Date   

Re: Mizzen Balooner falls

JOSE PRIETO
 

Hi Chuck, Michael and Danny, 
thanks so much for the advice!

Tomorrow I’ll post a picture from the block.

Cheers,

JP
--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain


Re: Mizzen Balooner falls

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi JP, you have just reinforced my rule. I will never go up the mast on an external block halyard. On the main mast there is a spare internal halyard. On the mizzen I lower the sail and use that halyard. To replace your block I commend that method to go up.
Kind regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

On 23/05/2022 07:39 JOSE PRIETO <prietomd11@...> wrote:


Sailing with 10/12 kt downwind, Jib, Mizzen and the mizzen balloner. Calm sea.suddenly the mizzen balloner falls into the water!

I retracted the sail and found that the halyard block that is on top of the mizzen mast fell off!  Inspecting the block, it is intact, but without the shackle that holds it to the mast.  It could have been the shackle pin that broke, or there was a material failure in the fastening.  I had inspected everything 6 months ago.  Thank God the block didn't come down with me hanging!  I report this as a warning to the group, because when we have to climb the mizzen mast, we don't have another block with a cable for Security. I would like suggestions from the group on how to reinstall the block and install another one with a different cable?  Remembering that there is no other cable to climb to the top of the mast.  Will I need to remove the mast to do this?

Thanks in advance

JP

--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain


Re: Mizzen Balooner falls

Michael Winand
 

I have used the mizzen halyard as a second line. 
Michael Nebo sm251 

On Mon, 23 May 2022, 6:17 am Chuck_Kim_Joy, <clacey9@...> wrote:
Use mizzen halyard to go up the mast. Buy an additional length of rope and two new blocks. Go up and replace your port block and install a duplicate block opposite it. There is a place for a second block. Run new line. Now you have a safety static line. Wire tie blocks. 
Chuck 
Joy 388

On Sun, May 22, 2022 at 3:39 PM JOSE PRIETO <prietomd11@...> wrote:

Sailing with 10/12 kt downwind, Jib, Mizzen and the mizzen balloner. Calm sea.suddenly the mizzen balloner falls into the water!

I retracted the sail and found that the halyard block that is on top of the mizzen mast fell off!  Inspecting the block, it is intact, but without the shackle that holds it to the mast.  It could have been the shackle pin that broke, or there was a material failure in the fastening.  I had inspected everything 6 months ago.  Thank God the block didn't come down with me hanging!  I report this as a warning to the group, because when we have to climb the mizzen mast, we don't have another block with a cable for Security. I would like suggestions from the group on how to reinstall the block and install another one with a different cable?  Remembering that there is no other cable to climb to the top of the mast.  Will I need to remove the mast to do this?

Thanks in advance

JP

--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain


Re: Mizzen Balooner falls

Chuck_Kim_Joy
 

Use mizzen halyard to go up the mast. Buy an additional length of rope and two new blocks. Go up and replace your port block and install a duplicate block opposite it. There is a place for a second block. Run new line. Now you have a safety static line. Wire tie blocks. 
Chuck 
Joy 388

On Sun, May 22, 2022 at 3:39 PM JOSE PRIETO <prietomd11@...> wrote:

Sailing with 10/12 kt downwind, Jib, Mizzen and the mizzen balloner. Calm sea.suddenly the mizzen balloner falls into the water!

I retracted the sail and found that the halyard block that is on top of the mizzen mast fell off!  Inspecting the block, it is intact, but without the shackle that holds it to the mast.  It could have been the shackle pin that broke, or there was a material failure in the fastening.  I had inspected everything 6 months ago.  Thank God the block didn't come down with me hanging!  I report this as a warning to the group, because when we have to climb the mizzen mast, we don't have another block with a cable for Security. I would like suggestions from the group on how to reinstall the block and install another one with a different cable?  Remembering that there is no other cable to climb to the top of the mast.  Will I need to remove the mast to do this?

Thanks in advance

JP

--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain


Mizzen Balooner falls

JOSE PRIETO
 

Sailing with 10/12 kt downwind, Jib, Mizzen and the mizzen balloner. Calm sea.suddenly the mizzen balloner falls into the water!

I retracted the sail and found that the halyard block that is on top of the mizzen mast fell off!  Inspecting the block, it is intact, but without the shackle that holds it to the mast.  It could have been the shackle pin that broke, or there was a material failure in the fastening.  I had inspected everything 6 months ago.  Thank God the block didn't come down with me hanging!  I report this as a warning to the group, because when we have to climb the mizzen mast, we don't have another block with a cable for Security. I would like suggestions from the group on how to reinstall the block and install another one with a different cable?  Remembering that there is no other cable to climb to the top of the mast.  Will I need to remove the mast to do this?

