Date   

Re: [Amel] Re: Onan genset starting problems

Patrick McAneny
 

Steve, There is a fuse between the battery bank and the inverter, but no
fuse or breaker from the inverter to the outlets. I assume the inverter has a
internal breaker, but that may be a bad assumption and will add a breaker
between the inverter and outlets. Thanks , Pat


Re: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow

Eric Lindholm <etlindholm@...>
 

I should be at the boat in the next few days, I will take a photo of the exhaust
and the heat jacket and forward it to you. Basically there is a 90 degree elbow
right off the turbo going almost straight up, swept back some to the rear. There
is a straight tube, single wall, no water jacket going up from the elbow and
then another 90 degree elbow at the top pointing back down towards the muffler.
At the end of this elbow is a double walled, water cooled straight tube that the
exhaust hose attaches to with multiple holes for the water to eject for cooling.
The fabricator, who is a wizard at this, then had a custom made exhaust jacket
made that wraps around the whole thing and is held in place with stainless steel
springs. 

Eric Maramu 105 

 



________________________________
From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, May 26, 2011 8:42:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow

 
In reading your note again, that is what the yanmar exhaust box looks like.

I would love to see a photo.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

Fair Winds

Eric

_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Lindholm
Sent: Thursday, May 26, 2011 11:26 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow

When I repowered my Maramu with a Yanmar, I had a stainless steel manifold
made
with a 20 inch rise with the water injection at the top of the riser. There
is
no water jacket to rust out as it is a dry stack to the top. I had a heat
proof
jacket made for the dry stack portion. The whole thing did not cost me
$1,000
and will last forever. You might want to look into that.

Eric Maramu 105

________________________________
From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net
<mailto:kimberlite%40optonline.net> >
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, May 26, 2011 7:06:07 PM
Subject: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow

I contacted my Yanmar dealer here in New York, about the rusted out exhaust
elbow.

Yanmar has come yup with a solution. , a box like manifold with an exhaust
port on the bottom.

Manifold, hoses, and support bracket $1300- US$

What an insult.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow

Eric Freedman
 

In reading your note again, that is what the yanmar exhaust box looks like.

I would love to see a photo.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

Fair Winds

Eric





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Lindholm
Sent: Thursday, May 26, 2011 11:26 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow





When I repowered my Maramu with a Yanmar, I had a stainless steel manifold
made
with a 20 inch rise with the water injection at the top of the riser. There
is
no water jacket to rust out as it is a dry stack to the top. I had a heat
proof
jacket made for the dry stack portion. The whole thing did not cost me
$1,000
and will last forever. You might want to look into that.

Eric Maramu 105

________________________________
From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net
<mailto:kimberlite%40optonline.net> >
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, May 26, 2011 7:06:07 PM
Subject: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow


I contacted my Yanmar dealer here in New York, about the rusted out exhaust
elbow.

Yanmar has come yup with a solution. , a box like manifold with an exhaust
port on the bottom.

Manifold, hoses, and support bracket $1300- US$

What an insult.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite


Re: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow

Eric Freedman
 

Eric,

Could you explain this a little more.

Do you have a photo?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Lindholm
Sent: Thursday, May 26, 2011 11:26 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow





When I repowered my Maramu with a Yanmar, I had a stainless steel manifold
made
with a 20 inch rise with the water injection at the top of the riser. There
is
no water jacket to rust out as it is a dry stack to the top. I had a heat
proof
jacket made for the dry stack portion. The whole thing did not cost me
$1,000
and will last forever. You might want to look into that.

Eric Maramu 105

________________________________
From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net
<mailto:kimberlite%40optonline.net> >
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, May 26, 2011 7:06:07 PM
Subject: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow


I contacted my Yanmar dealer here in New York, about the rusted out exhaust
elbow.

Yanmar has come yup with a solution. , a box like manifold with an exhaust
port on the bottom.

Manifold, hoses, and support bracket $1300- US$

What an insult.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite


Re: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow

Eric Lindholm <etlindholm@...>
 

When I repowered my Maramu with a Yanmar, I had a stainless steel manifold made
with a 20 inch rise with the water injection at the top of the riser. There is
no water jacket to rust out as it is a dry stack to the top. I had a heat proof
jacket made for the dry stack portion. The whole thing did not cost me $1,000
and will last forever. You might want to look into that.

Eric Maramu 105



________________________________
From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, May 26, 2011 7:06:07 PM
Subject: [Amel] Yanmar exhaust elbow

 
I contacted my Yanmar dealer here in New York, about the rusted out exhaust
elbow.

Yanmar has come yup with a solution. , a box like manifold with an exhaust
port on the bottom.

Manifold, hoses, and support bracket $1300- US$

What an insult.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Yanmar exhaust elbow

Eric Freedman
 

I contacted my Yanmar dealer here in New York, about the rusted out exhaust
elbow.

Yanmar has come yup with a solution. , a box like manifold with an exhaust
port on the bottom.

Manifold, hoses, and support bracket $1300- US$

What an insult.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite


Re: [Amel] Re: Onan genset starting problems

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Pat we put a breaker between the batteries and the 24 to 12 volt inverter we then run the 110 v output to the 110v breaker supplied by Amel. If we get a short anyplace we are protected.

