Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Dear Chuck,

Sorry, been busy with business related issue (almost done), so just going to echo what Mark wrote so that you have more feedback, sorry not to elaborate.

90% of the time I single hand and no issue. Even having a tendency to reef a little too late, always good.
Sure the wind will either be your friend or opponent when docking solo.

Never though it is too big.

Because of my work, I stay in marinas, I usually pay around $600/month (there was exceptions), will be happy to share which price and where I paid.

Sure the larger the vessel the more expensive will be the maintenance.
Standing or running rigging on the SM will be more than on the Santorin and Maramu

I spent 15 months in the Bahamas and draft was limiting, but not an issue.
In Grand Bahama I had to wait to be between low and mid tide to enter, no issue in the Berry, Nassau, Exumas, Turks & Caicos, etc.
but I decided to skip the Abacos because of the draft.

If I had to do it again, I would pick a newer SM2K, they have more batteries capacity, etc.


Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Harbor View Marina, Tortola, BVI


--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 1/13/17, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Friday, January 13, 2017, 12:22 PM


 

















Hi Chuck,

 

I have sailed our Amel single
handedly many times. People such as Kent and Alexandre can
speak to this better
than I, but I think the Amel is a breeze for a solo sailor.
One of the reasons
we purchased an Amel is either one of us can reef sails
single handedly and never
leave the cockpit. This is a huge safety factor when at sea.
I can sleep knowing
Cindy is safe in the cockpit and can adjust sails as needed.
This was also a
big comfort factor for her when considering which boat to
purchase. I would challenge
you to look at other designs of boats and ask yourself, how
easy is it for one
person to reef? In many cases, it is not
possible.

 

I have never thought our Amel
was too big. If fact, we think the opposite. Amel is so well
designed we do not
feel it is big at all. Some marinas and moorings in the USA
charge extra for
boats over 50'. We just say "see ya" and stay
elsewhere. We have
never been at a loss for a place to stay. For the most part,
businesses are
willing to take our money. You have probably noticed the
draft and mast height
are not Intracoastal friendly. But, if you want to travel
the eastern Intracoastal
Waterway buy a power boat (you are going to have to motor
the entire way anyway).
We have sailed eastern US and went outside. It is easier,
faster and in my
opinion much safer.

 

We recently sailed the Bahamas,
an area notorious for shallow waters. When we told other
cruisers we draw about
7' they give us the "oh my" face. If you are
looking for a shallow
draft boat, buy a cat. When you draw 2' you can get into
places off limits to
mono-hulls. IMO there is not much difference between a
6' draft and a 7' draft
when sailing shallow waters. A 7' foot draft usually
means you are just going
to run aground one minute before the 6' draft. For the
most part we try to stay
in 10', or more. In our entire Bahamas cruise, there
were only two places we
opted not to enter. We thought we were deep draft in the
Bahamas until we met
someone with a 9' draft. They had been to all the placed
we visited.

 

The real question you have to
ask yourself, is do you want a safe proven blue water
cruising boat, or
something else. We opted to purchase a boat that we knew
would take us anywhere
in the world with comfort and safety. If you start making
sacrifices such as
less draft or lower mast height, you are giving up some of
the characteristics
that make Amels awesome blue water cruisers.

 

 



With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Yacht: Cream Puff

SM2K #275 - Currently cruising:
Key West, FL (stuck
waiting for weather!)

 

 

 

www.creampuff.us



 





From:
amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]

Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 11:59 AM

To: amelyachtowners@...

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from
Utah





 

 







Hi All,



Thanks for taking the time
to respond in detail it helps
tremendously! Two quick questions. I have read of Monsieur
Amel's vision
regarding his design and light handed sailing. Have you ever
said to yourself
"This craft is too large for us" if so in what
aspect. Sailing,
maintenance, housekeeping, storage-haul out, slip fees. One
other question.
Have you ever said "I wish I had a shallower
draft". Has the draft of
the SM kept you away of spoiled your days? Do you have
regrets with either of
these. Do you just deal with it, embrace it or indifferent.
I know these are
basic questions but this will be our largest and deepest
draft boat to date.





 





Best Regards,





Chuck


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Top Ten for why the electric motor won't work?

sailor63109@...
 

Thanks for the reply Kent.  I'll check the start solenoid, is it attached to the motor in view or was it in a box attached to the motor?

