Date   

Re: Batteries

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Regarding: "in the case of Sealed batteries (like the original Amel
Delphi/Delco batteries), voltage after you finish charging. "

Hi Roy:

I have the original Amel supplied sealed batteries. My monitor will
show 100% after charging but I haven't really paid attention to the
voltage after charging. What should it be when the batteries are
fully charged?

Thanks, Gary Silver SM #335 Liahona


Amel Desalinator

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

I would like to contact the technical support people of the company
that manufatures the water maker for Amel. I have e-mailed Amel with
this request but thought someone on this forum might know how to
contact that company.
Thanks, Gary Silver Amel SM #335 Liahona


Re: Batteries

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

Hello Ian & Judy,
I think I can help you sort out your battery questions, but please
tell me first: what brand and model batteries do you have installed,
and what battery monitor do you have? Also, what brand and size
battery chargers do you have? And, do the battery chargers have an
equalization cycle?
Some battery monitors are programmed to show a % charge number
based on an assumed recharge efficiency. That is, to replace 100 amp-
hrs into batteries, you will need to generate 130 or 140 or 150 amp-
hrs, depending on the program that is in the battery monitor. A more
accurate measure of battery charge is Specific Gravity of the battery
acid, or in the case of Sealed batteries (like the original Amel
Delphi/Delco batteries), voltage after you finish charging.
Let me know what you have, and I will let you know what I think
based on 21 years experience with Amel batteries!!
Best regards, and Feliz Navidad,
Roy Benveniste
SM Excalibur #195


Re: Batteries

jjwiggin02 <no_reply@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian & Judy Jenkins"
<ianjudyjenkins@h...> wrote:
On our SM, 302, June 2000 launch, now lived aboard for 18 months,we
find
that at sea we run the genset about every six hours for an hour to
an hour
and a half on each occasion. Less when at anchor without autohelm,
nav
lights radar etc.Our first batteries ( we have 420 amps) lasted two
years,
since when I tend to recharge when we are down to 90% ( We found
that the
fridge cut out somewhere below 87% notwithstanding the fact that we
still
had 24v).
I find that the recharge quickly up to 99% but that those last few
amps,say the last 7, take for ever.
Does anyone know how important it is to always recharge to 100%?
The one thing I would suggest when running the genset is to check
that the
220v fan is working ( put your hand over the outlet in the cockpit
coaming.
) Ours failed in the Caribean and the extra heat in the engine room
was
appparently the reason why our 50 amp charger failed after 3 years,
to be
followed by the 30 amp one ten weeks later.This, despite the fact
that both
chargers have heat cut outs.The first failed in Guadeloupe and was
beyond
the knowledge of Pochon for a speedy repair.but both were repaired
by Manuel
in Ecuador ( thank God for the third world--they still know how to
fix
things there).He said he had never seen anything so hi tech and
powerful in
such a small box--the last time he saw such a powerful gadget it was
the
size and weight of his mother in law!
The cost of a new 220v fan ,one new 50 amp and two repairs was
unwelcome,
and I don`t understand the need for the 220v fan. The two 24v fans
are much
more powerful,give you an element of redundancy, much cheaper and
can be
sourced anywhere.Is there a good reason why they could not be wired
up to
come on with the genset just as they come on with the Volvo/Yanmar?
Ian. Pen
Azen
Azen,

If you are trying to charge to 100% you will be running your genset
far more than necessary. Conventional wisdom is that it is bad for
the batteries to go below 50% and that above 80% further recharging
becomes increasingly less cost-effective. Therefor an optimal program
would be to dischage to 50% and re charge to only 80%. Crossing the
Atlantic 19 days with 6 people, radar on most of the time,
transmitting daily on SSB, two refrigerators and a freezer, we ran it
for 1 to 1 1/2 hours twice a day.

Hope this helps,

Jim Wiggin, ANTARES, Amel SM
_________________________________________________________________
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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Batteries

kimberlt <kimberlt@...>
 

Ian,
The last few amps in the bank are not important and take a lot of
generator time to put in.
I usually look at the volt/amp meter and when the amps go below 25 or so
I turn off the generator.
You could remove the 220 volt fan and install a 220 volt relay and when
the genset goes on the relay would close and the fan will go on.
Feliz navidad,
Eric

-----Original Message-----
From: Ian & Judy Jenkins [mailto:ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2003 1:30 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Batteries

