Date   

Re: [Amel] Spice Rack bottles

john rogers <jsrogers@...>
 

I also like to reinstall the original Amel items when possible. If you find
the spice bottles I would appreciate hearing about it.



John Rogers

SM #105



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LaFrance
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2011 10:04 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Spice Rack bottles





God Day
Does anyone know the make/manufacture of the spice holders that go over the
Stainless Steel bar on the port side of the galley. The SS bar is set up
high and the spice jars hook on individually. I have seen them on other
Amels and I can not figure out any other reason for the bar set up so high.
Any pictures of the spice rack would help. Amel in France did supply thes
individual spice racks but no longer have any.

Paul & Sue LaFrance
SV NOMAD SM #362


Spice Rack bottles

LaFrance <pflafrance@...>
 

God Day
Does anyone know the make/manufacture of the spice holders that go over the Stainless Steel bar on the port side of the galley. The SS bar is set up high and the spice jars hook on individually. I have seen them on other Amels and I can not figure out any other reason for the bar set up so high. Any pictures of the spice rack would help. Amel in France did supply thes individual spice racks but no longer have any.

Paul & Sue LaFrance
SV NOMAD SM #362


Re: [Amel] a new amel 55

Paul LaFrance <pflafrance@...>
 

PPI
I visited the factory last week where Amel is just building the new 55'. A lot of improvements to the 55'. The 54' will still be available along with the 55' and 64'. Antoine Rioton, Directeur Commercial Adjoint, indicated that they have a number of orders for the new 55' and are just finishing off the last 54' units.

Paul LaFrance

SV NOMAD SM #362
Moored in St Martin




To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
From: no_reply@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thu, 12 May 2011 10:12:44 +0000
Subject: [Amel] a new amel 55







have you heard of a brand new Amel?
the AMEL 55 is coming ...
does anybody knows what will happend with the "old" 54?

Photo Albums > Amel 55 - new
rendering

ppi.pa64





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


a new amel 55

ppi.pa64 <no_reply@...>
 

have you heard of a brand new Amel?
the AMEL 55 is coming ...
does anybody knows what will happend with the "old" 54?


Photo Albums > Amel 55 - new
rendering


ppi.pa64


Re: [Amel] Sail in the Med

georges
 

Hi Ivar,
We could do that.
Presently navigating in Lefkas area.
What are your conditions?

Georges Pellegrini - Santorin 132 -

On Wed, May 11, 2011 at 3:14 PM, ivarmylde <mylde@online.no> wrote:



Hi,

Any Amel owner who can sail my SM from Corfu/greece to Southern Spain this
summer- alternative from Sicily. Boat is ready in Corfu approx 15-20 May.

Ivar



Re: [Amel] Re: Want to buy Amel maramu

amelforme
 

Good advice , Dave. For $100,000, even in a soft market, all you will
find is a challenge at best or trouble at worst. Good Maramu's fetch a
minimum of @ $145,000 and up for a boat with no issues. A ready to
cross oceans boat is $165,000 and more.



Be careful Yossi.



All the best,

Joel



Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

401 East Las Olas Boulevard, #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869

Email: jfpottercys@att.net

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys>
www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys


Re: Want to buy Amel maramu

Dave_Benjamin
 

Yossi,

Good luck. I think at that price point you will have a project boat needing a major refit. Perhaps you may want to consider the Sharki. It's very much like the Maramu except there is no toilet compartment in the aft cabin.

You will find it far more economical to buy a Maramu that has been updated than to refit one yourself. Our Maramu had approximimately $130,000 USD invested in it by the previous owner over four years and we probably spent another $20K ourselves.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "yossi_kl" <yossi_kl@...> wrote:

Well maintained inside,outside,engine ext. and very good equipped for sea going .
My budget for purchasing a boat is 100,000 (USD).
Thanks a lot
Yossi


Re: [Amel] How's everything?

Eric Lindholm
 

Thanks I will look at it. Eric




________________________________
From: Horst Pause <horst.puddleduck@yahoo.co.uk>
Sent: Wed, May 11, 2011 1:08:21 AM
Subject: [Amel] How's everything?

 
How's everything?
Have you found any preferable shopping websites? If not, here I would like to
recommend you www.ofenno.com I have bought  a piece of products with favourable
price. You can also get its free delivery charges if you shopping now. Hope you
won't miss the nice website if you have any interest in its products.
Best wishes for you!

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] navigation bulb

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Check with Dr Led on the web.

Regards Sm 209 for sale in Annapolis
Richard Piller

"Yacht Brokerage Service above and beyond the expected"

Walczak Yacht Brokerage Service LLC
2 Compromise St
Annapolis, MD 21401

Cell 603 767 5330
Office
Fax

www.Walczakyacht.com

On May 11, 2011, at 8:26, sjors prins <sjorsprins@yahoo.ca> wrote:



good morning, I just bought an older Maramu, built in 1978, She is in good shape. just that the bulbs in the navigation lights are burned out. I cannot find a replacement bulb. the base of the bulb is about 19 mm wide. on the back of the nav light is written; mm 193 sn-25w
Does anyone know where I could find such bulbs?
kind regards,
George prins

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


navigation bulb

sjors prins <sjorsprins@...>
 

good morning, I just bought an older Maramu, built in 1978, She is in good shape. just that the bulbs in the navigation lights are burned out. I cannot find a replacement bulb. the base of the bulb is about 19 mm wide.  on the back of the nav light is written; mm 193 sn-25w
Does anyone know where I could find such  bulbs?
kind regards,
George prins

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Sail in the Med

ivarmylde <mylde@...>
 

Hi,

Any Amel owner who can sail my SM from Corfu/greece to Southern Spain this summer- alternative from Sicily. Boat is ready in Corfu approx 15-20 May.

