Date   

Re: Small Fire in LED light - Forward Head - see word attachment

Tony Elliott
 

Bill, by all means.

I'll give another example of this to expand the subject.

I recently bought a new VHF radio for installation in Grand Cru. In the package was a power cable with an in-line replaceable fuse. I've connected it to a switch on a Blue Sea DC Distribution panel that is at my Nav station that already has a higher current rated breaker than that rated for the fuse. The fuse goes in line after the breaker/switch to protect the radio. The DC panel is a standard commercial product with, I believe, a variety of breaker ratings (for a total of 45A) but the supplied fuse and in-line receptacle is that recommended and supplied by the accessory manufacturer. If it is in place and the radio fails and blows the fuse, you can clearly state to the manufacturer that it was protected using their recommended and supplied protection devices.

I have the same situation on a new RayMarine Quantum Radar connected to the same DC distribution system. 

Breakers are fine if they are changed to reflect any change in technology or purpose for a circuit but it is often overlooked. A simple fuse that matches the rating defined by the accessory manufacturer, while not as convenient as a breaker, is invariably a better choice for equipment protection and for possible warranty claims later.

I'll restate the moral statement I used earlier:

The moral here is that changing ANY existing ELECTRICAL circuit technology OR PURPOSE has broader ramifications than you might think. It requires careful re-consideration of protection devices. Better to blow a fuse or breaker early than having something "sizzling" in a place you may not necessarily be fortunate enough to hear!

Tony
SM#443, Grand Cru


Re: Chain Counter Sensor Connector A54

Roque
 

Hi Dean

In addition to all previews comments:

1. Yes, the sensor is just a reed switch. While I was waiting for a replacement, I “fabricated” one using a reed switch inside a plastic tube (BIC pen). The reed switches cost  US 1 a dozen. I still have the Lewmar new one in the box as a spare! 

2. I would begin by replacing the magnet. Easy task, also inexpensive on Ebay.

3. I never found a conector along the wire but  I suppose there is none. The wire is very unlikely to be the problem. 

Roque
Attika A-54 # 117
Paraty. Brazil

Em sex., 3 de jun. de 2022 às 05:55, Nick Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> escreveu:

Hi Dean,

I replaced my non functioning Lewmar chain counter with the Lofrans version (Iris) a couple of years ago. Has been perfect ever since. 
I changed the sensor and the magnet. The sensor is mounted  from below the windlass. I tried yanking the old one out by the wire but broke it. So I drilled it out. I then inserted the new one and sealed it in place with silicon.

I then spliced the new cables to old with solder and heat shrink tubing.

The magnet too, which is on the gypsy got drilled out and a new one epoxied in its place.

The whole installation up forward was pretty easy. The wiring above the galley sink was harder, from a dexterity point of view.

Nick
S/Y Amelia
AML54-019
Turkey


On 3 Jun 2022, at 10:55, Dimitris Krasopoulos <dkrasopoulos@...> wrote:

Push the connector up it has the tendency to fall put some chewing gum or some plastic clay to keep it in place as much up as possible. The magnet in the gypsy is easy to inspect . It can be damaged from the salt and can easily been replaced if necessary. Do not turn the Gypsy upside down as the position of the magnet is different and you are going to have no signal at all



=================
Στάλθηκε από το iPhone of Dimitris Krasopoulos 
Mob Greek +306944302318
Mob Dubai
+971564602575

On Jun 3, 2022, at 9:28 AM, Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:



Hi Amelians,

I'm having a problem with the chain counter sensor of my Lewmar V4/5 windlass (Amel 54). The control head unit in the cockpit is the AA560. I assume this sensor is just a reed switch which triggers with each rotation of the gypsy as the magnet passes overhead. 

The problem shows up as random counting (and beeping) and the diagnostic check shows the sensor output being "unstable". The voltages displaying on the AA560 diagnostic check are unstable, flickering between 4.8-5.0V on the red connection and 0-2V on the black connection.

