with our OEM under settee freezer.  It was so poorly insulated that food thawed if it was against the wall of the box.  It consumed huge amounts of power. It was just terrible. The freezer is critical for us.  We are full time aboard on our boat, and we much prefer remote locations. So food storage is important.  In addition we need a place to store the fish we catch. A crappy freezer was not something we wanted to live with.

The poured foam factory insulation was of good quality, but was completely exposed to the air.  Even though it was nominally "closed cell" foam it was FULL of water from 25 years of condensation. The foam thickness was also marginal for a proper freezer, even assuming it was water free.

We took the whole thing out, cut it apart, threw out virtually everything, and started from scratch.  Using Panasonic vacuum insulating panels I built a completely new box.  4mm epoxy coated plywood as the box and with a double sealed lid. The design was a challenge because the vacuum panels are available in a very limited set of sizes. Many design iterations were needed before it was something I was ready to build. A one inch thickness of these vacuum panels is equal to about 10 inches of the best poured foam.  I couldn't quite come up with a design that was 100% vacuum insulated, but pretty close. In most places I used a double thickness of 1/2 inch panels just to guard against a failed vacuum panel.  Panasonics specifications say that they expect at least half the insulating capacity to remain after 12 years.  I'll take it!

The end result has vastly exceeded our expectations.  For the first time--ever--we have gone two days without running the generator. The seal on the lid is so tight that even after after 6 months of normal operation there is NO frost on the evaporator.  Seriously. None. I have no idea when we will actually need to defrost this thing. A year?  Two???

My best guess is it uses much less than half the power it used to. Even though the temperature in the box is higher than it was formally set to, nothing ever gets soft, much less thaws. All this, and because of the improved insulation efficiency we have ended up with a much bigger usable volume of freezer space. Since freezers are the biggest power suck on our boat--by far--this has had a huge positive impact on our power budget. Win/Win/Win

It was NOT an easy project, but it seems to be 100% worth the hassle. It is also not risk free.  I only have the specifications to believe that the vacuum panels will last a reasonable amount of time. If they fail early, I'll have a lot of work to redo. Call back in five years...

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Alan Leslie
 

Interesting Bill !
We struggled with the original freezer when we first bought Elyse...it just didn't really work well.
I guess we were spoilt on our previous boat which had an engine driven compressor which meant we could get down to -18C no problem. It was well insulated and we had a small electric frig unit with it's own plate in the freezer to keep it going.
Now, on Elyse, I enlisted the talents of Darren the Frigy at Gulf Harbour (he built our engine driven unit), he installed a plate in the freezer box that runs all along the aft side of the box, across the front and half way down the forward side. He connected that to a new frig compressor unit (larger capacity than the OEM) and that has been running for 7 years now and keeps the freezer at -16C at the end where there is no plate !
I'm sure it would be even better (more economical) if we replaced the insulation as well....maybe a future project!

Cheers

Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Justin Maguire
 

Pictures!


On Jan 21, 2022, at 21:04, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

This past year, I got totally frustrated with our OEM under settee freezer.  It was so poorly insulated that food thawed if it was against the wall of the box.  It consumed huge amounts of power. It was just terrible. The freezer is critical for us.  We are full time aboard on our boat, and we much prefer remote locations. So food storage is important.  In addition we need a place to store the fish we catch. A crappy freezer was not something we wanted to live with.

The poured foam factory insulation was of good quality, but was completely exposed to the air.  Even though it was nominally "closed cell" foam it was FULL of water from 25 years of condensation. The foam thickness was also marginal for a proper freezer, even assuming it was water free.

We took the whole thing out, cut it apart, threw out virtually everything, and started from scratch.  Using Panasonic vacuum insulating panels I built a completely new box.  4mm epoxy coated plywood as the box and with a double sealed lid. The design was a challenge because the vacuum panels are available in a very limited set of sizes. Many design iterations were needed before it was something I was ready to build. A one inch thickness of these vacuum panels is equal to about 10 inches of the best poured foam.  I couldn't quite come up with a design that was 100% vacuum insulated, but pretty close. In most places I used a double thickness of 1/2 inch panels just to guard against a failed vacuum panel.  Panasonics specifications say that they expect at least half the insulating capacity to remain after 12 years.  I'll take it!

The end result has vastly exceeded our expectations.  For the first time--ever--we have gone two days without running the generator. The seal on the lid is so tight that even after after 6 months of normal operation there is NO frost on the evaporator.  Seriously. None. I have no idea when we will actually need to defrost this thing. A year?  Two???

My best guess is it uses much less than half the power it used to. Even though the temperature in the box is higher than it was formally set to, nothing ever gets soft, much less thaws. All this, and because of the improved insulation efficiency we have ended up with a much bigger usable volume of freezer space. Since freezers are the biggest power suck on our boat--by far--this has had a huge positive impact on our power budget. Win/Win/Win

It was NOT an easy project, but it seems to be 100% worth the hassle. It is also not risk free.  I only have the specifications to believe that the vacuum panels will last a reasonable amount of time. If they fail early, I'll have a lot of work to redo. Call back in five years...


A HUGE improvement to under settee freezer/refridgerator

Bill Kinney
 

This past year, I got totally frustrated with our OEM under settee freezer.  It was so poorly insulated that food thawed if it was against the wall of the box.  It consumed huge amounts of power. It was just terrible. The freezer is critical for us.  We are full time aboard on our boat, and we much prefer remote locations. So food storage is important.  In addition we need a place to store the fish we catch. A crappy freezer was not something we wanted to live with.