Sm209 in Annapolis FOR SALE
Regards
Richard Piller

"Yacht Brokerage Service above and beyond the expected"

Walczak Yacht Brokerage Service LLC
2 Compromise St
Annapolis, MD 21401

Cell 603 767 5330
Office
Fax

www.Walczakyacht.com

On May 26, 2011, at 9:16, "svsummerlove" <svsummerlove@yahoo.com> wrote:

Hi Pat,

If it were up to me, I'd always put a properly sized breaker on the distribution side of the circuit to protect the wiring (i.e. the fire hazard). A GFI outlet will work, but is primarily intended to trip anytime it senses the presence of a path to ground to prevent shock to a person. Usually, they are only used where there's a reasonable chance a person could provide that path, such as through the copper plumbing of a bathroom or kitchen. In other words, you wouldn't wire an entire house with GFI outlets to eliminate the need for breakers on the main breaker panel, but you could use a GFI breaker in the panel to feed all the outlets for added personal hazard protection.

How do you have your inverter wired to the 110 VAC receptacles? For example, Amel wires the 220 VAC receptacles from the inverter through the breaker on the 220VAC panel.

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, sailw32@... wrote:

Steve, Last week I was down below when a lot of smoke poured from the
starboard lockers. I found the power supply cord to the tv fried. The inverter
was on supplying 110v. the tv was off ,I guess the cord or tv had a short. I
just put a gfi outlet to supply power in the future . Is that protection
enough or should I fuse the power cord as well. I am very glad I was onboard to
shut the power off.No other wiring was burnt. I think the tv that are built
today always have current to them provided there is a power source even when
the power is turned off. Thanks Pat

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Amel Orange Boot Stripe and corrosion in engine room

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Steve, I have now uploaded some photos to show the new waterline and boot top. Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Ibiza

To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
From: svsummerlove@yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 26 May 2011 12:32:24 +0000
Subject: [Amel] Re: Amel Orange Boot Stripe and corrosion in engine room

Hi Ian and Judy,

Many thanks for the advice. That sure sounds like the easiest and cleanest way to solve the problem. I just wanted to make certain I wasn't going to create a new problem.

I like the idea of a blue stripe too. I had already considered a dark green color to camouflage the growth. :-)

Thanks,

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Ian & Judy Jenkins <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:


Hi Steve, All SMs that I know of seem to float stern down, particularly when in cruising load mode. As a result I would take a lot of convincing that Amel have actually painted the orange stripe in the right place all these years. We love Amels dearly ( this is our third ) but stubbornness is one of their virtues. Having spent hours and hours over 9 years, in the water or in the dinghy, cleaning the orange and intermediate white stripe, we decided last year, when we applied Coppercoat antifouling, that enough was enough. We took a deep breath and brought the Coppercoat to the TOP of the orange stripe, adding a new blue stripe above that, with the intermediate white stripe in between. I cannot tell you how pleased we are with the result. Should have done it years ago. The hull looks just right, slightly sleeker, the fact that the Coppercoat ( brown but going very softly green with oxidisation) comes up so high looks right. No more cleaning of that lower part and , an added bonus, noticeably less white hull to clean and polish---and you can do that from the dinghy or dock without getting your polishing rag wet. In our experience you don't need to change the angle, just raise the waterline and add a new coloured strip. Happy painting, Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Ibiza ( where the water temp is 23c but the sea is awash with jellyfish!)

To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
From: svsummerlove@...
Date: Tue, 24 May 2011 15:19:54 +0000
Subject: [Amel] Re: Amel Orange Boot Stripe and corrosion in engine room

I would think that intentionally painting the boot stripe at an angle that isn't parallel to the water for marketing purposes is out of character for Capt Henri. If he wanted to "pose" a boat for the marketing literature photo with no anti-fouling paint showing to make it look "dynamic", I believe he was clever enough to artificially load one for that purpose, rather than painting the stripe in the wrong place on 450 boats. Nor do I see him sacrificing function for "eye appeal".

I'm not talking about simply raising the boot stripe 4" so the stern is barely out of the water, and the bow is now 12" out of the water. I'm asking about the consequences of changing the angle of it down the length of the boat so that it's 4" to 8" out of the water all the way to the stern. I've already got 8" of "dry" anti-fouling paint at the bow. I don't need 4 more inches.

Example:

If I want the fiberglass along the waterline to remain free of growth, I have 3 choices:

1. I can leave the boot stripe where it is now, and try to balance the boat with weight distribution so the bow rides 4" lower and the stern 4" higher.

2. I can change only the "location" of the entire boot stripe by raising it 4", so it is now 12" out of the water at the bow, and 4" out at the stern.

3. I can change both the "angle" and the "location" of the boot stripe so it is 4" out of the water along its entire length.

Since the boot stripe of every SM I've seen rides bow high with the stern in the water, it can be assumed that either none of the owners are capable of proper weight distribution, or the boot stripe was painted in the wrong place to begin with.

My concern is that, assuming the naval architect who put it there knew what he was doing and had a good reason for doing it, I don't want to alter the angle of the boot stripe without knowing that reason.

Does anyone know that reason?

Many thanks,

Steve
SM340
Summer Love


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Richard03801 <richard03801@> wrote:

In the normal loading for ocean work all the Amel seem to need the water line raised seems the Capt wanted the "sales" appearance to be more dynamic. We too collected an marine forest on the waterline and stern. Grant when healed over cross for days you will get growth on the leeward side as it is under water.

Smooth sailing.

Regards
Richard SM 209 ANNAPOLIS FOR SALE.

