Date   

Re: Hold down fittings for aft locker.

 

Eric,

Yes, that is my understanding, at least for some of the SMs built, maybe all of them, but certainly all that I have seen. 

And I believe the issue is that over time the screw sealant deteriorates. Amel used sealant on the screw to keep saltwater out. When saltwater gets inside, the metal plate will rust into nothing.

Remember, if you need to replace the steel plate embedded in the balsa deck, you can get to it from under the deck leaving the faux teak and faux caulk untouched.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sun, Oct 31, 2021 at 11:23 PM Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Does anyone know how the hinged fittings with the black knobs on the aft locker are fitted?

One of the screws seems stripped.

My assumption is that there is a plate under the deck that the screws fit into.

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Freedman
Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2021 4:06 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Genuine alternator for a yanmar 4jh3

 

 

Does anyone have a USA source for a Yanmar genuine Hitachi 4jh3 isolated ground alternator?

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 


Valeo 28.5 V 60 A specification and regulator

EricOpdeweegh
 

Hi Amelians,

We have become the proud owner of sv Abayomi (ex Nathape) since June this year and have sailed her back to Holland from Gaeta in Italy to be able to prepare her in the coming 1.5 year for our circumnavigation marked on the Calendar to commence in July 2023
We are now starting to look into the conversion from Gel to LiFePo4 
As we understand the Alternator of our Volvo TMD22A needs protection.

But first we would like to understand how the present situation is regulated. We have the support of a marine electrician who will draw up and assit with the conversion as we are beginners in the world of electrons

Can anyone assist us and tell us what the specifications of our Valeo ZV3729H alternator are and how the current system works? How is the temperature is regulated? Is there a regulator at the moment?

Thanks for the replies

Eric & Els Opdeweegh
sv Abayomi 
SM 158
Currently in Holland

  


Leak at baby stay chainplate on 54

Nick Newington
 

We have been enjoying a couple of rainy days here in Turkey. Sometimes really heavy rain, so an opportune moment to look for leaks. Apart from some stitch holes in the spray hood we only have one.
I noticed a small puddle under the floor in forward port cabin next to the depth sounder transducer. Fresh water and a small trickle from forward. Long and short of it is that it is coming from the inner inner forstay. Then running down behind the lining and out below the cupboard in the port forward cabin. Then draining aft.
The problem is that the shower moulding hides it. What I would like to do is remove the chain plate and re-bed it. However without cutting an access hole it is not possible.

I had the same leak a couple of years ago and bodged it by running a bead of sealant around the plate outside. Looks like I will do that again…
Has anyone else been here? Can offer better solution?
Nick
S/Y Amelia
Marmaris bay at anchor
AML 54-019


Hold down fittings for aft locker.

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

Does anyone know how the hinged fittings with the black knobs on the aft locker are fitted?

One of the screws seems stripped.

My assumption is that there is a plate under the deck that the screws fit into.

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Freedman
Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2021 4:06 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Genuine alternator for a yanmar 4jh3

 

 

Does anyone have a USA source for a Yanmar genuine Hitachi 4jh3 isolated ground alternator?

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 


Re: Upgrade to Lithium batteries, detailed circuit #solution

Jose Venegas
 

This is the updated schematic of the Ipanema’s electrical system following the installation of Battle-borne lithium batteries.

The main aim of the design was to minimize the need to modify any ac electrical connections inside the boat. 

 

The system is similar to that described by Brian Trautman for SV Delos with a few differences.  On the schematic, all new devices are in orange and new connections in red.  All connections represent positive and negative cables for DC (Solid lines), and hot and common for ac cables except for those connecting the controls of two new NC relays. 

 

The design uses an existing white box in the engine compartment. My boat was built for an American customer and included a white box with two electrical outlets: one for direct 220 V shore power and one for 120 V shore power transformed to 220 V.  Boats built without this box could use a switch that could be conveniently installed inside the boat.

