Date   

Maramu stuffing box issue

Dave_Benjamin
 

The boat is in Mexico and I'm in the states doing some shopping. Before I left I noted that our stuffing box is attached to the log with 2 inch (51mm) hose. When I went to buy a new stuffing box today I discovered they are set up for 2.5 inch hose not 2 inch. I am wondering if someone cut some threads inside the existing stuffing box and screwed in a 2 inch diam tailpiece. If that's the common scheme it would be easy enought to duplicate. I'd like to know as much as possible before we haul the boat.

Our boat has a 1 3/8 inch shaft and it's been repowered with a Yanmar so there is actually a lot of room behind the engine.

Regards,

Dave Benjamin
Maramu #29


Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

Hardy Stock <hardystock@...>
 

________________________________
From: Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Mon, November 15, 2010 12:57:55 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

 
Hi Danny & Yvonne,
   What happened to the marvellous Amel shaft alternator system......on my
Santorin, it provided about 60% of our power needs crossing the Atlantic, (light
winds - slow crossing), but on the Pacific crossing it supplied all the power to
keep the batteries fully charged.  You lose about 1/2 Kt boat speed, but the
security was worth it!
Where we are now, (in Phuket, geriatric day sailing), it is a terrific booster
to bring the batteries up quickly after a night at anchor.
   If Amel have stopped fitting them, I'm sorry but I consider it a backwards
step, which is unusual for Amel.
  Is there anyway one could be fitted, or does the new gearbox on the Amel's not
allow the prop to rotate under sail?

Mike & Chris
Santorin, Akwaaba
Phuket

--- On Sun, 11/14/10, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Sunday, November 14, 2010, 7:00 PM

 

Hi Anthony, we have a Super Maramu. We intended to do extended ocean crossings
and for us the issue was one of security. To rely solely on engine produced
electricity seemed high risk to us. Sarter motors and alternators can fail, fuel
can be contaminated. We wanted a power source that would at least keep our
instruments and radio going in the event of a failure. We fitted a  Super Wind
350 generator to the top of the mizzen. It is a robust unit designed for use in
remote locations with mechanically feathering blades for extreme winds. At deck
and cabin level we never hear it, and certainly no vibration. If there is 20
knots of wind it's output is formidable, under 10 knots, very little. We also
mounted two 150 watt solar panels with clamps on the port rail aft of the
cockpit. This has proved very satisfactory. When needed we can slack the clamps
and swing the panels vertical, eg entering marina berths.

In the Caribbean and the Pacific tropics with the freezer and fridges working
hard the combination made a good contribution, probably 50% of daily consumption
on average. Now we are in the temperate climate of NZ, mostly 100%..


 

Regards

Danny and Yvonne

Ocean Pearl SM 299

Mangonui NZ

www.getjealous.com/danneve

--- On Sun, 14/11/10, erickmejean <maramu@...> wrote:

From: erickmejean <maramu@...>

Subject: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Sunday, 14, November, 2010, 7:11 PM

 

Hi Anthony

I did install an Aerogen 400 on top of my SM mizzen. It has bee there for ten
years now and it works. However I wont do it again as I found it useless.. It
brings very little power, once in a while when conditions are optimum, it is
noisy and if one of the blade becomes unbalanced the vibrations travels all the
way down the mizzen mast. You have to check regularly the silent blocks as sun,
salt, heat and rubber don't get along well.

In my opinion the SM or the 54 are too much energy consumer boats to expect
covering the energy consumption with solar panels or wind generator . You will
never cover your needs fully. When conditions are good it will save you half an
hour of power generator a day at most? It is not worth the trouble. Unless you
cut down your electrical consumption drastically, no electronic, no autopilot no
fridge, no music, no entertainment, nothing in fact (which is purposely not the
right way to enjoy a SM or a 54) it does not bring enough benefit.


Erick

--- In amelyachtowners@..., xygakis <no_reply@...> wrote:

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of the
mizzen mast.
Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could give me
all details about the necessary support post of this installation?
With thanks in advance
Anthony
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

Patrick McAneny
 

I have only just got my psa working after replacing the alt. about a month
ago.But so far, while there has got to be some speed lose,I have not seen
more than perhaps a tenth or two not nearly a 1/2 a knot lose.When I think
about it, if sailing along at 7 knots and I dragged something the surface area
of a prop from behind the boat I would not expect a speed drop of 1/2 knot.I
had a Four Winns on one boat and a Kiss on another,' both quiet and good
output ,the Kiss a better value for the price .I will add a wind gen. for
anchoring but love the psa for power while sailing.I often found the apparent
wind too light while sailing off the wind for the wind gen.Someone asked me to
take pictures of my psa installation, we will download the pics. to photo
section under Shenanigans this week. Pat


Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

We don't have one, haven't looked at the posibility. On a Pacific crossing (which we have done) 3000 miles at 6.5knots instead of 7 is 1.38 days longer at sea. Also at slower hull speeds the percentage lost is greater. Also the continuous wear on the drive train has to be considered. The bushing and seals on Amel special drive system on the SM prop shaft are recommended for change every two years when just using the motor. What would the interval be with continuous running?
The wind and solar have done us well.
Regards
Danny and Yvonne
Ocean Pearl SM299

