Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mizzen Staysail setup, aka foc d'artimon, aka "Little Artie"

James Alton
 

Bill,

   Not tying off the rudder, that is a really interesting tidbit.  I remember reading some of the books on self steering way back that suggested securing the wheel/tiller and that is the way I used to do it on my sloops, with pretty poor results actually.  I actually played with all kinds of contraptions to get my boats to self steer with varying degrees of success, but at least it was fun.   On our trip to and from the Aeolian Islands this year, I was noticing that the autopilot was hardly doing anything to the wheel.  So I tried a couple times turning the autopilot off which left the wheel free and just watched the boat for as much as 1/2 hour.  Leaving the wheel free was more out of laziness than of wanting to see what would happen so maybe even laziness can be a useful tool sometimes. (grin)  The waves were minimal and the wind unusually steady for the Med. so perfect conditions for this kind of playing.  The boat would follow the minor apparent wind changes and never once ended up head to wind or too far off the wind or even luffed much that I can recall,  I was quite amazed.  The trick perhaps would be to try and see what can be done to help the boat steer itself in more difficult conditions.  Our boats are fairly beamy and not real deep so the hull itself of course creates a turning moment when heeled/rolled that is related to the boat speed and heel angle due to the asymmetric immersed shape.   I am not sure of what can be done there other than to try and minimize the rolling and reefing when needed.  Keep me apprised on what you figure out and I will do the same.

   That is really nice that you were able to direct your old boat to a safe place to anchor with no rudder control.  Not many people would try that.   That is exactly the kind of thinking that I have when I am experimenting with sailing on and off of anchor etc.  If I had to sum up the thing that I like most about my Amel, it is the feeling that I have that this is a boat that well handled can safely take us anywhere with very few limitations.  What underpins that feeling is the amazing redundancy that is built into these boats.  If you know some work arounds for even serious problems that involve critical items such as the steering,  engine or rig, I feel that with this boat that I can continue to sail to reach a safe port to effect repairs, even if that might involve crossing an Ocean.  In reality, over the past 40 plus years I have had very few serious problems with my boats (or those of customers) because I am pretty anal about maintenance but I think that getting to know ones boat and what it’s capabilities are is one of the most useful tools to have onboard.  My Amel is the most complex boat that I have owned so I really appreciate the input of others and hearing about what they have learned about their boats.

    I think that working on improving the windward performance as much as possible is another thing that can help keep you and your boat safe, just in case that ability is required.  I do move the genoa car a lot but I have not been playing the halyard, interesting,  I will give that a go.   It seems on my boat (as verified by the basic wind instruments) that my boat will point a lot higher using my 100% try radial jib than the older 155 Genoa.  I am unclear on whether this is related to the large overlap of the Genoa backwinding the main forcing me to over trim it or it is just better to use a working jib.  The same is true on my Loki.   By the time the wind reaches 15 knots with the boat on the wind, the working jib seems to be plenty of area.  More tinkering needed along with a new Genoa.  Any advice on the best Genoa for these boats,  construction and sail shape?

   I have never used a VMG function on an autopilot,  interesting indeed.

   I took a look at the cost of the 500 amp DC breakers and got some serious sticker shock.  Your comment about the difficulty of breaking a large DC current is making me a little nervous.  Are there connections in the normal Amel wiring where the connectors are close enough that if something metallic started an arc that even if it were removed the arc could continue?  I note that on my boat that there are a number of exposed connections on the bow thruster contractor/relay for instance that seem to be fairly close and that is one problem that I do not want to have to deal with at sea…  I have read a little about the idea of using individual 150 amp fuses on each battery post (I assume the positive side only?).  150 Amp breakers are not all that expensive, would this be a better way to go than to use the fuses?  My concern with the fuses is that the power goes down at a critical time and it could take a while in pitching seas etc. to locate the bad fuses and change.  Any downside to using breakers for this application?

   That was exciting to read about the power of your bow thruster.  My current bow thruster is very effective in lightish conditions but it is nothing like what you describe.  In fact it is so quiet that it is almost not audible.  I am going to look carefully to see if there might be a path to upgrade to a more powerful motor.  The lower unit parts that I am ordering from Amel also fit the SM.  The SM seals fit the composite tube etc. and I assume that the highest load any bow thruster could see would be impact with something solid so my boat might already have the required structural integrity.  No rush on this,  just research for now

Keep having fun with your boat and thank for the tidbits.  Some can take a long time to learn on your own!