"Yacht Brokerage Service above and beyond the expected"

Walczak Yacht Brokerage Service LLC
2 Compromise St
Annapolis, MD 21401

Cell 603 767 5330
Office
Fax

www.Walczakyacht.com

On May 22, 2011, at 17:49, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@> wrote:

Hi all, we too have the low stern. Knowing Amel do nothing without good reason and they build this model for many years without changing the waterline I wondered if they expected more ground tackle weight in the anchor locker than most of us have or more heavy items stored in the bow lockers?.
Corrosion in the engine room. A friend with a SM asked me how come my engine room is so free of corrosion and rust and his was so bad. The answer is WD40 or in NZ, CRC 556
Spray it regularly and liberally over just about every thing including alternators and electric motors. Makes a huge difference.
Regards
Danny and Yvonne
SM299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui New Zealand
--- On Mon, 23/5/11, Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@> wrote:

From: Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Amel Orange Boot Stripe
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, 23, May, 2011, 8:57 AM



Bill,
Once we moved onto our Amel as "liveaboards" we raised the antifoul to meet the stripe......after doing it we were told by others that this was a certain sign of "liveaboards"
Now that we have decided to stay in Phuket, and do no more ocean crossings.....at the next haulout I was thinking of re-adjusting the waterline......say no more!!
Glad to see that your move from the Maldives to the Med went well.

All the Best

Mike
Akwaaba
SN 027

________________________________
From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2011 11:26 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Amel Orange Boot Stripe


Eric, I was tempted to raise the antifouling paint to meet the stripe to solve the same issue, but I believe that BeBe will begin to loose weight now that we are in the Med...we'll see.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, Sm2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite <kimberlite@> wrote:

Bill,

I noticed a few weeks ago that the boot stripe area in the stern had marine
growth. The yard recommended that I raise the waterline as the stern is
lower in the water than the stripe.

Did you or any other owner raise the stripe?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Judy and Bill aboard
SV BeBe
Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2011 2:41 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Amel Orange Boot Stripe





We are in Marmaris, Turkey and just had the boot stripe renewed using a two
part paint matched to Amel orange.

We have purchased the paint twice and have paint, hardener and thinner
available for any Amel owner in the area to pick up.

Contact us at svbebe"at"gmail.com or Turkey cell at +90535-082-2191.

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey















------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio

Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
 

Conn,
       On our Santorin we have both SSB/Sailmail and Inmarsat C, both were useful, but once we decided to stay in Thailand, I cancelled both Sailmail and Satcom. We can still get the local SSB nets and that is fine for us. I agree with Bill, the satcom was essential in the long pacific leg, particularly when we had to go to the help of another yacht. If Sailmail has a transmitter in the Marquesas, then it might be OK for the leg from the Galapagos to Nuka Hiva. Also the "ocean nets" are very good as they give you actual weather from yachts ahead of you - most of the other forecasts are area forecasts, and can be, at times, dramatically wrong.

   However, I would add one warning, do NOT rely on the 2182 "emergency" channel on SSB to summon assistance....ther just are not many wireless operators out there listening any more. So you must have some other means of putting out a "MAYDAY" with some assurance that it will be heard.....transmission does not always mean reception.
   EPIRB's are very efficient.  In the one case where we were personally involved, by the time I had sent a satcom fax to UK, telling of an abandonment in mid Pacific, as the fax was running off the printer, the UKMRCC was on the phone saying that an EPIRB had been activated at xx Lat and yy Long and the NZMRCC had the call and it was registered in UK to this address and phone number.
   That was within 30 minutes of activation. The crew had been calling on 2182 for nearly an hour, including in the "silonce" period.
   Don't know about satphones, but I guess they will have some form of emergency system.

MIke & Chris
SN 027 Akwaaba



________________________________
From: Conn Williamson <connwilliamson@yahoo.com>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, May 26, 2011 4:30 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio


 
Thanks again for that info Tom / Bill. That's pretty much what I thought. Is HF the same SSB?. I think we ozzies call it HF.I had an old cb radio years ago with upper & lower side band which we called ssb.
 My rigger who is extremly well known in Brisbane for being the best around, suggested doing away with the antenna system, which is still installed on our boat, because of the extra expense involved in the rigging, when he replaces the tridadic and back stays. We don't have an HF unit in the boat at the minute.
 
Bill, we follow you on facebook
 
Thanks again
Conn
--- On Wed, 25/5/11, Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@svbebe.com> wrote:

From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@svbebe.com>
Subject: [Amel] Re: HF Radio
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Received: Wednesday, 25 May, 2011, 9:28 AM

 

Conn,

OUR EXPERIENCE:
We are 2/3rds or more away around beginning in the Caribbean and currently in Marmaris. We have HF, a Pator3 modem, winlink and sailmail. Hen not near civilization we used the HF for email communication and downloaded weather information. When near civilization we used WiFi and/or 3G modem. We seem to be using the 3G modem about 60% of the time recently.

When crossing the Pacific from Galapagos to French Polynesia we found a large hole in sailmail stations until we got closer to the Marquesas where sailmail has installed a new station at Manahi.

However, while making passages around the world, some of our best information came from informal Nets that included cruisers ahead of us as well as some behind us. You cannot duplicate these daily meetings on sat phones for lots of reasons, but one is that sat phone to sat phone calls can be very expensive. I have seen some as high as $14/min.