Danny and Yvonne
www.getjealous.com/danneve

--- On Mon, 15/11/10, Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...> wrote:


From: Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Monday, 15, November, 2010, 12:57 PM


 



Hi Danny & Yvonne,
   What happened to the marvellous Amel shaft alternator system.......on my Santorin, it provided about 60% of our power needs crossing the Atlantic, (light winds - slow crossing), but on the Pacific crossing it supplied all the power to keep the batteries fully charged.  You lose about 1/2 Kt boat speed, but the security was worth it!
Where we are now, (in Phuket, geriatric day sailing), it is a terrific booster to bring the batteries up quickly after a night at anchor.
   If Amel have stopped fitting them, I'm sorry but I consider it a backwards step, which is unusual for Amel.
  Is there anyway one could be fitted, or does the new gearbox on the Amel's not allow the prop to rotate under sail?

Mike & Chris
Santorin, Akwaaba
Phuket

--- On Sun, 11/14/10, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Sunday, November 14, 2010, 7:00 PM

 

Hi Anthony, we have a Super Maramu. We intended to do extended ocean crossings and for us the issue was one of security. To rely solely on engine produced electricity seemed high risk to us. Sarter motors and alternators can fail, fuel can be contaminated. We wanted a power source that would at least keep our instruments and radio going in the event of a failure. We fitted a  Super Wind 350 generator to the top of the mizzen. It is a robust unit designed for use in remote locations with mechanically feathering blades for extreme winds. At deck and cabin level we never hear it, and certainly no vibration. If there is 20 knots of wind it's output is formidable, under 10 knots, very little. We also mounted two 150 watt solar panels with clamps on the port rail aft of the cockpit. This has proved very satisfactory. When needed we can slack the clamps and swing the panels vertical, eg entering marina berths.

In the Caribbean and the Pacific tropics with the freezer and fridges working hard the combination made a good contribution, probably 50% of daily consumption on average. Now we are in the temperate climate of NZ, mostly 100%...

 

Regards

Danny and Yvonne

Ocean Pearl SM 299

Mangonui NZ

www.getjealous.com/danneve

--- On Sun, 14/11/10, erickmejean <maramu@...> wrote:

From: erickmejean <maramu@...>

Subject: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Sunday, 14, November, 2010, 7:11 PM

 

Hi Anthony

I did install an Aerogen 400 on top of my SM mizzen. It has bee there for ten years now and it works. However I wont do it again as I found it useless... It brings very little power, once in a while when conditions are optimum, it is noisy and if one of the blade becomes unbalanced the vibrations travels all the way down the mizzen mast. You have to check regularly the silent blocks as sun, salt, heat and rubber don't get along well.

In my opinion the SM or the 54 are too much energy consumer boats to expect covering the energy consumption with solar panels or wind generator . You will never cover your needs fully. When conditions are good it will save you half an hour of power generator a day at most? It is not worth the trouble. Unless you cut down your electrical consumption drastically, no electronic, no autopilot no fridge, no music, no entertainment, nothing in fact (which is purposely not the right way to enjoy a SM or a 54) it does not bring enough benefit.

Erick

--- In amelyachtowners@..., xygakis <no_reply@...> wrote:

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of the mizzen mast.
Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could give me all details about the necessary support post of this installation?
With thanks in advance
Anthony
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Wind Generator vs propeller shaft alternator PSA)

Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
 

Hi,
The propeller shaft alternator is, in my experience, the most efficient system
for cruisers (outside the tropics where solar panels are very efficient).
 
Amel ceased to offer the PSA with the introduction of the Z drives in SM with a
limited space between the hull and the transmission.

 
On my Mango, the PSA has proven most usefull in crossings, and the solar panels
take over at anchor only requiring the genset or the main engine every 3 or 4
days; I use the SSB and Pactor almost 2 hours every day but I have only used Air
Conditioning in marinas or ashore.
 
The genset remains necessary if the main engine (with a hi amp alternator) is
not used and the air cooled only Amel refrigeration systems  and the AC are
operated, particularly in the tropics.  
 
I purchased a Windbugger (initially two blades and later 3 blades extending 4
ft) wind generator in the 80 and still own this generator. It is efficient at
anchor, but usually outside the Bahamas, anchorages are often protected from the
wind. What remains is the noise for very little power, albeith, it is free
power, 24/24. Remember it also needs to be dismanteled every 3 or 4 years, the
bearings and the brushes do need attention.  
 
Furthermore, in large seas, the resistance to motion caused by the circular
rotation (giration) of the propeller of the wind generator (remember how it is
difficult to change the direction of a turning bicycle wheel held in two hands)
results in damages to the bearings of the generators and also causes vibrations
in the system and eventually the whole boat, for the pleasure of those trying to
sleep or simply enjoying the calm of sailing without an engine.  So the wind
generator has to be stopped...
 
I must add the accidents, either to hands or lines which seem always to find
their way to the propeller, even - and in particular those generators mounted on
the mizzen, where the top lift for the Amel mizzen balooner has, in one case,
created havoc...
 
Finally, I have to recognize one serious advantage of the wind generator:
experienced yachties avoid anchoring closer than a 100 yd from any boat with one
of these usually noisy wind generator that look like a bird with the 3
small blades black propeller.
 