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220

On Oct 23, 2017, at 12:19 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Your description of slightly over trimming the jib, and easing the mizzen for steady course keeping works well on a Super Maramu. On my old boat, doing that I could keep her on a steady course even deeper than a beam reach.  The odd trick on the old boat was to NOT tie off the rudder, but just let it run free. I remember reading about that somewhere, but not sure where...  I haven't gotten quite as good at it on the SM--yet.  Maybe after ten year's practice :)


These kinds of sailing games are just that--games.  Until you need those skills in an emergency. On my old boat I had a steering cable break coming into a marina fairway just as I was heading up into the wind to furl the sails.  By manipulating the jib and mizzen, I was able to tack the boat half a dozen times, sailing to a place where I could safely drop anchor and rig the emergency tiller.

Without a quick and easy way of locking the tiller on the SM, I haven't played those games as much as I probably should.  

Most of the detailed work I have done on understanding the SM under sail has been to get her going upwind as efficiently as possible.  They most important thing (not surprisingly) is genoa trim.  Besides sheet tension, the position of the sheet car fore and aft is very important, and don't forget the halyard tension!  Adding a bit a tension when the wind picks up but before you need to reef will move the draft in the sail forward, and keep really help upwind pointing ability and speed.  My feeling has always been on luff tension is that a little too tight is way better than a little too loose!  Having draft stripes and taking a picture of the sail looking straight up from foot to head can really help see changes in shape. 

I have found my autopilots " optimize VMG" function to be great help.  It is really hard to use an instrument display of VMG to manually steer, because every time you head up,VMG goes up... until the boat slows down.  Head up again same thing.  Eventually you point straight into the wind at full stop.  The AP has the patience to hold a steady AWA and average VMG over time, then make small changes in the AWA it is steering to get a reasonable optimum.  

What that tool has done is let me know if my sail trim is as good as it can be.  If the AP steadies in on an optimum course of greater than 38 degrees apparent, then I know I have something that needs attention.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Harris Creek, MD



Puerto Rican Marinas

Courtney Gorman
 

Hi guys I was shocked today when I received a Quote for $2106 a month for my 54 at Puerto Del Rey in Fajardo.  This is the reply I received when questioning the price.  Any suggestions for a more reasonable yet safe local.  I will be leaving my boat for just a month?  Thanks
Courtney
s/v Trippin'
Hi Courtney,
 
The .95 is the monthly price for a boat 0-40’, 41’ to 49’ is $1.10 and 50’ to 59’ is $1.30. Prices increase with the boats LOA. In which Marina are you stationed right now? An annual agreement might be close to $800-$900 in PDR which is a hurricane hole as well. I currently have an offer called “Ancho Down for 10 Off” which can give you up to 18% discount when you pre-pay your seasonal agreement. Let me know if you would like to proceed with a reservation.
 
I remain at your service,



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mizzen Staysail setup, aka foc d'artimon, aka "Little Artie"

greatketch@...
 

Your description of slightly over trimming the jib, and easing the mizzen for steady course keeping works well on a Super Maramu. On my old boat, doing that I could keep her on a steady course even deeper than a beam reach.  The odd trick on the old boat was to NOT tie off the rudder, but just let it run free. I remember reading about that somewhere, but not sure where...  I haven't gotten quite as good at it on the SM--yet.  Maybe after ten year's practice :)

These kinds of sailing games are just that--games.  Until you need those skills in an emergency. On my old boat I had a steering cable break coming into a marina fairway just as I was heading up into the wind to furl the sails.  By manipulating the jib and mizzen, I was able to tack the boat half a dozen times, sailing to a place where I could safely drop anchor and rig the emergency tiller.

Without a quick and easy way of locking the tiller on the SM, I haven't played those games as much as I probably should.  

Most of the detailed work I have done on understanding the SM under sail has been to get her going upwind as efficiently as possible.  They most important thing (not surprisingly) is genoa trim.  Besides sheet tension, the position of the sheet car fore and aft is very important, and don't forget the halyard tension!  Adding a bit a tension when the wind picks up but before you need to reef will move the draft in the sail forward, and keep really help upwind pointing ability and speed.  My feeling has always been on luff tension is that a little too tight is way better than a little too loose!  Having draft stripes and taking a picture of the sail looking straight up from foot to head can really help see changes in shape. 