So, it looks like I have either a faulty sensor or a problem in the wiring/connectors.  I have checked the cable connections at the terminal block behind the AA560 head unit and they look fine. 

In the fore-locker I can see the grey cable coming out of the windlass bottom plate where the sensor is located. The cable (along with the main power cabling for the windlass motor) then runs into some conduits and around into the switch panel in the box in the aft starboard corner of the fore-locker.

It seems to run through that locker (difficult to see) and out into a conduit that runs across the top of the locker and then aft into the boat.  

The questions in my mind at the moment:

Is there a connector somewhere along this sensor cable run that could be faulty, or is it a single cable run from the sensor to the terminal block behind the control head?

Is it easy to remove that sensor from the windlass plate? How? Is it glued in there?

Has someone trodden this path before me and can offer some guidance?
 
In the meantime, I will disconnect the cable behind the control head to stop the beeping!

Many thanks

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


--
Roque
Attika A54 117
Paraty - Brazil 


Re: Chain Counter Sensor Connector A54

Nick Newington
 

Hi Dean,

I replaced my non functioning Lewmar chain counter with the Lofrans version (Iris) a couple of years ago. Has been perfect ever since. 
I changed the sensor and the magnet. The sensor is mounted  from below the windlass. I tried yanking the old one out by the wire but broke it. So I drilled it out. I then inserted the new one and sealed it in place with silicon.

I then spliced the new cables to old with solder and heat shrink tubing.

The magnet too, which is on the gypsy got drilled out and a new one epoxied in its place.

The whole installation up forward was pretty easy. The wiring above the galley sink was harder, from a dexterity point of view.

Nick
S/Y Amelia
AML54-019
Turkey


On 3 Jun 2022, at 10:55, Dimitris Krasopoulos <dkrasopoulos@...> wrote:

Push the connector up it has the tendency to fall put some chewing gum or some plastic clay to keep it in place as much up as possible. The magnet in the gypsy is easy to inspect . It can be damaged from the salt and can easily been replaced if necessary. Do not turn the Gypsy upside down as the position of the magnet is different and you are going to have no signal at all


=================
Στάλθηκε από το iPhone of Dimitris Krasopoulos 
Mob Greek +306944302318
Mob Dubai
+971564602575

On Jun 3, 2022, at 9:28 AM, Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:



Hi Amelians,

I'm having a problem with the chain counter sensor of my Lewmar V4/5 windlass (Amel 54). The control head unit in the cockpit is the AA560. I assume this sensor is just a reed switch which triggers with each rotation of the gypsy as the magnet passes overhead. 

The problem shows up as random counting (and beeping) and the diagnostic check shows the sensor output being "unstable". The voltages displaying on the AA560 diagnostic check are unstable, flickering between 4.8-5.0V on the red connection and 0-2V on the black connection.

So, it looks like I have either a faulty sensor or a problem in the wiring/connectors.  I have checked the cable connections at the terminal block behind the AA560 head unit and they look fine. 

In the fore-locker I can see the grey cable coming out of the windlass bottom plate where the sensor is located. The cable (along with the main power cabling for the windlass motor) then runs into some conduits and around into the switch panel in the box in the aft starboard corner of the fore-locker.

It seems to run through that locker (difficult to see) and out into a conduit that runs across the top of the locker and then aft into the boat.  

The questions in my mind at the moment:

Is there a connector somewhere along this sensor cable run that could be faulty, or is it a single cable run from the sensor to the terminal block behind the control head?

Is it easy to remove that sensor from the windlass plate? How? Is it glued in there?

Has someone trodden this path before me and can offer some guidance?
 
In the meantime, I will disconnect the cable behind the control head to stop the beeping!