 

A 5KW inverter was mounted on the bulkhead next to the battery compartment.  This has enough power to run any of the 220 V ac current devices of Ipanema (not at the same time of course).  The 5KW inverter output was connected to a third outlet that I added to the engine compartment white box via a 30 amp 3 wire AC cable.  Not easy but a lot easier than passing several large DC cables from an inverter/charger installed in the engine compartment and minimizing their length.  The inverter is kept out of the engine compartment to avoid the heat while keeping two battery chargers in the engine compartment using the two existing medium-sized DC cables of the old chargers sending current to the new battery bank.  Note that the max DC current that could ever be sent to the lithium batteries is 320 amp (160 chargers +100 solar panels + 60 engine alternator) gives a C<1. 

 

Another feature of this design is that the Genset can be turned on at any time, and the existing AMEL relay automatically disconnects any connected AC power source.


To avoid the possibility that the battery chargers could remain active while the Genset was OFF and the inverter was connected as the power source on the white box,  I added two small NC 220V-220V ac relays to the ac panel that automatically open turning OFF the AC current to the battery chargers if the inverter was left ON.  So, the only modification of the ac AMEL circuit inside the boat was adding these two NC relays with their control lines fed by: 1) to the hot wires feeding the Battery chargers (red dotted), and 2)  to the common wire output from to the inverter at the corresponding outlet of the white box (brown dotted).

 

 Because the shore power in most of the marinas of the Caribbean is 60Hz, to use the cloth washer, the dishwasher, or the microwave oven, that need 50 Hz  I disconnect the shore power and connect the 5 KW 240 volt 50 Hz inverter to the white box.

 

With this large inverter the water maker can be used with the batteries for the first hour, and during a second hour with the Genset that keeps making water and charging 160 amps back into the batteries. So with only one hour of Genset, I get two hours of water making.  Also, the boat can be cooled for one hour in the evening by running the AC with the lithium batteries and still leave plenty of energy in the batteries to keep the regular DC loads running overnight.

 

In summary, this design is simple to implement, leaves the AMEL AC circuits virtually intact, allows the use of all the AC 50 Hz devices, and more importantly, is simple to use.  No need to think about changing different switches for different conditions to create specific results.

 


Genuine alternator for a yanmar 4jh3

Eric Freedman <kimberlite@...>
 

 

Does anyone have a USA source for a Yanmar genuine Hitachi 4jh3 isolated ground alternator?

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 


Re: Cooling Super Maramu Refrigeration Units

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Paul,

Our fridge/freezers pull cool air in from under the saloon table. The dust collects in a place you can easily clean and the warm air in the cabinet vents up and out behind the seat backs in the corner. It's worked well for us over the years.

As Michael and Robin point out, there are lots of inexpensive cooling fan options (used for computers, etc.). Definitely worth getting a spare or two.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
NZ


On Sat, Oct 30, 2021, 3:46 PM Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I thought I would throw this out to the group and see what those more knowledgeable than myself had to say.

I recently had to replace a bad fan on the aft salon refrigeration chest.  The fan I was replacing was installed to draw air from the salon, over the condenser, and into the compartment where the compressor and electronics are housed (sucking cooler air over the condenser).

When I looked at the forward unit in the salon, the fan was mounted the opposite way. That unit draws air from the compartment where the unit is installed, and blows it over the condenser and out into the salon (blowing warmer air over the condenser).  Additionally, this fan was the same brand and model sold by Coastal Climate Control (a US Frigoboat Distributor) which made me wonder if this was the original fan with the original Amel installation (blowing air out).

The Frigoboat installation  instructions seem to imply that the original set up is to blow air from the installed compartment and out (to the salon in our case):

“These units are designed to be mounted with compressor right way up on a horizontal surface in areas where they will not be susceptible to physical or water damage, but accessible for service. They require good ventilation, preferably expelling the heated air to another location by attaching a flexible duct of not more than 6' in length to the duct ring on the unit. A duct kit is available for Capri 35 and Capri 50 models. Do not add any filter type material anywhere in the air flow.