The poured foam factory insulation was of good quality, but was completely exposed to the air.  Even though it was nominally "closed cell" foam it was FULL of water from 25 years of condensation. The foam thickness was also marginal for a proper freezer, even assuming it was water free.

We took the whole thing out, cut it apart, threw out virtually everything, and started from scratch.  Using Panasonic vacuum insulating panels I built a completely new box.  4mm epoxy coated plywood as the box and with a double sealed lid. The design was a challenge because the vacuum panels are available in a very limited set of sizes. Many design iterations were needed before it was something I was ready to build. A one inch thickness of these vacuum panels is equal to about 10 inches of the best poured foam.  I couldn't quite come up with a design that was 100% vacuum insulated, but pretty close. In most places I used a double thickness of 1/2 inch panels just to guard against a failed vacuum panel.  Panasonics specifications say that they expect at least half the insulating capacity to remain after 12 years.  I'll take it!

The end result has vastly exceeded our expectations.  For the first time--ever--we have gone two days without running the generator. The seal on the lid is so tight that even after after 6 months of normal operation there is NO frost on the evaporator.  Seriously. None. I have no idea when we will actually need to defrost this thing. A year?  Two???

My best guess is it uses much less than half the power it used to. Even though the temperature in the box is higher than it was formally set to, nothing ever gets soft, much less thaws. All this, and because of the improved insulation efficiency we have ended up with a much bigger usable volume of freezer space. Since freezers are the biggest power suck on our boat--by far--this has had a huge positive impact on our power budget. Win/Win/Win

It was NOT an easy project, but it seems to be 100% worth the hassle. It is also not risk free.  I only have the specifications to believe that the vacuum panels will last a reasonable amount of time. If they fail early, I'll have a lot of work to redo. Call back in five years...


Re: Several Important things that you will want

Bill Kinney
 

Our Main and Genoa were both made by Island Planet Sails with Pro Radial cloth at a 50% savings over Hydranet.  We have been VERY happy with them.

We have 3 years on the main, and 2 on the genoa.

If your genoa has a lot of miles--especially if it is an older cross cut dacron sail--replacing it is the best thing you can do to improve the  performance of your boat.  Night and day.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: Several Important things that you will want

 

These are the dimensions of the design mock-up. The production model should match. This size was required to get all of the things included that were requested.

image.png


On Fri, Jan 21, 2022 at 6:53 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Bill,

I can confirm Christian's comments that the plastic manifold as supplied by SOFOMARIN is significantly bulkier than the original copper manifold from Amel. It requires both more horizontal length and vertical height than the original copper manifold installed by Amel on his boat.  It can be made to work with some jiggering of the location of things on that bulkhead, but it is not a "drop in" replacement, at least on his boat.  I see nothing about the manifold on his boat that suggests anything was done post-factory to make it shorter than OEM.  It is possible that the filter location was changed, but that seems unlikely.

I have no idea how it fits on newer or older boats. There seem to have been a lot of factory installed variations around this part of the boat.

Bill Kinney


Insurance Comparison

Bill Kinney
 

We have found that the number of insurance underwriters is (slowly!) growing again after so many beat a hasty retreat from the market after the disaster that was the 2019 hurricane season in the Caribbean.

We are especially difficult customers since we live aboard full time, are USA flagged, and have no fixed home port.  But we did manage to get at least two new quotes this year.  Unfortunately, one was prohibitive in cost, and the second, while apparently price competitive, was, to our standard, a terrible policy.  We do have one more iron in the fire, but at this point it looks like we will be sticking with our current underwriters as the best value, albeit not cheap.

You can see our evaluation here: https://fetchinketch.net/boat_thoughts/insurance-good-bad-and-ugly/

We have deliberately avoided using names in this discussion. Policies are highly individualized, and the same company might quote you something very different than they did us. This is more about letting you know what to look for when you read a policy. The last thing you need is to find out that your coverage is way more restricted than you thought AFTER you have a claim...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


Re: Several Important things that you will want

Bill Kinney
 

Bill,

I can confirm Christian's comments that the plastic manifold as supplied by SOFOMARIN is significantly bulkier than the original copper manifold from Amel. It requires both more horizontal length and vertical height than the original copper manifold installed by Amel on his boat.  It can be made to work with some jiggering of the location of things on that bulkhead, but it is not a "drop in" replacement, at least on his boat.  I see nothing about the manifold on his boat that suggests anything was done post-factory to make it shorter than OEM.  It is possible that the filter location was changed, but that seems unlikely.

I have no idea how it fits on newer or older boats. There seem to have been a lot of factory installed variations around this part of the boat.

Bill Kinney


Re: Several Important things that you will want

 

Christian,

The SOFOMARIN Secondary Saltwater Manifold was designed to replace a SM2k manifold as originally made by Amel. Its design should be exactly the same as Amel made and what is shown in the PDF file. It will not match any modifications made by someone after Amel made it. Of course, the original did not have valves at each outlet. Adding valves makes it bigger in one dimension. It has been successfully installed. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Fri, Jan 21, 2022, 17:13 Christian Sloane <csloane@...> wrote:
Hello Bill
Thanks for info below
My manifold from sofomarin arrived and I took to our boat last weekend.  It is a lot larger than what is in there now, and Bill Kinney and I looked and it is not an easy plug and play. It will involve moving the water filters for the water maker on my boat and maybe some other stuff. see pic.  Ay tips on installation you have heard from others?  Perhaps when I am next on the boat I can send you some other pics or video/facetime to see how your experience might suggest I proceed?
turns out the other extra hose is a deckwash pump showse outlet is in the starboard locker in the aft of the cockpit (location of fresh water shower and Fueling cap).  
I have:
1) ac cooling pump hose
2) water maker hose
3) anchor wash hose
4) 2 x heads
5) deckwash pump hose