Many thanks

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Re: Chain Counter Sensor Connector A54

Dimitris Krasopoulos
 

Push the connector up it has the tendency to fall put some chewing gum or some plastic clay to keep it in place as much up as possible. The magnet in the gypsy is easy to inspect . It can be damaged from the salt and can easily been replaced if necessary. Do not turn the Gypsy upside down as the position of the magnet is different and you are going to have no signal at all


=================
Στάλθηκε από το iPhone of Dimitris Krasopoulos 
Mob Greek +306944302318
Mob Dubai
+971564602575

On Jun 3, 2022, at 9:28 AM, Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:



Hi Amelians,

I'm having a problem with the chain counter sensor of my Lewmar V4/5 windlass (Amel 54). The control head unit in the cockpit is the AA560. I assume this sensor is just a reed switch which triggers with each rotation of the gypsy as the magnet passes overhead. 

The problem shows up as random counting (and beeping) and the diagnostic check shows the sensor output being "unstable". The voltages displaying on the AA560 diagnostic check are unstable, flickering between 4.8-5.0V on the red connection and 0-2V on the black connection.

So, it looks like I have either a faulty sensor or a problem in the wiring/connectors.  I have checked the cable connections at the terminal block behind the AA560 head unit and they look fine. 

In the fore-locker I can see the grey cable coming out of the windlass bottom plate where the sensor is located. The cable (along with the main power cabling for the windlass motor) then runs into some conduits and around into the switch panel in the box in the aft starboard corner of the fore-locker.

It seems to run through that locker (difficult to see) and out into a conduit that runs across the top of the locker and then aft into the boat.  

The questions in my mind at the moment:

Is there a connector somewhere along this sensor cable run that could be faulty, or is it a single cable run from the sensor to the terminal block behind the control head?

Is it easy to remove that sensor from the windlass plate? How? Is it glued in there?

Has someone trodden this path before me and can offer some guidance?
 
In the meantime, I will disconnect the cable behind the control head to stop the beeping!

Many thanks

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Re: Chain Counter Sensor Connector A54

Vladan SV PAME
 

Hi Dean,

I can’t answer about routing of sensor cable but can give you idea as I changed mine sensor recently

Before you change sensor check magnet on gipsy. Some time dirt is accumulating there.

Sensor is glued or use silicon but be careful with the distance from gipsy when you installing Should not be too far away from surface as will not ‘see’ magnet.

Hope this helps.

Best Regards,
Vladan
A54 #157
SV PAME


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Dean Gillies <stella@...>
Sent: Friday, June 3, 2022 9:28:50 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Chain Counter Sensor Connector A54
 

Hi Amelians,

I'm having a problem with the chain counter sensor of my Lewmar V4/5 windlass (Amel 54). The control head unit in the cockpit is the AA560. I assume this sensor is just a reed switch which triggers with each rotation of the gypsy as the magnet passes overhead. 

The problem shows up as random counting (and beeping) and the diagnostic check shows the sensor output being "unstable". The voltages displaying on the AA560 diagnostic check are unstable, flickering between 4.8-5.0V on the red connection and 0-2V on the black connection.

So, it looks like I have either a faulty sensor or a problem in the wiring/connectors.  I have checked the cable connections at the terminal block behind the AA560 head unit and they look fine. 

In the fore-locker I can see the grey cable coming out of the windlass bottom plate where the sensor is located. The cable (along with the main power cabling for the windlass motor) then runs into some conduits and around into the switch panel in the box in the aft starboard corner of the fore-locker.

It seems to run through that locker (difficult to see) and out into a conduit that runs across the top of the locker and then aft into the boat.  

The questions in my mind at the moment:

Is there a connector somewhere along this sensor cable run that could be faulty, or is it a single cable run from the sensor to the terminal block behind the control head?

Is it easy to remove that sensor from the windlass plate? How? Is it glued in there?

Has someone trodden this path before me and can offer some guidance?
 
In the meantime, I will disconnect the cable behind the control head to stop the beeping!

Many thanks

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


--
Vladan

A54 #157
SV PAME


Chain Counter Sensor Connector A54

Dean Gillies
 

Hi Amelians,

I'm having a problem with the chain counter sensor of my Lewmar V4/5 windlass (Amel 54). The control head unit in the cockpit is the AA560. I assume this sensor is just a reed switch which triggers with each rotation of the gypsy as the magnet passes overhead. 