On our SM, 302, June 2000 launch, now lived aboard for 18 months,we
find
that at sea we run the genset about every six hours for an hour to an
hour
and a half on each occasion. Less when at anchor without autohelm, nav
lights radar etc.Our first batteries ( we have 420 amps) lasted two
years,
since when I tend to recharge when we are down to 90% ( We found that
the
fridge cut out somewhere below 87% notwithstanding the fact that we
still
had 24v).
I find that the recharge quickly up to 99% but that those last few
amps,say the last 7, take for ever.
Does anyone know how important it is to always recharge to 100%?
The one thing I would suggest when running the genset is to check that
the
220v fan is working ( put your hand over the outlet in the cockpit
coaming.
) Ours failed in the Caribean and the extra heat in the engine room was
appparently the reason why our 50 amp charger failed after 3 years, to
be
followed by the 30 amp one ten weeks later.This, despite the fact that
both
chargers have heat cut outs.The first failed in Guadeloupe and was
beyond
the knowledge of Pochon for a speedy repair.but both were repaired by
Manuel
in Ecuador ( thank God for the third world--they still know how to fix
things there).He said he had never seen anything so hi tech and
powerful in
such a small box--the last time he saw such a powerful gadget it was the

size and weight of his mother in law!
The cost of a new 220v fan ,one new 50 amp and two repairs was
unwelcome,
and I don`t understand the need for the 220v fan. The two 24v fans are
much
more powerful,give you an element of redundancy, much cheaper and can be

sourced anywhere.Is there a good reason why they could not be wired up
to
come on with the genset just as they come on with the Volvo/Yanmar? Ian.
Pen
Azen

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Batteries

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

On our SM, 302, June 2000 launch, now lived aboard for 18 months,we find that at sea we run the genset about every six hours for an hour to an hour and a half on each occasion. Less when at anchor without autohelm, nav lights radar etc.Our first batteries ( we have 420 amps) lasted two years, since when I tend to recharge when we are down to 90% ( We found that the fridge cut out somewhere below 87% notwithstanding the fact that we still had 24v).
I find that the recharge quickly up to 99% but that those last few amps,say the last 7, take for ever.
Does anyone know how important it is to always recharge to 100%?
The one thing I would suggest when running the genset is to check that the 220v fan is working ( put your hand over the outlet in the cockpit coaming. ) Ours failed in the Caribean and the extra heat in the engine room was appparently the reason why our 50 amp charger failed after 3 years, to be followed by the 30 amp one ten weeks later.This, despite the fact that both chargers have heat cut outs.The first failed in Guadeloupe and was beyond the knowledge of Pochon for a speedy repair.but both were repaired by Manuel in Ecuador ( thank God for the third world--they still know how to fix things there).He said he had never seen anything so hi tech and powerful in such a small box--the last time he saw such a powerful gadget it was the size and weight of his mother in law!
The cost of a new 220v fan ,one new 50 amp and two repairs was unwelcome, and I don`t understand the need for the 220v fan. The two 24v fans are much more powerful,give you an element of redundancy, much cheaper and can be sourced anywhere.Is there a good reason why they could not be wired up to come on with the genset just as they come on with the Volvo/Yanmar? Ian. Pen Azen

_________________________________________________________________
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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] espar heater

Ian Shepherd <g4ljf@...>
 

Hi Eric,

sounds like you are most of the way there if you have the ducting already in place. I guess you have the stainless pipe through the aft heads too? It makes for a good towel heater. The fuel piping is routed down the engine room rear bulkhead and is T'd into the outlet from the Racor filter. On later boats, the Espar intake pipe is molded through the rear of the port side seat locker into the rope box. You lose a small amount of storage space in the locker, but the overall gain is a better looking cockpit and no worries about not opening the intake flap before starting the heater. There is also less risk of sea water getting down the intake too if you use it underway.

I shall be fitting a carbon monoxide detector soon. I believe that they are available for about $50 from Wal-Mart in Canada, and of a good design. A friend of mine is bringing me one back. He is a GA pilot and has fitted these units into several aircraft. Once I know the make and model number, I will circulate it here.

I am not sure when I will get back sailing. Yes I was on my way from Newfoundland south to Panama but I have suffered a major setback (again). I won't go into details on here for the moment, but if you send me your email address to g4ljf@winlink.org I will update you on my sailing plans.

Cheers

Ian


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] espar heater

kimberlite <kimberlt@...>
 

Dear Ian,
Thanks for the note. I thought you were on your way to Chile.
I had Amel install the fresh air system and the fan is in the location
of your heater in the port locker.
So I have the necessary ductwork. I have my air intake above the seat.
If anyone has the heater with the intake in the rope locker I would love
to see some photos.
When do you get back to the boat?
Fair winds,
Eric

When you are back on board can you send me some photos and also photos
of the diesel plumbing.