We have a sat phone for emergencies and only pay for airtime when used. I do not believe you can write a contract like that anymore. We did not use it for 2 years, but when crossing the Bay of Bengal, we encountered an un-forecasted LO which was fairly violent. We were unable to get weather information (grib files) that recorded this LO, but we were being hit with 45kt winds...we used the sat phone to call Commander's Weather who was able to give us the position of the LO, allowing us to plot a course out of it.

MY COMMENTS/ANSWER TO YOUR QUESTION:
Your rigger is absolutely correct if you only analyze the situation from his perspective...the additional cost of the rigging could buy you lots of minutes for your sat phone...does he also sell sat phones?

If you currently have HF, you may want to look at an HF halyard antenna to replace your rigging antenna...it will not be as good, but will probably suffice.

If you do not have HF and you do not want 2-way communication with fellow cruisers on passages, then your rigger is probably correct. With the money you will save from not purchasing and rigging HF, you can buy a lot of sat phone minutes.

BTW, out of 20 yachts crossing from Galapagos to French Polynesia with us in 2008, only one did not have a HF transceiver, and he had a HF receiver.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Conn" <connwilliamson@...> wrote:

I am going to get some standing rigging replaced on our Mongo. We are intending to cruise the Pacific in the next few years. My Rigger suggested to do away with the HF aerial system on the tridadic and back stays, saying that HF is outdated. What do Amel owners that are cruising full time think of this. HF or Sat phone?.

Cheers to all...Conn.. Jasmyn #28
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Onan genset starting problems

svsummerlove <svsummerlove@...>
 

Hi Pat,

If it were up to me, I'd always put a properly sized breaker on the distribution side of the circuit to protect the wiring (i.e. the fire hazard). A GFI outlet will work, but is primarily intended to trip anytime it senses the presence of a path to ground to prevent shock to a person. Usually, they are only used where there's a reasonable chance a person could provide that path, such as through the copper plumbing of a bathroom or kitchen. In other words, you wouldn't wire an entire house with GFI outlets to eliminate the need for breakers on the main breaker panel, but you could use a GFI breaker in the panel to feed all the outlets for added personal hazard protection.

How do you have your inverter wired to the 110 VAC receptacles? For example, Amel wires the 220 VAC receptacles from the inverter through the breaker on the 220VAC panel.

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, sailw32@... wrote:

Steve, Last week I was down below when a lot of smoke poured from the
starboard lockers. I found the power supply cord to the tv fried. The inverter
was on supplying 110v. the tv was off ,I guess the cord or tv had a short. I
just put a gfi outlet to supply power in the future . Is that protection
enough or should I fuse the power cord as well. I am very glad I was onboard to
shut the power off.No other wiring was burnt. I think the tv that are built
today always have current to them provided there is a power source even when
the power is turned off. Thanks Pat

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Amel Orange Boot Stripe and corrosion in engine room

svsummerlove <svsummerlove@...>
 

Hi Ian and Judy,

Many thanks for the advice. That sure sounds like the easiest and cleanest way to solve the problem. I just wanted to make certain I wasn't going to create a new problem.

I like the idea of a blue stripe too. I had already considered a dark green color to camouflage the growth. :-)

Thanks,

Steve
SM340
Summer Love

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Ian & Judy Jenkins <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:


Hi Steve, All SMs that I know of seem to float stern down, particularly when in cruising load mode. As a result I would take a lot of convincing that Amel have actually painted the orange stripe in the right place all these years. We love Amels dearly ( this is our third ) but stubbornness is one of their virtues. Having spent hours and hours over 9 years, in the water or in the dinghy, cleaning the orange and intermediate white stripe, we decided last year, when we applied Coppercoat antifouling, that enough was enough. We took a deep breath and brought the Coppercoat to the TOP of the orange stripe, adding a new blue stripe above that, with the intermediate white stripe in between. I cannot tell you how pleased we are with the result. Should have done it years ago. The hull looks just right, slightly sleeker, the fact that the Coppercoat ( brown but going very softly green with oxidisation) comes up so high looks right. No more cleaning of that lower part and , an added bonus, noticeably less white hull to clean and polish---and you can do that from the dinghy or dock without getting your polishing rag wet. In our experience you don't need to change the angle, just raise the waterline and add a new coloured strip. Happy painting, Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Ibiza ( where the water temp is 23c but the sea is awash with jellyfish!)

To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
From: svsummerlove@...
Date: Tue, 24 May 2011 15:19:54 +0000
Subject: [Amel] Re: Amel Orange Boot Stripe and corrosion in engine room

I would think that intentionally painting the boot stripe at an angle that isn't parallel to the water for marketing purposes is out of character for Capt Henri. If he wanted to "pose" a boat for the marketing literature photo with no anti-fouling paint showing to make it look "dynamic", I believe he was clever enough to artificially load one for that purpose, rather than painting the stripe in the wrong place on 450 boats. Nor do I see him sacrificing function for "eye appeal".

I'm not talking about simply raising the boot stripe 4" so the stern is barely out of the water, and the bow is now 12" out of the water. I'm asking about the consequences of changing the angle of it down the length of the boat so that it's 4" to 8" out of the water all the way to the stern. I've already got 8" of "dry" anti-fouling paint at the bow. I don't need 4 more inches.

Example:

If I want the fiberglass along the waterline to remain free of growth, I have 3 choices:

1. I can leave the boot stripe where it is now, and try to balance the boat with weight distribution so the bow rides 4" lower and the stern 4" higher.

2. I can change only the "location" of the entire boot stripe by raising it 4", so it is now 12" out of the water at the bow, and 4" out at the stern.