I have found my autopilots "optimize VMG" function to be great help.  It is really hard to use an instrument display of VMG to manually steer, because every time you head up,VMG goes up... until the boat slows down.  Head up again same thing.  Eventually you point straight into the wind at full stop.  The AP has the patience to hold a steady AWA and average VMG over time, then make small changes in the AWA it is steering to get a reasonable optimum.  

What that tool has done is let me know if my sail trim is as good as it can be.  If the AP steadies in on an optimum course of greater than 38 degrees apparent, then I know I have something that needs attention.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Harris Creek, MD


Re: Need diesel tank access

greatketch@...
 

Eamon,

If you search the file section of the forum you will find an Amel drawing of the fuel tank for a Super Maramu that will help you understand what the internals of the tank look like. The drawing apparently is not 100% exactly as built, but it is close.

 If your tank is contaminated with water, you can extend a tube down the fill pipe to reach the deepest part of the tank to pump it out with a hand pump.

After enough time, even the cleanest diesel tanks accumulate hard, black "coke" on the bottom from the slow, unavoidable,  oxidation of the fuel. When this breaks loose it can cause all kinds of problems.  As far as I know the only way to clean it is to mechanically remove it.

I did this on my old boat, cutting holes in the tank, and using these to patch them up again: 

Be really, really careful cutting holes in the tank.  This might be best done by an experienced professional.  Diesel fuel and fumes are not very flammable, but a mistake can cause the tank to explode.  I know someone who came very close to dying when this happened to him!

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie


Re: Aluminum Filler for Intercooler?

Duane Siegfri
 

Eric,

I called Old Port Cove and they don't have a used one in stock.  I've looked around a bit and it seems the Intercooler is not something they hold onto.  Plenty of wire harnesses, injectors, starters, etc.

Thanks for the reply.
Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: Aluminum Filler for Intercooler?

Duane Siegfri
 

Craig,

Carb's!  Hah!  So I'm not alone?

Thanks for the reply/thought.

Duane


Re: Need diesel tank access

philipp.sollberger@...
 

Hi Eamonn,

I have just cleaned (it was a try) as much as possible my diesel tank this summer by a dieselist from perkins La Rochelle. My SM isn't either a 2000. The access was only possible from the bottom of the tank. He took out the valve and put a new one in. When it was deinstalled I could try to cratch the black stuff out. You will never get all out! For this I have a big filter (300 micro meters) and a second one with 30 micros meters.
Before the dieselist let clean the dirty diesel by pumping out into a clean temporary tank with anti bug and push it back after have been holding through the night in the cleaning tank.

Hope this helps for the first time.

Good luck in Cleopatra Marina. I was there in 2000 during winter. Good price and good service.

Fair winds,

Philipp
SM 124, Félicie, Switzerland


Re: Need diesel tank access

smiles bernard
 

i'd be really interested to hear other people experience with this question of how to access/ clean diesel tanks

I have a maramu 1985 and was wondering how i would ever clean the tank if needed

I assume it has baffles to add a spot of complexity!

On my old boat I cut an inspection/cleaning hole. Not the nicest job in the world, upside down in the bilges in 40+ degrees on the hard in Venezuela with a reasonably blunt hack saw blade. Happy days none the less :)

All the best

Miles


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mizzen Staysail setup, aka foc d'artimon, aka "Little Artie"

Ian Park
 

Gentlemen
Thank you all for the very illuminating comments. This is exactly the sort of discussion I have been unable to find elsewhere. My Santorin is my first experience of a ketch. I love it and have stumbled through a self discovery knowledge of how it works. The commentary on the use of the mizzen in balancing the boat upwind is one I must experiment with more. I also have the addition of an offset Hydrovane which is great but on some points of sail I have found it difficult to get the sail balance correct enough and the wind occasionally overpowers the vane. This is mostly when the sailing upwind.
Looking forward to the coming season and honing my sail trim.
Thanks to all once more.
Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96


Need diesel tank access

eamonn.washington@...
 

Hi


My super maramu (not 2000) has, I believe, no access to clean the tank.  I know my tank is dirty since after 25 hours running the volvo the cleaned injectors are dirty again.