-----Original Message-----
From: Ian Shepherd [mailto:g4ljf@compuserve.com]
Sent: Monday, December 15, 2003 3:58 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] espar heater

Hi Eric,

I can't tell you the BTU output as I am in Cyprus at the moment, but the
unit is mounted in the port side cockpit up and under the horizontal
part upon which the winches are mounted. So you don't see it, and it
does not rob you of any useful storage space, though caution is needed
as it can get hot.

Later boats have the air intake in the rope box in front of the mizzen.
Earlier boats have a flap in the cockpit sidewall above the seat. This
was a pain as it is easy to forget to open it before firing the Espar
up. The result was overheating and an automatic shutdown.

To retrofit one of these units may prove very difficult when it comes to
installing the ducting around the boat. I remember that Amel specified a
deadline by which I had to specify a diesel heater during construction.
I am glad that I chose it. It was worth it's weight in gold whilst in
Greenland and Labrador.

Good luck

Ian

SM2000 "Crusader"







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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] espar heater

Ian Shepherd <g4ljf@...>
 

Hi Eric,

I can't tell you the BTU output as I am in Cyprus at the moment, but the unit is mounted in the port side cockpit up and under the horizontal part upon which the winches are mounted. So you don't see it, and it does not rob you of any useful storage space, though caution is needed as it can get hot.

Later boats have the air intake in the rope box in front of the mizzen. Earlier boats have a flap in the cockpit sidewall above the seat. This was a pain as it is easy to forget to open it before firing the Espar up. The result was overheating and an automatic shutdown.

To retrofit one of these units may prove very difficult when it comes to installing the ducting around the boat. I remember that Amel specified a deadline by which I had to specify a diesel heater during construction. I am glad that I chose it. It was worth it's weight in gold whilst in Greenland and Labrador.

Good luck

Ian

SM2000 "Crusader"


Trip 2003

r.zurkirchen
 

Hi all,
we , Rita and Rudy , SM # 407 had a super trip and
have documented it on
our site " < <http://www.sam-yacht.ch/> http://www.sam-yacht.ch/>
www.sam-yacht.ch" in Ggerman language. If interested how a SM stays in
50 kn
Wind and what bad surprise you can get in south of Italy ..
Have fun
Rudy and Rita on SAMANTHA


Re: Super Maramu for Sale in Australia

slavko_despotovic <no_reply@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, koenvelleman <no_reply@y...>
wrote:
My Super Maramu Flash IV is now for sale
She is on the hardstand in Bundaberg QLD and in perfect condition.
Hello,

is Maramu Flash IV avaliable? Or sold?

Best regards,

Slavko


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Converting 110 volts to 220 volts

kimberlite <kimberlt@...>
 

Dear Bob,
If the power post on the dock has two 30 amp 120 volt outlets it most
likely has a 240 volt outlet that takes a 50 amp plug as I described.
Just return the cord and “y” adapter and get a 50 amp plug. You can go
to home depot and get wire that will work to extend your power cord.
Eric

-----Original Message-----
From: rossirossix4 [mailto:equinoxsolstice@hotmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, December 14, 2003 3:43 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Converting 110 volts to 220 volts

My posting earlier may not have been clear. My boat, a 1993
Santorin, is presently in the Annapolis area and I am needing to
provide 220 volts (which my Santorin is wired for) from the 110
volts that is available in the USA. Presently I'm using a small
transformer to provide 220 to the boat via its 220 cord. The
transformer works well but is very limited in terms of its power
output. (The transformer is fused at 8 amps, 110 volts).

I've purchased a Marinco "reverse Y" at the suggestion of Joel
Potter when we talked together at the Annapolis Boat Show.
The "reverse Y" is capable of supplying 220 with more amperage than
the transformer, but I have couple of questions. The boat has a 220
cord in its lazarette with a French? three pronged male fitting on
the end using three round contacts in a "v" arrangement. Does any
one have any recommendations for how to mate it with the "reverse Y"
female plug?

Also, the 220 volt cord in the lazarette is not very long. I
already have one 50' 110v Marinco cord. It seems to make sense to
just buy another matching cord and connect the "reverse y" closer to
the boat or even in the lazarette at the end of two 110 cords
(rather than plugging the "reverse Y" into the two 110 30 amp plugs
that the marina supplies). Feeding two 110 cords into the secured
lazarette might also prevent the expensive "reverse y' from
disappearing. Does anyone have any advice on this?

I've been told that ABYC standards require a breaker within just
a few feet of where AC power enters the boat. Mine doesn't go
through a breaker until it gets to the GFI breaker in my galley
panel. I am aware of the boat's conformance with CE standards, but
my insurance company likes ABYC, and the idea of a breaker BEFORE
the cord enters the conduit from the lazarette makes sense to me.
Any thoughts on this?

