Date   

Re: [Amel] Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches

karkauai
 

Thanks, Richard and Craig.  I have a much better understanding of how they work now.  The "Top Climber" looks pretty good, I'll have to try to find someone who has one to give it a try.
Kent

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Re: [Amel] headsail idea

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Dave we had a high cut 90% heavy weather jib built to fly off the forestay and it has proved remakably powerfull. Anything over 12 knots true wind speed it is better than the genoa to windward and over 15 knots on a reach with the wind on or ahead of the beam. 
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui New Zealand 

From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@yahoo.com>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, 22 August 2011 4:44 PM
Subject: [Amel] headsail idea


 
I'm thinking about building an upwind sail when things slow down a bit this winter. It would be flown from a Dyneema stay. I'm thinking the stay could possibly be lashed to the foredeck cleat. I have no idea if this factoid is true but I read that the original concept with the huge foredeck cleat is that the boat could be lifted with a 3 point harness using that cleat for the forward attachment.

Since the effective J of this sail would be small-ish I'm thinking about building it with some battens so we can have some positive roach. The sail would stow in a zipper bag secured to the rail so the battens would not make it too tough to stow.

If anyone has tried something similar or has some ideas to offer, I'd love to hear them. Not sure yet what I'll use for material.

I'm thinking this would be a really useful sail if we were doing a passage like Hawaii to the west coast. When we built the genoa the idea was to create a really good reaching and downwind sail for use with the balooner. So the genoa isn't all that great upwind.

Not sure what we'd do for sheeting yet. Anyhow, love to hear ideas if you have any.

Regards,

Dave Benjamin
S/V Exit Strategy
Maramu #29





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Re: headsail idea

jjjk12s <jjjk12s@...>
 

Popeye (Maramu #91) has a solent stay which attaches with a pelican hook to a "D ring" type arrangement that is part of the stainless bow fitting but a few inches behind the forestay. It easily attaches out of the way to a D ring by the shrouds when not in use. I thought this is original equipment. Very handy for a variety of hank on sails and also in a crisis if there is a problem with the forestay.

John

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@...> wrote:

I'm thinking about building an upwind sail when things slow down a bit this winter. It would be flown from a Dyneema stay. I'm thinking the stay could possibly be lashed to the foredeck cleat. I have no idea if this factoid is true but I read that the original concept with the huge foredeck cleat is that the boat could be lifted with a 3 point harness using that cleat for the forward attachment.

Since the effective J of this sail would be small-ish I'm thinking about building it with some battens so we can have some positive roach. The sail would stow in a zipper bag secured to the rail so the battens would not make it too tough to stow.

If anyone has tried something similar or has some ideas to offer, I'd love to hear them. Not sure yet what I'll use for material.

I'm thinking this would be a really useful sail if we were doing a passage like Hawaii to the west coast. When we built the genoa the idea was to create a really good reaching and downwind sail for use with the balooner. So the genoa isn't all that great upwind.

Not sure what we'd do for sheeting yet. Anyhow, love to hear ideas if you have any.

Regards,

Dave Benjamin
S/V Exit Strategy
Maramu #29


headsail idea

Dave_Benjamin
 

I'm thinking about building an upwind sail when things slow down a bit this winter. It would be flown from a Dyneema stay. I'm thinking the stay could possibly be lashed to the foredeck cleat. I have no idea if this factoid is true but I read that the original concept with the huge foredeck cleat is that the boat could be lifted with a 3 point harness using that cleat for the forward attachment.

Since the effective J of this sail would be small-ish I'm thinking about building it with some battens so we can have some positive roach. The sail would stow in a zipper bag secured to the rail so the battens would not make it too tough to stow.

If anyone has tried something similar or has some ideas to offer, I'd love to hear them. Not sure yet what I'll use for material.

I'm thinking this would be a really useful sail if we were doing a passage like Hawaii to the west coast. When we built the genoa the idea was to create a really good reaching and downwind sail for use with the balooner. So the genoa isn't all that great upwind.