3. I can change both the "angle" and the "location" of the boot stripe so it is 4" out of the water along its entire length.

Since the boot stripe of every SM I've seen rides bow high with the stern in the water, it can be assumed that either none of the owners are capable of proper weight distribution, or the boot stripe was painted in the wrong place to begin with.

My concern is that, assuming the naval architect who put it there knew what he was doing and had a good reason for doing it, I don't want to alter the angle of the boot stripe without knowing that reason.

Does anyone know that reason?

Many thanks,

Steve
SM340
Summer Love


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Richard03801 <richard03801@> wrote:

In the normal loading for ocean work all the Amel seem to need the water line raised seems the Capt wanted the "sales" appearance to be more dynamic. We too collected an marine forest on the waterline and stern. Grant when healed over cross for days you will get growth on the leeward side as it is under water.

Smooth sailing.

Regards
Richard SM 209 ANNAPOLIS FOR SALE.

"Yacht Brokerage Service above and beyond the expected"

Walczak Yacht Brokerage Service LLC
2 Compromise St
Annapolis, MD 21401

Cell 603 767 5330
Office
Fax

www.Walczakyacht.com

On May 22, 2011, at 17:49, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@> wrote:

Hi all, we too have the low stern. Knowing Amel do nothing without good reason and they build this model for many years without changing the waterline I wondered if they expected more ground tackle weight in the anchor locker than most of us have or more heavy items stored in the bow lockers?.
Corrosion in the engine room. A friend with a SM asked me how come my engine room is so free of corrosion and rust and his was so bad. The answer is WD40 or in NZ, CRC 556
Spray it regularly and liberally over just about every thing including alternators and electric motors. Makes a huge difference.
Regards
Danny and Yvonne
SM299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui New Zealand
--- On Mon, 23/5/11, Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@> wrote:

From: Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Amel Orange Boot Stripe
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, 23, May, 2011, 8:57 AM



Bill,
Once we moved onto our Amel as "liveaboards" we raised the antifoul to meet the stripe......after doing it we were told by others that this was a certain sign of "liveaboards"
Now that we have decided to stay in Phuket, and do no more ocean crossings.....at the next haulout I was thinking of re-adjusting the waterline......say no more!!
Glad to see that your move from the Maldives to the Med went well.

All the Best

Mike
Akwaaba
SN 027

________________________________
From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2011 11:26 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Amel Orange Boot Stripe


Eric, I was tempted to raise the antifouling paint to meet the stripe to solve the same issue, but I believe that BeBe will begin to loose weight now that we are in the Med...we'll see.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, Sm2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite <kimberlite@> wrote:

Bill,

I noticed a few weeks ago that the boot stripe area in the stern had marine
growth. The yard recommended that I raise the waterline as the stern is
lower in the water than the stripe.

Did you or any other owner raise the stripe?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Judy and Bill aboard
SV BeBe
Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2011 2:41 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Amel Orange Boot Stripe





We are in Marmaris, Turkey and just had the boot stripe renewed using a two
part paint matched to Amel orange.

We have purchased the paint twice and have paint, hardener and thinner
available for any Amel owner in the area to pick up.

Contact us at svbebe"at"gmail.com or Turkey cell at +90535-082-2191.

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio

Conn Williamson <connwilliamson@...>
 

On our boat, 1982 Mango, The tridatic has insulators as well as both back stays. There is also a wire running down from the trydatic down to the bottom of the mizzen mast. This boat did have an old lightening protection system on it with a large earth attached below the hull, which I have had removed. I wonder if this is part of it as well. I talked to my electronic guy and he said I needed 10 meters of cable for the antenna, there seems to be a lot more here.
 
 Any way thanks for all the input, I'll be keeping the HF

--- On Thu, 26/5/11, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@xtra.co.nz> wrote:


From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@xtra.co.nz>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: HF Radio
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Received: Thursday, 26 May, 2011, 1:44 AM


 



I agree, we count the SSB as a number one priority offshore. Wouldn't be without it. When we bought Ocean Pearl she had the long transom mounted whip SSB antenna that looked strange and cumbersome to me compared to the backstay one we had on the previous boat. However in 16000 miles it has never got in the way and has functioned well. 
Danny
SM299
Ocean Pearl
Mangonui NZ
--- On Thu, 26/5/11, Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@att.net> wrote:

From: Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@att.net>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: HF Radio
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, 26, May, 2011, 9:51 AM

 

Conn, I can echo the sentiments expressed about SSB HF radio. Having
been fortunate to have resold hundreds of experienced Amel boats, I
can tell you the most honest opinion comes from folks that have been
there, done that ,and are now finished and moving on to other
adventures other than cruising. No ax to grind, they are a wealth of
what works and what does not.

Nearly every last soul has said that SSB/HF is one of the best items
aboard all things considered. The webs and nets are essential and the
inexpensive if not as sexy (or fast!) data transfer capability of
radio make it a real work horse for the cruising sailor.

Many prefer otherwise, but one way to rig the boat the strongest and
to add versatility is to have a separate SSB/HF antenna, which also
costs a bit more than insulators last time I did one for a client.
Plus, if the rigger buggers it up and the rig comes down, you can call
him on your SSB with the separate whip antenna, and inform him of your
great displeasure...

I know folks in the group either love or hate whip antenna but one
client lost his rig and was able to alert those waiting that he would
be somewhat delayed so they wouldn't worry. He also had them start the
assembly of another rig without swage fittings...