If air is required to be drawn into the unit from another area, the fan may be reversed by removing the housing and re-mounting the fan in the opposite orientation. Reversing the fan leads does not make the fan run in reverse, and the incorrect polarity will result in the fan not operating.

There should be adequate ventilation to allow cool air to enter the condenser, and precautions made to prevent the heated expelled air from being drawn back in. The temperature of the air entering the condenser determines the efficiency of the system. Re-circulating the heated air back into the condenser in a sealed or poorly ventilated cabinet will result in poor system performance. Poor system performance will also result from air being drawn in from a heated space, i.e. an engine room.”

Google searches seem to imply that these fans do a better job blowing than they do sucking, so the question is, what is better?  Blowing a lot of warmer air over the condenser and out into the salon or sucking less’ but cooler air over the condenser and into the installation compartment where all the heat is generated?

I tested the forward fridge unit with the fan installed both ways and the unit ran for basically the same amount of time regardless of fan direction, although the cabin temperature was only 74 degrees Fahrenheit.  I imagine things might be different at higher temperatures (which I plan to check).

My feeling is that the better mode of operation is to introduce cooler air over the condenser and into the installation area.  I believe this would be the more effective way to both cool the condenser efficiently and cool the area where the heat is being generated (compressor definitely felt cooler to the touch drawing air in rather that blowing it out).  Additionally, having the fan blow from the installation compartment and into the salon means that the dust is going to collect on the compartment face of the condenser.  To me, that translates to a situation whereby the condenser is rarely getting cleaned as you would have to gain access the area, remove the fan, and get the vacuum at it (another project for the list).

With the fan drawing air into the condenser, you can easily inspect the condenser from the salon and give it a cleaning whenever the vacuum is out to clean the floor.

As I said, I plan to do some more testing when we get to warmer climates, but I am curios to find out how others currently have their fans installed and any thoughts on which way is indeed best for our installations?

Incidentally, our galley fridge is also set up to draw air from the galley, over the condenser, and then towards the compressor.

Thank you in advance for any and all replies.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
Preparing to depart for Brunswick, GA

www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Volvo RPM issue

Doug Smith
 

Thanks Mohammad. Great data points. I’ll check mine next week against your values. The auto prop sounds like a consensus target as well as verifying the waste gate is fully moving through its range. At least I have a direction to proceed from here. 

Thanks, Doug Smith

Amel 54-113, Aventura
White Point Marina
Kinsale VA, USA
Dugsmith98@...

On Oct 30, 2021, at 11:48 AM, Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:



Hi Doug;

 

We dealt with a check engine error message last season that was related to the turbo boost pressure, so I did spend some time reading up on the function of the Variable Geometry turbo (VGT)  that is installed on the D3-110IC.

 

The VGT basically adjusts the physical size of the inlet of the turbo based on the amount of exhaust pressure available to produce the maximum consistent boost, so that there is wider range of power available and to minimize the peaky boost that some turbos produce. If you do not get the proper boost pressure from the turbo, the engine will not reach maximum RPMs. Since the turbo was just rebuilt and assuming the work was done correctly, and the fact that you are not getting a check engine error, you should be seeing boost pressures that match the RPMS.

 

On ours the Boost VS RPM is as follows:

 

RPM                                      Boost (kpa)

 

1600                                       20

1700                                       20

1800                                       30

1900                                       40

2000                                       50

 

This is in gear and not at idle. How much boost pressure are you seeing at these RPMs?

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Doug Smith via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 29, 2021 7:44 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Volvo RPM issue

 

Question for the group.

I have seen many messages from a few of you with the Volvo D3-110, where you have worked on or around the turbo. I have read through most that I could find and spoken to a couple of you to try to figure out our issue.

I have a Volvo D3-110-I C, and it has around 2000 hours on it.  I purchased it 24 months ago, and on survey it would run up to 3000 RPM’s. After running it on a longer passage, of 5 days, at 1500 RPM, I haven’t been able to get up to 3000 RPM’s again. When moving the throttle forward, the engine will climb to about 1500-1600 and slowly over the course of 2-3 seconds continue climbing up to 2070.  No more. At the dock and in neutral, it will easily climb to 3000, without hesitancy and the engine is responsive to the throttle appropriately.  I lubricated the external turbo actuator, but it didn’t change the hesitancy or the top RPM and it moves freely.

