Date   

Oxidation of rub rail

stargazer41amel <no_reply@...>
 

After owning our Sharki for 8 years now, we have finally found a
product that stops the oxidation of our rub rail. 303 Products makes
an item called 303 Aerospace Protectant. The best I can say is WOW!
Check out their website www.303products.com and learn all about their
line.

Delores Carter


Bali Hai SM319 A good nights sleep

John and Anne on Bali Hai <hollamby@...>
 

Dear Ian,
All the storage on the port side is now full of the clip on parts
for the Amel Double bunk.The drawer on the starboard side is not
easy to get at but we use the open locker behind it for shoes.All
the original storage is easily accessed by tilting the whole bed as
in one of the pics. I suppose that one could store a lot of stuff
that is not used often in the spaces behind the head and foot rests.
There is a space under the bed about 90x80x38cms and we slide the
odd box or two into there.
I had forgotten to mention the finishing touch to the bed. We got a
board about 12cms wide and 2mtrs long and padded one side of it with
some upholstery fibre and covered it with some of the fabric from
the original cushions stapled on to the blind side. We then drilled
three or four holes in the exposed side of the bed base and screwed
the padded board on through these holes.
The whole job is no big deal and does not require much skill, an
easy DIY project. It does help to have a jig saw to cut the curved
sections of plywood !
The whole thing could easily be removed to revert to the original
configuration if anyone wanted to as there would be no visible marks
apart from the butchered cushion.

Regards, Anne and John


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM319 A good nights sleep

Ian Shepherd <g4ljf@...>
 

Hi John & Anne,

thanks for all the good ideas. I have one query concerning the aft cabin bed modification. I don't know whether the single berths layout has storage under each bunk, but my double certainly does. I would miss this very useful space if it were to be made inaccessible by the new bed slats. Did you find a solution to this potential problem?

Pleasant Dreams

Ian Shepherd

"Crusader: SM2000 #414


SM319 A good nights sleep

John and Anne on Bali Hai <hollamby@...>
 

My wife and I are both about 6'1"or1.87m. We nearly did not buy an
Amel because of the bunks in the aft cabin.We settled for the
standard design (without the dressing table).Our solution was to buy
a queen size bed base with two sets of wooden slats and 2 Dunlopillo
type rubber foam mattresses and make them fit it across the cabin.It
turned out to be quite easy to do and is a huge improvement. The
shop was a bit surprised when we asked them to deliver the base in
pieces but fitting in a base 2.0m x1.55m through the aft hatch was
too difficult!
The frame was roughly assembled in the cabin to see what surgery was
needed.The position of the saw cuts was obvious after allowing for
each cut section to be long enough to accept the slats and their
mounts.The pieces were put in place on the original bed base on top
of a sheet of brown paper which was marked up to provide a template
to cut suitably shaped pieces of 18mm ply to fix the cut pieces to
so that once again we had a bed frame but now tailored to fit the
space available.
Offcuts of the ply were used to lift up the frame sections that were
not already lifted by the jury frame.
This left spaces either end of the bed frame and so we used bits of
wood cut to size, at 30mm centres, to go from the sides of the frame
up to the hidden side of the front bottom of the lockers and roughly
secured these with pieces of wood notched to receive the
uprights.These pieces were screwed up to the under side of the
lockers.
We then got a piece of hard board and cut it to be just too long
length and heightwise to fill the vertical gaps at the head and foot
of the bed frame. We then cut these bits of hardboard across the
middle from end to end and fixed what was to become the top half to
the top part of the struts tucking it in behind the bottom of the
lockers.Then put the other half in place below it and make a pencil
line along the top of it. Remove the top piece and cut off the
marked strip and refix having sorted out the length.
The surprising thing is that the original long back cushion will
now fit in around the new bed.All that remains to be done is to cut
up the original mattress and its cover to make cushions to fit the
gaps between the head and foot of the new bunk and the forward
bulkhead.We only made these single thickness. They would have been
better double thickness to bring them up to the level of the top of
the mattresses.
If it is ever necessary to fit the emergency tiller it is easy to
split the mattresses and remove one set of slats to give access.
Similarly the new frame is easily tilted up and propped with the
boat hook to access the rudder quadrant etc..
The new bunk works very well and,of course,when the boat is heeled
one person can sleep comfortably lying fore and aft.