I am thinking of taking the deck wash off the anchor wash line with a Y since I will not likely ever be using the anchor wash and the deckwash at the same time.
There is no location on the forward of the engine room for the filters for water maker, so we were thinking running hoses to from the aft bulkhead and mounting them above the muffler. 
Thanks in advance and have a nice weekend.
christian




Christian Sloane, MD FACEP
Program Medical Director, Mercy Air Services San Diego, Imperial
Medical Director, North County Dispatch JPA
Clinical Professor
Department of Emergency Medicine
UC San Diego Health System
csloane@...
(m) 858-414-0602

IF THIS COMMUNICATION INVOLVES DISCUSSION OF PATIENT CARE ISSUES IN THE PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PROCESS, IT IS PROTECTED FROM DISCOVERY BY CALIFORNIA EVIDENCE CODE 1157 AS A CONFIDENTIAL MEDICAL STAFF COMMUNICATION.





On Jan 21, 2022, at 2:59 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Saltwater Primary and Secondary Manifolds for SM & 54:
As many of you know Amel changed from copper saltwater manifolds to Polypropylene (PP) during the production of the A55 and is currently using this technology in the A50 & A60. SOFOMARIN is the OEM supplier to Amel for many plumbing parts. Several owners and I contacted SOFOMARIN to get them to design replacements for the Primary and Secondary Saltwater Manifolds for the SM2k and 54. More...
Amel SM Genoa Repair and Replacement Parts:
The series of electric genoa furlers used on various model Amels were manufactured for Amel by a machine shop owned by Pierangelo Vignando. Mr. Vignando has a limited number of SM Genoa Furller rebuild kits that include gears, bearings, and a new 24v electric motor. When these are gone, they are gone! More...

New sails for your Amel from QSails & Incidence:
In the past 8 years, many Amel owners have saved thousands of euros buying sails from QSails Turkey and Incidence Sails, France. Since COVID began QSails has had many difficulties. Even though QSails has been in business for over 33 years, the disruption of the supply chain, the problems with international deliveries, and the supply chain issues with Dimension-Polyant's Hydranet caused some of us serious problems. The lack of HydraNet sailcloth has impacted all sailmakers using this magnificent fabric. The mid-line ProRadial sailcloth, cut and sewn in a TriRadial configuration is available from both QSails and Incidence. Information including contacts and prices: QSails: More... Incidence: More...

Martinique is getting better and better for Amel owners:
More and more Amels are finding that Martinique is a wonderful place to bring your Amel. So much so, that Amel owners are experiencing delays for repair or refit. The following are the links to Preferred Vendors in Martinique. More...

Caraibe Marine offers Amel Yacht owners a large experienced and single ownership company that is divided into smaller specialized shops run by highly experienced managers responsible for each shop. Each shop is staffed with knowledgeable technicians and equipped with the necessary tools, equipment, and parts. They all have the necessary experience and they all love boating. Caraibe Marine is the vision of its owner, Philippe LECONTE.  Philippe is the owner of this great resource to an Amel owner, but on any day you will find him in one of the shops working for you. He is very close to his managers and their customers. If you meet Phillippe, tell him you are a friend of mine. Caraibe Marine and its shops are located in La Marina du Marin Martinique. I believe that Caraibe Greement (Rigging) is the best place in the world to re-rig your Amel.  More...

La Marina du Marin, located in the south of Martinique in the cul-de-sac du Marin is one of the largest nautical bases in the Caribbean. The marina is recommended by Bill Rouse and his Yacht School Clients as the best marina in the Eastern Caribbean. La Marina du Marin is the best marina in The Caribbean for Amel Yachts. The marina has special monthly pricing if reserved in advance of your arrival. Be sure to reserve in advance and ask for special pricing. The marina also has an "Amel Pontoon." It is Pontoon 4. Reserve this in advance because it fills up fast. More...

Amel Martinique Be sure to meet Alban LEROY manager of Amel Martinique. More...

Carenantilles Haulout Yard in my opinion is better than the best on the east coast of the US. Contact Jocelyne FRANCIETTE <j.franciette@...> or by mobile phone at +596 696 37 67 14 and identify yourself as my friend. More...

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


Re: Several Important things that you will want

Christian Sloane
 

Hello Bill
Thanks for info below
My manifold from sofomarin arrived and I took to our boat last weekend.  It is a lot larger than what is in there now, and Bill Kinney and I looked and it is not an easy plug and play. It will involve moving the water filters for the water maker on my boat and maybe some other stuff. see pic.  Ay tips on installation you have heard from others?  Perhaps when I am next on the boat I can send you some other pics or video/facetime to see how your experience might suggest I proceed?
turns out the other extra hose is a deckwash pump showse outlet is in the starboard locker in the aft of the cockpit (location of fresh water shower and Fueling cap).  
I have:
1) ac cooling pump hose
2) water maker hose
3) anchor wash hose
4) 2 x heads
5) deckwash pump hose

I am thinking of taking the deck wash off the anchor wash line with a Y since I will not likely ever be using the anchor wash and the deckwash at the same time.
There is no location on the forward of the engine room for the filters for water maker, so we were thinking running hoses to from the aft bulkhead and mounting them above the muffler. 
Thanks in advance and have a nice weekend.
christian




Christian Sloane, MD FACEP
Program Medical Director, Mercy Air Services San Diego, Imperial
Medical Director, North County Dispatch JPA
Clinical Professor
Department of Emergency Medicine
UC San Diego Health System
csloane@...
(m) 858-414-0602

IF THIS COMMUNICATION INVOLVES DISCUSSION OF PATIENT CARE ISSUES IN THE PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PROCESS, IT IS PROTECTED FROM DISCOVERY BY CALIFORNIA EVIDENCE CODE 1157 AS A CONFIDENTIAL MEDICAL STAFF COMMUNICATION.