Next, I did the seasonal haulout, and the bottom was cleaned and the prop was shiny again. All blades of the autoprop were free to rotate.

The first day back in the water, I could get to 3000, and I figured my problem was solved.  But literally the next week, I was unable to get back to 3000.  Same exact sense at the throttle, and same top RPM of 2070.

So I had the turbo rebuilt.  In speaking with Mark McGovern, he was confident that a good cleaning would likely be needed after the prolonged running at 1500.  Rebuilding a turbo, seemed too precise a job, so I had it professionally done, and the guy who did it felt there was some carbon build up, and after replacing the internal bearings, assured me this one would run like new. After reinstalling it, no change. At all. 2070.  Same hesitancy at the throttle.

So then I came across those threads speaking of the Turbo boost pressure sensor, Bosch 31355463.  Certainly, that must be it.  No change after installing it.

The engine starts easily, runs at a good temperature, and seems to perform well at the lower RPM’s. 1500 is the sweet spot. Runs fine up to 1800-1900. The transmission has a new filter and new fluid.  The C-drive Wear bushing, seals and fluid have all been recently changed. I double checked the tightness of the exhaust manifold, and the mixing elbow is clear.
Air filter intake is clean and the filter is new. And no error codes on the dash display.
Running out of ideas here, and hoping someone out there has some experience with this type of problem. I would happily bring a Volvo mechanic on board, to solve this, but have heard so many experiences from the group that suggests this might not be easily fixed by them.

 

Thank you for any of your thoughts on this.

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

White Point Marina, Kinsale VA USA


Re: FA50 Silent mode on A54?

Porter McRoberts
 

Oh well!

Off to Australia this am. 
Trying to get to Coffs Harbour where we may or may not have to do quarantine. 
Brisbane is a certainty. 

Ahh the joys of dealing with bureaucracy in Covid times!  

Hope your well Bill!  

Cheers

Porter and crew
 


On Oct 31, 2021, at 6:51 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Of course! 🙁


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sat, Oct 30, 2021 at 9:06 AM Chris Likins <likinsca@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Furuno tells me I have an older FA50 which is not capable of silent mode. Their solution? Buy a new one... 😅


Re: Cooling Super Maramu Refrigeration Units

Michael & Robyn
 

Hi Paul,

we replaced all fans of our frigoboat fridges with:
epm-pabst fans 4412FGL: DC Fan, 12V, 120x120x25mm, 55.3CFM, 1.3W, 26dBA, Wire Leads
and added screens epm-pabst LZ60  to prevent the dust get into the fan itself, because that is what killed our pantry fridge fan.
We bought em here:
https://www.alliedelec.com/product/ebm-papst/4412fgl/70105044/?keyword=70105044
https://www.alliedelec.com/product/ebm-papst/lz60/70105471/?keyword=70105471
be careful which way you mount the screen to the fan so the blades don't scrape (ask me why I know...).
These fans are so much quieter and provide at least the same amount of airflow.

We choose to blow air outwards of the cabinets in the hopes that there is less dust coming from the bilge area.
If you would choose to blow air towards the condenser it would be easier to clean the dust off the screens with a vacuum occasionally.  If I would have to redo the fridges I would go for it.
I agree with Bill K. that the direction doesn't really matter much from an air temperature perspective. The dirt on the condenser fins is the bigger issue.

kind regards
--
Michael & Robyn

SY RIPPLE SM2K # 417
currently BLM Brunswick GA


Re: FA50 Silent mode on A54?