Ivar


How's everything?

Horst Pause <horst.puddleduck@...>
 

How's everything?
Have you found any preferable shopping websites? If not, here I would like to
recommend you www.ofenno.com I have bought  a piece of products with favourable
price. You can also get its free delivery charges if you shopping now. Hope you
won't miss the nice website if you have any interest in its products.
Best wishes for you!


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: [Amel standing rigging tensioning

Eric Lindholm
 

Thanks Joel and Richard.

Eric Maramu 105




________________________________
From: Richard03801 <richard03801@yahoo.com>
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sat, May 7, 2011 1:16:59 PM
Subject: [Amel] Re: [Amel standing rigging tensioning

 
First make sure the
2 masts are straight in both directions/sides bring all the stays up going
around the boat. As the rig gets tighter using a mallet or wooden hammer handle
tap the wire when they no longer
Have a "dead" sound or if they have "ring " take another half turn.
Then take the boat put for a sail and repeat the process. Youll need to this a
few time as the rig settles in and the stays take a set as then rig will stretch
for a while.

Yes there are gauges to check the stays riggers have been doing it this way for
years b

Regards. Sm 209 for sale in Annapolis for sale.
Richard Piller

"Yacht Brokerage Service above and beyond the expected"

Walczak Yacht Brokerage Service LLC
2 Compromise St
Annapolis, MD 21401

Cell 603 767 5330
Office
Fax

www.Walczakyacht.com

On May 6, 2011, at 22:19, sailw32@aol.com wrote:

Joel, I took your advise and painted my entire mast, due to rain and pollen
its taken longer than expected but looks great and should for many years. I
will be stepping the mast next week and will need to tension the new
rigging.I just read your post and I was wondering if you could tell me how you
determine when tight is tight enough? Someone posted a while back to measure
with a stick the distance relative to the turbuckle. Any insight on how to
determine the proper tension would be helpful.
Thanks so
much,
Pat SM 123

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Lifting the Outboard

Dimitris Krassopoulos <dkra@...>
 

Hi All,



We have also attached to each side of the outboard engine, a Yamaha 8 Hp 4
stroke a metal head screw with O and we put on these the special sheets
supplied by Amel. The position was chosen so that the engine is level more
or less. The motor is much more stable than with a sunblella cover with a
handle.



Regards



Dimitris



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of svsummerlove
Sent: Sunday, May 08, 2011 3:46 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lifting the Outboard





Hi Kent,

Our boat came equipped with a second halyard (blue and white) that leads
through a block mounted just below the starboard mizzen spreader. I just
checked Liahona, which is docked beside us, and she also has the same
halyard. When not in use, it ties off to the starboard deck cleat on the aft
cabin roof to prevent it from clanging against the mast. It's all external
to the mast and would be relatively easy to add.

When we hoist the outboard, we lead this halyard over the starboard cheek
block on the end of the mizzen boom to the motor. The big advantage is that
by applying the lifting load from above, we can get additional height by
actually lifting the boom with the halyard. In other words, the outboard is
hoisted until the top of it reaches the mizzen boom, then the halyard starts
lifting the boom and motor together. The topping lift just goes slack. It's
very handy if you have to lift the outboard (or anything else) over the rail
onto the deck or into the lazarette. It's also makes removing the topping
lift easier during haulouts, but the mizzen ballooner halyard will also work
for that.

Looking forward to meeting you around the 20th.

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Kent Robertson <karkauai@...>
wrote:

Hi, Steve.
Thanks to all of you who have shared your thoughts and procedures for
going up the mast.

Steve, I'm interested in your description of raising the outboard. It
sounds like you have a dedicated line that goes through a block at the
mizzen spreader. I guess that means you stow the line somewhere on the mast
when not in use? On Kristy, we have always run a line straight from the
block at the end of the boom, over the port mizzen winch, and onto the main
winch. That puts the weight of the outboard on the topping lift, but hasn't
been a problem.

Should I be using the mizzen halyard for this task, or am I OK doing it as
I am?

Thanks.
Steady as she goes.
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



Re: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with Crewmember of an Amel 54

Dimitris Krassopoulos <dkra@...>
 

Steve,



The winch continued to worl although he has released the switch. It seems
that Lewmar changed the switches with lower quality and supplied with them
Amel . The SM2000 like Alma LIbre had old Lewmar switches with the same
winches that never had a problem obviously the new switches are defective.
My friend changed all switches anchor and winch to be safe one year ago he
owned the Amel 54 sinch 2005.



Regards



Dimitris



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of svsummerlove
Sent: Sunday, May 08, 2011 4:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with
Crewmember of an Amel 54





Dimitris,

That's an interesting point. When your friend says "failed", exactly what
does he mean?

I'm not familiar with the 54 (too far out of my price range to even dream
about), but I understand there are many 54 owners who had already owned
earlier Amel models.

1. Do any of you know whether the power winches and switch systems are
unique to the 54? (i.e. are the same Lewmar model winches used on the SM,
different model, etc?)