Thanks again, Bob Santorin "Hanalei"




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Converting 110 volts to 220 volts

rossirossix4 <equinoxsolstice@...>
 

My posting earlier may not have been clear. My boat, a 1993
Santorin, is presently in the Annapolis area and I am needing to
provide 220 volts (which my Santorin is wired for) from the 110
volts that is available in the USA. Presently I'm using a small
transformer to provide 220 to the boat via its 220 cord. The
transformer works well but is very limited in terms of its power
output. (The transformer is fused at 8 amps, 110 volts).

I've purchased a Marinco "reverse Y" at the suggestion of Joel
Potter when we talked together at the Annapolis Boat Show.
The "reverse Y" is capable of supplying 220 with more amperage than
the transformer, but I have couple of questions. The boat has a 220
cord in its lazarette with a French? three pronged male fitting on
the end using three round contacts in a "v" arrangement. Does any
one have any recommendations for how to mate it with the "reverse Y"
female plug?

Also, the 220 volt cord in the lazarette is not very long. I
already have one 50' 110v Marinco cord. It seems to make sense to
just buy another matching cord and connect the "reverse y" closer to
the boat or even in the lazarette at the end of two 110 cords
(rather than plugging the "reverse Y" into the two 110 30 amp plugs
that the marina supplies). Feeding two 110 cords into the secured
lazarette might also prevent the expensive "reverse y' from
disappearing. Does anyone have any advice on this?

I've been told that ABYC standards require a breaker within just
a few feet of where AC power enters the boat. Mine doesn't go
through a breaker until it gets to the GFI breaker in my galley
panel. I am aware of the boat's conformance with CE standards, but
my insurance company likes ABYC, and the idea of a breaker BEFORE
the cord enters the conduit from the lazarette makes sense to me.
Any thoughts on this?

Thanks again, Bob Santorin "Hanalei"


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 220Volt Power

kimberlite <kimberlt@...>
 

Gary,
That is correct.
That is the way I wired Kimberlite.
Please note that he USA white and green are at the same potential. If
you happen to check the voltage (when plugged into a 220 volt USA
configuration) the voltage between the green and either hot leg you will
find 110 volts.
Just to prevent plugging into some weird power pedestals I installed a
power monitor.
It consists of an ammeter, a voltmeter, a frequency meter, and a circuit
breaker.
I measure what is coming into the boat and if it is satisfactory, I flip
the breaker and let the current run into the Amel ac panel.

Fair Winds,
Eric
S/m 376

-----Original Message-----
From: amelliahona [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2003 10:27 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 220Volt Power

RE the color codes wires posting earlier:
I have been watching these postings and studying the differences
between USA and European power for some time. I had some questions
about this posting and would like to state my understanding and have
those in the know do a reality check for me. ( NOTE that this
discussion doesn't consider the difference in frequency of the
two
types of power, i.e. 60 Hertz in the USA and 50 Hertz for European
power or the differences in European grounding practices as compared
to the USA. )

Lets start with what I have. The 220 Volt AC cord that comes from
my Amel SM 2000 (Hull # 335) has three wires in it. Alivier
Beauteau told me that it was rated at 30 Amperes at 220 Volts AC.
The color coding is based on the latest European color code and is
as follows:

1. Brown = European Hot
2. Blue = European Neutral
3. Green with Yellow Stripe = European Grounding (or
Safety Ground)

USA 220 Volt AC typically has 4 wires with color codes as follows:

1. Red = USA Hot
2. Black = USA Hot
3. White = USA Neutral for 110 volt
circuits only
4. Green = USA Grounding (of Safety
Ground)

NOW, as you measure Voltage AC (RMS = root mean square voltage,
which is what your digital volt meter more or less shows you)
between the following points you will get the following readings:

EUROPEAN: Between the Brown and Blue Reads 220 Volts AC
Between the Blue and the Green with Yellow Stripe
Reads Zero Volts AC
Between the Brown and the Green with Yellow Stripe
Reads 220 Volts AC


USA: Between the Red and Black Reads 220 Volts AC
Between the Red and White Reads 110 Volts AC
Between the Black and White Reads 110 Volts AC
Between the White and Green Reads Zero Volts AC

When wiring the Amel 220 Volt AC cable from the boat to USA
power the following should be done:

a. The Amel Brown Wire (European Hot) should go to either the
USA Red or Black wire
b. The Amel Blue Wire (European Neutral) should go to the USA
Red or Black wire (whichever the Amel Brown wire isn't connected
to. My understanding, and please somebody correct me if I am wrong,
is that the polarity of these two connections (red and/or black to
blue and/or brown makes no difference).
Finally the Amel Green with Yellow Stripe wire should go to the USA
Green wire.
The USA white wire has nothing connected to it from the European
cable.