The problem shows up as random counting (and beeping) and the diagnostic check shows the sensor output being "unstable". The voltages displaying on the AA560 diagnostic check are unstable, flickering between 4.8-5.0V on the red connection and 0-2V on the black connection.

So, it looks like I have either a faulty sensor or a problem in the wiring/connectors.  I have checked the cable connections at the terminal block behind the AA560 head unit and they look fine. 

In the fore-locker I can see the grey cable coming out of the windlass bottom plate where the sensor is located. The cable (along with the main power cabling for the windlass motor) then runs into some conduits and around into the switch panel in the box in the aft starboard corner of the fore-locker.

It seems to run through that locker (difficult to see) and out into a conduit that runs across the top of the locker and then aft into the boat.  

The questions in my mind at the moment:

Is there a connector somewhere along this sensor cable run that could be faulty, or is it a single cable run from the sensor to the terminal block behind the control head?

Is it easy to remove that sensor from the windlass plate? How? Is it glued in there?

Has someone trodden this path before me and can offer some guidance?
 
In the meantime, I will disconnect the cable behind the control head to stop the beeping!

Many thanks

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Re: How to change the veneer on the companionway without removing the dodger

Johannes Schmidt
 

Hey Alex, we went for the option to cut out a piece of the rail on the inside (port side) of the sliding door with a FEIN Multimaster blade, then lifted it up and took it out completely. We just got a completely new veneer that's looks excellent. The cut - out trim piece was reseated with some brass - screws, so the door could be easily removed again.

We also found a suitable profile for the lower joint / seal from a car window seal.

Good luck on this!

Johannes


Re: Observation on using 12v Lifepo4 batteries in serial/parallel (probably applicable to lead, too)

Dean Gillies
 

Scott,
I'm still not convinced a balancer will help. 

I suspect your batteries will not show much imbalance if you check them at lower states of charge. The balancer only has time to do its job at the top end when the voltage of one battery kicks up before the other.  Maybe you can check this and log the imbalance at different states of charge. If your batteries are out of balance across the entire SOC range then maybe there is a case for an external balancer.

Series-connected lead batteries will definitely not self-balance, and will get progressively worse on each cycle.

Series-connected lithium batteries may try to self-balance, it depends upon how the cell balancing is configured. The cell-balancers provide an amount of bypass current which effectively does not (over)charge that battery, but will contribute charge to a second (lower voltage) battery.  The problem is that the bypass currents are very small, and only start when the first battery is almost fully charged so there is not enough time to bring the second battery up quickly enough.  So in practical terms the effect will not solve an imbalance problem.

Solar top balancing will help but timing is a problem. My bank takes about 4-5hours to fully balance after the pack reaches the balancing start voltage, and this only really happens in practice when on shore power.
  

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Re: SM Genoa Furler question

Bill Kinney
 

As we were re-assembling our furler with the Amel Martinique team, my understanding was they thought these bushings were very important.  It seems to me they would be, otherwise the inside of the furling drum  would rub on the swage, and be off-center from the weight of the furling motor. There would be a significant bending stress on the whole system where the foil attaches to the furling drum.

Unfortunately, we got all that together before we thought to measure, so I'm afraid I can't help with dimensions.  From a materials standpoint, either Delrin or UHMWPE would seem an excellent choice. If you need one pair, it would be just as cheap to make 10, and have a lifetime supply.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Le Marin, Martinique


Re: How to change the veneer on the companionway without removing the dodger

Eric Freedman
 

 

Here are some photos,

I thought that replacing the teak under the guides was a waste of effort as well as the teak that is never visible at the bottom of the companionway .

I replaced it with Formica brand “teak Color” laminate.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Alex Lomakin via groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2022 1:08 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] How to change the veneer on the companionway without removing the dodger

 

Dear Eric,

I could not get to your site to look at the photos on veneer replacement.

Could you please send them to me.

Thank you very much,

Alex
Super Maramu #416, Silver Star


Re: Engine BETA vs Yanmar

Eric Freedman
 

I Do not think you can buy the 4jh4 series in the USA.