Regards to all from Anne and John on Bali Hai in Malta.


Alterations we made,Bali Hai SM319

John and Anne on Bali Hai <hollamby@...>
 

We have just loaded a photo album showing some of the things we have
changed.Nos 1,2&3 show a much more user friendly cockpit seat.It is
based on a New Zealand made pedestal which has gas filled struts to
raise it and to move the seat fore and aft. The pedestal cost about
£100 about three years ago made by softrider@.... The seat
shell is available world wide but it would have been better if I had
picked one with a hand hold at the top of the back. The seat and top
half of the pedestal lift off to give easy access to the locker.
The hard bit about fitting it is removing the Amel seat which is
fixed with a few bolts and sealant. The latter is removed slowly
with a long bladed razor knife whilst pressure is applied to
separate the Amel seat. This suddenly comes free and lands on your
head as you will be standing in the engine room.
Locating the pedestal is simple but the light in the engine room has
to be taken down to cut away the insulation to make way for a
reinforcing pad of 12 mm ply underneath the pedestal.Bolt the
pedestal through the pad using sealant. Refix the insulation and
light and have a beer.
You now have a problem as the table is homeless.This we solved with
a brilliant table mount from Sweden. It costs about £100 and is
very
well made. It consists of an aluminium plate which we bolted on to
the side of the cockpit just forward of the reinforcing web in the
locker. The plate comes with two nylon wedges to make it fit
vertically and a ply pad to reinforce the inside of the locker.
There is then a vertical strut to fit the plate and a horizontal
strut to fit that. There is another plate which is screwed to the
underside of the Amel table top and this fits onto the strut. The
whole thing can be turned and raised as needed. We did not put the
plate in the centre of the table as this made it more adaptable. The
whole thing dismantles and goes in the locker when not needed.
The chart table seat requires the removal of the stool which is
through bolted under the cabin sole and then removal of the wooden
pad which is securely siliconed to the floor.The pad was removed
carefully bit by bit by the great Christian at La Rochelle. He also
provided a new thicker pad which we moved forward so that it just
hid the hole which was for the stool.The pedestal was then bolted
down with bolts made from studding and Dome nuts to be long enough.
The cabin sole is extremely strong and needs no reinforcing
underneath.The easy adjustments afforded by the gas struts mean that
they are much used to work in comfort at the chart table.
To be continued including supplying a fax no for the table struts.

Best wishes from Malta, Anne and John


photos of the amel

kimberlite1212 <no_reply@...>
 

does anyone have new pictures of the construction of the s/m
i would love to see some new photos.
fair winds,
eric freedman
s/m 376 Kimberlite


dinnerware

Roy A. Duddy, Esq. <rduddy.duddylawoffices@...>
 

I have an Amel Sharki #123 [Unwineding]. When I purchased the boat it had
dinner plates, cups, etc. that fit into the "holder". They were thrown out.
Now I am trying to replace them. However, the size of them is not "standard"
here in the United States. Any idea where I can obtain replacements?

Roy

Duddy Law Offices
175 Route 101
Bedford, NH 03110
603-472-8500
603-472-7333 Fax
rduddy.duddylawoffices@...


looking for a Maramu to buy

cjcolclough <cjcolclough@...>
 

Dear all

We, a couple from Denmark, are seriously looking for a Maramu. Having
just lost out on one that was for sale in Spain, our interest in
Maramu yachts has been further awakened, and we are pretty sure that
a Maramu is exactly what we are looking for.
We are planning to get off the merry go round of work, and live our
dream of setting sail and seeing the world. If anybody knows of a
Maramu for sale in the price range of 120.000 - 180.000 Euro, please
do let us know.