For those longing for a PSA, I would suggest looking at the water
generator propelled by the water flow, either with the trailing propeller on a
shaft or the version that looks like the foot of a outboard motor... but i have
not tested either...
 
Serge                     V Opera,      Mango#51




________________________________
De : Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
À : "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Envoyé le : Dim 14 novembre 2010, 19h 12min 28s
Objet : Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

 
We miss the shaft Gen from our old 46.

Regards
Richard Piller

On Nov 14, 2010, at 18:57, Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...> wrote:

Hi Danny & Yvonne,
What happened to the marvellous Amel shaft alternator system......on my
Santorin, it provided about 60% of our power needs crossing the Atlantic, (light
winds - slow crossing), but on the Pacific crossing it supplied all the power to
keep the batteries fully charged. You lose about 1/2 Kt boat speed, but the
security was worth it!
Where we are now, (in Phuket, geriatric day sailing), it is a terrific booster
to bring the batteries up quickly after a night at anchor.
If Amel have stopped fitting them, I'm sorry but I consider it a backwards
step, which is unusual for Amel.
Is there anyway one could be fitted, or does the new gearbox on the Amel's not
allow the prop to rotate under sail?

Mike & Chris
Santorin, Akwaaba
Phuket

--- On Sun, 11/14/10, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Sunday, November 14, 2010, 7:00 PM



Hi Anthony, we have a Super Maramu. We intended to do extended ocean crossings
and for us the issue was one of security. To rely solely on engine produced
electricity seemed high risk to us. Sarter motors and alternators can fail, fuel
can be contaminated. We wanted a power source that would at least keep our
instruments and radio going in the event of a failure. We fitted a Super Wind
350 generator to the top of the mizzen. It is a robust unit designed for use in
remote locations with mechanically feathering blades for extreme winds. At deck
and cabin level we never hear it, and certainly no vibration. If there is 20
knots of wind it's output is formidable, under 10 knots, very little. We also
mounted two 150 watt solar panels with clamps on the port rail aft of the
cockpit. This has proved very satisfactory. When needed we can slack the clamps
and swing the panels vertical, eg entering marina berths.

In the Caribbean and the Pacific tropics with the freezer and fridges working
hard the combination made a good contribution, probably 50% of daily consumption
on average. Now we are in the temperate climate of NZ, mostly 100%..




Regards

Danny and Yvonne

Ocean Pearl SM 299

Mangonui NZ

www.getjealous.com/danneve

--- On Sun, 14/11/10, erickmejean <maramu@...> wrote:

From: erickmejean <maramu@...>

Subject: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Sunday, 14, November, 2010, 7:11 PM



Hi Anthony

I did install an Aerogen 400 on top of my SM mizzen. It has bee there for ten
years now and it works. However I wont do it again as I found it useless.. It
brings very little power, once in a while when conditions are optimum, it is
noisy and if one of the blade becomes unbalanced the vibrations travels all the
way down the mizzen mast. You have to check regularly the silent blocks as sun,
salt, heat and rubber don't get along well.

In my opinion the SM or the 54 are too much energy consumer boats to expect
covering the energy consumption with solar panels or wind generator . You will
never cover your needs fully. When conditions are good it will save you half an
hour of power generator a day at most? It is not worth the trouble. Unless you
cut down your electrical consumption drastically, no electronic, no autopilot no
fridge, no music, no entertainment, nothing in fact (which is purposely not the
right way to enjoy a SM or a 54) it does not bring enough benefit.


Erick

--- In amelyachtowners@..., xygakis <no_reply@...> wrote:

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of the
mizzen mast.


Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could give
me all details about the necessary support post of this installation?


With thanks in advance
Anthony
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: staying in the Canaries

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Dirk:

We left our Super Maramu in Puerto Calero for 6 months, but that was way back in 2001. Great marina back then and probably still is. We were way back in on the last row next to a large service building and I felt very secure both from crime and weather. There was a service company there that boat tended our boat for us, and while I don't recall the name, their office was in the main group of buildings, they did a very nice job.

Gary Silver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM # 335

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "dirk.spinnewyn" <dirk.spinnewyn@...> wrote:

Hello,

I take delivery of a new Amel 54 next summer. I intend to sail to the Canaries and leave the boat on the island of Lanzarote during the first 2 years. On previous, short, visits to Lanzarote I found both Puerto Calero and Puerto Rubicon welcoming marinas.

Does anyone has experience with longterm stay in one of these marinas? Any preference for the one or the othere? What about security and protection against bad weather?

Please share your ideas.
Thank you very much,

Dirk Spinnewyn
Amel Santorin 'Kythera'
www.kythera.us


Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

We miss the shaft Gen from our old 46.

Regards
Richard Piller

On Nov 14, 2010, at 18:57, Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...> wrote:

Hi Danny & Yvonne,
What happened to the marvellous Amel shaft alternator system......on my Santorin, it provided about 60% of our power needs crossing the Atlantic, (light winds - slow crossing), but on the Pacific crossing it supplied all the power to keep the batteries fully charged. You lose about 1/2 Kt boat speed, but the security was worth it!
Where we are now, (in Phuket, geriatric day sailing), it is a terrific booster to bring the batteries up quickly after a night at anchor.
If Amel have stopped fitting them, I'm sorry but I consider it a backwards step, which is unusual for Amel.
Is there anyway one could be fitted, or does the new gearbox on the Amel's not allow the prop to rotate under sail?