I don’t know about the rest of the world.

The new 4jh4 has 16 valves and hums like a fine sewing machine.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Matt Salatino via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2022 8:13 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Engine BETA vs Yanmar

 

I’m a Yanmar fan, having repowered my previous boat with one, before commonrail and computer controls. If the new Yanmar is truly mechanical, I would go with it again, but if not, I would install a Beta.


Re: Emergency Navigation

Paul Stascavage
 

For those who want to use Open CPN or another navigation package that is not available for IOS or Android tablets, you can install an app such as  Splashtop (there are plenty out there) on both the computer running the program as well as the tablet.  These apps allow the tablet to view and manage what is on the computer or laptop.  So, if you were running Open CPN on your laptop at the nav station, you could project the laptop screen onto the tablet at the helm station.  The navigation software can be manipulated from either the tablet or the computer. In the case of Splashtop, you can download the apps for free and you don't need to purchase a subscription unless you want to utilize the functionality over the internet.  As long as both devices are on the same wifi network, they can communicate with each other without a subscription.  In the attached photo, the laptop is running Open CPN and the iPad is connecting remotely to the laptop using Splashtop.





Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
Brunswick Landing Marina - Brunswick, GA

www.RitaKathryn.com

 


Re: Small Fire in LED light - Forward Head - see word attachment

 

Tony,

Excellent and I am going to quote you if it is OK.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   

On Thu, Jun 2, 2022 at 12:03 PM Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:
Excellent advice Tony.


--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154






Re: Observation on using 12v Lifepo4 batteries in serial/parallel (probably applicable to lead, too)

Scott SV Tengah
 

Thanks for the explanation - certainly over my pay grade, but it helps me understand where my thinking was wrong.

I'll let everyone know if the high/low voltages swap around with the batteries.

Regarding the balancer, do you think my use-case is a bit different and therefore it may make sense to include a balancer? It is extremely rare that I run the genset to charge to 100%. Typically I stop at 90%, when cell voltages are still far from the upper "knee" and just let the solar do the rest. I do notice that if I pump 200amps in to the batteries until full, the battery temp (Victron batteries report temp via bluetooth) increases a lot more than if I reduce this tail current. And knowing that lithium don't love heat combined with high SOC, I avoid it.

In any event, I wonder if the much lower currents and longer duration of solar top balancing gives the balancers enough time to do their magic?




--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Observation on using 12v Lifepo4 batteries in serial/parallel (probably applicable to lead, too)

Scott SV Tengah
 

Hi Dean,

 

Since we rarely use the generator, charging is *generally* not at high currents. Our solar is limited to 35amps and as we all know, max output is rarely held for long. If I do run the genset, I typically stop at 90% SOC, where the batteries are still well below absorption voltage and current is still at max.

 

My understand is that imbalances between batteries in a serial pair typically do not sort themselves out. This was told to me when I had gel batteries and re-iterated by Victron when I installed my lithium serial-parallel bank. While extended charge times may allow the cells within an individual 12.8v battery to equalize, it will not even out disparities between batteries in a serial pair. Victron even states that in their instructions.

 

Is Victron incorrect here?

 

From: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Dean Gillies <stella@...>
Reply-To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, June 2, 2022 at 4:36 AM
To: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Observation on using 12v Lifepo4 batteries in serial/parallel (probably applicable to lead, too)

 

Scott,
John makes a couple of good points.

Each of the batteries balances itself by providing a current bypass for the cells with higher voltages, at some stage near the end of the charge cycle this process could divert current from the cells in one battery whereas the other battery will continue to charge.  By reducing the current it extends the timeline and gives the lower battery time to catch up and balance.

The other point is that John is charging to 28.8V, this will also extend the time that the cells are balancing, and thereby help reduce the imbalance in the batteries.

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Small Fire in LED light - Forward Head - see word attachment

Dean Gillies
 

Excellent advice Tony.