Yep, the 24V breaker on the engine room fwd blkhd was on.

Duane


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

Mark Erdos
 

Hi Chuck,

 

I have sailed our Amel single handedly many times. People such as Kent and Alexandre can speak to this better than I, but I think the Amel is a breeze for a solo sailor. One of the reasons we purchased an Amel is either one of us can reef sails single handedly and never leave the cockpit. This is a huge safety factor when at sea. I can sleep knowing Cindy is safe in the cockpit and can adjust sails as needed. This was also a big comfort factor for her when considering which boat to purchase. I would challenge you to look at other designs of boats and ask yourself, how easy is it for one person to reef? In many cases, it is not possible.

 

I have never thought our Amel was too big. If fact, we think the opposite. Amel is so well designed we do not feel it is big at all. Some marinas and moorings in the USA charge extra for boats over 50'. We just say "see ya" and stay elsewhere. We have never been at a loss for a place to stay. For the most part, businesses are willing to take our money. You have probably noticed the draft and mast height are not Intracoastal friendly. But, if you want to travel the eastern Intracoastal Waterway buy a power boat (you are going to have to motor the entire way anyway). We have sailed eastern US and went outside. It is easier, faster and in my opinion much safer.

 

We recently sailed the Bahamas, an area notorious for shallow waters. When we told other cruisers we draw about 7' they give us the "oh my" face. If you are looking for a shallow draft boat, buy a cat. When you draw 2' you can get into places off limits to mono-hulls. IMO there is not much difference between a 6' draft and a 7' draft when sailing shallow waters. A 7' foot draft usually means you are just going to run aground one minute before the 6' draft. For the most part we try to stay in 10', or more. In our entire Bahamas cruise, there were only two places we opted not to enter. We thought we were deep draft in the Bahamas until we met someone with a 9' draft. They had been to all the placed we visited.

 

The real question you have to ask yourself, is do you want a safe proven blue water cruising boat, or something else. We opted to purchase a boat that we knew would take us anywhere in the world with comfort and safety. If you start making sacrifices such as less draft or lower mast height, you are giving up some of the characteristics that make Amels awesome blue water cruisers.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Yacht: Cream Puff

SM2K #275 - Currently cruising: Key West, FL (stuck waiting for weather!)

 

 

 

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 11:59 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

 

 

Hi All,

Thanks for taking the time to respond in detail it helps tremendously! Two quick questions. I have read of Monsieur Amel's vision regarding his design and light handed sailing. Have you ever said to yourself "This craft is too large for us" if so in what aspect. Sailing, maintenance, housekeeping, storage-haul out, slip fees. One other question. Have you ever said "I wish I had a shallower draft". Has the draft of the SM kept you away of spoiled your days? Do you have regrets with either of these. Do you just deal with it, embrace it or indifferent. I know these are basic questions but this will be our largest and deepest draft boat to date.

 

Best Regards,

Chuck

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] whereabouts

karkauai
 

Now you guys and gals can see why I learned so much from Craig on that maiden voyage.  Read back through his posts and see just how resourceful and capable he is.

But...like me, he doesn't get it perfect every time...hmmm, maybe that's why the 50-90 rule works for me, my mentor showed me how to do things!

Glad you got it done Craig!

Kent


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

karkauai
 

I haven't had the experience with a shower draft or smaller boat, Chuck. That may make it easier for me to live with the deeper draft of my SM.  The Bahamas are known as a shallow draft venue, but there are lots of great places I can go.  I can get into the ICW many places, but not use it to transit N & S.  I wouldn't likely do that anyway.
Even single-handing, I have never thought it was too much boat for me.  If you go much smaller you will lose the genset, that's a deal breaker for me.  I often have 2-4 guests aboard, and the SM is great for that,  any more and I start to get a little claustrophobic.

The difference in dockage  or storage between a 45' and a 53' is 15%.  I've never thought that was significant, since I'm almost always at anchor.

I bought Kristy to do blue water sailing.  I don't believe I could find a better boat for that purpose.

Kent 


whereabouts

Craig Briggs
 

---In amelyachtowners@..., <karkauai@...> wrote :
Hi Craig!  Hope you and Katherine are well.  Where y'at?
Kent

Hi Kent, We're back in Boca for the winter and Katherine is back to her part time job while I keep Sangaris in shape.  She's on a mooring in Vero Beach where she limped in a few weeks ago (the boat, not Katherine).  Funny story that other Amelians may enjoy.  