The given appliance or load doesn't care about polarity since it
is
alternating current (AC). All the load cares about is that there is
an EMF (ElectroMotive Force) of 220 Volts pushing the electrons back
and forth in the wires of the load (e.g. the lamp, motor etc.) Again
this discussion doesn't take into consideration the frequency
with
which the electrons are moved back and forth (Hertz). If I
understand it correctly the naming of the wires (Hot, Neutral etc is
somewhat arbitrary) and hence confusing at times.

So there you have it, the distillation of my many sources. I have
an electronics background but there we deal mostly with DC voltage
and theory. I have approached two commercial electricians here in
the USA to verify the differences between USA and European power and
they both stammered and stuttered until I had basically no
confidence in their confused explanations. I haven't tried
wiring
up my Amel to this standard yet so if someone else would try it out
and let me know if anything smokes I can then refine the theory
further. Please, your comments and criticisms are welcome.

Sincerely, Gary Silver s/v Liahona currently in Tortola at
Nanny Cay






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[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 220Volt Power

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

RE the color codes wires posting earlier:
I have been watching these postings and studying the differences
between USA and European power for some time. I had some questions
about this posting and would like to state my understanding and have
those in the know do a reality check for me. ( NOTE that this
discussion doesn't consider the difference in frequency of the
two
types of power, i.e. 60 Hertz in the USA and 50 Hertz for European
power or the differences in European grounding practices as compared
to the USA. )

Lets start with what I have. The 220 Volt AC cord that comes from
my Amel SM 2000 (Hull # 335) has three wires in it. Alivier
Beauteau told me that it was rated at 30 Amperes at 220 Volts AC.
The color coding is based on the latest European color code and is
as follows:

1. Brown = European Hot
2. Blue = European Neutral
3. Green with Yellow Stripe = European Grounding (or
Safety Ground)

USA 220 Volt AC typically has 4 wires with color codes as follows:

1. Red = USA Hot
2. Black = USA Hot
3. White = USA Neutral for 110 volt
circuits only
4. Green = USA Grounding (of Safety
Ground)

NOW, as you measure Voltage AC (RMS = root mean square voltage,
which is what your digital volt meter more or less shows you)
between the following points you will get the following readings:

EUROPEAN: Between the Brown and Blue Reads 220 Volts AC
Between the Blue and the Green with Yellow Stripe
Reads Zero Volts AC
Between the Brown and the Green with Yellow Stripe
Reads 220 Volts AC


USA: Between the Red and Black Reads 220 Volts AC
Between the Red and White Reads 110 Volts AC
Between the Black and White Reads 110 Volts AC
Between the White and Green Reads Zero Volts AC

When wiring the Amel 220 Volt AC cable from the boat to USA
power the following should be done:

a. The Amel Brown Wire (European Hot) should go to either the
USA Red or Black wire
b. The Amel Blue Wire (European Neutral) should go to the USA
Red or Black wire (whichever the Amel Brown wire isn't connected
to. My understanding, and please somebody correct me if I am wrong,
is that the polarity of these two connections (red and/or black to
blue and/or brown makes no difference).
Finally the Amel Green with Yellow Stripe wire should go to the USA
Green wire.
The USA white wire has nothing connected to it from the European
cable.

The given appliance or load doesn't care about polarity since it
is
alternating current (AC). All the load cares about is that there is
an EMF (ElectroMotive Force) of 220 Volts pushing the electrons back
and forth in the wires of the load (e.g. the lamp, motor etc.) Again
this discussion doesn't take into consideration the frequency
with
which the electrons are moved back and forth (Hertz). If I
understand it correctly the naming of the wires (Hot, Neutral etc is
somewhat arbitrary) and hence confusing at times.

So there you have it, the distillation of my many sources. I have
an electronics background but there we deal mostly with DC voltage
and theory. I have approached two commercial electricians here in
the USA to verify the differences between USA and European power and
they both stammered and stuttered until I had basically no
confidence in their confused explanations. I haven't tried
wiring
up my Amel to this standard yet so if someone else would try it out
and let me know if anything smokes I can then refine the theory
further. Please, your comments and criticisms are welcome.