 

Of course! 🙁


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sat, Oct 30, 2021 at 9:06 AM Chris Likins <likinsca@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Furuno tells me I have an older FA50 which is not capable of silent mode. Their solution? Buy a new one... 😅


Re: Volvo RPM issue

 

Doug,

Maybe this helps and maybe it will make sense to those Amel owners who have not experienced vacuum controls on a diesel engine. On older diesel engines for boats, there was no vacuum. The D3 might have been the game-changer for this.  Full Disclosure: The reason I know a little about this is that I own a 1985 MBZ diesel which has 2 electric vacuum pumps and one mechanical vacuum pump. I believe the only way to get vacuum on most diesel engines is to "pump it" with a pump, electric or mechanical.

I think this is what Mark is referring to and how to check it. Unlike most diesel engines prior to the D3, the D3 has vacuum-operated systems. You'll need a hand vacuum pump with a gauge that you can buy online from auto parts suppliers. I doubt the mechanical vacuum pump is defective, but trace that vacuum line looking for loose connections, cracks, or breaks.
image.png


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sat, Oct 30, 2021 at 10:26 AM Mark & Debbie Mueller <brass.ring@...> wrote:

Hi Doug,

Checking wide-open throttle at the dock may not necessarily reflect what you see underway.  The vacuum pressure in the engine is usually dramatically different under full load conditions versus no load.

There is a vacuum operated device on the turbo I have always heard called a waste gate, Volvo calls it a turbo actuator.  This device is a valve that controls the flow of exhaust gases to the turbine wheel.  If the vacuum pressure is not correct the turbo will never develop full boost pressure.  I am not sure of the D3 spec on vacuum but it might be worthwhile to try and measure it if the following does not work.  You may have a vacuum leak somewhere in the system. 

Take a look at the OEM Fault Codes shown on the Volvo multifunction display; see the attached PDF on how to retrieve those fault codes to see if any refer to the turbo.  Next, take a look at the Volvo service bulletin regarding the turbo actuator – be sure to click on the “Comments” at the top of your PDF reader for additional information.  It does take a little bit of effort to push the linkage causing the vacuum actuator and wastegate to operate manually.

Forgot the attachments in the earlier message.

Good luck!!


--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54


Re: Volvo RPM issue

 

Ian & Doug,

Ian is absolutely correct. An AutoProp will not bite the water when tied up at the dock, versus going forward.

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Sat, Oct 30, 2021 at 9:17 AM ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:
Hi Doug,

 Just a comment on running your engine at the dock---if you have an Autoprop it will not load up  properly when the boat is tied to a dock as there is not the flow of water that you get when the boat is moving. Because of that, it's not difficult to get to full revs at a dock.
 That can be a problem if you run aground. I don't think you get the full power out of an Autoprop when stationary. Just avoid those sand banks  ( as we didn't once in the USVIs ....)

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Mark & Debbie Mueller <brass.ring@...>
Sent: 30 October 2021 13:44
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Volvo RPM issue
 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Doug,

Checking wide-open throttle at the dock may not necessarily reflect what you see underway.  The vacuum pressure in the engine is usually dramatically different under full load conditions versus no load.

There is a vacuum operated device on the turbo I have always heard called a waste gate, Volvo calls it a turbo actuator.  This device is a valve that controls the flow of exhaust gases to the turbine wheel.  If the vacuum pressure is not correct the turbo will never develop full boost pressure.  I am not sure of the D3 spec on vacuum but it might be worthwhile to try and measure it if the following does not work.  You may have a vacuum leak somewhere in the system. 

Take a look at the OEM Fault Codes shown on the Volvo multifunction display; see the attached PDF on how to retrieve those fault codes to see if any refer to the turbo.  Next, take a look at the Volvo service bulletin regarding the turbo actuator – be sure to click on the “Comments” at the top of your PDF reader for additional information.  It does take a little bit of effort to push the linkage causing the vacuum actuator and wastegate to operate manually.

Good luck!!

--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54


Re: Bow Thruster Travel Sensors H, B, and SP

Paul Harries
 


Re: Volvo RPM issue

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Doug;

 

We dealt with a check engine error message last season that was related to the turbo boost pressure, so I did spend some time reading up on the function of the Variable Geometry turbo (VGT)  that is installed on the D3-110IC.