Mike & Chris
Santorin, Akwaaba
Phuket

--- On Sun, 11/14/10, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Sunday, November 14, 2010, 7:00 PM



Hi Anthony, we have a Super Maramu. We intended to do extended ocean crossings and for us the issue was one of security. To rely solely on engine produced electricity seemed high risk to us. Sarter motors and alternators can fail, fuel can be contaminated. We wanted a power source that would at least keep our instruments and radio going in the event of a failure. We fitted a Super Wind 350 generator to the top of the mizzen. It is a robust unit designed for use in remote locations with mechanically feathering blades for extreme winds. At deck and cabin level we never hear it, and certainly no vibration. If there is 20 knots of wind it's output is formidable, under 10 knots, very little. We also mounted two 150 watt solar panels with clamps on the port rail aft of the cockpit. This has proved very satisfactory. When needed we can slack the clamps and swing the panels vertical, eg entering marina berths.

In the Caribbean and the Pacific tropics with the freezer and fridges working hard the combination made a good contribution, probably 50% of daily consumption on average. Now we are in the temperate climate of NZ, mostly 100%..



Regards

Danny and Yvonne

Ocean Pearl SM 299

Mangonui NZ

www.getjealous.com/danneve

--- On Sun, 14/11/10, erickmejean <maramu@...> wrote:

From: erickmejean <maramu@...>

Subject: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Sunday, 14, November, 2010, 7:11 PM



Hi Anthony

I did install an Aerogen 400 on top of my SM mizzen. It has bee there for ten years now and it works. However I wont do it again as I found it useless.. It brings very little power, once in a while when conditions are optimum, it is noisy and if one of the blade becomes unbalanced the vibrations travels all the way down the mizzen mast. You have to check regularly the silent blocks as sun, salt, heat and rubber don't get along well.

In my opinion the SM or the 54 are too much energy consumer boats to expect covering the energy consumption with solar panels or wind generator . You will never cover your needs fully. When conditions are good it will save you half an hour of power generator a day at most? It is not worth the trouble. Unless you cut down your electrical consumption drastically, no electronic, no autopilot no fridge, no music, no entertainment, nothing in fact (which is purposely not the right way to enjoy a SM or a 54) it does not bring enough benefit.

Erick

--- In amelyachtowners@..., xygakis <no_reply@...> wrote:

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of the mizzen mast.
Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could give me all details about the necessary support post of this installation?
With thanks in advance
Anthony
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
 

Hi Danny & Yvonne,
   What happened to the marvellous Amel shaft alternator system......on my Santorin, it provided about 60% of our power needs crossing the Atlantic, (light winds - slow crossing), but on the Pacific crossing it supplied all the power to keep the batteries fully charged.  You lose about 1/2 Kt boat speed, but the security was worth it!
Where we are now, (in Phuket, geriatric day sailing), it is a terrific booster to bring the batteries up quickly after a night at anchor.
   If Amel have stopped fitting them, I'm sorry but I consider it a backwards step, which is unusual for Amel.
  Is there anyway one could be fitted, or does the new gearbox on the Amel's not allow the prop to rotate under sail?

Mike & Chris
Santorin, Akwaaba
Phuket

--- On Sun, 11/14/10, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Sunday, November 14, 2010, 7:00 PM







 









Hi Anthony, we have a Super Maramu. We intended to do extended ocean crossings and for us the issue was one of security. To rely solely on engine produced electricity seemed high risk to us. Sarter motors and alternators can fail, fuel can be contaminated. We wanted a power source that would at least keep our instruments and radio going in the event of a failure. We fitted a  Super Wind 350 generator to the top of the mizzen. It is a robust unit designed for use in remote locations with mechanically feathering blades for extreme winds. At deck and cabin level we never hear it, and certainly no vibration. If there is 20 knots of wind it's output is formidable, under 10 knots, very little. We also mounted two 150 watt solar panels with clamps on the port rail aft of the cockpit. This has proved very satisfactory. When needed we can slack the clamps and swing the panels vertical, eg entering marina berths.

In the Caribbean and the Pacific tropics with the freezer and fridges working hard the combination made a good contribution, probably 50% of daily consumption on average. Now we are in the temperate climate of NZ, mostly 100%..

 

Regards

Danny and Yvonne

Ocean Pearl SM 299

Mangonui NZ

www.getjealous.com/danneve



--- On Sun, 14/11/10, erickmejean <maramu@...> wrote:



From: erickmejean <maramu@...>

Subject: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Sunday, 14, November, 2010, 7:11 PM



 



Hi Anthony

I did install an Aerogen 400 on top of my SM mizzen. It has bee there for ten years now and it works. However I wont do it again as I found it useless.. It brings very little power, once in a while when conditions are optimum, it is noisy and if one of the blade becomes unbalanced the vibrations travels all the way down the mizzen mast. You have to check regularly the silent blocks as sun, salt, heat and rubber don't get along well.