The volvo is out of the boat for a rebuild (2300 hours, but internal oil leak) so this is an ideal opportunity to create access hatches to the tank and clean it.  Does anyone have the tank specification, in terms of is it a single tank or are there separate compartments, and specifically where should the access hatches be cut?


As a side question, if I installed a day tank would that be a suitable alternative?


Thanks

Eamonn Washington

Travel Bug SM 151

Cleopatra Marina, Greece




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mizzen Staysail setup, aka foc d'artimon, aka "Little Artie"

James Alton
 

Bill,

   I agree with your comments here.  When Olin Stephens was testing the weatherliness of the infamous yawl “Stormy Weather” he was using his earlier smaller yawl Dorade as a trial horse.  The winds were quite strong and Dorade was consistently faster to weather.  So a decision was made to hoist the mizzen on Stormy and she slowly pulled ahead.  I think that story is contained in Olin’s book “All this and Sailing too” but I am reaching back more than a few years… Those older very deep and narrow boats develop very little weather helm from heel so I think that it is quite possible that the difference in this case was just as you stated, a change from Lee to Weather helm.  As I am sure that you already understand,  Lee helm creates an underwater coupling between the keel and rudder that is in effect camber in the wrong direction (increasing lee way) and weather  helm as you state reduces leeway by creating camber in the correct direction making the coupling between the rudder and the keel a lifting shape.  

   While on the subject of balance,  I wanted to say that my Amel ketch has the best course keeping ability of any boat that I have owned to date.   I attribute this to the pretty well balanced hull and the Ketch rig but I would like to understand all of this better.   On a sloop the CE of the two sails are both fairly close to the point that the boat wants to turn about so any coupling between the sails is not very meaningful or stable from my experiences.  On a Ketch there is a significant spread between the Genoa and the Mizzen so a large turning moment can be developed when there is an imbalance and fortunately when the sails are trimmed correctly the imbalances that occur tend to be favourable for holding the boat at a particular wind angle.  The stability I find is most noticeable with the wind forward of the beam and the mizzen eased to the verge of luffing and the Genoa just slightly over trimmed.  As the boat deviates towards the eye of the wind, the Genoa creates a stronger force to leeward as the apparent wind increases and the Mizzen being already close to luffing  (Which also happens naturally when hard on the wind since the Mizzen is flying in wind that has been altered by the Genoa and Main so that the Mizzen is seeing an apparent wind much closer to the bow) unloads removing some of it’s force to leeward creating a turning moment to leeward which is in the direction to restore the trimmed course.

   It would be interesting to hear more about what you have learned about sailing your Amel if you have more to add.

   I would like to add one thing that helps explains just one of the reasons that I have become a convert to having either a yawl or a ketch for a cruising rig.  In addition to providing a tool to balance the boat, the mizzen can also be used as an “air rudder” to steer the boat when there is little or no way on.  ( I have not tried this on any other boats besides my Loki yawl and my Maramu so maybe this will not work on all yawls/ketches. )  This technique can be useful if you find yourself needing to sail off of a mooring or anchor and do not have the engine available.  It also often happens that the tack that you depart on can be quite important due to hazards on a particular side of the boat.  In my experience, departing such a situation in a sloop is risky because there is not much control of which tack you might end up on.  One brief wind shift and the backed jib can become full and drawing which isn’t good. With either my yawl or the Maramu on anchor (with no current),  if I put up the mizzen and the main, then draw the mizzen boom to windward on the side that I wish to turn to, the boat will rotate in that direction.  As the boat rotates, the main fills and the boat begins to move forward.  By alternating sides it is even possible to tack the boat slowly to windward.  I have so far only tried this in lightish air but in theory it should work in higher winds too.  Maybe some food for thought.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220

On Oct 22, 2017, at 11:46 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

The mizzen certainly can add more drag up wind than lift ("be a brake") but...it depends on the boat and details of the sail plan if that drag is worth it or not.


I find our SM with main and jib alone tends to have a bit of leehelm when close hauled.  Putting out the mizzen adds nothing in terms of boat speed, but... it changes the balance of the boat to add a bit of weather helm, which reduces leeway and we get up wind faster as a result.

But, we are talking little, tiny, fussy changes here.  I tend to fuss a lot more with boat balance than most people do.  If I see my autopilot holding the rudder to windward to hold a straight course, I am going to do something to fix that.