Thanks in advance

JP

--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain


Re: Galley sink

Kristen Schmit
 

Thanks Bill.  Also looking at simply replacing, but then May need whole new counter (not a bad thing😀) due to the integrated side board.  Thanks!
Kris
Kiana
SM#362


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2022 1:58:45 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Galley sink
 
Kristen,

Not exactly the same... but close.  On my old boat I built a sink out of mahogany and finished it with two-part polyurethane varnish.  It was a robust finish that took all the routine abuse that a sink in daily use gets.

Based on that, I'd expect a two-part polyurethane paint like Awlgrip to be a good choice.  

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Galley sink

Bill Kinney
 

Kristen,

Not exactly the same... but close.  On my old boat I built a sink out of mahogany and finished it with two-part polyurethane varnish.  It was a robust finish that took all the routine abuse that a sink in daily use gets.

Based on that, I'd expect a two-part polyurethane paint like Awlgrip to be a good choice.  

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Le Marin, Martinique


Galley sink

Kristen Schmit
 

Has anyone tried painting the galley sink?  Not fond of the existing mustard color on the SMM

Kristen Schmit
s/v Kiana


SPURS Line Cutter

WASABI - Rudolf Waldispuehl
 

Hi Amelia's 
I need to order a new SPURS Line cuter and I'm not sure about size and type. I think it is: Spurs B 1 ½ ".
Can anybody please confirm if it's the right one?
Does anybody know a source in Europe? 
Thanks and best regards
Ruedi Waldispuehl, 
WASABI A54 #55, 
Zakynthos - GR


Re: Genoa Furler Mods, a la Amel Caraibe

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Bill, I had the same experience as you with the alloy tab wearing through .....twice before I discovered the nylon pencil. When we got Ocean Pearl home to NZ with the rigging over 10 years old I had riggers replace the forestay and while they were at it I had them put new bearings in the furler as a preventative while the forestay was down. I assumed this unique piece of Amel had got lost in the process. I may or may not be right in my assumption. However, now it is fitted I don't expect a repeat. I was having trouble fitting it as it wouldn't fit in through the slot at the bottom of the foil and I thought I would have to remove the foil from the gearbox to slide it up from the bottom. After trying every thing I could think of I called in a trusted rigger. When I looked away he gave it a sharp whack with a plastic  hammer and in it went.
Kind Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl 

On 22/05/2022 09:21 Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:


Danny,

My understanding is that the "pin" was introduced sometime later in the Super Maramu production cycle than our boat.  Possibly with the 2000 model year when there were other changes to the design of the swivel, for example, the GRP sleeve on the inside (ours is all aluminum).  

Not completely clear on timing of the change, since the amount of French on our side and the amount of English on Amel's side doesn't always allow for perfect communication!  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Le Marin, Martinique


Workaround failing GPS

Nick Newington
 

Further to my question regarding setting up Navnet 2 with mushroom style GPS receiver.

I set up the inexpensive receiver just tie wrapped above the chart table along with an Actisense repeater to provide multiple devices with data. The mushroom GPS is connected to a power on/off toggle switch the same as the GP90.
I had problems with setting up the Navnet to accept the New GPS source. I had to run the set up wizard every time I powered up the Navnet.
My latest workaround is to turn on the Navnet with GPS off, then it alarms “no position”.
I then turn on the toggle for the GPS and power that up and hey presto it works every time.

I stumbled upon it accidentally. I forgot to turn on the GPS! The alarm rang. Turned on the GPS toggle…hey presto.

I can not explain this but it works…

I am not too keen on workarounds, the boat needs to function such that any 54 owner could step onboard and know exactly what to do…however a small sticker would do it…
Nick
S/Y Amelia
AML54-019
Anchored Aperlae and ancient sunken port Southern Turkey


Re: Genoa Furler Mods, a la Amel Caraibe

Bill Kinney
 

Danny,

My understanding is that the "pin" was introduced sometime later in the Super Maramu production cycle than our boat.  Possibly with the 2000 model year when there were other changes to the design of the swivel, for example, the GRP sleeve on the inside (ours is all aluminum).  