Sincerely, Gary Silver s/v Liahona currently in Tortola at
Nanny Cay


espar heater

eric freedman <kimberlt@...>
 

for those of you who opted for the espar heater option. what sixe
(btu) is it and how and where is it mounted?
thanks
eric
sm kimnerlite #376


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 220Volt Power

kimberlite <kimberlt@...>
 

Bob,
Numerous things on a new Amel do not meet abyc standards.
Remember this is a French boat and meets all the European standards.
ABYC is not the only standard in the world.
I have investigated the difference between the standards of ABYC and CE
standards. I feel the Amel engineered better than ABYC and have made no
changes to the Boat.
Fair winds,
Eric

-----Original Message-----
From: rossirossix4 [mailto:equinoxsolstice@hotmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2003 6:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 220Volt Power

I had a few AC related questions and thought I would link them to
this earlier discussion about AC power.

I've purchased a Marinco "reverse Y" for my 1993 Santorin and have a
couple of questions. The boat has a 220 cord in its lazarette with
a French? three pronged male fitting on the end using three
straight,round contacts in a "v" arrangement. The plug is labeled
10 amps. Does any one have any recommendations for how to mate it
with the "reverse Y" female plug?

The 220 volt cord in the lazarette is not very long. I already have
one 50' 110v Marinco cord. It seems to make sense to just buy
another matching cord and connect the "reverse y" closer to the boat
or even in the lazarette with two 110 cords. Does anyone have any
advice on this?

I've been told that ABYC standards require a breaker within just a
few feet of where AC power enters the boat. Mine doesn't go through
a breaker until it gets to the GFI breaker in my galley panel. Any
thoughts on this?

Thanks, Bob "Hanalei"

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite1212
<no_reply@y...> wrote:
the amel plug has 3 wires a green and yellow and two hot 110 volt
wires. The usa side has a green, white, black and red.
when you connect the amel to the 220 volt 50 amp twistlock you do
not use the usa side white. the green and yellow goes to the usa
green
the other 2 amel wires go to the red and the black.
AGAIN do not use the us white (neutral side).
I have had no problem connecting in the virgin islands and in the
USA. I leave the 50 amp twistlock connected to my boat and use a
number of adapter cords that i have made to connect elsewhere.
Fair winds,
eric Freedman
Kimberlite sm 376

when you connect this to a twist --- In
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "edmund_steele"
<edmundsteele@e...>
wrote:
Walter,
If the marina you are planning on visiting can handle the depth
and
length of an Amel, they will most probably supply 50 Ampere /
220Volt
power. The supply outlet may in the form of a single twist lock
plug.
The plug contains 4 connectors which are both phases of 110
volts,
a
common and a ground wire. Many boaters (the majority are power
boaters) in the USA will then use a "splitter" to separate this
supply into two 110 volt cables which are then plugged into
their
vessels as two separate cables. For the Amel, we simply plug the
single 220V cable directly into the boat.
Some marinas supply two 110 volt twist lock plugs on a post.
These
outlets are of opposite phase so they can be combined to produce
a
220 volt supply. This is the inverse of the "splitter" mentioned
above and can be purchased from WestMarine (www.westmarine.com).
WestMarine call this a "Reverse Y Adapter" Model 491985 and it
sells
for US$409.99

I have only once had to use a transformer to get 220V from 110V
and
that was because I did not have a 220V extension cord at the
time.
This approach is also very limiting as you probably won't be
able
to
take enough power off the 110 volt supply to run air-
conditioners
without throwing it's breaker.

BTW, anything that has 220V on it tends to cost a fortune in the
USA.
For example, a 50 foot 110 volt extension cord may sell for
US$40
but
a 50 foot 220 volt extension cord may cost near US$600. If you
are
not
afraid of using a screwdriver, you can cut the plugs off a 110
volt
extension cord and replace the plugs with 220 volt plugs.
Ed Steele
DoodleBug SM331




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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 220Volt Power

kimberlite <kimberlt@...>
 

Why don't you just disconnect the European connector and install a 50
amp 220 volt connector and return the expensive "y" connector and cord?
Eric

-----Original Message-----
From: rossirossix4 [mailto:equinoxsolstice@hotmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2003 6:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 220Volt Power

I had a few AC related questions and thought I would link them to
this earlier discussion about AC power.

I've purchased a Marinco "reverse Y" for my 1993 Santorin and have a
couple of questions. The boat has a 220 cord in its lazarette with
a French? three pronged male fitting on the end using three
straight,round contacts in a "v" arrangement. The plug is labeled
10 amps. Does any one have any recommendations for how to mate it
with the "reverse Y" female plug?

The 220 volt cord in the lazarette is not very long. I already have
one 50' 110v Marinco cord. It seems to make sense to just buy
another matching cord and connect the "reverse y" closer to the boat
or even in the lazarette with two 110 cords. Does anyone have any
advice on this?

I've been told that ABYC standards require a breaker within just a
few feet of where AC power enters the boat. Mine doesn't go through
a breaker until it gets to the GFI breaker in my galley panel. Any
thoughts on this?