As we were motoring down from Melbourne the overheat alarm went off. I jumped down into the engine room and spotted a steady stream of water coming out in the vicinity of the circulating water pump. That's not an underway repair job so I just topped up the cooling water every five minutes with the cockpit shower hose, until we got to Vero Beach a couple of hours later.

The water pump had failed years ago in Mexico at about 3500 engine hours. The Perkins shop manual says it is not repairable and must be renewed, but the Mexicans in a little shop in Baja did fix it for about 80 pesos and it was fine.  I did replace it after getting back to the US, when I rebuilt the engine (in the cockpit in Ft Lauderdale!) So, assuming the replacement pump had failed, not surprisingly since we've now gone another 3500 hours, I ordered one from Trans Atlantic Diesel in Virginia. 

Went back the next week and pulled the engine, since replacing the pump is far easier that way than attempting to do it with the engine in place. The pump is behind the timing belt cover and you have to pull the cogged pulleys of the crankshaft, camshaft and injector pump, plus the timing belt and idler pulleys to get the cover off.  Then you can finally remove the water pump. Then reassemble everything, put the engine back in the engine room and reconnect all the plumbing, electric etc.

So, got that all sorted and refilled with antifreeze.  Son of a gun if she wasn't leaking just as bad. So, lifted the engine out a second time, stripped it down again and discovered the leak hadn't been from the pump after all - bad assumption on my part. It was a freeze plug on the engine block just below the water pump that had corroded through. Those are 84 cents at the auto parts store - yikes.  Anyway, put it all together again, plopped it back in the engine room, filled it up and it didn't leak. That was the good news. The bad news was it didn't want to start, although with lots of preheating and cranking it finally got going, but ran really rough with lots of smoke. A sure sign of the timing being off - likely because I put timing belt on one cog off.

So yesterday I just finished hoisting the engine out for the third time, moved the belt over one notch, reassembled and tossed it back in the engine room. Now works like a champ. Great fun and have set a new Guiness World Record for speedy engine removal - 1 hour, 52 minutes and 23 seconds.

Cheers,
Craig


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

Chuck_Kim_Joy
 

Hi All,
Thanks for taking the time to respond in detail it helps tremendously! Two quick questions. I have read of Monsieur Amel's vision regarding his design and light handed sailing. Have you ever said to yourself "This craft is too large for us" if so in what aspect. Sailing, maintenance, housekeeping, storage-haul out, slip fees. One other question. Have you ever said "I wish I had a shallower draft". Has the draft of the SM kept you away of spoiled your days? Do you have regrets with either of these. Do you just deal with it, embrace it or indifferent. I know these are basic questions but this will be our largest and deepest draft boat to date.

Best Regards,
Chuck
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Top Ten for why the electric motor won't work?

karkauai
 

That's a start solenoid on my 24v60 (not duo).  Try tapping on it with a wrench.  It may start.  I replaced mine with a new one I got online.  I don't remember where but as I remember it was easy to find.

If that doesn't work, try bypassing the solenoid to see if the motor runs.

I assume you checked for power to the motor.  On SM 243 the breaker for the watermaker is on the forward engine room bulkhead.  Didn't bump that accidentally, did you?

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:11 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

After replacing the sprague bearings on the Cat Pump for our Duo 60 Dessalator, now the 24 volt motor won't run (it's always something isn't it?).  I'm going to take off all the connections and shine them up, but they look fine to me now; no rust or other gunk visible.  It ran fine up to the time of taking the belt off.  We even ran it without the belt momentarily to confirm the direction of rotation for the one-way bearing and it was fine.  I d on't see a fuse at the motor anywhere.  There is a "box" attached to the motor that the red battery wire connects to that I suppose is connected to the control panel "24V" switch to start it.  


So, would anyone like to suggest things to check?


1.  Power to the motor with the switch "on".  

2.  Clean the connections.

3.  ???


Top Ten for why the electric motor won't work?

sailor63109@...
 

After replacing the sprague bearings on the Cat Pump for our Duo 60 Dessalator, now the 24 volt motor won't run (it's always something isn't it?).  I'm going to take off all the connections and shine them up, but they look fine to me now; no rust or other gunk visible.  It ran fine up to the time of taking the belt off.  We even ran it without the belt momentarily to confirm the direction of rotation for the one-way bearing and it was fine.  I d on't see a fuse at the motor anywhere.  There is a "box" attached to the motor that the red battery wire connects to that I suppose is connected to the control panel "24V" switch to start it.  