2. Have any of you found the power winch systems to be more prone to
"failure" than your previous Amels?

Thanks,

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dimitris Krassopoulos"
<dkra@...> wrote:

Steve,



A friend of mine who has an Amel 54 in Greece advised me that his Lewmar
winch switches failed twice so he changed both the anchor and winch
switches
on his boat. So it seems to me that it is obvious that they are a weak
point
that has to be addressed either by Lewmar or Amel or finaly the owners to
be
safe.



Regards



Dimitris



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of svsummerlove
Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2011 4:54 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with
Crewmember of an Amel 54





Dimitris,

Before we start blaming the components and the manufacturers, lets wait to
see which part failed and more importantly, why.

Has it been determined that it was in fact the switch that failed, or the
relay? If it was the switch, then you are correct, the 24V breaker on the
panel would have shut off the relay. If, however, the relay contacts
arc-welded themselves closed, the only way to shut off the power is from
the
100A breaker at the relay.

I have no idea where these breakers are located on the 54, but on our SM,
the port winch breaker is mounted on the forward bulkhead of the engine
room. That would mean lifting the cockpit floor to get at it, and only an
Amel owner would know that. Given what was going on in the cockpit at that
moment, it's doubtful anyone would have had the time or space to get to
that
breaker even if they did know where it was. On the SM, the windshield only
opens on the port side, so that's where most people lead the halyard to
the
winch. The 54 I believe opens on both sides, so it doesn't rule out the
starboard winch.

If it was the starboard winch, the relay and its 100A breaker is located
above the headliner in the passageway. More accessible than the port
breaker, but again, only an Amel owner would know where to find it.

After 40 years in telecom, I've seen my share of electrical component
failures on some very robust equipment. Again, that's why I don't use the
electric thingies to transport precious cargo.

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
, "Dimitris Krassopoulos" < <mailto:dkra@>
dkra@> wrote:

I have put a file with the original article from Yachting World May 2011
for
your reference. The big problem is that the winch was stuck in on
position
and ofcource the woman could not do anything without leaving the halyard
that was connected with her husband. The norvegian man that was trying
to
help had to switch of the winch from the mail 24V electrical table if he
knew about that instead he tried to help and lost his fingers. It is a
pitty
that Lewmar put such low quality switches on her winches and that Amel
accepts that bad quality.



Dimitris

S/Y Amel 54 Alma Libre Too

<http://www.almalibre.gr> www.almalibre.gr



From: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
] On Behalf Of svsummerlove
Sent: Friday, May 06, 2011 3:53 PM
To: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with
Crewmember of an Amel 54





Gary,

Great system!

When we bought our boat, the surveyor went aloft to do a mast and
rigging
inspection. I picked up a couple of valuable lessons from his safety
precautions.

He used the windlass, but insisted it was to be manned by 2 people. I
was
assigned to tail the halyard and another person to work the windlass. My
job
was to stand forward of the windlass facing aft, watch ONLY for the free
running of the halyard and to NOT be distracted with the person aloft.
If
I
had any problem with the halyard, I was to yell "STOP". The person on
the
windlass switch was to watch ONLY the person aloft, and NOT be
distracted
by
the halyard. If they detected any problem with the climber, they stopped
the
windlass and yelled "STOP". That way, we each had only 2
responsibilities-
one visual, and one physical. His reasoning was that it wasn't prudent
to
try to watch 2 different places, tail the halyard and work the windlass
simultaneously. It may be OK as long as nothing went wrong, but too easy
for
one person to get decision overload and panic in an emergency.

I was reminded of this one day when the windlass stuck in the "on"
position
while anchoring. I had a lot of things running through my head, but
fortunately all I had to worry about was losing the anchor and not
someone's
life. I was lucky. I hit the "up" button and it stopped, otherwise I
would
have had to dash to the breaker in the forward locker or the battery
switch.

The other thing he insisted on, was that at least one of the halyards
(preferably the lifting halyard) be led inside the mast. In other words,
he
didn't want to be dependent on a halyard attached only to the masthead
crane. His reasoning was that the block dangling from the crane was a
point
of failure. If that block or the shackle holding it were to fail, the
halyard would drop with it. If it's led inside the mast and the block
fails,
the halyard will be supported by the top of the mast. This lesson became
very clear to me one day when I was lifting the outboard on the mizzen
boom.
The block failed at the mizzen spreader and I was showered in bearings
and
coils of halyard. Fortunately, it failed just as the load was applied,
so
the motor hadn't yet lifted off the life rail mounting. Five more
seconds
and it would have gone for a swim. Again, it would have been a lot worse
if
it had been supporting me.

One last thing. When I bought my top climber, Etienne told me to always
use
a sheet bend to attach it directly to the halyard (i.e. never use the
shackles). Being completely anal, I use a DOUBLE sheet bend. :-)

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
< <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , amelliahona <no_reply@>
wrote:






Hello all:

This is a very important topic and as I have had a rather substantial
mountaineering career including crevasse rescue and rock climbing I
think
I
might have something to offer. When you are dangling from a cliff with
nothing but 3,000 feet of air below you you learn some very important
safety
measures.

Going aloft, whether on a mast or on a sheer rock wall, requires what
we
call "PROTECTION". Protection depends upon having anchors into which you
tie
your harness. You need a quality harness that fits well and won't allow
you
to fall out if you become inverted.