On Jan 21, 2022, at 2:59 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Saltwater Primary and Secondary Manifolds for SM & 54:
As many of you know Amel changed from copper saltwater manifolds to Polypropylene (PP) during the production of the A55 and is currently using this technology in the A50 & A60. SOFOMARIN is the OEM supplier to Amel for many plumbing parts. Several owners and I contacted SOFOMARIN to get them to design replacements for the Primary and Secondary Saltwater Manifolds for the SM2k and 54. More...
Amel SM Genoa Repair and Replacement Parts:
The series of electric genoa furlers used on various model Amels were manufactured for Amel by a machine shop owned by Pierangelo Vignando. Mr. Vignando has a limited number of SM Genoa Furller rebuild kits that include gears, bearings, and a new 24v electric motor. When these are gone, they are gone! More...

New sails for your Amel from QSails & Incidence:
In the past 8 years, many Amel owners have saved thousands of euros buying sails from QSails Turkey and Incidence Sails, France. Since COVID began QSails has had many difficulties. Even though QSails has been in business for over 33 years, the disruption of the supply chain, the problems with international deliveries, and the supply chain issues with Dimension-Polyant's Hydranet caused some of us serious problems. The lack of HydraNet sailcloth has impacted all sailmakers using this magnificent fabric. The mid-line ProRadial sailcloth, cut and sewn in a TriRadial configuration is available from both QSails and Incidence. Information including contacts and prices: QSails: More... Incidence: More...

Martinique is getting better and better for Amel owners:
More and more Amels are finding that Martinique is a wonderful place to bring your Amel. So much so, that Amel owners are experiencing delays for repair or refit. The following are the links to Preferred Vendors in Martinique. More...

Caraibe Marine offers Amel Yacht owners a large experienced and single ownership company that is divided into smaller specialized shops run by highly experienced managers responsible for each shop. Each shop is staffed with knowledgeable technicians and equipped with the necessary tools, equipment, and parts. They all have the necessary experience and they all love boating. Caraibe Marine is the vision of its owner, Philippe LECONTE.  Philippe is the owner of this great resource to an Amel owner, but on any day you will find him in one of the shops working for you. He is very close to his managers and their customers. If you meet Phillippe, tell him you are a friend of mine. Caraibe Marine and its shops are located in La Marina du Marin Martinique. I believe that Caraibe Greement (Rigging) is the best place in the world to re-rig your Amel.  More...

La Marina du Marin, located in the south of Martinique in the cul-de-sac du Marin is one of the largest nautical bases in the Caribbean. The marina is recommended by Bill Rouse and his Yacht School Clients as the best marina in the Eastern Caribbean. La Marina du Marin is the best marina in The Caribbean for Amel Yachts. The marina has special monthly pricing if reserved in advance of your arrival. Be sure to reserve in advance and ask for special pricing. The marina also has an "Amel Pontoon." It is Pontoon 4. Reserve this in advance because it fills up fast. More...

Amel Martinique Be sure to meet Alban LEROY manager of Amel Martinique. More...

Carenantilles Haulout Yard in my opinion is better than the best on the east coast of the US. Contact Jocelyne FRANCIETTE <j.franciette@...> or by mobile phone at +596 696 37 67 14 and identify yourself as my friend. More...

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


Several Important things that you will want

 

Saltwater Primary and Secondary Manifolds for SM & 54:
As many of you know Amel changed from copper saltwater manifolds to Polypropylene (PP) during the production of the A55 and is currently using this technology in the A50 & A60. SOFOMARIN is the OEM supplier to Amel for many plumbing parts. Several owners and I contacted SOFOMARIN to get them to design replacements for the Primary and Secondary Saltwater Manifolds for the SM2k and 54. More...
Amel SM Genoa Repair and Replacement Parts:
The series of electric genoa furlers used on various model Amels were manufactured for Amel by a machine shop owned by Pierangelo Vignando. Mr. Vignando has a limited number of SM Genoa Furller rebuild kits that include gears, bearings, and a new 24v electric motor. When these are gone, they are gone! More...

New sails for your Amel from QSails & Incidence:
In the past 8 years, many Amel owners have saved thousands of euros buying sails from QSails Turkey and Incidence Sails, France. Since COVID began QSails has had many difficulties. Even though QSails has been in business for over 33 years, the disruption of the supply chain, the problems with international deliveries, and the supply chain issues with Dimension-Polyant's Hydranet caused some of us serious problems. The lack of HydraNet sailcloth has impacted all sailmakers using this magnificent fabric. The mid-line ProRadial sailcloth, cut and sewn in a TriRadial configuration is available from both QSails and Incidence. Information including contacts and prices: QSails: More... Incidence: More...

Martinique is getting better and better for Amel owners:
More and more Amels are finding that Martinique is a wonderful place to bring your Amel. So much so, that Amel owners are experiencing delays for repair or refit. The following are the links to Preferred Vendors in Martinique. More...

Caraibe Marine offers Amel Yacht owners a large experienced and single ownership company that is divided into smaller specialized shops run by highly experienced managers responsible for each shop. Each shop is staffed with knowledgeable technicians and equipped with the necessary tools, equipment, and parts. They all have the necessary experience and they all love boating. Caraibe Marine is the vision of its owner, Philippe LECONTE.  Philippe is the owner of this great resource to an Amel owner, but on any day you will find him in one of the shops working for you. He is very close to his managers and their customers. If you meet Phillippe, tell him you are a friend of mine. Caraibe Marine and its shops are located in La Marina du Marin Martinique. I believe that Caraibe Greement (Rigging) is the best place in the world to re-rig your Amel.  More...