In my opinion the SM or the 54 are too much energy consumer boats to expect covering the energy consumption with solar panels or wind generator . You will never cover your needs fully. When conditions are good it will save you half an hour of power generator a day at most? It is not worth the trouble. Unless you cut down your electrical consumption drastically, no electronic, no autopilot no fridge, no music, no entertainment, nothing in fact (which is purposely not the right way to enjoy a SM or a 54) it does not bring enough benefit.

Erick



--- In amelyachtowners@..., xygakis <no_reply@...> wrote:

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of the mizzen mast.
Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could give me all details about the necessary support post of this installation?
With thanks in advance
Anthony


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

Barry Ferguson <seagasm@...>
 

We installed a Rutland 913 24 volt unit on the stern, very quiet but not
much output. We have to be in 25 - 30 knot winds before anything happens and
then it is only showing an input of 2 amps. No, the Rutland in my view was a
waste of money, unfortunately.

Best Regards
Barry & Robyn
Tradewinds III SM191



On Mon, Nov 15, 2010 at 5:00 AM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>wrote:



Hi Anthony, we have a Super Maramu. We intended to do extended ocean
crossings and for us the issue was one of security. To rely solely on engine
produced electricity seemed high risk to us. Sarter motors and alternators
can fail, fuel can be contaminated. We wanted a power source that would at
least keep our instruments and radio going in the event of a failure. We
fitted a Super Wind 350 generator to the top of the mizzen. It is a robust
unit designed for use in remote locations with mechanically feathering
blades for extreme winds. At deck and cabin level we never hear it, and
certainly no vibration. If there is 20 knots of wind it's output is
formidable, under 10 knots, very little. We also mounted two 150 watt solar
panels with clamps on the port rail aft of the cockpit. This has proved very
satisfactory. When needed we can slack the clamps and swing the panels
vertical, eg entering marina berths.
In the Caribbean and the Pacific tropics with the freezer and fridges
working hard the combination made a good contribution, probably 50% of daily
consumption on average. Now we are in the temperate climate of NZ, mostly
100%..

Regards
Danny and Yvonne
Ocean Pearl SM 299
Mangonui NZ
www.getjealous.com/danneve

--- On Sun, 14/11/10, erickmejean <maramu@...<maramu%40hotmail.com>>
wrote:

From: erickmejean <maramu@... <maramu%40hotmail.com>>
Subject: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54
To: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sunday, 14, November, 2010, 7:11 PM



Hi Anthony
I did install an Aerogen 400 on top of my SM mizzen. It has bee there for
ten years now and it works. However I wont do it again as I found it
useless.. It brings very little power, once in a while when conditions are
optimum, it is noisy and if one of the blade becomes unbalanced the
vibrations travels all the way down the mizzen mast. You have to check
regularly the silent blocks as sun, salt, heat and rubber don't get along
well.
In my opinion the SM or the 54 are too much energy consumer boats to expect
covering the energy consumption with solar panels or wind generator . You
will never cover your needs fully. When conditions are good it will save you
half an hour of power generator a day at most? It is not worth the trouble.
Unless you cut down your electrical consumption drastically, no electronic,
no autopilot no fridge, no music, no entertainment, nothing in fact (which
is purposely not the right way to enjoy a SM or a 54) it does not bring
enough benefit.
Erick

--- In amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>,
xygakis <no_reply@...> wrote:

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of
the mizzen mast.

Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could
give me all details about the necessary support post of this installation?

With thanks in advance

Anthony





--
Email: seagasm@...
Off Shore E-mail: vhn3361@... (text only)
Phone: Australia (0407) 65-2046
HF Call Sign: VHN3361
SV Tradewinds III, SM#171


Re: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Anthony, we have a Super Maramu. We intended to do extended ocean crossings and for us the issue was one of security. To rely solely on engine produced electricity seemed high risk to us. Sarter motors and alternators can fail, fuel can be contaminated. We wanted a power source that would at least keep our instruments and radio going in the event of a failure. We fitted a  Super Wind 350 generator to the top of the mizzen. It is a robust unit designed for use in remote locations with mechanically feathering blades for extreme winds. At deck and cabin level we never hear it, and certainly no vibration. If there is 20 knots of wind it's output is formidable, under 10 knots, very little. We also mounted two 150 watt solar panels with clamps on the port rail aft of the cockpit. This has proved very satisfactory. When needed we can slack the clamps and swing the panels vertical, eg entering marina berths.
In the Caribbean and the Pacific tropics with the freezer and fridges working hard the combination made a good contribution, probably 50% of daily consumption on average. Now we are in the temperate climate of NZ, mostly 100%..
 