Not completely clear on timing of the change, since the amount of French on our side and the amount of English on Amel's side doesn't always allow for perfect communication!  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Genoa Furler Mods, a la Amel Caraibe

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Bill, I thought that  you pin with slot was original
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

On 21/05/2022 13:11 Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:


We have been in Martinique having some maintenance done by Alban and his crew.  It is a real delight to deal with professional boat mechanics who understand Amel Yachts inside and out.  Here are a couple modifications to the original design that Amel has come up with to improve the functionality and longevity of the genoa furling system.  Some of these have been discussed before on this forum, but I don't remember seeing any photos...

First, is the method of securing the manual furling drum. This has been mentioned on the forum before, but a photo might help.  The original factory system used rivets. Eventually, the reversing loads distort the soft metal of the rivet, and they fail.  In the process of failing, the holes in the aluminum foil are distorted making a repair more complex. It was a quick and easy system to assemble when building the boats, but not good for the long run.



The new and improved system uses these metal blocks that fit inside grooves of the foil, and are threaded to accept a machine screw. It's not obvious from the photo, but there are two blocks, and each block uses two screws. This is a MUCH more secure system than rivets, or anything else that just engages with the holes in the foil to transmit the torque. Way better than the solution I came up with.

The second change is not one I remember reading about before.  Inside the headstay swivel there is a small aluminum tab that engages with the groove for the genoa luff tape that forces the proper alignment of the lower part of the swivel with the foil so the latch for the ballonner mouse works as designed. An important part. I was sure ours would be in excellent shape, after all it was replaced just 18 months ago by Nance and Underwood in Fort Lauderdale.  Here is what we saw when we removed the swivel:



Sorry for the quality of the photo, which makes it a little hard to see...  The aluminum key has lost almost half of its thickness.  A few more months of rigorous sailing and it would have broken off. The issue here is that the key is loaded from one side, and then the other, as you furl and unfurl the sail.  Not only does this wear at the key, it also wears on the foil:



The arrow points to the part of the genoa luff groove where the swivel is at full hoist.  You can see that it has been deformed (especially in the "furl in" direction). As this gap get wider, the key bangs back and forth more, and it wears more, and causes more damage to the foil in an unfortunate spiral.

The good news is the guys here have a solution.  Once again, I have to apologize for the photo, but things got assembled before I realized that things were not as clear as I had hoped...



They make this plastic part they call a "pin" that slides up the luff groove with the swivel. It has a slot to accept the standard aluminum tab.  Now, instead of the tab bearing against the sides of the luff groove, the "pin" distributes the load across a wide area. This prevents wear on the pin and on the foil.  Brilliant.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Near constant hot water without a generator - Here is how i did it.

Craig Briggs
 

The original Isotemp heaters did use the standard 1" element - they had orange insulating jackets and mine from 2002 is still ticking, with many patches and replaced elements. The current silver-jacketed model uses a different (proprietary?) element as Alan describes. Btw, Indel-Webasto uses the Isotherm brand name for their refrigeration equipment and Isotemp for the water heaters - same company (probably part of Dometic). The water heaters were originally a product of Thermoproduktur AB in Sweden.

Anyway, here's a link to a DC standard 1" element, with a 12v 200w version and a 24v 600w version. The arithmetic would say those would draw 16.6 and 25 amps respectively. The seller has a specific warning: "DO NOT USE GRID POWER AS IT WILL IMMEDIATELY DESTROY THE ELEMENT!" 
https://windandsolar.com/6-inch-dc-submersible-water-heater-element/

The thermostats are simply bi-metal snap-open temperature switches and do not care about AC vs DC. 
--
Craig Briggs - s/v Sangaris / SN68  Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: Near constant hot water without a generator - Here is how i did it.

Alan Leslie
 
Edited

1.The Isotherm element is not a one-nut job - Google it you'll see - not an easy substitute - in fact probably impossible-it's a simple element with two nuts bolted to a flange -  I know, I've changed a few over the last 20 years.
2.Power (W) is a square function of voltage so a reduction to one tenth of voltage equates to a 100th reduction in power (W=Vsqd/R)  so if you ran your 240V 750W element on 24V you'd get 7.5W
Sorry to burst your bubbles

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Genoa Furler Mods, a la Amel Caraibe

Bill Kinney
 

We have been in Martinique having some maintenance done by Alban and his crew.  It is a real delight to deal with professional boat mechanics who understand Amel Yachts inside and out.  Here are a couple modifications to the original design that Amel has come up with to improve the functionality and longevity of the genoa furling system.  Some of these have been discussed before on this forum, but I don't remember seeing any photos...