I was taught, by people who know more about sailing than I ever will, to never sail upwind with leehelm if I could possibly avoid it.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Harris Creek, Eastern Shore, MD



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Aluminum Filler for Intercooler?

Eric Freedman
 

Duane,

There are a lot of used and broken 4jh3hte’s. I don’t know where you are located but in the us I would try Oldport Marine in Newport or St Marten yanmar in St Maarten, they had a brand new engine that was run without Oil. I am sure you could find a used intercooler and use just the endcaps.

If it were mine, I would just have a good machine shop weld metal back on the eroded intercooler and then machine them again milled flat and then machine a groove for the O ring.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, October 22, 2017 8:07 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Aluminum Filler for Intercooler?

 

 

I have the Yanmar 4JH3-HTE, which has an Intercooler/Air Cooler to cool the pressurized air from the turbo prior to going to the cylinders.

 

It developed a leak between the end cap (part 2 or Box A) and the body of the heat exchanger, which led me to disassemble it.  .  The part I'm writing about now is the body of the intercooler.  The end surface of the intercooler that the O-Ring seats against has eroded from about 45 degrees off vertical on both sides all the way around, apparently due to exposure to salt water.  

 

At the worst the loss of material on the face is 1.1mm, which leads me to doubt the O-Ring that seals the joint between the end cap and the Intercooler/heat exchanger body will be water-tight (I mean, it was already leaking!) . The End Cap has a 45degree bevel that the O-Ring contacts.  The O-Ring is then sandwiched between the intercooler end face and the end cap 45degree bevel.

 

OPTION 1: I was thinking about trying to create a smooth surface using something like an aluminum filled epoxy putty (e.g. Hy-Poxy Alumfast Rapid Cure Aluminum Filled Epoxy Putty).  Any thoughts on a material? It would have to be workable enough to file and sand.

 

OPTION 2:  The other thought I had was to cut a thick gasket and glue it to the body of the intercooler to fill some of the eroded areas.  The problem with this solution is that the End Cap will be able to compress the O-Ring less than before, likely leading to a leak.  So really, this solution would "effectively" eliminate the O-Ring and depend on the gasket.

 

OPTION 3:   Using a file, create a level surface by removing 1.1mm from the upper non-eroded area and flatten the rest to match.

 

OPTION 4:  Buy a new Intercooler Assembly (Part 1 on the attachment) for $1,800.

 

OPTION 5:  Your thoughts?

 

Thanks,

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 


Re: Mizzen Staysail setup, aka foc d'artimon, aka "Little Artie"

greatketch@...
 

The mizzen certainly can add more drag up wind than lift ("be a brake") but...it depends on the boat and details of the sail plan if that drag is worth it or not.

I find our SM with main and jib alone tends to have a bit of leehelm when close hauled.  Putting out the mizzen adds nothing in terms of boat speed, but... it changes the balance of the boat to add a bit of weather helm, which reduces leeway and we get up wind faster as a result.

But, we are talking little, tiny, fussy changes here.  I tend to fuss a lot more with boat balance than most people do.  If I see my autopilot holding the rudder to windward to hold a straight course, I am going to do something to fix that.

I was taught, by people who know more about sailing than I ever will, to never sail upwind with leehelm if I could possibly avoid it.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Harris Creek, Eastern Shore, MD


Re: Aluminum Filler for Intercooler?

Craig Briggs
 

Duane,
Option 1 sounds splendiferous but probably will not last more than 50 years. Shaping the material after it cures is easy. Alternatively try JB Weld - similar stuff. Forget the $1800 option, but then I am an unrepentant CARB (Cheap Ass Rag Bagger).
Good luck with it,
Craig Briggs, SN#68


---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailor63109@...> wrote :

I have the Yanmar 4JH3-HTE, which has an Intercooler/Air Cooler to cool the pressurized air from the turbo prior to going to the cylinders.


It developed a leak between the end cap (part 2 or Box A) and the body of the heat exchanger, which led me to disassemble it.  .  The part I'm writing about now is the body of the intercooler.  The end surface of the intercooler that the O-Ring seats against has eroded from about 45 degrees off vertical on both sides all the way around, apparently due to exposure to salt water.  