Regards
Danny and Yvonne
Ocean Pearl SM 299
Mangonui NZ
www.getjealous.com/danneve

--- On Sun, 14/11/10, erickmejean <maramu@...> wrote:


From: erickmejean <maramu@...>
Subject: [Amel] Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Sunday, 14, November, 2010, 7:11 PM


 



Hi Anthony
I did install an Aerogen 400 on top of my SM mizzen. It has bee there for ten years now and it works. However I wont do it again as I found it useless.. It brings very little power, once in a while when conditions are optimum, it is noisy and if one of the blade becomes unbalanced the vibrations travels all the way down the mizzen mast. You have to check regularly the silent blocks as sun, salt, heat and rubber don't get along well.
In my opinion the SM or the 54 are too much energy consumer boats to expect covering the energy consumption with solar panels or wind generator . You will never cover your needs fully. When conditions are good it will save you half an hour of power generator a day at most? It is not worth the trouble. Unless you cut down your electrical consumption drastically, no electronic, no autopilot no fridge, no music, no entertainment, nothing in fact (which is purposely not the right way to enjoy a SM or a 54) it does not bring enough benefit.
Erick

--- In amelyachtowners@..., xygakis <no_reply@...> wrote:

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of the mizzen mast.

Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could give me all details about the necessary support post of this installation?

With thanks in advance

Anthony


staying in the Canaries

dirk.spinnewyn
 

Hello,

I take delivery of a new Amel 54 next summer. I intend to sail to the Canaries and leave the boat on the island of Lanzarote during the first 2 years. On previous, short, visits to Lanzarote I found both Puerto Calero and Puerto Rubicon welcoming marinas.

Does anyone has experience with longterm stay in one of these marinas? Any preference for the one or the othere? What about security and protection against bad weather?

Please share your ideas.
Thank you very much,

Dirk Spinnewyn
Amel Santorin 'Kythera'
www.kythera.us


Re: Hatches

Dave_Benjamin
 

Some time ago I was dealing with Goiot on some hardware and asked them about replacement hatch seals. Since we were getting some hardware shipped over from France for an unrelated project I figured I'd just order up some of the Goiot hatch seals.

About a year later I decided to install the seals and discovered they are the wrong ones. I think the ones I have are for hatches like the ones on the SM. They are a squarish shape. I'd be happy to photograph and measure what I have if anyone is interested.

Regards,

Dave Benjamin
Maramu #29

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Conn Williamson <connwilliamson@...> wrote:

Hi there, if you go to the files section on the amel owners websit there is a
really good file on the goiot part numbers.

regards Conn...Mango #28 




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

erickmejean <maramu@...>
 

Hi Anthony
I did install an Aerogen 400 on top of my SM mizzen. It has bee there for ten years now and it works. However I wont do it again as I found it useless. It brings very little power, once in a while when conditions are optimum, it is noisy and if one of the blade becomes unbalanced the vibrations travels all the way down the mizzen mast. You have to check regularly the silent blocks as sun, salt, heat and rubber don't get along well.
In my opinion the SM or the 54 are too much energy consumer boats to expect covering the energy consumption with solar panels or wind generator . You will never cover your needs fully. When conditions are good it will save you half an hour of power generator a day at most? It is not worth the trouble. Unless you cut down your electrical consumption drastically, no electronic, no autopilot no fridge, no music, no entertainment, nothing in fact (which is purposely not the right way to enjoy a SM or a 54) it does not bring enough benefit.
Erick

--- In amelyachtowners@..., xygakis <no_reply@...> wrote:

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of the mizzen mast.

Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could give me all details about the necessary support post of this installation?

With thanks in advance

Anthony


Wind Generator on an AMEL 54

xygakis <no_reply@...>
 

I would like to install a six kilo Air Breeze wind generator on top of the mizzen mast.

Is there anyone who has already made such an installation and who could give me all details about the necessary support post of this installation?

With thanks in advance

Anthony


Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

karkauai
 

Thanks, Mike.  I think I've got it now.
Happy Sailing,
Kent

--- On Thu, 11/11/10, Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...> wrote:


From: Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thursday, November 11, 2010, 6:50 PM


 



Hi All,
   Fundamentally, for twice the voltage you need half the current to get the same power (Ohms Law - W=IxV), and as the thickness of the conductor determines the current carrying capacity, thus 120V (US) cables are generally thicker than 240V (rest of world) for the same required load.
   This is oversimplified, as slightly different rules apply with ac inductive loads, (motors etc), but it is a good "rule of thumb"
   If wires carrying loads get warm, then the first place to look is at the connections, as heat in wires is generated by high resistance and the plugs and sockets are the most probable culprits. Electrical cables transfer heat almost as well as electricity!. Clean water resistant contacts will eliminate most problems. ( I use lanolin grease - natural product and lasts well)
   If your wire is warm in the middle only, then you could have some damage, internally, at that point. Don't try to fix it - replace the cable!
   Hope this helps.

Mike
Santorin Akwaaba
Also retired electrical engineer
   

--- On Thu, 11/11/10, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thursday, November 11, 2010, 8:19 PM

 

Hi there, thought I'd weigh into this with a comment, (question) that my understanding of the reason for larger boats being fitted with 24 volt systems is that they require smaller cables than 12 volt and given the distances and the loom sizes on the Amel it is the only way to go. I believe the same applies to 110 and 220, perhaps hence the smaller shore cable from Europe.  Any electician like to confirm or deny this? 