Kind regards and happy sailing to you all,

Christina Colclough & Lars Knudsen


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] trip around the horn

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Eric, above 45 knots you just press those little black buttons a tad, put Keith and Sam on the weather rail,( ok ,you can also fill your soil tanks if you are on Port, but that might spoil their fun......) turn up the stereo and keep truckin!!Ian ..... being boring for a moment..on the wind it`s going to be really hard work, much assisted by engine I am in Peru, a third of the way down to Chile, a windward passage of 2,400 miles, learning more each day about the SMs windward skills. Nothing above 25 knots so far but difficult, with a heavily laden boat, clean bottom, to achieve much better than 120 degrees between tacks when you take ocean conditions into account . You need to crack off to have the speed to keep going over the swells. Very comfortable,but not quite the same as an empty boat in a force 3 off La R or in the Solent .Off the wind above 45 knots I would expect real performance and comfort, despite deep reefs.We have yet to have those conditions in the SM but had 12hours of 45+, gusting to 56, in our Maramu, we ended up with just a deep reefed main going down hill and it was very secure. I think we broached twice, but recovered without difficulty, and you really appreciate the tracking abilities of an Amel hull.
I am sure there are lots of Amels that have had prolonged experince of heavy weather. It will be interesting to hear .


From: kimberlite1212 <no_reply@...>
Reply-To: amelyachtowners@...
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] trip around the horn
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 01:31:23 -0000

Does anyone know of an amel that has made the trip around the horn?
secondly what do you do on a s/m when the wind get above 45 knots.
thnaks
eric
sm 376 kimberlite



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Re: Propane Conversion

edmund_steele
 

I replaced both butane regulators as supplied by Amel with propane
regulators. I pressure tested the rig with one bottle disconnected
and the gas does not appear escape "backwards" through the regulator
that is not attached to a bottle.
To be doubly sure, I asked the propane supply company if they could
give me the top valve from a propane bottle. They had a bucket full
of discarded bottle valves and gave me one. I am now able
to "terminate" the regulator that is usually attached to the bottle I
am currently taking to be refilled by attaching my bottle adaptor and
closing its valve.
I can still switch bottles while under sail by just closing one valve
and opening the valve on the reserve bottle. I don't have to switch
regulators or leak test while underway and if one regulator should
crap out, I can operate the system on the remaining regulator.
Fair Winds and No Propane Leaks.
Ed
DoodleBug

--- In amelyachtowners@..., kimberlite1212
<no_reply@y...> wrote:
I found a great marine plumbing supply in the marina in la
Rochelle.
He has a kit of 3 adapters that will convert your system to almost
any gas supply. i used this while i was in europe. for the trans
atlantic trip i decided to convert to propane.i found it very easy
to convert from butane to propane.
i removed the wood butane rack, tanks , and regulator also the "T"
connector at the solenoid. i added a adapter that i purchased in
home depot from "i think 1/4 inch" pipe thread at the solenoid to
the hose that connects to a trident wall mount regulator. i mounted
the regulator to the underside of the top of the gas locker. from
there i used a single hose to either of my 2 tanks. a 20 and 10
pound aluminum tank. I do not like the idea of having both tanks
hooked up at once . when you run out of gas you are 100 % out if
both are hooked together. i prefer to switch to a new tank manually.
we crossed the atlantic with 5 crew including a professional chef-
who cooked too much- on less than 10 lbs of propane.
Fair winds,
eric




--- In amelyachtowners@..., "edmund_steele"
<edmundsteele@e...> wrote:
Hi Walter,
We ("DoodleBug SM331") switched our system from Butane to Propane
3
months ago. The plywood rack that holds the butane bottles
unscrews
into its component parts. The base is lightly glued into place
and
pries out easily. I put in two aluminium tanks of 20lbs and
10lbs.
capacity plus two regulators - all purchased from WestMarine. I
cut a
piece of 3/4 inch plywood to match the base of the locker, with
two
cut-outs to hold the base of the tanks.
The hard part was getting a fitting to hook the regulators into
the
electric shut-off valve. I solved this by purchasing a connector
plus
a couple of hose clamps from a propane supply store. This
involved
me
cutting off the connector from the butane hose and replacing it
with
the purchased connector.
The burners on the stove require no adjustment but the oven
burner
needs to have the air tube adjusted. We have the Eno brand stove
and
it requires the air tube gap at the gas jet, be adjusted from 6mm
(butane) to 4 mm (propane). I used an appropriately sized allen
wrench to measure this.
Pressure test the system before you fire it up! We now carry
30lbs
of
propane versus the Amel supplied 12 lbs. of butane.
Ed Steele
edmundsteele@e...