At the worst the loss of material on the face is 1.1mm, which leads me to doubt the O-Ring that seals the joint between the end cap and the Intercooler/heat exchanger body will be water-tight (I mean, it was already leaking!) . The End Cap has a 45degree bevel that the O-Ring contacts.  The O-Ring is then sandwiched between the intercooler end face and the end cap 45degree bevel.


OPTION 1: I was thinking about trying to create a smooth surface using something like an aluminum filled epoxy putty (e.g. Hy-Poxy Alumfast Rapid Cure Aluminum Filled Epoxy Putty).  Any thoughts on a material? It would have to be workable enough to file and sand.


OPTION 2:  The other thought I had was to cut a thick gasket and glue it to the body of the intercooler to fill some of the eroded areas.  The problem with this solution is that the End Cap will be able to compress the O-Ring less than before, likely leading to a leak.  So really, this solution would "effectively" eliminate the O-Ring and depend on the gasket.


OPTION 3:   Using a file, create a level surface by removing 1.1mm from the upper non-eroded area and flatten the rest to match.

 

OPTION 4:  Buy a new Intercooler Assembly (Part 1 on the attachment) for $1,800.


OPTION 5:  Your thoughts?


Thanks,

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477



Re: Mizzen Staysail setup, aka foc d'artimon, aka "Little Artie"

Craig Briggs
 


Hey Ian,
Sounds like you've got it sorted very well, indeed. Btw, it was Joel Potter who gave me the tip that the mizzen is a brake upwind. One other point is that Little Artie's sheet, if it's snatched to the stern cleat, is inside the life line railing, so it really doesn't hang up on the swim ladder. The pennant does help. As for the genny collapsing, it probably needs to be poled out and the main needs to be furled up - or it needs to be furled and the "iron genny" hoisted :-)  When you're back in Grenada look up Maxwell Selwyn, one of the "cognoscenti" taxi drivers / yacht tenders who's a great guy and give him our best.
Best, Craig Briggs, SN68

---In amelyachtowners@..., <parkianj@...> wrote :

Craig
I hadn’t thought of running the ballooner sheet through the unused Genoa roller! Nice one. The two large blocks are attached to the rear cleats. As Bill points out Staysail starboard sheet does catch a bit in the swim ladder, and I will test out both your 1m extension line and the boom end.
I have come to the same conclusion about using the mizzen upwind. It gets back winded from the main and hauling it in does nothing for the speed.
One thing I have done down wind in light airs when the weight of the Genoa collapses the sail from time to time is to take an extra line and put a rolling hitch on the genoa sheet and lead it back through the stern block and back to the winch. The extra length of sheet keeps the sail flying better.
There hasn’t been any conversations on the forum for newbies about changing from sloop to ketch. Most welcome!

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96
(11 more days and back to the boat in Grenada after 18 months away,)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Distributed vs. Conventional Electrical Systems

greatketch@...
 

500 amp DC breakers are hard to find (although they do exist--at a price), 

500 amp DC fuses are readily available.  

Breaking high current DC is hard, because the arc formed by ionized air carries the current.  With AC the arc collapses at each zero voltage crossing, so it's easier to interrupt a high current flow.

I know the thruster on the SM is a potent machine.  If you are on the bow and not holding on when it is run you might end up on your butt--or in the water.  I see SO many boats with thrusters that seem to not actually DO anything other than make noise, it is really nice having one that actually WORKS!

I am not sure the logic that Amel applied to not put circuit protection in the wiring.  As Bill R has said, it is not really fair to second guess decisions made 25 years ago or more.  But it is also not unreasonable to revisit those decisions with modern equipment and tools.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Harris Creek, Eastern Shore, MD


Aluminum Filler for Intercooler?

Duane Siegfri
 

I have the Yanmar 4JH3-HTE, which has an Intercooler/Air Cooler to cool the pressurized air from the turbo prior to going to the cylinders.


It developed a leak between the end cap (part 2 or Box A) and the body of the heat exchanger, which led me to disassemble it.  .  The part I'm writing about now is the body of the intercooler.  The end surface of the intercooler that the O-Ring seats against has eroded from about 45 degrees off vertical on both sides all the way around, apparently due to exposure to salt water.  


At the worst the loss of material on the face is 1.1mm, which leads me to doubt the O-Ring that seals the joint between the end cap and the Intercooler/heat exchanger body will be water-tight (I mean, it was already leaking!) . The End Cap has a 45degree bevel that the O-Ring contacts.  The O-Ring is then sandwiched between the intercooler end face and the end cap 45degree bevel.