La Marina du Marin, located in the south of Martinique in the cul-de-sac du Marin is one of the largest nautical bases in the Caribbean. The marina is recommended by Bill Rouse and his Yacht School Clients as the best marina in the Eastern Caribbean. La Marina du Marin is the best marina in The Caribbean for Amel Yachts. The marina has special monthly pricing if reserved in advance of your arrival. Be sure to reserve in advance and ask for special pricing. The marina also has an "Amel Pontoon." It is Pontoon 4. Reserve this in advance because it fills up fast. More...

Amel Martinique Be sure to meet Alban LEROY manager of Amel Martinique. More...

Carenantilles Haulout Yard in my opinion is better than the best on the east coast of the US. Contact Jocelyne FRANCIETTE <j.franciette@...> or by mobile phone at +596 696 37 67 14 and identify yourself as my friend. More...

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


Re: Wrench for rudder post packing nut

david bruce
 

Hi all,  I purchased the packing gland  wrench through Maud at Amel for 46.00 euros minus VAT and shipping about 2 yrs ago.  
Best
Dave
Liesse
SN006


On Jan 21, 2022, at 11:06 PM, Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io <southernadventurer@...> wrote:

 Hi David,

I wouldn’t bother going down the plastic breadboard design as I tried it and it broke with only a small amount of force. I ended up using it as a template and had a steel wrench fabricated here in Turkey for less than $10 NZ. Sorry that’s not much use to you living/cruising in New Zealand.

Cheers
Ross and Donna
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Finike, Turkey.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, January 20, 2022, 1:40 AM, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the offer re “wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person” - I have an original from Arthur (svVISTA), which I am using as a template.

+++
All,

Thank all, for the pics and files forwarded – much appreciated, and useful reference for others following this path.

Presently there are four folks interested in these wrenches.

I’ve bitten the bullet and am getting a CAD drawing make up, templated off an original – I’ll split the cost of this, if we finalise, otherwise I’ll accept the cost (<$100-, or 1/10th of a boat-unit).  I may be more advantageous for those in EUROPE to go direct to AMEL, however, I am unsure of the price -- I recall reading, but cannot find it anywhere now, that the cost was in the order of EUR70-.  Arthur is checking his records to see if he still has this info.  If so, then I’ll report back.  In the interim, can anyone else provide further info on this???

I am in any case mindful of the desirability, where practicable, to keep sourcing from AMEL, to encourage the OEM to continue to support us and our boats.  So, that always remains an option.

In the meantime, the original appears to be galvanised (zinc-coated) iron.  So I’m obtaining a quote for that, in addition to stainless, and aluminium.

Background: the raw-material component for the iron version is likely to be cheapest, but to get it galvanised is likely to then increase the overall cost above stainless.  However, to complicate matters, the cost of machining stainless-steel here in NZ is cheaper than iron.  This is because there is more competition in the stainless-steel fabricating market.  So, I don’t yet have a definitive answer – iron -vs- ss.  As an aside, the cost of all raw materials here in NZ is rising across-the-board, due to supply-and-demand factors, on top of the cost of transport (sea freight, in particular).  For example, reportedly, the point-to-point cost of shipping a sea container has increased 2.5x to 3.5x since the beginning of the pandemic.  In addition, up-stream issues in the supply-chain is resulting in increased competition/demand at the consumer end of the pipeline, meaning suppliers are taking advantage to raise costs.  That’s the unpleasant truth of it here at the moment.  RESULT: the cost of stainless (10mm) in NZ is now over $1,075/sq.m = ~$75 per unit for the spanner.  Plus cutting, plus freight, plus anything else.  I don’t yet know where the aluminium version will sit in the scheme of things.  The ‘free’ plastic version (using a bread-board), as reported on the forum, is looking increasingly attractive, but having suffered rigidity & stability problems with convention packing-nut spanners, I wonder it that would be a problem going this route.  But we’ll see.  In the interim, I’m reminded of the quote: “Sailing is the most expensive way of getting somewhere for free.”

I discuss aspects relating to the main-outhaul shaft puller under separate cover, when I have more info.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ

Those on file as interested for the wrench for the rudder packing nut
  Mike Longcor    SM#023    Trilogy     Opua
  Keith Tice        SM#282     Bikini     Calvi, France
  Chris Paul        SM#352    Glazig        Whangarei
  David Vogel        SM#396    Perigee    Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)" <svtrilogy53@...>
Date: Monday, 17 January 2022 at 3:15 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ (outhaul puller PLUS wrench for the rudder-post-packing nut)

Hi David,

Thanks for this effort. I have a different set up for the main outhaul with my older SM so no need for the special puller. I am, however, very keen on the rudder packing nut wrench.

I have a trace of the Amel specific one that I copied from Rusty on Pitu that has the critical dimensions. Perhaps there's a better file on the forum or maybe another owner will let us borrow one. I never got around to having a shop make one for me. I've got a crude tool that does the job but would very much prefer a proper wrench as mine only grabs two sides of the nut (dangerous!).

Photo of the wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person if needed. I believe the wrench was made of aluminium.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022, 1:26 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

OK, I have some indicative numbers – it seems only 2 or 3 potentially for the puller for the main-outhaul.