So, would anyone like to suggest things to check?


1.  Power to the motor with the switch "on".  

2.  Clean the connections.

3.  ???


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Yanmar 75HP - Cannot go over 2300 RPM

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

I believe that a repitch is nearly impossible. the AutoProp automatically pitches based on the rpm and the hydronamics of the shape of the blade. So a repitch of the AutoProp I believe requires reshaping the blades.

Since there is no adjustment in an AutoProp as compared to other folding/feathering props, low rpm has to be caused by any one of the previous suggestions.

If you want to know how I would rank the causes:
1.) Dirty prop
2.) Restricted fuel flow anywhere between tank and injector nozzles...tank, filters, fuel pump, injector pump, injectors, nozzels.
3.) Restriced exhaust/Turbo...valve lash clearance, exhaust manifold, elbow, rest of the exhaust system, Turbo needs service
4.) Prop needs bearing service
5.) Engine timing problem
6.) Fuel quality issue
7.) A C Drive issue
8.) AutoProp blade bent (wrong pitch)

I would eliminate one at a time beginning with the most likely to the least likely.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Virgin Islands
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


On Jan 12, 2017 10:05 AM, "SV Island Pearl II colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Vladimir
Since Island Pearl II is the same 75hp Yanmar engine, same gearbox, and the original Amel supplied autoprop, and it easily does 3300 - 3500 when clean, I think you will find it is the turbo, not a need to re-pitch the autoprop. Good luck with it though. Hope you don't need to re-pitch that really nice prop.
Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II, SM#332
Brisbane

On Thu, Jan 12, 2017 at 11:49 PM, Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

As I stated above in this thread, I also have low engine RPM. It was 2500 RPM maximum when I bought my boat. I have 75 HP YANMAR with transmission 2.8:1 ratio. I contacted US Autoprop representative. He forward my question to the factory. See below their reply.  I copied and pasted it below.


"As far as I am aware Amel have not advised us about using Yanmar engine so this prop was never set up for this engine. Our records show that they only used Perkins or Volvo so it is not surprising that the pitch is out. Probably never right from day one. Say that however, it should not be too far off the mark in terms of engine loading. My best guess is that if the turbo is not working this is the reason for the low maximum rpm and not because the prop is holding it down."

My boat is on the hard now. I plan to check torbo when boat is in the water. I will conduct some other tests. If I could not resolve the problem I will remove the prop and send it to US Autoprop representative for a pitch change.

Vladimir
SM#345 "LIFE IS GOOD"


On Jan 11, 2017 7:16 AM, "David Pawley pawleyd@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

Its possible there are 2 types of injectors for the same engine, one set for derated. The difference would be seen in the nozzle hole Dia. Have you still got the old injectors!. Visual examination should be adequate but better to use nozzle cleaners. I have no idea if Yanmar have derated injectors, but other large bore engine manufacturers certainly have.


On 11 January 2017 at 16:34, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

Dom,

The autoprop rebuild is not difficult just tedious and takes the  good part of a day.

If you Contact AB the bruton distributor in the USA they will sell you the bearings needed and rent you the special tools needed for the rebuild at a nominal price.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 





--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Asking for information SM 246

Ben and Gayle Super Maramu #347
 

Hola Rafael,
A good source for information about Amels is Joel Potter in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.  Formerly, he was North American sales and service agent for Amel.  And he is still actively marketing used boats.  He monitors this forum. 

Joel F. Potter

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954-812-2485

Joel F. Potter 

jfpottercys@...


Ben Driver
La Bella Vita
SM #347

On Jan 12, 2017, at 11:27 PM, rcavie <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Hi all. I am not really Amel Owner but I want to be one.
I am looking for my Amel SM
In St Maarten recently I saw Agapanthe. SM 246.
I appreciate if somebody has some information about this boat. She has been sailing in Caribbean the last years.
I apologize for my English. Is not my mother tongue. Thank you
Rafael
Rcavie@...


TIP: Grease your autoprop asap after haul-out.

dbv_au@...
 

Greetings all,

An interesting tip from the BRUNTON / Autoprop crew at the London Boat Show earlier this week, regarding idiosyncrasies of the autoprop.