Regards

Danny and Yvonne

Ocean Pearl. SM299

--- On Fri, 12/11/10, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@...>

Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Friday, 12, November, 2010, 5:03 AM

 

Thanks, Craig.  That makes very good sense for the 110 cable.  I'm still not sure why we can get by with such a small 220 cable compared to what's recommended in the US, and why it makes a difference (or if it even does) if we're using EU 220 or US 220 to what size shore power cable we need.  Is it just the difference between EU 220 50Hz and US 120/240 60Hz?  If so that's a huge difference in cable size for a 9% difference in voltage and a 20% difference in Hz (the difference in Hz really doesn't alter the Amperage, does it?).  I don't know if I'm really as dumb as I feel about this stuff, but I get a different answer from every electrician I deal with...and now this one (who seems sharper than the average) is strongly recommending that I change the 220 shore power cable to a much larger one (~1inch dia) at great expense.  My gut tells me no, but I'm trying to get my head in line, too.

Thanks again to all.

Kent

SM243

KRISTY

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
 

Hi All,
   Fundamentally, for twice the voltage you need half the current to get the same power (Ohms Law - W=IxV), and as the thickness of the conductor determines the current carrying capacity, thus 120V (US) cables are generally thicker than 240V (rest of world) for the same required load.
   This is oversimplified, as slightly different rules apply with ac inductive loads, (motors etc), but it is a good "rule of thumb"
   If wires carrying loads get warm, then the first place to look is at the connections, as heat in wires is generated by high resistance and the plugs and sockets are the most probable culprits. Electrical cables transfer heat almost as well as electricity!. Clean water resistant contacts will eliminate most problems. ( I use lanolin grease - natural product and lasts well)
   If your wire is warm in the middle only, then you could have some damage, internally, at that point. Don't try to fix it - replace the cable!
   Hope this helps.

Mike
Santorin Akwaaba
Also retired electrical engineer

--- On Thu, 11/11/10, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thursday, November 11, 2010, 8:19 PM







 









Hi there, thought I'd weigh into this with a comment, (question) that my understanding of the reason for larger boats being fitted with 24 volt systems is that they require smaller cables than 12 volt and given the distances and the loom sizes on the Amel it is the only way to go. I believe the same applies to 110 and 220, perhaps hence the smaller shore cable from Europe.  Any electician like to confirm or deny this? 

Regards

Danny and Yvonne

Ocean Pearl. SM299



--- On Fri, 12/11/10, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:



From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@...>

Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Friday, 12, November, 2010, 5:03 AM



 



Thanks, Craig.  That makes very good sense for the 110 cable.  I'm still not sure why we can get by with such a small 220 cable compared to what's recommended in the US, and why it makes a difference (or if it even does) if we're using EU 220 or US 220 to what size shore power cable we need.  Is it just the difference between EU 220 50Hz and US 120/240 60Hz?  If so that's a huge difference in cable size for a 9% difference in voltage and a 20% difference in Hz (the difference in Hz really doesn't alter the Amperage, does it?).  I don't know if I'm really as dumb as I feel about this stuff, but I get a different answer from every electrician I deal with...and now this one (who seems sharper than the average) is strongly recommending that I change the 220 shore power cable to a much larger one (~1inch dia) at great expense.  My gut tells me no, but I'm trying to get my head in line, too.

Thanks again to all.

Kent

SM243

KRISTY

































[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

dr_hofschulte
 

gesendet von meinem HTC HD2
<dr.hofschulte@...>

-----Original Message-----

From: "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...>
Sent: Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:48:41 -0000
To: amelyachtowners@...
Received: 11-Nov-2010 19:49:04 +0100
Subject: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

I LOVE this forum! To all who have chimed in, Craig, Richard, Gary and Serge...Thank you for your input. My head is now in line with my gut and I am comfortable leaving the wiring as-is. Gary, I will install a 220 monitor so I can keep track of what I'm actuall getting and using. It will also help to monitor the genset's output. I'll monitor the wire temp carefully and adjust my usage if it's getting a bit too warm. If I find I'm not able to use what I want to (not likely while in the temperate/tropical zones), I'll consider upgrading the shore power cables. I'll straighten out the cables if there's any excess and change the posts to busses, too, Serge.

Thanks again to all, happy sailing!
Kent
SM243
KRISTY


Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi there, thought I'd weigh into this with a comment, (question) that my understanding of the reason for larger boats being fitted with 24 volt systems is that they require smaller cables than 12 volt and given the distances and the loom sizes on the Amel it is the only way to go. I believe the same applies to 110 and 220, perhaps hence the smaller shore cable from Europe.  Any electician like to confirm or deny this? 
Regards
Danny and Yvonne
Ocean Pearl. SM299

--- On Fri, 12/11/10, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:


From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Friday, 12, November, 2010, 5:03 AM


 



Thanks, Craig.  That makes very good sense for the 110 cable.  I'm still not sure why we can get by with such a small 220 cable compared to what's recommended in the US, and why it makes a difference (or if it even does) if we're using EU 220 or US 220 to what size shore power cable we need.  Is it just the difference between EU 220 50Hz and US 120/240 60Hz?  If so that's a huge difference in cable size for a 9% difference in voltage and a 20% difference in Hz (the difference in Hz really doesn't alter the Amperage, does it?).  I don't know if I'm really as dumb as I feel about this stuff, but I get a different answer from every electrician I deal with...and now this one (who seems sharper than the average) is strongly recommending that I change the 220 shore power cable to a much larger one (~1inch dia) at great expense.  My gut tells me no, but I'm trying to get my head in line, too.
Thanks again to all.
Kent
SM243
KRISTY

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

karkauai
 

I LOVE this forum! To all who have chimed in, Craig, Richard, Gary and Serge...Thank you for your input. My head is now in line with my gut and I am comfortable leaving the wiring as-is. Gary, I will install a 220 monitor so I can keep track of what I'm actuall getting and using. It will also help to monitor the genset's output. I'll monitor the wire temp carefully and adjust my usage if it's getting a bit too warm. If I find I'm not able to use what I want to (not likely while in the temperate/tropical zones), I'll consider upgrading the shore power cables. I'll straighten out the cables if there's any excess and change the posts to busses, too, Serge.