Ross Hickey, SM#356, IntrepidKiwi
Raul Schleier, SM#344, SeaBean

I have no idea yet of the cost, as businesses here in WHargarie are just again winding up for the New year, and hence I also am just starting the contact-research on this.  As there will be only 2 or 3 units, I would not expect that it will be worthwhile to go to the trouble (and cost) of establishing a CAD/CAM file for subsequent orders.  Although I will research this lightly, I presently expect that whatever we do will be hand-crafted as ‘one-offs’.

I’ll keep you posted once I have an idea of the cost and timings – I’ll go first to the guy who did the copper keel grounding straps (where we did get a small economy of scale, mainly for the freight).

Regarding design details, I will template off what I have seen before on (or as referred to by) this forum, et al. 

BTW, I did try a conventional gear-puller for the extracting the axle for the line-handling-winch from the main-outhaul gearbox, and it was simply not up to the task; hence why I am getting a special tool made up.

I am also looking at getting a wrench made up specifically for the packing-nut on the rudder shaft gland.  Anyone interested in this???

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town Basin, Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io" <southernadventurer=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 7:54 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,

We may also be interested the specific Amel main outhaul winch puller if one can be manufactured. Can you please advise of of cost and design details.

Ross Hickey
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently cruising Turkey
+++


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Raul Schleier <raul.schleier@...>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 5:21 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,
I’d be keen to join in on this if I’m not too late. I just pulled mine borrowing a home made puller from my dock neighbour. I’m planning to service the outhaul shaft regularly from now onwards so that it doesn’t stick but I will still likely need a puller some day.
We’re just down the creek in Marsden Cove Marina if we’re not out
Email: raul “at” seabean.nz
SM2k#344, SeaBean
+++



Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad
On Wednesday, January 5, 2022, 2:00 AM, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Calling all SM owners in NZ.

Having done a small run of the copper grounding straps for the grey-water bilge, and been happy with the results, I am now planning on getting some AMEL-specific tools machined - for example, the puller for the main-outhaul line-handling winch/motor/gearbox assembly.

It may be possible to come to some kind of economy-of-scale arrangement with the fabricator/s.  Even if not, if you have any hints or tips on where to go / who to use, I would be interested to hear; or, if you're wanting to bolster your tool-kit with that special nick-knack ...

If you’re interested in getting involved, please get back to me via this forum; I would then plan to take the discussion off-line for resolving the nitty-gritty.

Thanks, and best to all,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town-Basin, Whangarei






--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey




















--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey


Re: Wrench for rudder post packing nut

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello Davis, Mike et al,

Amel provided one which works perfectly.  I assume someone asked them if they still have those available.  AS for the design, if still needed, I’ll loan mine to Mike or David to use as template.

Good luck,


Jean-Pierre Germain



On 22 Jan 2022, at 09:06, Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io <southernadventurer@...> wrote:

Hi David,

I wouldn’t bother going down the plastic breadboard design as I tried it and it broke with only a small amount of force. I ended up using it as a template and had a steel wrench fabricated here in Turkey for less than $10 NZ. Sorry that’s not much use to you living/cruising in New Zealand.

Cheers
Ross and Donna
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Finike, Turkey.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, January 20, 2022, 1:40 AM, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the offer re “wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person” - I have an original from Arthur (svVISTA), which I am using as a template.

+++
All,

Thank all, for the pics and files forwarded – much appreciated, and useful reference for others following this path.

Presently there are four folks interested in these wrenches.

I’ve bitten the bullet and am getting a CAD drawing make up, templated off an original – I’ll split the cost of this, if we finalise, otherwise I’ll accept the cost (<$100-, or 1/10th of a boat-unit).  I may be more advantageous for those in EUROPE to go direct to AMEL, however, I am unsure of the price -- I recall reading, but cannot find it anywhere now, that the cost was in the order of EUR70-.  Arthur is checking his records to see if he still has this info.  If so, then I’ll report back.  In the interim, can anyone else provide further info on this???

I am in any case mindful of the desirability, where practicable, to keep sourcing from AMEL, to encourage the OEM to continue to support us and our boats.  So, that always remains an option.

In the meantime, the original appears to be galvanised (zinc-coated) iron.  So I’m obtaining a quote for that, in addition to stainless, and aluminium.

Background: the raw-material component for the iron version is likely to be cheapest, but to get it galvanised is likely to then increase the overall cost above stainless.  However, to complicate matters, the cost of machining stainless-steel here in NZ is cheaper than iron.  This is because there is more competition in the stainless-steel fabricating market.  So, I don’t yet have a definitive answer – iron -vs- ss.  As an aside, the cost of all raw materials here in NZ is rising across-the-board, due to supply-and-demand factors, on top of the cost of transport (sea freight, in particular).  For example, reportedly, the point-to-point cost of shipping a sea container has increased 2.5x to 3.5x since the beginning of the pandemic.  In addition, up-stream issues in the supply-chain is resulting in increased competition/demand at the consumer end of the pipeline, meaning suppliers are taking advantage to raise costs.  That’s the unpleasant truth of it here at the moment.  RESULT: the cost of stainless (10mm) in NZ is now over $1,075/sq.m = ~$75 per unit for the spanner.  Plus cutting, plus freight, plus anything else.  I don’t yet know where the aluminium version will sit in the scheme of things.  The ‘free’ plastic version (using a bread-board), as reported on the forum, is looking increasingly attractive, but having suffered rigidity & stability problems with convention packing-nut spanners, I wonder it that would be a problem going this route.  But we’ll see.  In the interim, I’m reminded of the quote: “Sailing is the most expensive way of getting somewhere for free.”