Not sure what we'd do for sheeting yet. Anyhow, love to hear ideas if you have any.

Regards,

Dave Benjamin
S/V Exit Strategy
Maramu #29


Re: [Amel] Galley Sink drain insert

karkauai
 

We use the dishwasher as more storage space. Do you hav e a pic of your cutting board in place?
Kent
SM2K 243
KRISTY
Sent from my BlackBerry® smartphone powered by Alltel


Re: Mizzen Ballooner

Craig Briggs
 

--- Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe" wrote:
Good news... sock (snuffer) ..on Mizzen Ballooner.
.. (It).. will give .. a gain of 1-2kts in 15kts of wind.

I do not know if this is correct, but we always set the ballooner with the main to the outside of the ballooner...seems to work better and not get blanketed by the main, but when the wind is on the beam it seems that the main is too far out possibly spilling a lot of air. Your thoughts on this would be appreciated as the Amel manual does not address the position of the main.
Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387

Hi Bill,
You are absolutely correct - the "foc d'artimon" - "jib of the mizzen" indeed flies inside the main. We call ours "Little Artie" and he's like a little turbocharger - watch out for "whip-lash" as you accelerate! (Well, a little hyperbole is allowed!)

Start trimming from the bow with the "foc" and work aft. And remember the racers mantra - "when in doubt, let it out". Use the boom vang on the main to crank it down and you'll be surprised how far out it will trim and still be effective.

In the 15 kts of wind you mentioned, the main delvelops max power off the leach, and a little softness at the luff isn't an issue - even to the point of a bit of flutter.

Then move on to "Little Artie" and let him out past luffing, then trim him in till he's just drawing - I've got telltales on him so I can see when I've got attached flow on both side. Finish up with the Artimon - Mizzen, which will be on a close reach, because all the wind coming from the bow is being bent closer to the boat as it flows past the first three sails.

And Bob's your Uncle!

Cheers, Craig Briggs aboard "SANGARIS" SN#68, in Leros, Greece.


Re: [Amel] outhaul motor parts

eric freedman
 

_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kimberlite
Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 12:43 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] outhaul motor parts





I have had my mainsail outhaul motor taken apart in a motor shop. One of
the magnets glue

To the inside shell of the motor is broken. Otherwise the motor is fine.
Does anyone in the USA or Canada have a corroded or broken Leroy Sommer
outhaul motor? I need to take the motor apart for the magnets.

If there is also a damaged or corroded gearbox I would also be interested in
purchasing it.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Super Maramu #376


Re: [Amel] Galley Sink drain insert

Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

If you find replacements I am also interested!

We have had a custom made cut board in teak that is fit voer the big zink and underneath I have this plastic tray. It is perfect to keep the dish brush and other small things on.

Drying plates, why don't you use the dishwasher for that instead of having one more thing in the kitchen.

Regards
Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila
SM #232




To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
From: karkauai@yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 12:42:05 -0700
Subject: Re: [Amel] Galley Sink drain insert






I never liked that plastic tray as it wouldn't stay in place. I found a small Stainless/rubber-coated drip basket that fits nicely in one side of the double sink for drying dishes (Bed Bath and Beyond- ~$15US). It also has rubber feet that keep it from sliding around when placed on the drainboard to the starboard of the sinks. Altogether a much better solution than the old plastic tray.
Kent
SM243
KRISTY

________________________________
From: Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2011 1:13 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Galley Sink drain insert


Hi Bill,

when I purchased Crusader (2) In 2003 I asked Olivier for a spare tray.
He said that trays were no longer available, but gave me his last spare
which I have now used. In my double sink there are two plastic trays and
both could do with replacing now so if you find a source then please let
me know. Good luck.