Thanks, Bob "Hanalei"

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite1212
<no_reply@y...> wrote:
the amel plug has 3 wires a green and yellow and two hot 110 volt
wires. The usa side has a green, white, black and red.
when you connect the amel to the 220 volt 50 amp twistlock you do
not use the usa side white. the green and yellow goes to the usa
green
the other 2 amel wires go to the red and the black.
AGAIN do not use the us white (neutral side).
I have had no problem connecting in the virgin islands and in the
USA. I leave the 50 amp twistlock connected to my boat and use a
number of adapter cords that i have made to connect elsewhere.
Fair winds,
eric Freedman
Kimberlite sm 376

when you connect this to a twist --- In
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "edmund_steele"
<edmundsteele@e...>
wrote:
Walter,
If the marina you are planning on visiting can handle the depth
and
length of an Amel, they will most probably supply 50 Ampere /
220Volt
power. The supply outlet may in the form of a single twist lock
plug.
The plug contains 4 connectors which are both phases of 110
volts,
a
common and a ground wire. Many boaters (the majority are power
boaters) in the USA will then use a "splitter" to separate this
supply into two 110 volt cables which are then plugged into
their
vessels as two separate cables. For the Amel, we simply plug the
single 220V cable directly into the boat.
Some marinas supply two 110 volt twist lock plugs on a post.
These
outlets are of opposite phase so they can be combined to produce
a
220 volt supply. This is the inverse of the "splitter" mentioned
above and can be purchased from WestMarine (www.westmarine.com).
WestMarine call this a "Reverse Y Adapter" Model 491985 and it
sells
for US$409.99

I have only once had to use a transformer to get 220V from 110V
and
that was because I did not have a 220V extension cord at the
time.
This approach is also very limiting as you probably won't be
able
to
take enough power off the 110 volt supply to run air-
conditioners
without throwing it's breaker.

BTW, anything that has 220V on it tends to cost a fortune in the
USA.
For example, a 50 foot 110 volt extension cord may sell for
US$40
but
a 50 foot 220 volt extension cord may cost near US$600. If you
are
not
afraid of using a screwdriver, you can cut the plugs off a 110
volt
extension cord and replace the plugs with 220 volt plugs.
Ed Steele
DoodleBug SM331




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Re: 220Volt Power

rossirossix4 <equinoxsolstice@...>
 

I had a few AC related questions and thought I would link them to
this earlier discussion about AC power.

I've purchased a Marinco "reverse Y" for my 1993 Santorin and have a
couple of questions. The boat has a 220 cord in its lazarette with
a French? three pronged male fitting on the end using three
straight,round contacts in a "v" arrangement. The plug is labeled
10 amps. Does any one have any recommendations for how to mate it
with the "reverse Y" female plug?

The 220 volt cord in the lazarette is not very long. I already have
one 50' 110v Marinco cord. It seems to make sense to just buy
another matching cord and connect the "reverse y" closer to the boat
or even in the lazarette with two 110 cords. Does anyone have any
advice on this?

I've been told that ABYC standards require a breaker within just a
few feet of where AC power enters the boat. Mine doesn't go through
a breaker until it gets to the GFI breaker in my galley panel. Any
thoughts on this?

Thanks, Bob "Hanalei"

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite1212
<no_reply@y...> wrote:
the amel plug has 3 wires a green and yellow and two hot 110 volt
wires. The usa side has a green, white, black and red.
when you connect the amel to the 220 volt 50 amp twistlock you do
not use the usa side white. the green and yellow goes to the usa
green
the other 2 amel wires go to the red and the black.
AGAIN do not use the us white (neutral side).
I have had no problem connecting in the virgin islands and in the
USA. I leave the 50 amp twistlock connected to my boat and use a
number of adapter cords that i have made to connect elsewhere.
Fair winds,
eric Freedman
Kimberlite sm 376

when you connect this to a twist --- In
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "edmund_steele"
<edmundsteele@e...>
wrote:
Walter,
If the marina you are planning on visiting can handle the depth
and
length of an Amel, they will most probably supply 50 Ampere /
220Volt
power. The supply outlet may in the form of a single twist lock
plug.
The plug contains 4 connectors which are both phases of 110
volts,
a
common and a ground wire. Many boaters (the majority are power
boaters) in the USA will then use a "splitter" to separate this
supply into two 110 volt cables which are then plugged into
their
vessels as two separate cables. For the Amel, we simply plug the
single 220V cable directly into the boat.
Some marinas supply two 110 volt twist lock plugs on a post.
These
outlets are of opposite phase so they can be combined to produce
a
220 volt supply. This is the inverse of the "splitter" mentioned
above and can be purchased from WestMarine (www.westmarine.com).
WestMarine call this a "Reverse Y Adapter" Model 491985 and it
sells
for US$409.99

I have only once had to use a transformer to get 220V from 110V
and
that was because I did not have a 220V extension cord at the
time.
This approach is also very limiting as you probably won't be
able
to
take enough power off the 110 volt supply to run air-
conditioners
without throwing it's breaker.