First, is the method of securing the manual furling drum. This has been mentioned on the forum before, but a photo might help.  The original factory system used rivets. Eventually, the reversing loads distort the soft metal of the rivet, and they fail.  In the process of failing, the holes in the aluminum foil are distorted making a repair more complex. It was a quick and easy system to assemble when building the boats, but not good for the long run.



The new and improved system uses these metal blocks that fit inside grooves of the foil, and are threaded to accept a machine screw. It's not obvious from the photo, but there are two blocks, and each block uses two screws. This is a MUCH more secure system than rivets, or anything else that just engages with the holes in the foil to transmit the torque. Way better than the solution I came up with.

The second change is not one I remember reading about before.  Inside the headstay swivel there is a small aluminum tab that engages with the groove for the genoa luff tape that forces the proper alignment of the lower part of the swivel with the foil so the latch for the ballonner mouse works as designed. An important part. I was sure ours would be in excellent shape, after all it was replaced just 18 months ago by Nance and Underwood in Fort Lauderdale.  Here is what we saw when we removed the swivel:



Sorry for the quality of the photo, which makes it a little hard to see...  The aluminum key has lost almost half of its thickness.  A few more months of rigorous sailing and it would have broken off. The issue here is that the key is loaded from one side, and then the other, as you furl and unfurl the sail.  Not only does this wear at the key, it also wears on the foil:



The arrow points to the part of the genoa luff groove where the swivel is at full hoist.  You can see that it has been deformed (especially in the "furl in" direction). As this gap get wider, the key bangs back and forth more, and it wears more, and causes more damage to the foil in an unfortunate spiral.

The good news is the guys here have a solution.  Once again, I have to apologize for the photo, but things got assembled before I realized that things were not as clear as I had hoped...



They make this plastic part they call a "pin" that slides up the luff groove with the swivel. It has a slot to accept the standard aluminum tab.  Now, instead of the tab bearing against the sides of the luff groove, the "pin" distributes the load across a wide area. This prevents wear on the pin and on the foil.  Brilliant.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Welcome New Owner of Phantom

Dean Gillies
 

Hi Ruslan,
Congratulations! I cast an eye over Phantom's details when Jamie listed her and she is certainly an impressive vessel. Fair winds, I hope you enjoy many great voyages.
Cheers
Dean

Sent from my iPhone X

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Re: Introduction - and some help on fridges pls

Tom Crosbie
 
Edited

I should have been more specific with the model.

My new one is an Isotherm Cruise Classic - there is also the Isotherm Cruise Elegance which may be the version you got as that one has a stainless steel door.
The Classic door is more basic (and a bit cheaper) - it comes with a plastic catch which I removed as the catch is only doing what Amel's nice timber rotating catch does anyway. Removing the catch allowed the original wooden panel to fit perfectly flush to the door surface - I needed a filler strip of about 23mm thickness to make up for the fact that the new door is slightly narrower. I suspect the classic door might be lighter also.
Is it too late to swap the model?

Regarding the Intelligent controller I decided against also. Isotherm will sell you a conversion kit which the say will work but even though my fridge was being shipped new made directly from the factory the don't install the option themselves! For now I am happy to keep it simple. I also left out the 220V shore power option for simplicity as it appeared just another thing that complicates.

Good luck with the install.
Tom


Re: Airmar 220WX weather station ?

Bill Kinney
 

Paul,

I had one of these on my old boat, and it worked, although there were a few issues.  

Don't count on using the internal GPS for a boat speed signal for example. When the boat rolls, the waving back and forth of the mast counts as boat speed.

It is hard to mount them far enough away from the top of the sails to get away from the updraft.  As far as I know, nobody makes a bracket for moving them forward of the mast to solve this.  The alternative is to mount them quite high. These all mount on a 1" diameter pole, that can leave a significant blind spot when mounted close to a masthead navigation light.

Look carefully at the mounting guidelines in the manual.  The specifications say at least 1 meter away from a VHF antenna, for example. That might be tough. to achieve on top of the mast.

Back when I installed mine ~10 years ago, they listed one of their models specifically for use on sailboats.  They no longer do that in any of the literature I can find.  Before I used one again, I'd want to know why.

I keep looking for the LCJ version of these, but it is very hard to come by outside of Europe. I am hoping to have a chance to talk to Pochon about them here in Martinique.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Le Marin, Martinique.


Re: Airmar 220WX weather station ?

Billy Newport
 

I have one on top of my main mast. Lasted about 21k NM or 4 years before it failed. 1200 bucks for the replacement. It works and produces low frequency data. Never tried to use it with our 711c autopilot though.

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