All the best,

Joel F. Potter

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

401 East Las Olas Boulevard, #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869

Email: jfpottercys@att.net

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys>
www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

I agree, we count the SSB as a number one priority offshore. Wouldn't be without it. When we bought Ocean Pearl she had the long transom mounted whip SSB antenna that looked strange and cumbersome to me compared to the backstay one we had on the previous boat. However in 16000 miles it has never got in the way and has functioned well. 
Danny
SM299
Ocean Pearl
Mangonui NZ

--- On Thu, 26/5/11, Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@att.net> wrote:


From: Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@att.net>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: HF Radio
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, 26, May, 2011, 9:51 AM


 



Conn, I can echo the sentiments expressed about SSB HF radio. Having
been fortunate to have resold hundreds of experienced Amel boats, I
can tell you the most honest opinion comes from folks that have been
there, done that ,and are now finished and moving on to other
adventures other than cruising. No ax to grind, they are a wealth of
what works and what does not.

Nearly every last soul has said that SSB/HF is one of the best items
aboard all things considered. The webs and nets are essential and the
inexpensive if not as sexy (or fast!) data transfer capability of
radio make it a real work horse for the cruising sailor.

Many prefer otherwise, but one way to rig the boat the strongest and
to add versatility is to have a separate SSB/HF antenna, which also
costs a bit more than insulators last time I did one for a client.
Plus, if the rigger buggers it up and the rig comes down, you can call
him on your SSB with the separate whip antenna, and inform him of your
great displeasure...

I know folks in the group either love or hate whip antenna but one
client lost his rig and was able to alert those waiting that he would
be somewhat delayed so they wouldn't worry. He also had them start the
assembly of another rig without swage fittings...

All the best,

Joel F. Potter

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

401 East Las Olas Boulevard, #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869

Email: jfpottercys@att.net

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys>
www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys


Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio

Eric Freedman
 

I love having the use of SSB email on the boat.

If you are a ham radio operator you can use winlink for free. It works
great. We can also download about 300 different weather charts and weather
data from winlink which is very helpful.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard03801
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 7:28 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio





We done a lot of off shore miles and would take the ssb over the sat
everytime so long as you have a pactor and sailmail

Regards
Richard Piller

"Yacht Brokerage Service above and beyond the expected"

Walczak Yacht Brokerage Service LLC
2 Compromise St
Annapolis, MD 21401

Cell 603 767 5330
Office
Fax

www.Walczakyacht.com

On May 25, 2011, at 5:28, "Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe"
<yahoogroups@svbebe.com <mailto:yahoogroups%40svbebe.com> > wrote:



Conn,

OUR EXPERIENCE:
We are 2/3rds or more away around beginning in the Caribbean and currently
in Marmaris. We have HF, a Pator3 modem, winlink and sailmail. Hen not near
civilization we used the HF for email communication and downloaded weather
information. When near civilization we used WiFi and/or 3G modem. We seem to
be using the 3G modem about 60% of the time recently.

When crossing the Pacific from Galapagos to French Polynesia we found a
large hole in sailmail stations until we got closer to the Marquesas where
sailmail has installed a new station at Manahi.

However, while making passages around the world, some of our best
information came from informal Nets that included cruisers ahead of us as
well as some behind us. You cannot duplicate these daily meetings on sat
phones for lots of reasons, but one is that sat phone to sat phone calls can
be very expensive. I have seen some as high as $14/min.

We have a sat phone for emergencies and only pay for airtime when used. I
do not believe you can write a contract like that anymore. We did not use it
for 2 years, but when crossing the Bay of Bengal, we encountered an
un-forecasted LO which was fairly violent. We were unable to get weather
information (grib files) that recorded this LO, but we were being hit with
45kt winds...we used the sat phone to call Commander's Weather who was able
to give us the position of the LO, allowing us to plot a course out of it.

MY COMMENTS/ANSWER TO YOUR QUESTION:
Your rigger is absolutely correct if you only analyze the situation from
his perspective...the additional cost of the rigging could buy you lots of
minutes for your sat phone...does he also sell sat phones?

If you currently have HF, you may want to look at an HF halyard antenna to
replace your rigging antenna...it will not be as good, but will probably
suffice.

If you do not have HF and you do not want 2-way communication with fellow
cruisers on passages, then your rigger is probably correct. With the money
you will save from not purchasing and rigging HF, you can buy a lot of sat
phone minutes.

BTW, out of 20 yachts crossing from Galapagos to French Polynesia with us
in 2008, only one did not have a HF transceiver, and he had a HF receiver.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Conn" <connwilliamson@...>
wrote:

I am going to get some standing rigging replaced on our Mongo. We are
intending to cruise the Pacific in the next few years. My Rigger suggested
to do away with the HF aerial system on the tridadic and back stays, saying
that HF is outdated. What do Amel owners that are cruising full time think
of this. HF or Sat phone?.

Cheers to all...Conn.. Jasmyn #28


Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

We done a lot of off shore miles and would take the ssb over the sat everytime so long as you have a pactor and sailmail

Regards
Richard Piller

"Yacht Brokerage Service above and beyond the expected"

Walczak Yacht Brokerage Service LLC
2 Compromise St
Annapolis, MD 21401

Cell 603 767 5330
Office
Fax

www.Walczakyacht.com

On May 25, 2011, at 5:28, "Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe" <yahoogroups@svbebe.com> wrote:



Conn,

OUR EXPERIENCE:
We are 2/3rds or more away around beginning in the Caribbean and currently in Marmaris. We have HF, a Pator3 modem, winlink and sailmail. Hen not near civilization we used the HF for email communication and downloaded weather information. When near civilization we used WiFi and/or 3G modem. We seem to be using the 3G modem about 60% of the time recently.