All protection is there to prevent falls. In mountaineering and in
going
up a mast YOU SHOULD NEVER DEPEND UPON ONE PIECE OF PROTECTION. You
should
always have two means to protect yourself should one piece fail. In the
case
of using a power winch for lifting you should never use a self tailing
winch
since you have no safety release if the winch "goes live" and you can't
stop
it. By manually tailing your rope, if the winch button fails active, you
prevent injury to the person aloft by easing the rope on the drum. If
the
person tailing the lifting rope is disabled, looses control or has some
other type of mishap the steps listed below prevents injury.

My method is as follows:

I use a bosun chair with a steel ring. The two pieces of protection
are:
1. The Spinnaker halyard
2. The Ballooner halyard
I tie the spinnaker halyard to the bosun chair steel lifting ring with
a
bowline knot with a back up half hitch.
I then tie the ballooner halyard "around" the straps to which the
steel
ring is sewn. Thus if the steel ring fails the ballooner halyard is a
backup. If a single web of the bosun's chair fails you still have a
backup.
Do you see how this, "always have a secondary protection" thinking is
starting to work.

The spinnaker halyard comes down from the masthead, takes a single
wrap
clockwise around the starboard side lowest main mast winch. It then
leads
forward to the port side drum on the windlass. The main lifting is done
by
hand tailing this line on the windlass drum. This keeps the operator
forward
of the place where a falling object might hit them. It also lets the
operator cleat the rope to any of several cleats as necessary for
relieving
overriding turns or just to rest etc. This person should have a length
of
rope available to tie a Prusik knot (see below) if needed.

The ballooner halyard is cleated tightly on the upper winch of the
starboard main mast. It is thus fixed. A Prusik knot tied around this
halyard is then secured to the bosuns chair. If you are unfamiliar with
the
Prusik knot it has a host of uses aboard ship including securing your
electrical cable running ashore at the marina. See this link
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prusik

This knot can be use to ascend any rope, much like a mechanical
ascender
(top climber etc). As you ascend the mast with the powered spinnaker
halyard, the Prusik knot is slid up the ballooner halyard. If at any
time
the main lifting line looses tension, the tension would immediately come
on
the Prusik knot and any fall would be prevented. One can self rescue if
you
have a spare piece of rope and fashion a second Prusik knot. Then you
can
either ascend or descend by yourself by alternating between loading and
unloading the two Prusik lines.

Using these safety measures my wife has lifted me aloft many times.
The
only thing this doesn't address is a rapid response if there is an issue
while aloft or at the windlass. Self rescue using Prusiks isn't a fast
process. So from here on out I plan to have a hand held VHF radio at the
windlass and one aloft. Thus if something goes wrong, either person can
quickly summon help.

If you have questions about how a Prusik is used google it up. I
promise
you will never go aloft again without a back up piece of protection.
Think
2
pieces of protection for any work aloft.

Happy to field questions, and be safe out there.

Gary Silver
Amel SM 200 # 335











Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with Crewmember of an Amel 54

svsummerlove <svsummerlove@...>
 

Dimitris,

That's an interesting point. When your friend says "failed", exactly what does he mean?

I'm not familiar with the 54 (too far out of my price range to even dream about), but I understand there are many 54 owners who had already owned earlier Amel models.

1. Do any of you know whether the power winches and switch systems are unique to the 54? (i.e. are the same Lewmar model winches used on the SM, different model, etc?)

2. Have any of you found the power winch systems to be more prone to "failure" than your previous Amels?

Thanks,

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dimitris Krassopoulos" <dkra@...> wrote:

Steve,



A friend of mine who has an Amel 54 in Greece advised me that his Lewmar
winch switches failed twice so he changed both the anchor and winch switches
on his boat. So it seems to me that it is obvious that they are a weak point
that has to be addressed either by Lewmar or Amel or finaly the owners to be
safe.



Regards



Dimitris



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of svsummerlove
Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2011 4:54 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with
Crewmember of an Amel 54





Dimitris,

Before we start blaming the components and the manufacturers, lets wait to
see which part failed and more importantly, why.

Has it been determined that it was in fact the switch that failed, or the
relay? If it was the switch, then you are correct, the 24V breaker on the
panel would have shut off the relay. If, however, the relay contacts
arc-welded themselves closed, the only way to shut off the power is from the
100A breaker at the relay.

I have no idea where these breakers are located on the 54, but on our SM,
the port winch breaker is mounted on the forward bulkhead of the engine
room. That would mean lifting the cockpit floor to get at it, and only an
Amel owner would know that. Given what was going on in the cockpit at that
moment, it's doubtful anyone would have had the time or space to get to that
breaker even if they did know where it was. On the SM, the windshield only
opens on the port side, so that's where most people lead the halyard to the
winch. The 54 I believe opens on both sides, so it doesn't rule out the
starboard winch.

If it was the starboard winch, the relay and its 100A breaker is located
above the headliner in the passageway. More accessible than the port
breaker, but again, only an Amel owner would know where to find it.

After 40 years in telecom, I've seen my share of electrical component
failures on some very robust equipment. Again, that's why I don't use the
electric thingies to transport precious cargo.

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dimitris Krassopoulos" < <mailto:dkra@>
dkra@> wrote:

I have put a file with the original article from Yachting World May 2011
for
your reference. The big problem is that the winch was stuck in on position
and ofcource the woman could not do anything without leaving the halyard
that was connected with her husband. The norvegian man that was trying to
help had to switch of the winch from the mail 24V electrical table if he
knew about that instead he tried to help and lost his fingers. It is a
pitty
that Lewmar put such low quality switches on her winches and that Amel
accepts that bad quality.