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] trip around the horn

Randy Kilmon <drifter01us@...>
 

Ralph Nehrig and Ann Harsh have made the trip around
Cape Horn aboard their SM "Harmonie". Their e-mail
address is:
syharmonie@...

--- kimberlite1212 <no_reply@...> wrote:
Does anyone know of an amel that has made the trip
around the horn?
secondly what do you do on a s/m when the wind get
above 45 knots.
thnaks
eric
sm 376 kimberlite


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[Amel Yacht Owners] winterizing watermaker

Anne and John Hollamby <hollamby@...>
 

Message text written by INTERNET:amelyachtowners@...
<
I had this problem when I was shipping my Oyster back from NZ and got some
very helpful info from Sea Recovery.They recommend changing the prefilters
and then flushing the system with a cleansing/sterilising solution in
product or non chlorinated water. The system should then be run on a
solution of their system and membrane element storage chemical with a
solution of food grade gl;ycerine (polyproylene glycol which I bought at a
local pharmacy).
My info may well be out of date and you might want to put the question to
them at info@... without telling them that your system is not
one of theirs!
Best wishes, Anne
and John Bali Hai SM319


trip around the horn

kimberlite1212 <no_reply@...>
 

Does anyone know of an amel that has made the trip around the horn?
secondly what do you do on a s/m when the wind get above 45 knots.
thnaks
eric
sm 376 kimberlite


Re: Propane Conversion

kimberlite1212 <no_reply@...>
 

I found a great marine plumbing supply in the marina in la Rochelle.
He has a kit of 3 adapters that will convert your system to almost
any gas supply. i used this while i was in europe. for the trans
atlantic trip i decided to convert to propane.i found it very easy
to convert from butane to propane.
i removed the wood butane rack, tanks , and regulator also the "T"
connector at the solenoid. i added a adapter that i purchased in
home depot from "i think 1/4 inch" pipe thread at the solenoid to
the hose that connects to a trident wall mount regulator. i mounted
the regulator to the underside of the top of the gas locker. from
there i used a single hose to either of my 2 tanks. a 20 and 10
pound aluminum tank. I do not like the idea of having both tanks
hooked up at once . when you run out of gas you are 100 % out if
both are hooked together. i prefer to switch to a new tank manually.
we crossed the atlantic with 5 crew including a professional chef-
who cooked too much- on less than 10 lbs of propane.
Fair winds,
eric




--- In amelyachtowners@..., "edmund_steele"
<edmundsteele@e...> wrote:
Hi Walter,
We ("DoodleBug SM331") switched our system from Butane to Propane
3
months ago. The plywood rack that holds the butane bottles
unscrews
into its component parts. The base is lightly glued into place and
pries out easily. I put in two aluminium tanks of 20lbs and 10lbs.
capacity plus two regulators - all purchased from WestMarine. I
cut a
piece of 3/4 inch plywood to match the base of the locker, with
two
cut-outs to hold the base of the tanks.
The hard part was getting a fitting to hook the regulators into
the
electric shut-off valve. I solved this by purchasing a connector
plus
a couple of hose clamps from a propane supply store. This involved
me
cutting off the connector from the butane hose and replacing it
with
the purchased connector.
The burners on the stove require no adjustment but the oven burner
needs to have the air tube adjusted. We have the Eno brand stove
and
it requires the air tube gap at the gas jet, be adjusted from 6mm
(butane) to 4 mm (propane). I used an appropriately sized allen
wrench to measure this.
Pressure test the system before you fire it up! We now carry 30lbs
of
propane versus the Amel supplied 12 lbs. of butane.
Ed Steele
edmundsteele@e...