 

The VGT basically adjusts the physical size of the inlet of the turbo based on the amount of exhaust pressure available to produce the maximum consistent boost, so that there is wider range of power available and to minimize the peaky boost that some turbos produce. If you do not get the proper boost pressure from the turbo, the engine will not reach maximum RPMs. Since the turbo was just rebuilt and assuming the work was done correctly, and the fact that you are not getting a check engine error, you should be seeing boost pressures that match the RPMS.

 

On ours the Boost VS RPM is as follows:

 

RPM                                      Boost (kpa)

 

1600                                       20

1700                                       20

1800                                       30

1900                                       40

2000                                       50

 

This is in gear and not at idle. How much boost pressure are you seeing at these RPMs?

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Doug Smith via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 29, 2021 7:44 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Volvo RPM issue

 

Question for the group.

I have seen many messages from a few of you with the Volvo D3-110, where you have worked on or around the turbo. I have read through most that I could find and spoken to a couple of you to try to figure out our issue.

I have a Volvo D3-110-I C, and it has around 2000 hours on it.  I purchased it 24 months ago, and on survey it would run up to 3000 RPM’s. After running it on a longer passage, of 5 days, at 1500 RPM, I haven’t been able to get up to 3000 RPM’s again. When moving the throttle forward, the engine will climb to about 1500-1600 and slowly over the course of 2-3 seconds continue climbing up to 2070.  No more. At the dock and in neutral, it will easily climb to 3000, without hesitancy and the engine is responsive to the throttle appropriately.  I lubricated the external turbo actuator, but it didn’t change the hesitancy or the top RPM and it moves freely.

Next, I did the seasonal haulout, and the bottom was cleaned and the prop was shiny again. All blades of the autoprop were free to rotate.

The first day back in the water, I could get to 3000, and I figured my problem was solved.  But literally the next week, I was unable to get back to 3000.  Same exact sense at the throttle, and same top RPM of 2070.

So I had the turbo rebuilt.  In speaking with Mark McGovern, he was confident that a good cleaning would likely be needed after the prolonged running at 1500.  Rebuilding a turbo, seemed too precise a job, so I had it professionally done, and the guy who did it felt there was some carbon build up, and after replacing the internal bearings, assured me this one would run like new. After reinstalling it, no change. At all. 2070.  Same hesitancy at the throttle.

So then I came across those threads speaking of the Turbo boost pressure sensor, Bosch 31355463.  Certainly, that must be it.  No change after installing it.

The engine starts easily, runs at a good temperature, and seems to perform well at the lower RPM’s. 1500 is the sweet spot. Runs fine up to 1800-1900. The transmission has a new filter and new fluid.  The C-drive Wear bushing, seals and fluid have all been recently changed. I double checked the tightness of the exhaust manifold, and the mixing elbow is clear.
Air filter intake is clean and the filter is new. And no error codes on the dash display.
Running out of ideas here, and hoping someone out there has some experience with this type of problem. I would happily bring a Volvo mechanic on board, to solve this, but have heard so many experiences from the group that suggests this might not be easily fixed by them.

 

Thank you for any of your thoughts on this.

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

White Point Marina, Kinsale VA USA


Re: Volvo RPM issue

Mark & Debbie Mueller
 

Hi Doug,

Checking wide-open throttle at the dock may not necessarily reflect what you see underway.  The vacuum pressure in the engine is usually dramatically different under full load conditions versus no load.

There is a vacuum operated device on the turbo I have always heard called a waste gate, Volvo calls it a turbo actuator.  This device is a valve that controls the flow of exhaust gases to the turbine wheel.  If the vacuum pressure is not correct the turbo will never develop full boost pressure.  I am not sure of the D3 spec on vacuum but it might be worthwhile to try and measure it if the following does not work.  You may have a vacuum leak somewhere in the system. 