--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Re: Amel 54 - Volkswagen TDI Cooling

Wolfgang Weber
 

Pictures of cap and cable to sensor


Amel 54 - Volkswagen TDI Cooling

Wolfgang Weber
 

Hello to the group,
I think there are the last 10  AMEL 54 with a Volkswagen 140 HP engine . It is a nice engine which runs 400.000 km in a VW T4 bus.  To find a  service for changing the timing belt is sometimes a problem.
I have the contact of the man  from Volkswagen who made  the training for mechanics on VW-Marine motors and  is always a great help for problems.
I had a loss of coolingfluid due to a leakage of a little black rubber cap - located under the fuel filter . My VW-man told me that this is a known problem which occured by  spilling fuel on the cap when changing the fuel filter.
The cap costs 12 € and can be ordered at a normal VW service station . Part number  06D 133 335 A .

Don´t expect an alarm for loss of coolingfluid -the sensor for coolwaterlevel is not connected ! because of the isolated ground of Amel !

For contact my VW-man  www.der-marine-tdi-shop.de



Wolfgang 
SY Elise Amel 54 # 162 La Rochelle


Re: Small Fire in LED light - Forward Head - see word attachment

Tony Elliott
 

Chris,

It is important to know that, as Bill noted, the original circuits were designed for higher current draw devices - specifically the G4 Halogen bulbs. These bulbs draw amps (a 24 wattt bulb in a 24V system would pull 1amp for example).instead of milli-amps as is the case with most LED replacements.

The breakers are designed to protect and handle the higher current capability of the Halogen bulbs - typically several in parallel pulling 4, 6, 8amps or so. Bulbs like this, in general, fail by going open circuit - they "burn out" and the filament is broken - this reduces the current flow in the circuit when a light fails. There is generally very little in a filament bulb that can cause it to short which in turn causes higher current to flow.

The failure mechanisms for a voltage regulator circuit as used in these LED bulbs can be open circuit but invariably it is a short circuit which, if not properly fused, can lead to high current, heat and possibly fires.

So, when making what appear to be simple decisions about replacing a halogen bulb for an LED equivalent, due consideration should be given to the likelihood of failure (don't read the hype on the product labels as there are more failure mechanisms involved in the voltage regulated, LED circuit than there is in a Halogen filament bulb), the failure mode - invariably an internal circuit short, and the secondary method of protecting the lighting circuit. I will give you an example here that is applicable to my SM.

All of the original Nav lights on my SM had failed for various reasons. I chose to replace them with Hella LED Port, Starboard and Stern 2NM lights. In the manual accompanying the lights, it states that the light should be protected by a 3A fuse. The breaker on the 24V panel is 10A. If a short cct were to occur in one of the LED lamp regulator circuits, or a capacitor in that circuit blows for whatever reason, that circuit would be pulling more than 10Amps before the breaker would trip. Depending on the nature of the circuit failure in the LED lamp, that could last for a few seconds to possibly much longer, heating the wire, the breaker, and/or the circuit in the lamp  which could easily create a fire.

The LED lights only pull 0.08A (80mA) each at 24V so, in my case, I chose to open the breaker panel and insert a changeable fuse on the supply line to cater for this difference. Now, if a failure occurs, the 3A fuse will blow well before the breaker would trip and the likelihood of something like a fire is reduced significantly. The down side of this approach of course is convenience since the breaker panel needs to be pulled if the lights fail. It is likely that the Diruptor would not have tripped so to check the fuse you would need to pull the panel. I have not been able to find a 3A "Dirupter' in my inventory or anywhere else as this would be the ideal solution. An alternate is to mount a series of panel mounted fuses as you go through this process and connect the Diruptor output through the fuses as you change to LED's.

The moral here is that changing your existing light circuit technology has broader ramifications than you might think. 

FWIW.

Tony, 
SM#443, Grand Cru


Re: Near constant hot water without a generator - Here is how i did it.

JOSE PRIETO
 

I will try!

Thanks Craig!
By the way, I found some elements 24 vdc on Chinese websites.

Cheers,

JP
--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain

2001 - 2020 of 65624