Re: 110 Volt Power

kimberlite1212 <no_reply@...>
 

the amel plug has 3 wires a green and yellow and two hot 110 volt
wires. The usa side has a green, white, black and red.
when you connect the amel to the 220 volt 50 amp twistlock you do
not use the usa side white. the green and yellow goes to the usa
green
the other 2 amel wires go to the red and the black.
AGAIN do not use the us white (neutral side).
I have had no problem connecting in the virgin islands and in the
USA. I leave the 50 amp twistlock connected to my boat and use a
number of adapter cords that i have made to connect elsewhere.
Fair winds,
eric Freedman
Kimberlite sm 376

when you connect this to a twist --- In
amelyachtowners@..., "edmund_steele" <edmundsteele@e...>
wrote:
Walter,
If the marina you are planning on visiting can handle the depth
and
length of an Amel, they will most probably supply 50 Ampere /
220Volt
power. The supply outlet may in the form of a single twist lock
plug.
The plug contains 4 connectors which are both phases of 110 volts,
a
common and a ground wire. Many boaters (the majority are power
boaters) in the USA will then use a "splitter" to separate this
supply into two 110 volt cables which are then plugged into their
vessels as two separate cables. For the Amel, we simply plug the
single 220V cable directly into the boat.
Some marinas supply two 110 volt twist lock plugs on a post. These
outlets are of opposite phase so they can be combined to produce a
220 volt supply. This is the inverse of the "splitter" mentioned
above and can be purchased from WestMarine (www.westmarine.com).
WestMarine call this a "Reverse Y Adapter" Model 491985 and it
sells
for US$409.99

I have only once had to use a transformer to get 220V from 110V
and
that was because I did not have a 220V extension cord at the time.
This approach is also very limiting as you probably won't be able
to
take enough power off the 110 volt supply to run air-conditioners
without throwing it's breaker.

BTW, anything that has 220V on it tends to cost a fortune in the
USA.
For example, a 50 foot 110 volt extension cord may sell for US$40
but
a 50 foot 220 volt extension cord may cost near US$600. If you are
not
afraid of using a screwdriver, you can cut the plugs off a 110
volt
extension cord and replace the plugs with 220 volt plugs.
Ed Steele
DoodleBug SM331


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 110v

amelforme
 

Hello Walter,

Joel Potter here. When you get to the Caribbean, you will find 220 volts
more often than 110 volts. The bane of your existence will be in collecting
the assortment of plug-in adapters...every marina seems to have different
outlets. Coincidentally, most dock masters just happen to have the proper
adapter for their outlets...they never cost less than three digits.

To convert 110 volt to 220 volt most cost effectively, get a "reverse-Y"
cord. It plugs into two 110 volt outlets to give you 220 volt and employs a
blocking diode so you don't get smoked. West Marine has one, part # 491985.
It's a Marinco product and Marinco's product number is MARCO 167RY. Retail
is 549.50, but I've seen them on sale for less than $400.

Hope this helps.

Best regards to the entire crew on LINNEA.

Joel F. Potter
AMEL SUPER MARAMU, MARY BROWN hull # 400

------Original Message-----
From: Walter Lundstrom [mailto:linneasail@...]
Sent: Monday, November 10, 2003 7:25 AM
To: AmelGroup
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] 110v


We have just left the Med, and we're going to Caribbean and later on
Florida
with "Linnea" our SMM 2000. We have not installed an inverter and are
looking for a simple way to get 220v from the 110 outlets in the US. I
know
that we will not be able to use the dish washer and the washer/dryer due
to
the difference in frequency. However, I have some recollection about some
really simple and smart way to get 220v from 110v.

Any advise would be great!