Is that, whenever you haul-out for period of longer than [3] days, it is important to re-grease the prop asap after hauling out. The reason being that after some time in the water, salt water enters the grease channels.  Then, when out of the water, as the hub dries out the salt crystallises, which then creates opportunity for unnecessary wear later on (and as well making it harder for grease to flow through the now-obstructed channels, in order to remove the grease / salt).  The preventative intervention is to get rid of the old grease (and with it any salt &/or other contaminants) before the dry-out takes place.  Rule-of-thumb: Grease the prop within 3 days of haul-out, preferably within 24 hours.

All common sense when you think about it; but I never thought it through before.

David
Perigee, SM#396, Martinique

Contact: BRUNTONS (UK), David Sheppard, Product Manager, david [at] bruntons-propellers [dot] com.



Re: Yanmar 75HP - Cannot go over 2300 RPM (Grease the prop asap after Haul-out)

dbv_au@...
 

Greetings all,

An interesting tip from the BRUNTON / Autoprop crew at the London Boat Show earlier this week, regarding idiosyncrasies of the autoprop.

Is that, whenever you haul-out for period of longer than [3] days, it is important to re-grease the prop asap after hauling out. The reason being that after some time in the water, salt water enters the grease channels.  Then, when out of the water, as the hub dries out the salt crystallises, which then creates opportunity for unnecessary wear later on (and as well making it harder for grease to flow through the now-obstructed channels, in order to remove the grease / salt).  The preventative intervention is to get rid of the old grease (and with it any salt &/or other contaminants) before the dry-out takes place.  Rule-of-thumb: Grease the prop within 3 days of haul-out, preferably within 24 hours.

All common sense when you think about it; but I never thought it through before.

David
Perigee, SM#396, Martinique

Contact: BRUNTONS (UK), David Sheppard, Product Manager, david [at] bruntons-propellers [dot] com.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Yanmar 75HP - Cannot go over 2300 RPM

Bob Grey
 

Bill, your advice on replacing a Vetus coupling on a 55 would be appreciated, Amel recommends sliding the engine forward 15 cm to fit it, it appears to me I can drill and tap the steel spacer to use shorter bolts or studs than the long through bolts supplied without moving the engine.

Thoughts?

Bob Grey

On Tuesday, January 10, 2017, 16:57, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Dom,

I recommend C Drive service at 800 engine hours or 2 years which ever comes first. This would include new wear bushing, 3 new seals, and new oil. At that same time adding grease to the AutoProp, and servicing the bow thruster. We also renew antifouling every two years.

Bruntons, manufacturer of AutoProp, recommended 1200 hours for bearing replacement. I replaced our AutoProp bearings at 2200 hours and the old bearings had no signs of wear...so I am not sure. The bearing kit is around 500-600 euros. Do you remember if Amel just added grease, or if they installed a bearing kit? BTW, the bearing kit installation is not that easy. I had an AutoProp representative do it for me.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


On Jan 9, 2017 9:18 PM, "Dominique Guenot dominique_guenot@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thanks Bill and all for sharing your thoughts and experience and taking the time.  


I will clean the Turbo per your recommendation when we will come back from our road trip at the end of February


Regarding the Autoprop I have it serviced by Amel Caraibes early February at 2600 hours as well as the C-Drive.

Then I have cleaned the Autoprop diving several times since to ensure good mobility.

We are now in NZ at 3600 hours.

 

What is your recommended hours to service the C-drive - we assume no mayonnaise in the oil ?

and the Autoprop?


Thank you

Dominique Guenot 


You'll need Skype CreditFree via Skype
You'll need Skype CreditFree via Skype
You'll need Skype CreditFree via Skype


Asking for information SM 246

rcavie <no_reply@...>
 

Hi all. I am not really Amel Owner but I want to be one.
I am looking for my Amel SM
In St Maarten recently I saw Agapanthe. SM 246.
I appreciate if somebody has some information about this boat. She has been sailing in Caribbean the last years.
I apologize for my English. Is not my mother tongue. Thank you
Rafael
Rcavie@...


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

karkauai
 

Hi Craig!  Hope you and Katherine are well.  Where y'at?