Regards

Ian SM Crusader Lesbos Greek Islands

On 16/08/2011 16:44, Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe wrote:

Does anyone know where we can buy a replacement for the plastic tray
for the galley sink? It has "CER&#9825;MAT" on each end of the tray.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Crete, Greek Islands

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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Amel] Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches

Craig Briggs
 

Bill,

"Runaways" , as you say, are most certainly a failed switch closing the
low current side of a relay, which in turn energizes the electromagnet
that closes the hi current terminals.

To address Kent's question of whether flipping off the panel switch
eliminates all possiblility of a runaway and Bill's second scenario of a
solenoid failing and going to the closed position - there is virtually
no realistic chance of such a failure and turning off the panel switch
is definitely "enough" as Kent put it.

These relays/contactors/solenoids - whatever term you wish - are highly
engineered devices that have their high current terminals held open by
strong springs (some are normally closed, but ours are normally open).
They are designed so that any realistic failure mode will not activate
the switch. Bill, I guess I can't disagree when you say this "could"
fail - but it's in the realm of an irrelevant hypothetical, not real
life. Oh, I suppose if you had dripping sea water making it a massive
corroded wad it could fail - but, hey, these are Amels!

Thus, unless and until you hit the switch (or the switch fails and
closes by itself), thereby feeding low amp current to the electromagnet,
thus closing the contacts, the relay/solenoid will not energize the high
current side - period.

This is NOT analogous to "hot wiring" a car (and I grew up in Detroit
when we could still do that!). Hot wiring is simply bypassing the switch
with a jumper, which IS totally analogous to the failed switch scenario
- not the failed solenoid scenario.

I'd suggest some KISS, and just turn off the panel breaker - a simple
routine easily made habit. It will, ideeed, eliminate all reasonable
possibility of a failure and, more important, it'll get done. Can't
quite see traipsing around after every sail from engine room to
companionway to bow to open breakers becoming anything but a PITA.

Having said all that, this part is really not too important. What's
really, really important is that all the crew know exactly what to do
with a runaway.

Bill - sounds like we may have crossed paths as you're in Crete and we
just left there and are now in the Dodecanese. Will you be headed back
this way or to Turkey - would welcome you for sundowners. Ever come up
on the Med Net?

Cheers,

Craig Briggs, "SANGARIS", SN#68

--- Bill aboard SV BeBe" wrote:
.. breaker ..only turns off the low-amp side .. high-amp side remains ON
when the 24v panel breaker is OFF. If any of the relays/solenoids fails
and closes the high-amp side, the motor will run with .. breaker set to
OFF. Some of you may remember "hot wiring" a starter solenoid on a car
with the key switch OFF...same principle. (NOT THE SAME PRINCIPLE -
Craig)

In my opinion there are two possible/probable causes of a runaway
electric winch:
---One is if the winch/windlass control button fails and closes...this
will cause the winch to runaway if the 24v panel breaker and the
high-amp breakers are ON.
---The other potential cause could be if the the relay/solenoid fails
and closes, the winch will runaway even if the 24v panel breaker set to
OFF. ("COULD", BUT SO IMPROBABLE AS TO BE IRRELEVANT - Craig)

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Crete, Greek Islands

Kent Robertson karkauai@ wrote:

If the winches are turned off at the 24v panel, does that shut off
all possiblity of the winches running, or do you have to turn them off
at their individual breakers or even the primary 24v breaker at the
battery bank?
We've always turned them off at the 24v panel, but now I'm
questioning if that's enough.
.....


Mizzen Ballooner

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Good news...

We had a sock (snuffer) installed on our Mizzen Ballooner. What a difference in setting and snuffing. A few days ago, we used it with the snuffer for the first time with the wind on the beam and at 15kts.

Try it and you will use the Mizzen Ballooner a lot more...great when wind is at 90 to 150 degrees. It will give you a gain of 1-2kts in 15kts of wind.

