Date   

Re: Anchor wash pump

Dean Gillies
 

Bill,
Do you think a UP3/E pump would do the same job. The specs seem to be identical and I have one kicking around. (I asked Marco support, but got no response).
Cheers
Dean
SV Stella*****
A54-154


Sent from my iPhone X

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Re: Whisker Poles needing work

Bill Kinney
 

Rivets are not an ideal fastener for this application, although they are quick and easy to install at the factory.  It is hard to get them really tight enough, and as a result there is movement between the parts under load, which leads to the fastens and holes becoming worn, which means it gets even worse trying to fit everything together when the rivet does fail (which they will).

We have used our poles a fair bit, and got tired of the regular repairs needed to the rivets.  I drilled and tapped the holes for appropriately sized pan head machine screws and that has held together perfectly.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Port Louis, Grenada.


Re: Whisker Poles needing work

David Dickman
 

Hi Chris,
  I believe I recall Brian on SV Delos had a video on how he accomplished the job using a shop in Florida and some parts from Amel.

Here is a link to get you started.


Best,
    David
    Galini
    A54-100 

On Sun, Jun 26, 2022 at 10:45 AM Chris Doucette <amaroksailing@...> wrote:
Today, whilst rigging the poles the connector popped right off out of the pole.  Lucky me to have thus happen with no harm or foul. Upon quick inspection it appears the rivets have corroded and broke-  So next port its time to replace them.  I suspect the job will require drilling  old ones out and replacing with proper molly coat.

Has anyone accomplished this?  I’m looking for any known rivet sizes and metal to use ( Aluminum or Stainless). I worry a bit about corrosion on SS and also strength on Aluminum;). 

Chris SM #385
Amarok


Re: Anchor wash pump

Alan Leslie
 

Like Danny we have a through deck fitting with one way valve and a twist in hose connection. Unlike Danny we don't have the chain only wash anymore. We have used the hose system for years in what are more often than not, muddy bottoms.
It means you can keep the bow lockers shut and stand on them.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Whisker Poles needing work

Mark McGovern SV Cara
 
Edited

Chris,

I did this last year after noticing a few damaged rivets.  I used these Aluminum Blind Rivets with Aluminum Mandrel
Domed Head, 3/16" Diameter, for 0.751"-0.875" Material Thickness from McMaster-Carr:  https://www.mcmaster.com/97447A071/

You are riveting three pieces together so you need a rivet with at least 20mm grip length.  I now inspect the rivets on the poles as part of my pre-departure checklist and so far they are doing fine.

Here's some pics of the worst rivet and the three pieces that make up the assembly:







Some of the holes were a bit "ovalized" which is not ideal for a rivet joint, but we've but sailed several thousand miles using the poles since I did the repair and they seem to be fine.  If I notice any issues over time, I will likely just drill four (4) new holes and rivet the new holes.


Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Annapolis MD USA


Re: 𝗡𝗢𝗪 𝗛𝗘𝗔𝗥 𝗧𝗛𝗜𝗦

 

I sent a follow-up to them.

They were working on a code for you to use.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   

On Sun, Jun 26, 2022 at 10:50 AM Chris Doucette <amaroksailing@...> wrote:
Any new news here? I would love to take advantage here soon!  We are under way.

Chris
SM 385 Amarok


Re: 𝗡𝗢𝗪 𝗛𝗘𝗔𝗥 𝗧𝗛𝗜𝗦

Chris Doucette
 

Any new news here? I would love to take advantage here soon!  We are under way.

Chris
SM 385 Amarok


Whisker Poles needing work

Chris Doucette
 

Today, whilst rigging the poles the connector popped right off out of the pole.  Lucky me to have thus happen with no harm or foul. Upon quick inspection it appears the rivets have corroded and broke-  So next port its time to replace them.  I suspect the job will require drilling  old ones out and replacing with proper molly coat.