OPTION 1: I was thinking about trying to create a smooth surface using something like an aluminum filled epoxy putty (e.g. Hy-Poxy Alumfast Rapid Cure Aluminum Filled Epoxy Putty).  Any thoughts on a material? It would have to be workable enough to file and sand.


OPTION 2:  The other thought I had was to cut a thick gasket and glue it to the body of the intercooler to fill some of the eroded areas.  The problem with this solution is that the End Cap will be able to compress the O-Ring less than before, likely leading to a leak.  So really, this solution would "effectively" eliminate the O-Ring and depend on the gasket.


OPTION 3:   Using a file, create a level surface by removing 1.1mm from the upper non-eroded area and flatten the rest to match.

 

OPTION 4:  Buy a new Intercooler Assembly (Part 1 on the attachment) for $1,800.


OPTION 5:  Your thoughts?


Thanks,

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477



Re: Mizzen Staysail setup, aka foc d'artimon, aka "Little Artie"

Ian Park
 

Craig
I hadn’t thought of running the ballooner sheet through the unused Genoa roller! Nice one. The two large blocks are attached to the rear cleats. As Bill points out Staysail starboard sheet does catch a bit in the swim ladder, and I will test out both your 1m extension line and the boom end.
I have come to the same conclusion about using the mizzen upwind. It gets back winded from the main and hauling it in does nothing for the speed.
One thing I have done down wind in light airs when the weight of the Genoa collapses the sail from time to time is to take an extra line and put a rolling hitch on the genoa sheet and lead it back through the stern block and back to the winch. The extra length of sheet keeps the sail flying better.
There hasn’t been any conversations on the forum for newbies about changing from sloop to ketch. Most welcome!

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96
(11 more days and back to the boat in Grenada after 18 months away,)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Whisker Pole

karkauai
 

I'm reticent to do that, Courtney, as the collar is a composite material of some kind.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
Panama cell: +507-61171896
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Oct 22, 2017, at 1:12 PM, Courtney Gorman Itsfun1@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

kent could you heat up the pole to allow for som expansion to remove it?

Courtney



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] staysail mizzen setup

James Alton
 

Bill,

   Sueno came with a Dacron mizzen staysail that looks almost unused.     The sail is a little unusual in that it is cut pretty flat and when properly trimmed has similar depth to my genoa so it is actually a pretty nice shape for upwind reaching.  Being Dacron and also filled, it holds it’s shape unlike a nylon sail so it is efficient enough to add some boat speed at 60 degrees apparent and will trim to 50 degrees but I doubt it is adding any speed and is likely slowing the boat at that angle.  If you think about it, there is a big open triangle between the mizzen mast and the Main and the Mizzen Staysail is filling part of that unused space.  My other boat is a yawl and the mizzen staysail is 3/4 ounce Nylon,  (the wife built this sail from a Sailrite kit BTW, came out really well) and it works well on a beam reach or further aft but is almost useless with the wind forward of the beam due to the sail shape.  That nylon staysail weighs almost nothing, can be bag stuffed so is super easy to set.  So I really like the Mizzen Staysail that came with Sueno and use it a lot but I would also like to have a light Nylon Mizzen Staysail for easier handling and off wind sailing.   All of my previous boats (5)  were sloops so my first split rig was the yawl and the Maramu is my first Ketch.  Despite a bit more complexity I will never go back to the sloop for cruising,  there are so many advantages to a split rig IMO.  I think that Henri was very wise to select the Ketch rig for these boats, a good match.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220

On Oct 22, 2017, at 11:57 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

James,


Interesting....  I have never seen or heard of a dacron mizzen staysail--on an Amel or any other  ketch.  It seems to me like it would be an odd beast.  I would think if the wind was far enough forward to make it worth it, the main would be a more efficient use of that space.  The closest thing I can think of is the main staysail on a staysail schooner, but on that rig there is no boomed sail on the foremast to interfere.

On my old boat I always rigged my mizzen staysail to the mizzen boom.  On my Super Maramu I started doing that when I realized it was a way to keep the sheet from tangling with the swimladder.  With the mizzen furled, and the staysail sheeted to the mizzen boom, and the boom eased all the way out, you can sail quite a bit further off the wind.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Harris Creek, Eastern Shore, MD