I do not know if this is correct, but we always set the ballooner with the main to the outside of the ballooner...seems to work better and not get blanketed by the main, but when the wind is on the beam it seems that the main is too far out possibly spilling a lot of air. Your thoughts on this would be appreciated as the Amel manual does not address the position of the main.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Crete, The Greek Islands


Re: [Amel] Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Kent given that I'm on a lot of boats I have a "top climer" that allow getting up on my own. We use the windlass and a safety line on our SM

Regards. SM 209 FOR SALE IN ANNAPOLIS

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

"brokerage beyond your expectations"

On Aug 19, 2011, at 17:09, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

If the winches are turned off at the 24v panel, does that shut off all possiblity of the winches running, or do you have to turn them off at their individual breakers or even the primary 24v breaker at the battery bank?
We've always turned them off at the 24v panel, but now I'm questioning if that's enough.
As for taking someone up the mast, turning the winches off when at the top of the mast is a great idea too. We need to know where the closest fail-safe switch is that can be thrown in the event of a runaway.
Craig (Sangaris) taught me to tie the secondary safety line off at the halyard winch and use a rolling hitch to move up and down that line. With the real possiblilty of runaway winch, I will now ALWAYS use that method instead of using the two jib winches together for my primary and secondary lines.

What would you recommend I purchase as a method of going up the mast without relying on the winches (ie if I were single-handing)? There are several products on the market that I'd like to hear some feedback on. Perhaps that's the best way to go up every timye!?
Scary, huh?!
Kent
SM2K 243
KRISTY

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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[Amel] Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Kent,

The breaker on the 24v panel only turns off the low-amp side of the voltage to the relays/solenoids of the electric winches, the furlers and outhaul, and to the windlass. The high-amp side of voltage still remains ON when the 24v panel breaker is OFF. If any of the relays/solenoids fails and closes the high-amp side, the motor will run with the 24v panel breaker set to OFF. Some of you may remember "hot wiring" a starter solenoid on a car with the key switch OFF...same principle.

In my opinion there are two possible/probable causes of a runaway electric winch:
---One is if the winch/windlass control button fails and closes...this will cause the winch to runaway if the 24v panel breaker and the high-amp breakers are ON.
---The other potential cause could be if the the relay/solenoid fails and closes, the winch will runaway even if the 24v panel breaker set to OFF.

As Eric posted, on a Super Maramu, the PORT winch high-amp breaker is in the engine room, the STARBOARD side high-amp breaker is above the passage berth, and the windlass high-amp breaker is inside the forward port side locker in the V berth.

The troubling Caribbean story about the loss of limbs caused me to always acquaint new crew members with all of the breakers and their purposes.

A "runaway windlass" on an Amel equipped with the low-amp control switches on top of the windlass is almost always caused by water egress into the switch which is a direct result of damage to the rubber switch covers. Egress of water causes the switch to close and the windlass to runaway. These rubber covers should be inspected regularly. My experience in the tropics is that UV damage will shorten the life of the rubber cover to about 3 years. I do not agree with earlier postings that the location of the windlass switches on top of the windlass causes the problem. This sort of windlass runaway operation is problematic with deck-mounted foot switches and deck-mounting will open one more hole in the deck...in my opinion, a much bigger problem.

Hope this helps.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Crete, Greek Islands

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

If the winches are turned off at the 24v panel, does that shut off all possiblity of the winches running, or do you have to turn them off at their individual breakers or even the primary 24v breaker at the battery bank?
We've always turned them off at the 24v panel, but now I'm questioning if that's enough.
As for taking someone up the mast, turning the winches off when at the top of the mast is a great idea too.  We need to know where the closest fail-safe switch is that can be thrown in the event of a runaway.
Craig (Sangaris) taught me to tie the secondary safety line off at the halyard winch and use a rolling hitch to move up and down that line.  With the real possiblilty of runaway winch, I will now ALWAYS use that method instead of using the two jib winches together for my primary and secondary lines.
 