Dimitris

S/Y Amel 54 Alma Libre Too

<http://www.almalibre.gr> www.almalibre.gr



From: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of svsummerlove
Sent: Friday, May 06, 2011 3:53 PM
To: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with
Crewmember of an Amel 54





Gary,

Great system!

When we bought our boat, the surveyor went aloft to do a mast and rigging
inspection. I picked up a couple of valuable lessons from his safety
precautions.

He used the windlass, but insisted it was to be manned by 2 people. I was
assigned to tail the halyard and another person to work the windlass. My
job
was to stand forward of the windlass facing aft, watch ONLY for the free
running of the halyard and to NOT be distracted with the person aloft. If
I
had any problem with the halyard, I was to yell "STOP". The person on the
windlass switch was to watch ONLY the person aloft, and NOT be distracted
by
the halyard. If they detected any problem with the climber, they stopped
the
windlass and yelled "STOP". That way, we each had only 2 responsibilities-
one visual, and one physical. His reasoning was that it wasn't prudent to
try to watch 2 different places, tail the halyard and work the windlass
simultaneously. It may be OK as long as nothing went wrong, but too easy
for
one person to get decision overload and panic in an emergency.

I was reminded of this one day when the windlass stuck in the "on"
position
while anchoring. I had a lot of things running through my head, but
fortunately all I had to worry about was losing the anchor and not
someone's
life. I was lucky. I hit the "up" button and it stopped, otherwise I would
have had to dash to the breaker in the forward locker or the battery
switch.

The other thing he insisted on, was that at least one of the halyards
(preferably the lifting halyard) be led inside the mast. In other words,
he
didn't want to be dependent on a halyard attached only to the masthead
crane. His reasoning was that the block dangling from the crane was a
point
of failure. If that block or the shackle holding it were to fail, the
halyard would drop with it. If it's led inside the mast and the block
fails,
the halyard will be supported by the top of the mast. This lesson became
very clear to me one day when I was lifting the outboard on the mizzen
boom.
The block failed at the mizzen spreader and I was showered in bearings and
coils of halyard. Fortunately, it failed just as the load was applied, so
the motor hadn't yet lifted off the life rail mounting. Five more seconds
and it would have gone for a swim. Again, it would have been a lot worse
if
it had been supporting me.

One last thing. When I bought my top climber, Etienne told me to always
use
a sheet bend to attach it directly to the halyard (i.e. never use the
shackles). Being completely anal, I use a DOUBLE sheet bend. :-)

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
< <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , amelliahona <no_reply@>
wrote:






Hello all:

This is a very important topic and as I have had a rather substantial
mountaineering career including crevasse rescue and rock climbing I think
I
might have something to offer. When you are dangling from a cliff with
nothing but 3,000 feet of air below you you learn some very important
safety
measures.

Going aloft, whether on a mast or on a sheer rock wall, requires what we
call "PROTECTION". Protection depends upon having anchors into which you
tie
your harness. You need a quality harness that fits well and won't allow
you
to fall out if you become inverted.

All protection is there to prevent falls. In mountaineering and in going
up a mast YOU SHOULD NEVER DEPEND UPON ONE PIECE OF PROTECTION. You should
always have two means to protect yourself should one piece fail. In the
case
of using a power winch for lifting you should never use a self tailing
winch
since you have no safety release if the winch "goes live" and you can't
stop
it. By manually tailing your rope, if the winch button fails active, you
prevent injury to the person aloft by easing the rope on the drum. If the
person tailing the lifting rope is disabled, looses control or has some
other type of mishap the steps listed below prevents injury.

My method is as follows:

I use a bosun chair with a steel ring. The two pieces of protection are:
1. The Spinnaker halyard
2. The Ballooner halyard
I tie the spinnaker halyard to the bosun chair steel lifting ring with a
bowline knot with a back up half hitch.
I then tie the ballooner halyard "around" the straps to which the steel
ring is sewn. Thus if the steel ring fails the ballooner halyard is a
backup. If a single web of the bosun's chair fails you still have a
backup.
Do you see how this, "always have a secondary protection" thinking is
starting to work.

The spinnaker halyard comes down from the masthead, takes a single wrap
clockwise around the starboard side lowest main mast winch. It then leads
forward to the port side drum on the windlass. The main lifting is done by
hand tailing this line on the windlass drum. This keeps the operator
forward
of the place where a falling object might hit them. It also lets the
operator cleat the rope to any of several cleats as necessary for
relieving
overriding turns or just to rest etc. This person should have a length of
rope available to tie a Prusik knot (see below) if needed.

The ballooner halyard is cleated tightly on the upper winch of the
starboard main mast. It is thus fixed. A Prusik knot tied around this
halyard is then secured to the bosuns chair. If you are unfamiliar with
the
Prusik knot it has a host of uses aboard ship including securing your
electrical cable running ashore at the marina. See this link
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prusik

This knot can be use to ascend any rope, much like a mechanical ascender
(top climber etc). As you ascend the mast with the powered spinnaker
halyard, the Prusik knot is slid up the ballooner halyard. If at any time
the main lifting line looses tension, the tension would immediately come
on
the Prusik knot and any fall would be prevented. One can self rescue if
you
have a spare piece of rope and fashion a second Prusik knot. Then you can
either ascend or descend by yourself by alternating between loading and
unloading the two Prusik lines.