I discuss aspects relating to the main-outhaul shaft puller under separate cover, when I have more info.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ

Those on file as interested for the wrench for the rudder packing nut
  Mike Longcor    SM#023    Trilogy     Opua
  Keith Tice        SM#282     Bikini     Calvi, France
  Chris Paul        SM#352    Glazig        Whangarei
  David Vogel        SM#396    Perigee    Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)" <svtrilogy53@...>
Date: Monday, 17 January 2022 at 3:15 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ (outhaul puller PLUS wrench for the rudder-post-packing nut)

Hi David,

Thanks for this effort. I have a different set up for the main outhaul with my older SM so no need for the special puller. I am, however, very keen on the rudder packing nut wrench.

I have a trace of the Amel specific one that I copied from Rusty on Pitu that has the critical dimensions. Perhaps there's a better file on the forum or maybe another owner will let us borrow one. I never got around to having a shop make one for me. I've got a crude tool that does the job but would very much prefer a proper wrench as mine only grabs two sides of the nut (dangerous!).

Photo of the wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person if needed. I believe the wrench was made of aluminium.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022, 1:26 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

OK, I have some indicative numbers – it seems only 2 or 3 potentially for the puller for the main-outhaul.

Ross Hickey, SM#356, IntrepidKiwi
Raul Schleier, SM#344, SeaBean

I have no idea yet of the cost, as businesses here in WHargarie are just again winding up for the New year, and hence I also am just starting the contact-research on this.  As there will be only 2 or 3 units, I would not expect that it will be worthwhile to go to the trouble (and cost) of establishing a CAD/CAM file for subsequent orders.  Although I will research this lightly, I presently expect that whatever we do will be hand-crafted as ‘one-offs’.

I’ll keep you posted once I have an idea of the cost and timings – I’ll go first to the guy who did the copper keel grounding straps (where we did get a small economy of scale, mainly for the freight).

Regarding design details, I will template off what I have seen before on (or as referred to by) this forum, et al. 

BTW, I did try a conventional gear-puller for the extracting the axle for the line-handling-winch from the main-outhaul gearbox, and it was simply not up to the task; hence why I am getting a special tool made up.

I am also looking at getting a wrench made up specifically for the packing-nut on the rudder shaft gland.  Anyone interested in this???

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town Basin, Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io" <southernadventurer=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 7:54 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,

We may also be interested the specific Amel main outhaul winch puller if one can be manufactured. Can you please advise of of cost and design details.

Ross Hickey
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently cruising Turkey
+++


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Raul Schleier <raul.schleier@...>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 5:21 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,
I’d be keen to join in on this if I’m not too late. I just pulled mine borrowing a home made puller from my dock neighbour. I’m planning to service the outhaul shaft regularly from now onwards so that it doesn’t stick but I will still likely need a puller some day.
We’re just down the creek in Marsden Cove Marina if we’re not out
Email: raul “at” seabean.nz
SM2k#344, SeaBean
+++



Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad
On Wednesday, January 5, 2022, 2:00 AM, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Calling all SM owners in NZ.

Having done a small run of the copper grounding straps for the grey-water bilge, and been happy with the results, I am now planning on getting some AMEL-specific tools machined - for example, the puller for the main-outhaul line-handling winch/motor/gearbox assembly.

It may be possible to come to some kind of economy-of-scale arrangement with the fabricator/s.  Even if not, if you have any hints or tips on where to go / who to use, I would be interested to hear; or, if you're wanting to bolster your tool-kit with that special nick-knack ...

If you’re interested in getting involved, please get back to me via this forum; I would then plan to take the discussion off-line for resolving the nitty-gritty.

Thanks, and best to all,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town-Basin, Whangarei






--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey




















--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey


Re: Wrench for rudder post packing nut

Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
 

Hi David,

I wouldn’t bother going down the plastic breadboard design as I tried it and it broke with only a small amount of force. I ended up using it as a template and had a steel wrench fabricated here in Turkey for less than $10 NZ. Sorry that’s not much use to you living/cruising in New Zealand.

Cheers
Ross and Donna
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Finike, Turkey.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, January 20, 2022, 1:40 AM, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the offer re “wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person” - I have an original from Arthur (svVISTA), which I am using as a template.

+++
All,

Thank all, for the pics and files forwarded – much appreciated, and useful reference for others following this path.

Presently there are four folks interested in these wrenches.

I’ve bitten the bullet and am getting a CAD drawing make up, templated off an original – I’ll split the cost of this, if we finalise, otherwise I’ll accept the cost (<$100-, or 1/10th of a boat-unit).  I may be more advantageous for those in EUROPE to go direct to AMEL, however, I am unsure of the price -- I recall reading, but cannot find it anywhere now, that the cost was in the order of EUR70-.  Arthur is checking his records to see if he still has this info.  If so, then I’ll report back.  In the interim, can anyone else provide further info on this???

I am in any case mindful of the desirability, where practicable, to keep sourcing from AMEL, to encourage the OEM to continue to support us and our boats.  So, that always remains an option.

In the meantime, the original appears to be galvanised (zinc-coated) iron.  So I’m obtaining a quote for that, in addition to stainless, and aluminium.