What would you recommend I purchase as a method of going up the mast without relying on the winches (ie if I were single-handing)? There are several products on the market that I'd like to hear some feedback on.  Perhaps that's the best way to go up every timye!?
Scary, huh?!
Kent
SM2K 243
KRISTY

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches

eric freedman
 

John,

Do you turn the winch relays off on the DC panel or actually go to the winch
control boxes, one above the midships berth and the other in the engine
room?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Hollamby
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2011 3:02 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches





Hello Craig,
On the Super Maramu the breakers for the anchor and the other electric
winches are separate so that should not be a problem. In ten years we have
never made this boo boo before and nor have we ever switched the winches
off...ever. From now on we shall allways turn them off when we stop as we do
with the instruments. I was astonished nothing broke as the forestay was
pulled a long way back.
Lesson learned.

Best wishes from the Ionian, Anne and John, SM319

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "sv Sangaris" <sangaris@...>
wrote:


John,

Good "head's up" and whilst we don't have electric winches on our
Santorin, we have occasionally activated the furlers and anchor windlass
by setting things on the switches when moored or at anchor. Have tried
to get in the habit of turning off the main breaker when done sailing -
does that also deactivate the electric winches on a SM? Granted, we
sometimes forget to turn it back on when hoisting anchor, but it's a
small nuisance.

Cheers, Craig Briggs - "Sangaris" - SN#68

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "John Hollamby"
<annejohnholl@> wrote:
.....the port winch started running of its own accord ...


Re: [Amel] Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches

karkauai
 

If the winches are turned off at the 24v panel, does that shut off all possiblity of the winches running, or do you have to turn them off at their individual breakers or even the primary 24v breaker at the battery bank?
We've always turned them off at the 24v panel, but now I'm questioning if that's enough.
As for taking someone up the mast, turning the winches off when at the top of the mast is a great idea too.  We need to know where the closest fail-safe switch is that can be thrown in the event of a runaway.
Craig (Sangaris) taught me to tie the secondary safety line off at the halyard winch and use a rolling hitch to move up and down that line.  With the real possiblilty of runaway winch, I will now ALWAYS use that method instead of using the two jib winches together for my primary and secondary lines.
 
What would you recommend I purchase as a method of going up the mast without relying on the winches (ie if I were single-handing)? There are several products on the market that I'd like to hear some feedback on.  Perhaps that's the best way to go up every timye!?
Scary, huh?!
Kent
SM2K 243
KRISTY


Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches

John and Anne on Bali Hai
 

Hello Craig,
On the Super Maramu the breakers for the anchor and the other electric winches are separate so that should not be a problem. In ten years we have never made this boo boo before and nor have we ever switched the winches off...ever. From now on we shall allways turn them off when we stop as we do with the instruments. I was astonished nothing broke as the forestay was pulled a long way back.
Lesson learned.

Best wishes from the Ionian, Anne and John, SM319

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "sv Sangaris" <sangaris@...> wrote:


John,

Good "head's up" and whilst we don't have electric winches on our
Santorin, we have occasionally activated the furlers and anchor windlass
by setting things on the switches when moored or at anchor. Have tried
to get in the habit of turning off the main breaker when done sailing -
does that also deactivate the electric winches on a SM? Granted, we
sometimes forget to turn it back on when hoisting anchor, but it's a
small nuisance.

Cheers, Craig Briggs - "Sangaris" - SN#68

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "John Hollamby"
<annejohnholl@> wrote:
.....the port winch started running of its own accord ...