BTW, anything that has 220V on it tends to cost a fortune in the
USA.
For example, a 50 foot 110 volt extension cord may sell for
US$40
but
a 50 foot 220 volt extension cord may cost near US$600. If you
are
not
afraid of using a screwdriver, you can cut the plugs off a 110
volt
extension cord and replace the plugs with 220 volt plugs.
Ed Steele
DoodleBug SM331


Re: trip around the horn

resolute56s
 

The solent stay is attached to the mast just 3 feet from the
masthead, thus no runners were needed. The maramu had only a single
spreader rig and small foretriangle, so this worked well. The
deckplate fitting bolted through the longitudnal bulkhead dividing
the forward sail lockers, essentially two chainplates, one on each
side of the bulkhead, extending from deck level about 18 inches and
bolted with 6 large bolts. This attached just aft of the windlass.
Only downsides were we had to keep the backstay pretty tight (around
25% of the wire's breaking strength) to keep the rig well tuned, and
we couldn't get a ton of tension on the solent stay so there was a
decent amount of sag in the stay. However, this never seemed to be a
problem and the boat sailed great with that 70% jib on hanks in a
stiff breeze.

If we had had a super maramu, we would have rigged it as a cutter
with removable inner forestay at the level of the second set of
spreaders and also added running backstays. Unfortunatly, to sail
properly upwind one would need an inner track for the staysail
sheets, and it would obstruct the nice clear amel splashdeck, but
would be worth it when needed. Most boats that sail from Puerto
Williams have a cutter rig and fly a very small staysail on roller
furling (almost invariably profurl). They use these small heavy
sails frequently down there, so the roller furling makes sense. We
were kind of sticklers for weight and windage aloft because the ketch
rig already suffers in this regard.

On another note, if doing it again we probably would have increased
the mainmast rigging to 3/8". The mizzen is overrigged in stock
form, but the standard rigging of 5/16", while appropriate for the
sail area, is not quite matched to the ballast the way it would be
for a sloop. With 3/8" wire, we could have left tension similar to
that with 5/16" wire, but had much less stretch to deal with and have
an extra margin of safety for a modest penalty in weight and
windage. Not sure about the SMs rigging, but if you're headed real
high latitude, I might do these calculations (can find them in
Dashew's encyclopedia for example) and think about the rigging,
particularly if the wire already has over 25,000 miles or 5 years on
it.

Ben
--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite <kimberlt@o...>
wrote:
Dear Ben,
Thank you very much for the info.
How was the solent stay rigged. What did you attach it to and how
did
you strengthen the deck and below deck fittings?
Did you install running backstays?
Thanks A lot.
Fair winds,
Eric


-----Original Message-----
From: resolute56s [mailto:bwestley@u...]
Sent: Thursday, December 11, 2003 7:16 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: trip around the horn

Hi, new to the forum...

My father, brother and myself sailed our 1983 Maramu Resolute from
Alaska to Cape Horn and back in 1998-2000. Our website is
www.paonline.com/resolute

For heavy weather we had a removable solent stay about 3 feet aft
of
the forestay that we flew either a 70% working jib or storm jib
depending on wind strength. This jib sheets to the main genoa
track,
which we had added a second car to on each side. We felt an atn
gale
sail would be ok for the tropics but insufficient for the southern
ocean, and on the passage from tahiti to chile were very glad for
the
hanked jibs. Our maramu did great downwind with just the working
jib
or storm jib in a gale. We never sailed upwind in over 35 knots of
wind, but would probably go with the working jib and mizzen, then
reef the mizzen, then go to storm jib and mizzen if really hard
pressed.

By the way, we rounded the horn on jan 4, 2000. 2 weeks later an
italian sharki rounded, and about 3 weeks later a swedish super
maramu rounded. At least 1 amel has been to the antarctic. Lots
of
amels down there!!

Ben Westley

PS Our boat is former excalibur, owned by roy benveniste. I know
he
used to frequent this site.



--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite1212
<no_reply@y...> wrote:
Does anyone know of an amel that has made the trip around the
horn?
secondly what do you do on a s/m when the wind get above 45 knots.
thnaks
eric
sm 376 kimberlite




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