Kent


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

Craig Briggs
 

Hey Kent,
Thanks for the kind words.  I do hope that by now you've got all those items on "Craig's List" fixed up!!!  Kidding aside and having been aboard Kristy several years after that initial sail, she is a beaut!  From an engineer, I must say I'm very impressed at how well you swing a wrench, ....well, for a Medical Doctor!
Cheers,
Craig SN#68 Sangaris 


---In amelyachtowners@..., <karkauai@...> wrote :

I had a broker and the seller had a broker, neither of which know a thing about Amels. The owner wasn't involved in the sale, nor did he spend any time with me explaining things. Big mistake. If I were to do it again, I would get Joel Potter in the US or the guy in Europe that is so highly recommended (sorry I don't remember his name, it's been mentioned several times here). I would make a 4-7 day period of one on one education part of the purchase price.

I got lucky when Craig Briggs (Sangaris) volunteered to help me bring the boat from Galveston to Ft Lauderdale on my first sail. He taught me more in that few days than I would have learned in a year on my own. Thanks again Craig!!!

Kent
Kristy
SM243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Yanmar 75HP - Cannot go over 2300 RPM

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Vladimir

The serial # of the autoprop on Island Pearl II is AP 3713

Cheers
Colin

On 13 Jan 2017 8:26 AM, "Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Colin,

If it is not difficult for you,
could you give me your prop number. Yes we have the same engine and transmission but our props could be different.


Vladimir
202 258 1916

On Jan 12, 2017 09:05, "SV Island Pearl II colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hi Vladimir
Since Island Pearl II is the same 75hp Yanmar engine, same gearbox, and the original Amel supplied autoprop, and it easily does 3300 - 3500 when clean, I think you will find it is the turbo, not a need to re-pitch the autoprop. Good luck with it though. Hope you don't need to re-pitch that really nice prop.
Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II, SM#332
Brisbane

On Thu, Jan 12, 2017 at 11:49 PM, Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

As I stated above in this thread, I also have low engine RPM. It was 2500 RPM maximum when I bought my boat. I have 75 HP YANMAR with transmission 2.8:1 ratio. I contacted US Autoprop representative. He forward my question to the factory. See below their reply.  I copied and pasted it below.


"As far as I am aware Amel have not advised us about using Yanmar engine so this prop was never set up for this engine. Our records show that they only used Perkins or Volvo so it is not surprising that the pitch is out. Probably never right from day one. Say that however, it should not be too far off the mark in terms of engine loading. My best guess is that if the turbo is not working this is the reason for the low maximum rpm and not because the prop is holding it down."

My boat is on the hard now. I plan to check torbo when boat is in the water. I will conduct some other tests. If I could not resolve the problem I will remove the prop and send it to US Autoprop representative for a pitch change.

Vladimir
SM#345 "LIFE IS GOOD"


On Jan 11, 2017 7:16 AM, "David Pawley pawleyd@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

Its possible there are 2 types of injectors for the same engine, one set for derated. The difference would be seen in the nozzle hole Dia. Have you still got the old injectors!. Visual examination should be adequate but better to use nozzle cleaners. I have no idea if Yanmar have derated injectors, but other large bore engine manufacturers certainly have.


On 11 January 2017 at 16:34, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

Dom,

The autoprop rebuild is not difficult just tedious and takes the  good part of a day.

If you Contact AB the bruton distributor in the USA they will sell you the bearings needed and rent you the special tools needed for the rebuild at a nominal price.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 





--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

Mark Erdos
 

Kent,

 

I agree wholeheartedly, except for one thing: we love the dishwasher. We run our dinner dishes in the evening with the end of the day battery charge and make hot water for showers. It is going to be a very sad day on our boat when the dishwasher dies since replacements are not available. We just changed out the heating element and giving it a burst of new life.

 

 

Chuck & Kim (stuck in Utah),

 