runaway electric winch

Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
 

Just before leaving the boat for hurricane season last month, while sitting in the cockpit of my Mango docked at the marina, the starboard main winch started turning.
 Could not stop it until I switched off the main switch which is  closer to the winch  (the electrical panel in the kitchen) than the breaker  next to the main switches.
A week before, I had used this winch to haul up a friend to check a component of the mizzen mast. Since I was alone, I used the self tailing facility to hold on the halyard.
I shiver at what would have occurred if my winch had run away then... since the halyard I was using is set on a block riveted on the outside of the mast. Would it have resisted to the pull until the 130 amp breaker  was activated?
I will never used the self tailing facility of an electric winch to haul up someone.
I did not have the time to find the origin of the self activation of the winch, is it one of the switches (there are two: one near the winch and the other at the helm) or is it a failure of a solenoid under the winch.
Reflecting on this problem, I have concluded that, since I often sail alone and need the self tailing facility of these winches, I have to protect my genoa against this type of incident.
I first thought of reducing the maximum amp capacity of the electric breaker. It is 130 amp. However I have found that when I use the winches for long loads, such as hoisting a heavy friend with a continuous use of the winch, the breaker will operate and I need to wait a few minutes for it to cool before using the winch, otherwise, the breaker opens up after less than a minute of use. I have concluded, the amp capacity should not be reduced.
On my other boat (a 41 f Columbia without electric winches) I used a ‘textile shackle’ ( erse à bouton) to attach the sheets, as recommended by the great sailor E Tabarly, in order to avoid the low cut genoa being destroyed by a wave falling on the genoa. This shackle is a small line which should break in the event of a pull exceeding approximately 300 pounds. After many years of use on the Columbia, the shackle never broke .  I did not install this on the genoa sheets of the Mango since I was too lazy to try to estimate the maximum load and after thousands of miles, including a crossing, I never saw a wave breaking in the genoa.
But with a runaway winch, it may be a proper security. So I will have to determine the breaking load of this textile shackle. If anyone has an enlightened suggestion?
Looking for the cause of this runaway winch is the first item on my ‘to do list’ for next fall...
Serge, V Opera, Mango #51

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Genoa sheets and runaway winches

Craig Briggs
 

John,

Good "head's up" and whilst we don't have electric winches on our
Santorin, we have occasionally activated the furlers and anchor windlass
by setting things on the switches when moored or at anchor. Have tried
to get in the habit of turning off the main breaker when done sailing -
does that also deactivate the electric winches on a SM? Granted, we
sometimes forget to turn it back on when hoisting anchor, but it's a
small nuisance.

Cheers, Craig Briggs - "Sangaris" - SN#68

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "John Hollamby"
<annejohnholl@...> wrote:
.....the port winch started running of its own accord ...


Re: Outhaul Gearbox Removal

Craig Briggs
 

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, sangaris@... wrote:
.......Gives you an opportunity to clean up the commentator...
Cheers,
Craig - s/v Sangaris, SN#68.

PS:
..and, of course, that would be the commutator you'd be cleaning up :-)


Re: [Amel] Galley Sink drain insert

karkauai
 

I never liked that plastic tray as it wouldn't stay in place.  I found a small Stainless/rubber-coated drip basket that fits nicely in one side of the double sink for drying dishes (Bed Bath and Beyond- ~$15US).  It also has rubber feet that keep it from sliding around when placed on the drainboard to the starboard of the sinks.  Altogether a much better solution than the old plastic tray.
Kent
SM243
KRISTY


________________________________
From: Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2011 1:13 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Galley Sink drain insert


 
Hi Bill,

when I purchased Crusader (2) In 2003 I asked Olivier for a spare tray.
He said that trays were no longer available, but gave me his last spare
which I have now used. In my double sink there are two plastic trays and
both could do with replacing now so if you find a source then please let
me know. Good luck.

Regards

Ian SM Crusader Lesbos Greek Islands

On 16/08/2011 16:44, Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe wrote:

Does anyone know where we can buy a replacement for the plastic tray
for the galley sink? It has "CER&#9825;MAT" on each end of the tray.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Crete, Greek Islands






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Outhaul Gearbox Removal

Craig Briggs
 

A much kinder approach to this, rather than sledgehammers and jury-rigged
blocking, and what any machine shop professional would highly recommend, is
to simply remove the entire boom and use a proper press to gently force
out the shaft.

Granted, if you're in the boonies that may not be practical, but virtually
every shop in even out-of-the way places will have a press and pulling the
boom is not a big deal. Gives you an opportunity to clean up the
commentator on the electric motor, which it probably needs if your reduction gear is
old enough to need service, too.

Cheers,
Craig - s/v Sangaris, SN#68.