Take a look at the OEM Fault Codes shown on the Volvo multifunction display; see the attached PDF on how to retrieve those fault codes to see if any refer to the turbo.  Next, take a look at the Volvo service bulletin regarding the turbo actuator – be sure to click on the “Comments” at the top of your PDF reader for additional information.  It does take a little bit of effort to push the linkage causing the vacuum actuator and wastegate to operate manually.

Forgot the attachments in the earlier message.

Good luck!!


--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54


Re: Volvo RPM issue

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Doug,

 Just a comment on running your engine at the dock---if you have an Autoprop it will not load up  properly when the boat is tied to a dock as there is not the flow of water that you get when the boat is moving. Because of that, it's not difficult to get to full revs at a dock.
 That can be a problem if you run aground. I don't think you get the full power out of an Autoprop when stationary. Just avoid those sand banks  ( as we didn't once in the USVIs ....)

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Mark & Debbie Mueller <brass.ring@...>
Sent: 30 October 2021 13:44
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Volvo RPM issue
 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Doug,

Checking wide-open throttle at the dock may not necessarily reflect what you see underway.  The vacuum pressure in the engine is usually dramatically different under full load conditions versus no load.

There is a vacuum operated device on the turbo I have always heard called a waste gate, Volvo calls it a turbo actuator.  This device is a valve that controls the flow of exhaust gases to the turbine wheel.  If the vacuum pressure is not correct the turbo will never develop full boost pressure.  I am not sure of the D3 spec on vacuum but it might be worthwhile to try and measure it if the following does not work.  You may have a vacuum leak somewhere in the system. 

Take a look at the OEM Fault Codes shown on the Volvo multifunction display; see the attached PDF on how to retrieve those fault codes to see if any refer to the turbo.  Next, take a look at the Volvo service bulletin regarding the turbo actuator – be sure to click on the “Comments” at the top of your PDF reader for additional information.  It does take a little bit of effort to push the linkage causing the vacuum actuator and wastegate to operate manually.

Good luck!!

--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54


Re: FA50 Silent mode on A54?

Chris Likins
 

Hi all,

Furuno tells me I have an older FA50 which is not capable of silent mode. Their solution? Buy a new one... 😅


Re: Volvo RPM issue

 

Doug,

All I can add is that in your situation it is almost always the autoprop.

One barnacle on one blade at just the right spot can cause that single blade to dig deeper in the water. Also, I am sure that you are aware of the AutoProp bearing replacement intervals of 800 hours. I have seen others replace the bearings between 800 and 1200 without an issue. You didn't mention the bearings and I am betting the previous owner never replaced them. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Sat, Oct 30, 2021, 7:15 AM Doug Smith via groups.io <dugsmith98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks Bill and Martin. 
Yes, the auto prop was moving nicely when we hauled out and I had lubricated it and cleaned it externally prior to launch. I think it is good. 
As for a laser tach, no, I haven’t done that, since the sounds and speed match the engine tach. I can hear the engine as it speeds up to that level and the boat hits 7 knots  on flat water at 1650 rpms. 1250, 6 knots, and at about 1400, 6.7-6.8.
No sound of any thing irregular at those rpms. 

Thanks, Doug Smith

Amel 54-113, Aventura
White Point Marina
Kinsale VA, USA

On Oct 29, 2021, at 11:11 PM, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Doug,

This is a tough one... Your run through of the testing you have done so far is good. I don't have any quick and easy answers based on specific experience, but a couple of questions:

Have you checked the accuracy of the dashboard tach with a separate measurement?  Maybe a laser tach on the flywheel?

Does the boat speed reflect the lower RPM's you see? In other words, does the boat run at the speed you expect at 2070 RPM?  Or is it faster, like you used to get at full throttle?

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA (heading south in 24 to 48 hours...)


Re: Cooling Super Maramu Refrigeration Units

Jose Venegas
 

Paul,
The proper way is to blow air into the condenser. Not only it improves the heat transfer by blowing cooler air into the condenser but , more importantly, it filters the air before it is blown into it
José
Ipanema SM2k 278
Red frog Panama

Enviado desde mi iPhone

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