Thanks again to all, happy sailing!
Kent
SM243
KRISTY


Re: [Amel] Re: Shore Power Cables

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Thanks for a good explanation we too will stick to the Amel supplied wire

Regards
Richard Piller

On Nov 11, 2010, at 11:47, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:



Kent and all:

By way of explanation:
220 AC (alternating current): Picture a wave on the ocean (actually a sine wave). You measure the height of the wave from the trough to the peak and come up with 220 feet, (it is a really big wave). The boat sees that wave and thinks, "wow, that is a big wave". The boat doesn't KNOW whether the 220 feet from peak to trough is measured relative to mean sea level, mean low tide, or mean high tide. All the boat KNOWS is that it is a 220 ft wave. Now if the wave passes under the boat (hopefully) 60 times a second, that is equivalent to sixty hertz. If it passes under the boat 50 times a second, that is equivalent to 50 hertz (a hertz is a cycle per second when speaking of all things electrical). I think you can see that more energy is expended/used/dissipated by the boat going up and down 60 times a second compared to going up and down over the waves at 50 times per second.

Now to electricity. The load (washer, microwave, heater or whatever is using electricity) doesn't know if it is seeing 220 volts generated in Europe or in the US (actually EMF or electromotive force). All the load sees is the peak to peak change in voltage and that is identical in the US or Europe except for hertz. The difference between 220 volt European power and 220 volt US power is only in Hertz and the color codes of the wires. The load sees no difference in voltage but does run at a different speed due to the difference in Hertz. Granted less work is done per minute by European power (fewer cycles) than by US power. Motors and electronics using timers etc are sensitive to the hertz (frequency) of the power. Grounding and bonding are different between the US and Europe but that is a whole different story. Neutral in the US (white wire in household US wiring) is just that. It is Neutral, that means that it SEEs the sine wave power at 1/2 way between the peak and the trough of the wave 220 volt wave. Since it only SEES 1/2 of the wave height it only SEEs 110 volts. In the ocean wave analogy, Neutral is 1/2 way between the peak and trough of the wave.

On my Amel SM Hull 335, the 220 volt cable is sized for 30 Amps at 50 hertz.. I have the 110 volt cable with the 110 to 220 volt step up transformer (installed as an option by Amel with the change over box in the engine room) like you. You have to be able to draw 60 amps at 110 volts to equal 220 volts at 30 amps. Furthermore, when plugged into 60 hertz power that cable must be able to handle more POWER than when plugged into 50 hertz power. I do not know the amperage ratting of the transformer but 60 amps is a fair amount of power. Consider that the average US house has 200 amp service. I sized a 60 foot extension cord for my Amel that could handle 60 amps at 60 hertz.. My thinking was that, that way I could use it for either 110 or 220 power. This was a mistake on my part since the cable is 1 inch in diameter and weighs about 100 lbs. I paid about $500 for this cord and couldn't return it, so I lug it around being mad every time I use it. Even if you upgrade your Amel 110 volt cable, the wiring downstream in the boat (i.e. from the garage to the step up transformer might need to be upgraded too. I suggest that you just use a little less power, and install a multimeter before the 220 volt panel that will show you Watts, Volts, Hertz, Amps, and that way you can monitor your power usage. See my Photo section under watermaker service (I think that is where I put a picture of my multimeter). I will post subsequently with a link to the vendor.

Don't feel bad about getting different answers about this from most electricians. My experience is that 95 % of US electricians don't have a clue about European power. By the way, as you know, we in the US are a minority in the world for our power. Virtually the rest of the world uses 220 volt /50 hertz power.

Hope this helps.

Gary Silver

Amel SM #335 s/v Liahona

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

Thanks, Craig. That makes very good sense for the 110 cable. I'm still not sure why we can get by with such a small 220 cable compared to what's recommended in the US, and why it makes a difference (or if it even does) if we're using EU 220 or US 220 to what size shore power cable we need. Is it just the difference between EU 220 50Hz and US 120/240 60Hz? If so that's a huge difference in cable size for a 9% difference in voltage and a 20% difference in Hz (the difference in Hz really doesn't alter the Amperage, does it?). I don't know if I'm really as dumb as I feel about this stuff, but I get a different answer from every electrician I deal with...and now this one (who seems sharper than the average) is strongly recommending that I change the 220 shore power cable to a much larger one (~1inch dia) at great expense. My gut tells me no, but I'm trying to get my head in line, too.
Thanks again to all.
Kent
SM243
KRISTY

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]