The systems on Amel boats are not really that more complicated than other vessels of this size. The biggest difference with Amel is you can get to the systems. Let me emphasize: "you can get to the systems". And, Amel did a fantastic job over the years of fine-tuning the assortment of parts to ensure longevity and reliability. Our Amel is now 17 years old. We can still buy parts from Amel and many of our systems are original. Amel will ship world-wide. If we do have to replace something, we try very hard to use the same brand and model that was installed by the Amel factory (else we get guidance on this forum). For example, we recently replaced the guts of our refrigerator. The Frigoboat units were still available and it was a swap out of the condenser (icebox), thermostat and compressor. We kept the fridge box as it was very high quality stainless and the wood facade door matched the African mahogany aboard. No drilling new holes or re-engineering required. The fridge is removed by taking out 3 thumbs screws. The whole unit can then be placed atop the washer/dryer without having to disconnect anything. The whole project took less than half a day. Plug and play! On our previous boat it would have taken a day to just remove the old parts. It would have taken a cabinet maker to install the new parts. Once you have owned an Amel, every day you appreciate the nuances of the brand. Things like running an antenna cable from the nav-station to the lazarette can be done in a few minutes. On other boats, this is an all day project. Having an engine room I can stand up in and access 4 sides of the engine and genset is heaven. Have you ever tried to change out a starter while lying on your stomach and unscrewing bolts by brail? I have. I'm glad those days are gone.

 

I would encourage you to go look at an Island Packet 485. This is the finest example of good ideas gone bad. Look at the engine and ask yourself how you could ever replace it. It would take a master cabinet maker and you would have to cut a huge hole in the cockpit floor. The boat is built around the engine. Crazy stupid. Look at the size of the nav-station and how much boat real-estate is given to it. ask yourself how often you sit at the nave station. Things like this are common place amongst other boat manufacturers. Amel didn't get everything right but they did way better than most.

 

Hope this helps push you over the ledge to buy an Amel and leave the snow in the rear view mirror.

 

And, call Joel Potter. You'll be glad you did.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Yacht: Cream Puff

SM2K #275 - Currently cruising: Key West, FL (stuck waiting for weather!)

www.creampuff.us

 

 

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 5:16 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

 

 

If another boat has the amenities present on Amels, there will be the same kinds of problems, Chuck.  If an autopilot or reefer or AC fails, you're going to have to go thru the same troubleshooting, parts acquisition, and repairs.  Amels are French boats and are set up in European electrical style with 220v50Hz appliances and 24v motors, etc.  They can be a bit harder to source than 110v60Hz or 12vDC, but this forum is great for learning where others have sourced them.  The bonding system is significantly different from most other boats and electricians on this side of the pond won't understand it.  They'll want you to conform to ABYC standards, and if you aren't there while they're doing something, they'll hook it up by some method other than the Amel way.  That can lead to problems.

 

Some proprietary parts are only available from Amel and expensive, but they're worth it!

 

One of the really great things about Amels is this forum.  Kristy is my first sailboat and my first big boat.  I was totally clueless about how to troubleshoot or repair anything.  The folks here took me by the hand and very patiently walked me thru things step by step.  If it hadn't been for them I'd have given up after a few years.  Now, 8 years later, I've learned to find and repair most things that go wrong.  I can post a question here and get an answer in a few hours.  I spent a ton of money paying mechanics and electricians to learn my boat and try to teach me, only to find out later they really didn't "get" Amels.  In retrospect, I'd have been better off flying in someone like Olivier to teach me and the electrician what and why.

If I can do it, anyone can.

As to the KISS principle, it's up to the individual to decide how important all the different amenities are.  I would find it difficult to be living aboard a boat without them.  The only thing I don't use regularly is the dishwasher.

 

Kent

Kristy

SM243

 


On Jan 12, 2017, at 4:28 PM, clacey9@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thank you for the warm welcome Kent,

I have been lurking for quite some time and have enjoyed the interactions (from afar). I have also followed a few blogs from members here. I guess the first question is: Is this type of yacht too complicated with too many intricate systems to manage. Are Amels anymore more complicated than any other comparable yacht with similar features. I have read for years of the KISS principle and agree but that also conflicts with my other want and that is to sail and liveaboard in somewhat safety and comfort. This boats checks almost all the boxes (I do have a spreadsheet and there are boxes).


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Introduction from Utah

karkauai
 

I had a broker and the seller had a broker, neither of which know a thing about Amels. The owner wasn't involved in the sale, nor did he spend any time with me explaining things. Big mistake. If I were to do it again, I would get Joel Potter in the US or the guy in Europe that is so highly recommended (sorry I don't remember his name, it's been mentioned several times here). I would make a 4-7 day period of one on one education part of the purchase price.

I got lucky when Craig Briggs (Sangaris) volunteered to help me bring the boat from Galveston to Ft Lauderdale on my first sail. He taught me more in that few days than I would have learned in a year on my own. Thanks again Craig!!!

Kent
Kristy
SM243