When crossing the Pacific from Galapagos to French Polynesia we found a large hole in sailmail stations until we got closer to the Marquesas where sailmail has installed a new station at Manahi.

However, while making passages around the world, some of our best information came from informal Nets that included cruisers ahead of us as well as some behind us. You cannot duplicate these daily meetings on sat phones for lots of reasons, but one is that sat phone to sat phone calls can be very expensive. I have seen some as high as $14/min.

We have a sat phone for emergencies and only pay for airtime when used. I do not believe you can write a contract like that anymore. We did not use it for 2 years, but when crossing the Bay of Bengal, we encountered an un-forecasted LO which was fairly violent. We were unable to get weather information (grib files) that recorded this LO, but we were being hit with 45kt winds...we used the sat phone to call Commander's Weather who was able to give us the position of the LO, allowing us to plot a course out of it.

MY COMMENTS/ANSWER TO YOUR QUESTION:
Your rigger is absolutely correct if you only analyze the situation from his perspective...the additional cost of the rigging could buy you lots of minutes for your sat phone...does he also sell sat phones?

If you currently have HF, you may want to look at an HF halyard antenna to replace your rigging antenna...it will not be as good, but will probably suffice.

If you do not have HF and you do not want 2-way communication with fellow cruisers on passages, then your rigger is probably correct. With the money you will save from not purchasing and rigging HF, you can buy a lot of sat phone minutes.

BTW, out of 20 yachts crossing from Galapagos to French Polynesia with us in 2008, only one did not have a HF transceiver, and he had a HF receiver.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Conn" <connwilliamson@...> wrote:

I am going to get some standing rigging replaced on our Mongo. We are intending to cruise the Pacific in the next few years. My Rigger suggested to do away with the HF aerial system on the tridadic and back stays, saying that HF is outdated. What do Amel owners that are cruising full time think of this. HF or Sat phone?.

Cheers to all...Conn.. Jasmyn #28


Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio

Conn Williamson <connwilliamson@...>
 

Thanks for that Joel, The seperate antenna sounds like a better alternative to me.

--- On Wed, 25/5/11, Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@att.net> wrote:


From: Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@att.net>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: HF Radio
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Received: Wednesday, 25 May, 2011, 9:51 PM


 



Conn, I can echo the sentiments expressed about SSB HF radio. Having
been fortunate to have resold hundreds of experienced Amel boats, I
can tell you the most honest opinion comes from folks that have been
there, done that ,and are now finished and moving on to other
adventures other than cruising. No ax to grind, they are a wealth of
what works and what does not.

Nearly every last soul has said that SSB/HF is one of the best items
aboard all things considered. The webs and nets are essential and the
inexpensive if not as sexy (or fast!) data transfer capability of
radio make it a real work horse for the cruising sailor.

Many prefer otherwise, but one way to rig the boat the strongest and
to add versatility is to have a separate SSB/HF antenna, which also
costs a bit more than insulators last time I did one for a client.
Plus, if the rigger buggers it up and the rig comes down, you can call
him on your SSB with the separate whip antenna, and inform him of your
great displeasure...

I know folks in the group either love or hate whip antenna but one
client lost his rig and was able to alert those waiting that he would
be somewhat delayed so they wouldn't worry. He also had them start the
assembly of another rig without swage fittings...

All the best,

Joel F. Potter

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

401 East Las Olas Boulevard, #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869

Email: jfpottercys@att.net

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys>
www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys


Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio

amelforme
 

Conn, I can echo the sentiments expressed about SSB HF radio. Having
been fortunate to have resold hundreds of experienced Amel boats, I
can tell you the most honest opinion comes from folks that have been
there, done that ,and are now finished and moving on to other
adventures other than cruising. No ax to grind, they are a wealth of
what works and what does not.



Nearly every last soul has said that SSB/HF is one of the best items
aboard all things considered. The webs and nets are essential and the
inexpensive if not as sexy (or fast!) data transfer capability of
radio make it a real work horse for the cruising sailor.



Many prefer otherwise, but one way to rig the boat the strongest and
to add versatility is to have a separate SSB/HF antenna, which also
costs a bit more than insulators last time I did one for a client.
Plus, if the rigger buggers it up and the rig comes down, you can call
him on your SSB with the separate whip antenna, and inform him of your
great displeasure...



I know folks in the group either love or hate whip antenna but one
client lost his rig and was able to alert those waiting that he would
be somewhat delayed so they wouldn't worry. He also had them start the
assembly of another rig without swage fittings...



All the best,

Joel F. Potter



Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

401 East Las Olas Boulevard, #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869

Email: jfpottercys@att.net

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys>
www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys


Re: [Amel] Re: HF Radio

Conn Williamson <connwilliamson@...>
 

Thanks again for that info Tom / Bill. That's pretty much what I thought. Is HF the same SSB?. I think we ozzies call it HF.I had an old cb radio years ago with upper & lower side band which we called ssb.
 My rigger who is extremly well known in Brisbane for being the best around, suggested doing away with the antenna system, which is still installed on our boat, because of the extra expense involved in the rigging, when he replaces the tridadic and back stays. We don't have an HF unit in the boat at the minute.
 