Has anyone accomplished this?  I’m looking for any known rivet sizes and metal to use ( Aluminum or Stainless). I worry a bit about corrosion on SS and also strength on Aluminum;). 

Chris SM #385
Amarok


Re: Anchor wash pump

Alexander Hofmann
 

Hey Kinney,

 

excellent idea to install a 3-way-valve in the bow locker. You are right and in a good humour! The wash of the chain is good, but when you really need it in cohesive mug like in Bretagne and many ‘rivers’ and logoons worldwide, you need more powerful measures.

 

My contribution: I have installed the smallest Kärcher high-pressure sprayer, the K2, in my cockpit locker, have a water output to connect the water in the cockpit near the manual Henderson bilge pump and a electric connection inside the cockpit locker. With a 8 m pressure hose in between the K2 and the nozzle I reach every part on deck. Easy to take just the hose and the nozzle out and leave all installation in place. Additionally I have 3 small wooden blocks that keep the locker 2 cm open, so I can use the seat and the hose is not squeezed. I use it for everything when I am out on sea and do not want to use too much of water for cleaning, also for sail cleaning while sailing single hand 😊 in rather calm seas.

 

Anyway, I’d like to install a short nozze and hose in the bow locker like you. Superbe idea. Also for cleaning the anchor. I use a 42 kg Bügel, which lifts up a lot of mug sometimes.

 

Can you tell me please the model of the Marco pump and where the pressure switch is, on the pump or external ? How do you operate this switch, switch it on when needed or leave it on always?

Is it the Marco / DP3 that you have noted previously, please?

 

I still have my old A.M.F.A. pump which shows quite some corrosion.

 

All the best

Alexander Hofmann

SY Oceanica I, Amel54#156, Lagos / Portugal

 

 


Amel 54 with VW engine

ofer magen
 

Denis, Aarts dieseltechniek bv. In  Holland.
He is a representative of VW marine engines. 
You can order parts from him. 
Look him up on the web


Amel 54 with VW engine

ofer magen
 

Hi,
To late model A54 with VW engine.
I had a Service to the engine and generator.
When trying to start the engine, suddenly no electricity at all to the engine.
After a long reserch, the came from a friend, a VW marine technican who new what to do:
In the electrical box on the engine, down on the right side the 2 smal blue fuses.
One of them was bad..
Hope it will help.
Ofer
A54 160


Re: Anchor wash pump

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Mike, we have a two way valve on the back wall of the port locker and a through deck fitting. This has a twist in hose connection which shuts off when the hose is removed. The two way valve allows a choice between the anchor wash or the hose. Like you all we find the hose superior to the anchor wash in any real mud. We have the same type of outlet in the cockpit, less the two way valve relying on the valve shut off
Kind Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

On 26/06/2022 09:11 Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy) <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:


Hi Bill,

We have done something similar. I'm curious how your hand held hose exits the locker? For now, we leave the locker open just enough for the hose to fit out. It's worked well - no issues with water or mud splashing in there but it's always a risk. Just curious if a through deck fitting or altering the locker cover is worth it - so it shuts and seals properly while using the deck wash, and can be stepped on worry-free. We couldn't agree more about the effectiveness of the handheld sprayer vs the fixed wash on the bow - huge improvement.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
NZ


On Sat, Jun 25, 2022, 5:58 AM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
While on the subject of anchor wash, once we added the Marco pump (which has a pressure switch) we could also add a 3-way valve in the bow locker and connect a hose and nozzle into the system.  We always found the Amel anchor wash most effective in sand and light mud.  In other words, those places you did not really need it.  

In places like the Chesapeake Bay with heavy, cohesive mud the addition of a hand directed jet of pressurized water makes a HUGE difference in the amount of gunk we carry into the anchor locker.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Port Elizabeth, Bequia, SVG




Re: Anchor wash pump

Bill Kinney
 

Mike,

We leave the locker lid open while weighing anchor.  There were a couple modifications to the original design that lets this be our go-to method without creating issues.