Background: the raw-material component for the iron version is likely to be cheapest, but to get it galvanised is likely to then increase the overall cost above stainless.  However, to complicate matters, the cost of machining stainless-steel here in NZ is cheaper than iron.  This is because there is more competition in the stainless-steel fabricating market.  So, I don’t yet have a definitive answer – iron -vs- ss.  As an aside, the cost of all raw materials here in NZ is rising across-the-board, due to supply-and-demand factors, on top of the cost of transport (sea freight, in particular).  For example, reportedly, the point-to-point cost of shipping a sea container has increased 2.5x to 3.5x since the beginning of the pandemic.  In addition, up-stream issues in the supply-chain is resulting in increased competition/demand at the consumer end of the pipeline, meaning suppliers are taking advantage to raise costs.  That’s the unpleasant truth of it here at the moment.  RESULT: the cost of stainless (10mm) in NZ is now over $1,075/sq.m = ~$75 per unit for the spanner.  Plus cutting, plus freight, plus anything else.  I don’t yet know where the aluminium version will sit in the scheme of things.  The ‘free’ plastic version (using a bread-board), as reported on the forum, is looking increasingly attractive, but having suffered rigidity & stability problems with convention packing-nut spanners, I wonder it that would be a problem going this route.  But we’ll see.  In the interim, I’m reminded of the quote: “Sailing is the most expensive way of getting somewhere for free.”

I discuss aspects relating to the main-outhaul shaft puller under separate cover, when I have more info.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ

Those on file as interested for the wrench for the rudder packing nut
  Mike Longcor    SM#023    Trilogy     Opua
  Keith Tice        SM#282     Bikini     Calvi, France
  Chris Paul        SM#352    Glazig        Whangarei
  David Vogel        SM#396    Perigee    Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)" <svtrilogy53@...>
Date: Monday, 17 January 2022 at 3:15 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ (outhaul puller PLUS wrench for the rudder-post-packing nut)

Hi David,

Thanks for this effort. I have a different set up for the main outhaul with my older SM so no need for the special puller. I am, however, very keen on the rudder packing nut wrench.

I have a trace of the Amel specific one that I copied from Rusty on Pitu that has the critical dimensions. Perhaps there's a better file on the forum or maybe another owner will let us borrow one. I never got around to having a shop make one for me. I've got a crude tool that does the job but would very much prefer a proper wrench as mine only grabs two sides of the nut (dangerous!).

Photo of the wrench trace/dimensions attached, which I can get to you in person if needed. I believe the wrench was made of aluminium.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022, 1:26 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

OK, I have some indicative numbers – it seems only 2 or 3 potentially for the puller for the main-outhaul.

Ross Hickey, SM#356, IntrepidKiwi
Raul Schleier, SM#344, SeaBean

I have no idea yet of the cost, as businesses here in WHargarie are just again winding up for the New year, and hence I also am just starting the contact-research on this.  As there will be only 2 or 3 units, I would not expect that it will be worthwhile to go to the trouble (and cost) of establishing a CAD/CAM file for subsequent orders.  Although I will research this lightly, I presently expect that whatever we do will be hand-crafted as ‘one-offs’.

I’ll keep you posted once I have an idea of the cost and timings – I’ll go first to the guy who did the copper keel grounding straps (where we did get a small economy of scale, mainly for the freight).

Regarding design details, I will template off what I have seen before on (or as referred to by) this forum, et al. 

BTW, I did try a conventional gear-puller for the extracting the axle for the line-handling-winch from the main-outhaul gearbox, and it was simply not up to the task; hence why I am getting a special tool made up.

I am also looking at getting a wrench made up specifically for the packing-nut on the rudder shaft gland.  Anyone interested in this???

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town Basin, Whangarei


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io" <southernadventurer=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 7:54 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,

We may also be interested the specific Amel main outhaul winch puller if one can be manufactured. Can you please advise of of cost and design details.

Ross Hickey
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently cruising Turkey
+++


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Raul Schleier <raul.schleier@...>
Date: Saturday, 15 January 2022 at 5:21 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Machining AMEL-specific tools in NZ

Hi David,
I’d be keen to join in on this if I’m not too late. I just pulled mine borrowing a home made puller from my dock neighbour. I’m planning to service the outhaul shaft regularly from now onwards so that it doesn’t stick but I will still likely need a puller some day.
We’re just down the creek in Marsden Cove Marina if we’re not out
Email: raul “at” seabean.nz
SM2k#344, SeaBean
+++



Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad
On Wednesday, January 5, 2022, 2:00 AM, David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Calling all SM owners in NZ.

Having done a small run of the copper grounding straps for the grey-water bilge, and been happy with the results, I am now planning on getting some AMEL-specific tools machined - for example, the puller for the main-outhaul line-handling winch/motor/gearbox assembly.

It may be possible to come to some kind of economy-of-scale arrangement with the fabricator/s.  Even if not, if you have any hints or tips on where to go / who to use, I would be interested to hear; or, if you're wanting to bolster your tool-kit with that special nick-knack ...

If you’re interested in getting involved, please get back to me via this forum; I would then plan to take the discussion off-line for resolving the nitty-gritty.

Thanks, and best to all,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Town-Basin, Whangarei






--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey




















--
Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond
SV Intrepid Kiwi
SM2K #356
Currently in Turkey


Re: Wide open throttle

Dean Gillies
 

Hi Richard,
As I recall, when I talked about the distance from the fluid to the mating surface, I was referring to the mating surface of the gearbox rather than the dipstick. Also, don't forget that the dipstick is designed to measure whilst not screwed home. 

Do those clarifications make any difference to your thinking? If not, I'll go back and review my docs in more detail.
Best regards
Dean
SV Stella
A54-154


Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Justin Maguire
 

Well put Olivier. 


On Jan 20, 2022, at 21:52, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:


Thank you Olivier. A timely reminder.
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
On 21/01/2022 03:16 Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...> wrote:


Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Re: Raising Boot Stripe

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thank you Olivier. A timely reminder.
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

On 21/01/2022 03:16 Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...> wrote:


Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Re: C drive transmission failure

Ira and Roman Morozov
 

Thanks, Craig! We opened it today

Roman and Ira Morozov SM2000 #320 Ginger

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