Using these safety measures my wife has lifted me aloft many times. The
only thing this doesn't address is a rapid response if there is an issue
while aloft or at the windlass. Self rescue using Prusiks isn't a fast
process. So from here on out I plan to have a hand held VHF radio at the
windlass and one aloft. Thus if something goes wrong, either person can
quickly summon help.

If you have questions about how a Prusik is used google it up. I promise
you will never go aloft again without a back up piece of protection. Think
2
pieces of protection for any work aloft.

Happy to field questions, and be safe out there.

Gary Silver
Amel SM 200 # 335




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Lifting the Outboard

svsummerlove <svsummerlove@...>
 

Hi Kent,

Our boat came equipped with a second halyard (blue and white) that leads through a block mounted just below the starboard mizzen spreader. I just checked Liahona, which is docked beside us, and she also has the same halyard. When not in use, it ties off to the starboard deck cleat on the aft cabin roof to prevent it from clanging against the mast. It's all external to the mast and would be relatively easy to add.

When we hoist the outboard, we lead this halyard over the starboard cheek block on the end of the mizzen boom to the motor. The big advantage is that by applying the lifting load from above, we can get additional height by actually lifting the boom with the halyard. In other words, the outboard is hoisted until the top of it reaches the mizzen boom, then the halyard starts lifting the boom and motor together. The topping lift just goes slack. It's very handy if you have to lift the outboard (or anything else) over the rail onto the deck or into the lazarette. It's also makes removing the topping lift easier during haulouts, but the mizzen ballooner halyard will also work for that.

Looking forward to meeting you around the 20th.

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, Steve.
Thanks to all of you who have shared your thoughts and procedures for going up the mast.
 
Steve, I'm interested in your description of raising the outboard.  It sounds like you have a dedicated line that goes through a block at the mizzen spreader.  I guess that means you stow the line somewhere on the mast when not in use?  On Kristy, we have always run a line straight from the block at the end of the boom, over the port mizzen winch, and onto the main winch.  That puts the weight of the outboard on the topping lift, but hasn't been a problem.
 
Should I be using the mizzen halyard for this task, or am I OK doing it as I am?
 
Thanks.
Steady as she goes.
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with Crewmember of an Amel 54

Dimitris Krassopoulos <dkra@...>
 

Steve,



A friend of mine who has an Amel 54 in Greece advised me that his Lewmar
winch switches failed twice so he changed both the anchor and winch switches
on his boat. So it seems to me that it is obvious that they are a weak point
that has to be addressed either by Lewmar or Amel or finaly the owners to be
safe.



Regards



Dimitris



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of svsummerlove
Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2011 4:54 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with
Crewmember of an Amel 54





Dimitris,

Before we start blaming the components and the manufacturers, lets wait to
see which part failed and more importantly, why.

Has it been determined that it was in fact the switch that failed, or the
relay? If it was the switch, then you are correct, the 24V breaker on the
panel would have shut off the relay. If, however, the relay contacts
arc-welded themselves closed, the only way to shut off the power is from the
100A breaker at the relay.

I have no idea where these breakers are located on the 54, but on our SM,
the port winch breaker is mounted on the forward bulkhead of the engine
room. That would mean lifting the cockpit floor to get at it, and only an
Amel owner would know that. Given what was going on in the cockpit at that
moment, it's doubtful anyone would have had the time or space to get to that
breaker even if they did know where it was. On the SM, the windshield only
opens on the port side, so that's where most people lead the halyard to the
winch. The 54 I believe opens on both sides, so it doesn't rule out the
starboard winch.

If it was the starboard winch, the relay and its 100A breaker is located
above the headliner in the passageway. More accessible than the port
breaker, but again, only an Amel owner would know where to find it.

After 40 years in telecom, I've seen my share of electrical component
failures on some very robust equipment. Again, that's why I don't use the
electric thingies to transport precious cargo.

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dimitris Krassopoulos" < <mailto:dkra@...>
dkra@...> wrote:

I have put a file with the original article from Yachting World May 2011
for
your reference. The big problem is that the winch was stuck in on position
and ofcource the woman could not do anything without leaving the halyard
that was connected with her husband. The norvegian man that was trying to
help had to switch of the winch from the mail 24V electrical table if he
knew about that instead he tried to help and lost his fingers. It is a
pitty
that Lewmar put such low quality switches on her winches and that Amel
accepts that bad quality.



Dimitris

S/Y Amel 54 Alma Libre Too

<http://www.almalibre.gr> www.almalibre.gr



From: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of svsummerlove
Sent: Friday, May 06, 2011 3:53 PM
To: <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with
Crewmember of an Amel 54





Gary,

Great system!

When we bought our boat, the surveyor went aloft to do a mast and rigging
inspection. I picked up a couple of valuable lessons from his safety
precautions.

He used the windlass, but insisted it was to be manned by 2 people. I was
assigned to tail the halyard and another person to work the windlass. My
job
was to stand forward of the windlass facing aft, watch ONLY for the free
running of the halyard and to NOT be distracted with the person aloft. If
I
had any problem with the halyard, I was to yell "STOP". The person on the
windlass switch was to watch ONLY the person aloft, and NOT be distracted
by
the halyard. If they detected any problem with the climber, they stopped
the
windlass and yelled "STOP". That way, we each had only 2 responsibilities-
one visual, and one physical. His reasoning was that it wasn't prudent to
try to watch 2 different places, tail the halyard and work the windlass
simultaneously. It may be OK as long as nothing went wrong, but too easy
for
one person to get decision overload and panic in an emergency.