Bill, we follow you on facebook
 
Thanks again
Conn

--- On Wed, 25/5/11, Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@svbebe.com> wrote:


From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@svbebe.com>
Subject: [Amel] Re: HF Radio
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Received: Wednesday, 25 May, 2011, 9:28 AM


 





Conn,

OUR EXPERIENCE:
We are 2/3rds or more away around beginning in the Caribbean and currently in Marmaris. We have HF, a Pator3 modem, winlink and sailmail. Hen not near civilization we used the HF for email communication and downloaded weather information. When near civilization we used WiFi and/or 3G modem. We seem to be using the 3G modem about 60% of the time recently.

When crossing the Pacific from Galapagos to French Polynesia we found a large hole in sailmail stations until we got closer to the Marquesas where sailmail has installed a new station at Manahi.

However, while making passages around the world, some of our best information came from informal Nets that included cruisers ahead of us as well as some behind us. You cannot duplicate these daily meetings on sat phones for lots of reasons, but one is that sat phone to sat phone calls can be very expensive. I have seen some as high as $14/min.

We have a sat phone for emergencies and only pay for airtime when used. I do not believe you can write a contract like that anymore. We did not use it for 2 years, but when crossing the Bay of Bengal, we encountered an un-forecasted LO which was fairly violent. We were unable to get weather information (grib files) that recorded this LO, but we were being hit with 45kt winds...we used the sat phone to call Commander's Weather who was able to give us the position of the LO, allowing us to plot a course out of it.

MY COMMENTS/ANSWER TO YOUR QUESTION:
Your rigger is absolutely correct if you only analyze the situation from his perspective...the additional cost of the rigging could buy you lots of minutes for your sat phone...does he also sell sat phones?

If you currently have HF, you may want to look at an HF halyard antenna to replace your rigging antenna...it will not be as good, but will probably suffice.

If you do not have HF and you do not want 2-way communication with fellow cruisers on passages, then your rigger is probably correct. With the money you will save from not purchasing and rigging HF, you can buy a lot of sat phone minutes.

BTW, out of 20 yachts crossing from Galapagos to French Polynesia with us in 2008, only one did not have a HF transceiver, and he had a HF receiver.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Conn" <connwilliamson@...> wrote:

I am going to get some standing rigging replaced on our Mongo. We are intending to cruise the Pacific in the next few years. My Rigger suggested to do away with the HF aerial system on the tridadic and back stays, saying that HF is outdated. What do Amel owners that are cruising full time think of this. HF or Sat phone?.

Cheers to all...Conn.. Jasmyn #28







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: BILGE PUMP NYLON GEAR for SM Bilge Pump - "Marina"

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Paul & Peter,

One more thing, but I am not sure about it...language difficulties!

I believe that Siggi ALEV [Alev Yachting, phone +90252-412-1712] was trying to tell us that the gearbox on the MARINA bilge pump is from a Mercedes windshield wiper gearbox.

I have limited Internet Search ability and no Mercedes dealer nearby, but I did a search and found this at http://www.racepages.com/parts/windshield_wiper_motor/mercedes_benz.html Looks a lot like the motor and gearbox on the MARINA pump.

I am thinking that Siggi bought a nylon gear for a Mercedes wiper gearbox and installed it in the MARINA bilge pump.

I am sure there is some owner out there who can followup on this and come up with the answer...if your $900 MARINA pump is going to fail with something other than what is included in a pump rebuild kit, this nylon gear is going to be the failing part...worth a little investigation.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Marmaris, Turkey


BILGE PUMP NYLON GEAR for SM Bilge Pump - "Marina"

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

BILGE PUMP NYLON GEAR for SM Bilge Pump - "Marina"
Paul & Peter,

I do not know if this helps you, but I found a place in Marmaris, Turkey that rebuilt the Bilge Pump (Marina) gearbox replacing the nylon gear with an OEM part for 60 euro. Had he been unable to find an OEM part, he was going to have one made and installed for 150 euro. He has a source that duplicates gears and other machined parts.

Name and Contact: Siggi ALEV, Alev Yachting, phone +90252-412-1712. I have their email, but my experience is that in Turkey they may not respond to email...their web address is www.alevyacht.com. I just tried the web address, it re-directs to a different website, but has the same phone...not sure about all of that. We are in Marmaris. I took the pump to him and it was ready about 5 days later.

My recommendation is to call the guy and explain that one of these pumps was just repaired in his shop for BeBe and ask him if he can send you a part.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Marmaris, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Paul LaFrance <pflafrance@...> wrote:


We had the same problem and since we are in France we tried to source the parts to repair same.
The company that made the original bilge pump was sold to REYA. I tried contacting the company in Italy and they have since closed. Reya now has another company in Italy making the pump but would not tell me who or where they are located. They also have no pumps or spare parts in inventory and I think they are having a problem sourcing the pump. At Amel in La Rochelle they also have a problem getting this pump.
As a result we are replacing the original with a RM69 pump which seems to to fit the bill as the pipe diameter is the same and no adjustments if you install a Jabsco pump.
Currently in Marsailles, France looking for vessel parts.

Paul & Sue LaFrance
SV NOMAD SM362
Vessel in St. Martin





To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
From: pjppappas@...
Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2011 21:20:02 +0000
Subject: [Amel] BILGE PUMP NYLON GEAR






Has any one found a source for nylon gear in the bilge pump. Mine has broken and it seems to be a fairly common problem. Thank you Peter Pappas sm2000 #369 Callisto - Costa Rica





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]