We ditched the switches that Amel added on the the windlass motor housing for a wired remote that also plugs in inside the locker. With that, we can actually lean over the rail while washing chain or just looking at how the chain is coming up without being a 7 foot tall contortionist. We get virtually all the gunk off the chain before it comes over the roller, so the amount that ends up on deck is very small.

Lastly, we also have a drain in the locker, so any incidental water that gets in runs down to the anchor locker. and on through.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Port Louis, Grenada.


Re: Start of fire from old Grundig TV in saloon

Gary Wells
 

I can share that I, like you, had a small electrical "incident" due to my own negligence (handing a hot wire I thought was cold) and I steuggled with whether or not to pull the handle on a dry powder extinguisher.  I'm glad I didn't because it would likely have damaged the SSB and the 24v-12v converters ... but ... it was iffy and worrisome and a smoke-filled saloon is just not fun.

I said a that to say that I can recommend a type of fire extinguisher that generates retardant electrostatically.  I got those in Malta as they aren't readily available in the U.S. and the model number is JE-50.

Understanding that these aren't USCG approved, they are still very viable additional kit. No residue to speak of and equal in extinguishing capability to the ABCs. 

So glad you caught this before it became unmanageable and/or deadly. 

Gary W.
Former SM 209, Adagio

 


Re: Anchor wash pump

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Bill,

We have done something similar. I'm curious how your hand held hose exits the locker? For now, we leave the locker open just enough for the hose to fit out. It's worked well - no issues with water or mud splashing in there but it's always a risk. Just curious if a through deck fitting or altering the locker cover is worth it - so it shuts and seals properly while using the deck wash, and can be stepped on worry-free. We couldn't agree more about the effectiveness of the handheld sprayer vs the fixed wash on the bow - huge improvement.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
NZ


On Sat, Jun 25, 2022, 5:58 AM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
While on the subject of anchor wash, once we added the Marco pump (which has a pressure switch) we could also add a 3-way valve in the bow locker and connect a hose and nozzle into the system.  We always found the Amel anchor wash most effective in sand and light mud.  In other words, those places you did not really need it.  

In places like the Chesapeake Bay with heavy, cohesive mud the addition of a hand directed jet of pressurized water makes a HUGE difference in the amount of gunk we carry into the anchor locker.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Port Elizabeth, Bequia, SVG


Re: Whangerei, New Zealand recommendations?

Chris Paul
 

Hi Scott
My experiences getting
BOTTOM PAINT REPLACED at Riverside Drive Marina. (Whangarei). 


For environmental reasons blasting antifoul paint off was not allowed. So it was done by hand by Limbard scraper.  It was time consuming & difficult to get experienced workers). 

The marina staff were always helpful but were paranoid about any flakes of antifoul paint that might end up on the ground - fines if caught. 
They required big screens to completely surround the boat & tarpaulins underneath. This took 2 days to set up & frequently had to be fixed when the winds were strong. Of course, when spray painting the screens were already set up. 

local painter - Simon was very good. He painted the bottom layers. (Mostly spray paint - fast) 

I also considered doing the keel. I decided to wait until I could access a sand blaster. 

This marina was unsealed. Rain => muddy mess - difficult to keep out of boat
 
I certainly would research other places to get this job done. This job is not nice & labour intensive. Can you do it in Fiji? 
I am not sure - maybe soda blasting can be done in NZ but probably need to go in a shed (masts pulled)??

SOLAR PANELS
I upgraded my solar panels at Opua. I can recommend Cameron (someone else also recommended him) 
This job required some welding Garth the local welder did a good job. Unfortunately can’t weld in the water without council permission so this job is best done on the hard. 

Chris Paul
SV GLAZIG
SM 352



On 22 Jun 2022, at 12:43 pm, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

Hi all,

We're headed to New Zealand this Austral Summer and have a load of projects to get done. I know some of you are from NZ and many of you have been there, so I'm hoping to get some recommendations for the following projects:

1) Strip hull to gelcoat and repaint. It seems that in NZ, soda blasting is less common than sand blasting. I'd also like to get the cast iron ballast stripped and recoated. We also want to raise the waterline.