I was reminded of this one day when the windlass stuck in the "on"
position
while anchoring. I had a lot of things running through my head, but
fortunately all I had to worry about was losing the anchor and not
someone's
life. I was lucky. I hit the "up" button and it stopped, otherwise I would
have had to dash to the breaker in the forward locker or the battery
switch.

The other thing he insisted on, was that at least one of the halyards
(preferably the lifting halyard) be led inside the mast. In other words,
he
didn't want to be dependent on a halyard attached only to the masthead
crane. His reasoning was that the block dangling from the crane was a
point
of failure. If that block or the shackle holding it were to fail, the
halyard would drop with it. If it's led inside the mast and the block
fails,
the halyard will be supported by the top of the mast. This lesson became
very clear to me one day when I was lifting the outboard on the mizzen
boom.
The block failed at the mizzen spreader and I was showered in bearings and
coils of halyard. Fortunately, it failed just as the load was applied, so
the motor hadn't yet lifted off the life rail mounting. Five more seconds
and it would have gone for a swim. Again, it would have been a lot worse
if
it had been supporting me.

One last thing. When I bought my top climber, Etienne told me to always
use
a sheet bend to attach it directly to the halyard (i.e. never use the
shackles). Being completely anal, I use a DOUBLE sheet bend. :-)

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
< <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , amelliahona <no_reply@>
wrote:






Hello all:

This is a very important topic and as I have had a rather substantial
mountaineering career including crevasse rescue and rock climbing I think
I
might have something to offer. When you are dangling from a cliff with
nothing but 3,000 feet of air below you you learn some very important
safety
measures.

Going aloft, whether on a mast or on a sheer rock wall, requires what we
call "PROTECTION". Protection depends upon having anchors into which you
tie
your harness. You need a quality harness that fits well and won't allow
you
to fall out if you become inverted.

All protection is there to prevent falls. In mountaineering and in going
up a mast YOU SHOULD NEVER DEPEND UPON ONE PIECE OF PROTECTION. You should
always have two means to protect yourself should one piece fail. In the
case
of using a power winch for lifting you should never use a self tailing
winch
since you have no safety release if the winch "goes live" and you can't
stop
it. By manually tailing your rope, if the winch button fails active, you
prevent injury to the person aloft by easing the rope on the drum. If the
person tailing the lifting rope is disabled, looses control or has some
other type of mishap the steps listed below prevents injury.

My method is as follows:

I use a bosun chair with a steel ring. The two pieces of protection are:
1. The Spinnaker halyard
2. The Ballooner halyard
I tie the spinnaker halyard to the bosun chair steel lifting ring with a
bowline knot with a back up half hitch.
I then tie the ballooner halyard "around" the straps to which the steel
ring is sewn. Thus if the steel ring fails the ballooner halyard is a
backup. If a single web of the bosun's chair fails you still have a
backup.
Do you see how this, "always have a secondary protection" thinking is
starting to work.

The spinnaker halyard comes down from the masthead, takes a single wrap
clockwise around the starboard side lowest main mast winch. It then leads
forward to the port side drum on the windlass. The main lifting is done by
hand tailing this line on the windlass drum. This keeps the operator
forward
of the place where a falling object might hit them. It also lets the
operator cleat the rope to any of several cleats as necessary for
relieving
overriding turns or just to rest etc. This person should have a length of
rope available to tie a Prusik knot (see below) if needed.

The ballooner halyard is cleated tightly on the upper winch of the
starboard main mast. It is thus fixed. A Prusik knot tied around this
halyard is then secured to the bosuns chair. If you are unfamiliar with
the
Prusik knot it has a host of uses aboard ship including securing your
electrical cable running ashore at the marina. See this link
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prusik

This knot can be use to ascend any rope, much like a mechanical ascender
(top climber etc). As you ascend the mast with the powered spinnaker
halyard, the Prusik knot is slid up the ballooner halyard. If at any time
the main lifting line looses tension, the tension would immediately come
on
the Prusik knot and any fall would be prevented. One can self rescue if
you
have a spare piece of rope and fashion a second Prusik knot. Then you can
either ascend or descend by yourself by alternating between loading and
unloading the two Prusik lines.

Using these safety measures my wife has lifted me aloft many times. The
only thing this doesn't address is a rapid response if there is an issue
while aloft or at the windlass. Self rescue using Prusiks isn't a fast
process. So from here on out I plan to have a hand held VHF radio at the
windlass and one aloft. Thus if something goes wrong, either person can
quickly summon help.

If you have questions about how a Prusik is used google it up. I promise
you will never go aloft again without a back up piece of protection. Think
2
pieces of protection for any work aloft.

Happy to field questions, and be safe out there.