Walter
S/Y Linnea (hull no. 366)

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110 Volt Power

edmund_steele
 

Walter,
If the marina you are planning on visiting can handle the depth and
length of an Amel, they will most probably supply 50 Ampere / 220Volt
power. The supply outlet may in the form of a single twist lock plug.
The plug contains 4 connectors which are both phases of 110 volts, a
common and a ground wire. Many boaters (the majority are power
boaters) in the USA will then use a "splitter" to separate this
supply into two 110 volt cables which are then plugged into their
vessels as two separate cables. For the Amel, we simply plug the
single 220V cable directly into the boat.
Some marinas supply two 110 volt twist lock plugs on a post. These
outlets are of opposite phase so they can be combined to produce a
220 volt supply. This is the inverse of the "splitter" mentioned
above and can be purchased from WestMarine (www.westmarine.com).
WestMarine call this a "Reverse Y Adapter" Model 491985 and it sells
for US$409.99

I have only once had to use a transformer to get 220V from 110V and
that was because I did not have a 220V extension cord at the time.
This approach is also very limiting as you probably won't be able to
take enough power off the 110 volt supply to run air-conditioners
without throwing it's breaker.

BTW, anything that has 220V on it tends to cost a fortune in the USA.
For example, a 50 foot 110 volt extension cord may sell for US$40 but
a 50 foot 220 volt extension cord may cost near US$600. If you are not
afraid of using a screwdriver, you can cut the plugs off a 110 volt
extension cord and replace the plugs with 220 volt plugs.
Ed Steele
DoodleBug SM331


Propane Conversion

edmund_steele
 

Hi Walter,
We ("DoodleBug SM331") switched our system from Butane to Propane 3
months ago. The plywood rack that holds the butane bottles unscrews
into its component parts. The base is lightly glued into place and
pries out easily. I put in two aluminium tanks of 20lbs and 10lbs.
capacity plus two regulators - all purchased from WestMarine. I cut a
piece of 3/4 inch plywood to match the base of the locker, with two
cut-outs to hold the base of the tanks.
The hard part was getting a fitting to hook the regulators into the
electric shut-off valve. I solved this by purchasing a connector plus
a couple of hose clamps from a propane supply store. This involved me
cutting off the connector from the butane hose and replacing it with
the purchased connector.
The burners on the stove require no adjustment but the oven burner
needs to have the air tube adjusted. We have the Eno brand stove and
it requires the air tube gap at the gas jet, be adjusted from 6mm
(butane) to 4 mm (propane). I used an appropriately sized allen
wrench to measure this.
Pressure test the system before you fire it up! We now carry 30lbs of
propane versus the Amel supplied 12 lbs. of butane.
Ed Steele
edmundsteele@...


Switching toi Propane

Marty Scheinberg <martyray@...>
 

If you plan in advance Amel will build a mini locker (typical Amel excellence) in the aft
lazerette. They would need an empty propane tank in order to build to size. The
mini locker would house two propane tanks. The gas line that runs from the galley
aft, would remain the same. However, a different size "Y" valve would also live in the
locker to accomodate the different type of gas. It would also be quite simple to switch
back to butane. In addition, an On /Off propane switch would be mounted in the
galley area [physically close to the butane switch (Ouvert/Ferme)] and the gas would
flow through both switches. I leave the butane O/F switch permanently in the Ouvert
position. I recommend a visit to the yard in Hyeres. My SM is "Rosebud", hull # 191.
More info required? Feel free to ontact me..
Good Luck, Marty


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] switching to Propane

Jim <jim@...>
 

Hi Walter,
Group member martyray@..., owner of SM Rosedbud has used propane for several years. I am sending him a copy of your email. Good luck.
Jim Grossman

----- Original Message -----
From: Walter Lundstrom
To: AmelGroup
Sent: Monday, November 10, 2003 7:18 AM
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] switching to Propane


Hi,

We have been in the Med for the last 18 months with "Linnea" our Amel SMM
(hull no. 366). Our boat is currently setup with the standard butane bottles
supplied by Amel. However, we are crossing to Caribbean (and later Florida)
in a few weeks, and it seems like we will need to switch to propane. Does
anybody have any advise/experience about what changes we would need to do to
start using propane instead of butane?

Walter Lundstrom
S/Y Linnea

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