2) Building a hard top for our A54
After this thread, I'm seriously contemplating having a hard top added. The current favored design is something similar to Soleil Bleu
https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/topic/hardtop_for_amel_54/75406304?p=Created%2C%2C%2C20%2C1%2C0%2C0&jump=1

3) Replace motor mounts. Two bolts have broken on our motor mounts so the motor will need to be lifted and the remaining studs drilled out.

4) Acrylic window replacement

5) Solar electrical. We want to add more rigid solar on top of the new hard top. 

Currently, we have an appointment for haul out at Norsand boatyard and they're mostly an "open boatyard" except for boatbuilding and painting. For projects requiring those tradesmen, we will need to use Norsand. If Norsand is not a good choice, I'm happy to switch boatyards.

Thanks in advance!
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah, currently Tahiti, preparing for passage to Fiji
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

Matt Salatino
 

We leave approx. 1/4 tank of water, maybe less. The n affect about 200 ml of H2O2, just before leaving the boat. We wait a bit, then ruin each faucet for a minute, and flush our toilets (fresh water). Peroxide is an oxidizer and kills the nasties. It’s highly reactive, so within a couple of months, it just reverts to water. Won’t hurt the Watermaker. 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

karkauai
 

How much H²0² Matt?  Does it keep the tanks from getting growth? Do you flush the tanks when you get back to the boat?

Is it bad for the watermaker membranes?

Thanks
Kent
SM 243
Keisty

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Steering cables

James Alton
 

Ben,

   Here are the instructions that Oliver B. kindly provided me.

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

The reason for reducing the slack in the cables (in fact in the cables sheaths) is to reduce the work of the autopilot. With too much slack, the auto-pilot, every time it needs to adjust the course, needs to turn until the boat really shifts course, and the first movements are done for nothing. Same, when it adjusts the course the other way (or to stabilize the new course).
To know about "how much" play there is, you should be two people. One is turning the wheel for 1/4 of a turn, then very slowly turns the other way. The other person is in the aft cabin, watching the quadrant. He should be pointing at the quadrant with the tip of a screw driver.
When the helmsman starts to turn the wheel the other way, he needs to tell the other person. When the quadrant man sees the quadrant moving, he needs to say "STOP!". The helmsman can now assess how much he turned the wheel until the quadrant moves.
A reasonable slack is 5cm on the wheel circumference. More than 10cm is definitely too much and the cables sheaths need to be tightened.
When the boat is out of the water, it's easier to check this slack by gently shaking the rudder blade side to side. More than 1cm movement is too much.

To adjust the sheaths tension, in the aft cabin, release the locking washers of both sheaths and release the nuts. Mark the tubes with a screw driver or permanent marker (to know how much you will turn). Turn the threaded tubes of 1 turn each (clockwise when you look towards portside) if the slack is from 10 to 15cm on the wheel. For each 10cm more, turn each tube of half a turn.


-----Original Message-----
From: Ben Levy <benjamin.levy@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 24, 2022 10:50 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Steering cables

Hi everyone, 
Can anyone explain to me how to tighten the steering cables in my maramu? I understand that the metal flaps need to be lifted in order for the nuts to be able to turn but what then? What part turns, by how much? And how do I know it is tight enough? (the surveyor wrote in his report that they needed tightening). 

Cheers 
Ben
M #98 


Steering cables

Ben Levy
 

Hi everyone, 
Can anyone explain to me how to tighten the steering cables in my maramu? I understand that the metal flaps need to be lifted in order for the nuts to be able to turn but what then? What part turns, by how much? And how do I know it is tight enough? (the surveyor wrote in his report that they needed tightening). 

Cheers 
Ben
M #98