Gary Silver
Amel SM 200 # 335






Re: [Amel standing rigging tensioning

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

First make sure the
2 masts are straight in both directions/sides bring all the stays up going around the boat. As the rig gets tighter using a mallet or wooden hammer handle tap the wire when they no longer
Have a "dead" sound or if they have "ring " take another half turn.
Then take the boat put for a sail and repeat the process. Youll need to this a few time as the rig settles in and the stays take a set as then rig will stretch for a while.
Yes there are gauges to check the stays riggers have been doing it this way for years b

Regards. Sm 209 for sale in Annapolis for sale.
Richard Piller

"Yacht Brokerage Service above and beyond the expected"

Walczak Yacht Brokerage Service LLC
2 Compromise St
Annapolis, MD 21401

Cell 603 767 5330
Office
Fax

www.Walczakyacht.com

On May 6, 2011, at 22:19, sailw32@aol.com wrote:

Joel, I took your advise and painted my entire mast, due to rain and pollen
its taken longer than expected but looks great and should for many years. I
will be stepping the mast next week and will need to tension the new
rigging.I just read your post and I was wondering if you could tell me how you
determine when tight is tight enough? Someone posted a while back to measure
with a stick the distance relative to the turbuckle. Any insight on how to
determine the proper tension would be helpful.
Thanks so
much,
Pat SM 123

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with Crewmember of an Amel 54

Steve Constantine <svsummerlove@...>
 

Hi Gary,

Liahona is safe, sound and looking as beautiful as ever. Her dock lines are all
OK. We haven't had much weather that would be of concern here in the CCBM
Amellery. A few days in April we had 30+ knots, but for the most part it's been
relatively light.

Donna says hi, and please pass along our best to Mary.

See you on the 18th,

Steve



________________________________
From: amelliahona <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, May 6, 2011 10:13:54 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Lewmar Safety Notice and Lifting Accident with Crewmember of
an Amel 54


Hi Steve:

Thanks for the input. Is my boat still happily bobbing in her slip next to
yours there at Clarks Court Bay Marina? Say hi to Donna.

I think you make several valuable points. Minimizing the number of tasks any
one person must concentrate on during this operation is a very valuable
suggestion.


I agree with the concept of having one halyard go thru a sheave at the top of
the mast so that if the halyard that goes to the block at the masthead crane
fails, your second anchor point (climbing term) is completely independent.


On my mizzen mast I only had one halyard I could use initially, the mizzen
staysail halyard. One of the most anxiety inducing things I ever did was to
make the first trek up the mizzen with only one halyard to fit a second eyebolt
and mizzen masthead block for my second anchor. I now have two halyards on the
mizzen masthead that I use to go aloft on the mizzen (really three halyards if
you include the one on the mizzen sail itself). In retrospect the safest thing
back then would have been to lower the mizzen sail and use that as the second
halyard. In fact, I helped a fellow in Jolly Harbor that blew out his mizzen
staysail 3 days out from Antigua while on the ARC. The tattered pieces of the
head of that sail fluttered in the wind for three days until the got into port.
The only halyard available was the mizzen sail halyard and had to be extended
(there is a cutout in the mast for a knot of the appropriate size to pass
through when joining an extension length of line to) so that the mizzen could be
lowered and then we used that single halyard to take someone aloft to bring the
staysail halyard down.

Lastly, I think the need for quality halyards that don't have chafe or 20 years
of UV damage should be utilized. On our climbing ropes for mountaineering, we
retired the ropes every 3-4 years or if they had ever sustained a hard fall by a
climber.


Looking forward to seeing you May 17th when Mary and I get back down there.

All the best,

Gary Silver
Amel SM 2000 #335
s/v Liahona

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "svsummerlove" <svsummerlove@...> wrote:

Gary,

Great system!

When we bought our boat, the surveyor went aloft to do a mast and rigging
inspection. I picked up a couple of valuable lessons from his safety
precautions.


He used the windlass, but insisted it was to be manned by 2 people. I was
assigned to tail the halyard and another person to work the windlass. My job
was to stand forward of the windlass facing aft, watch ONLY for the free running
of the halyard and to NOT be distracted with the person aloft. If I had any
problem with the halyard, I was to yell "STOP". The person on the windlass
switch was to watch ONLY the person aloft, and NOT be distracted by the halyard.
If they detected any problem with the climber, they stopped the windlass and
yelled "STOP". That way, we each had only 2 responsibilities- one visual, and
one physical. His reasoning was that it wasn't prudent to try to watch 2
different places, tail the halyard and work the windlass simultaneously. It may
be OK as long as nothing went wrong, but too easy for one person to get decision
overload and panic in an emergency.


I was reminded of this one day when the windlass stuck in the "on" position
while anchoring. I had a lot of things running through my head, but fortunately
all I had to worry about was losing the anchor and not someone's life. I was
lucky. I hit the "up" button and it stopped, otherwise I would have had to dash
to the breaker in the forward locker or the battery switch.

The other thing he insisted on, was that at least one of the halyards
(preferably the lifting halyard) be led inside the mast. In other words, he
didn't want to be dependent on a halyard attached only to the masthead crane.
His reasoning was that the block dangling from the crane was a point of failure.
If that block or the shackle holding it were to fail, the halyard would drop
with it. If it's led inside the mast and the block fails, the halyard will be
supported by the top of the mast. This lesson became very clear to me one day
when I was lifting the outboard on the mizzen boom. The block failed at the
mizzen spreader and I was showered in bearings and coils of halyard.
Fortunately, it failed just as the load was applied, so the motor hadn't yet
lifted off the life rail mounting. Five more seconds and it would have gone for
a swim. Again, it would have been a lot worse if it had been supporting me.

One last thing. When I bought my top climber, Etienne told me to always use a
sheet bend to attach it directly to the halyard (i.e. never use the shackles).
Being completely anal, I use a DOUBLE sheet bend. :-)

Steve
SM340
Summer Love