Date   

Santorin shaft alternator diagram

yachtakwaaba@...
 

P
Please does anyone have a wiring diagram for the shaft alternator as installed in1990 santorin ?
Wrote to Amel 10 days ago and have not yet had a reply.

Thanks
Chris Smither


Re: [Amel] Battery Plan for Amel 54

ericmeury@...
 

Hi Rainer,

The previous owner purchased a hydrovane (thanks bob...we love our boat btw) and although there has been much discussion on its effectiveness on this forum mostly from SM owners (it might be two small to handle the SM) we are thinking that we too can get away with not having to use a generator.  I know of only one santorin that had one installed. 

I will say that you might be the only SM owner that doesn't use their onan on regular basis!  I have heard the same complaints form other duo gen owners.  They say it is a great hydro gen. 


Re: [Amel] Battery Plan for Amel 54

ericmeury@...
 

Attilio & Maria Siviero

I usuall keep the santoin in reverse when sailing as we are not using the shaft alternator yet.  Maybe joel can chime in here...but if there was risk to the gearbox why would amel intstall this....Is there a pump to move the oil around or does the prop turning by sail move the oil around   and if so what precautions should owners take to make sure everything functions for as planned.  - and how often have you had to change your wear bearing? and do you think that is because of the prop spinning.

Eric J.


Re: [Amel] Battery Plan for Amel 54

ericmeury@...
 


Grounding Strap - Santorin the same?

ericmeury@...
 

Bill..

Your post is great.  Does anybody know if the measurements are the same, Ironically i have a metal guy that owes me some cash so i might as well have him make me a few of these to keep on the boat. 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] RE: Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

Mark Erdos
 

My Amel came equipped with a toilet brush taped to a long stick. This was stored in the engine compartment. It wasn’t long before I figured out it’s intended use J

 

 

Best regards,

 

Mark

 

SM2K #275

www.creampuff.us

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of john martin
Sent: Friday, April 11, 2014 10:38 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] RE: Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

 

 

There are 2 items that are a must on an Amel. A wet dry vac. and a pressure washer. The pressure washer can be bought any where and fits on the end of your regular hose. This 3 foot long pipe goes to the bottom of the bilge and blast all the crud from the sides and bottom of the bilge. Take  the filter off the wet dry vacuum and tape a plastic 3 foot long pipe on the end of the hose to reach the bottom. With numerous fill ups and washing, the bilge will be like new. I found a great pressure washer(haven't bought it yet). It even has a container for soap and can go from heavy to light washing. Great for the engine room. Its only $35.00 @ Hyde tools.com Phone 800-8724933  John  "Moon DOG" SM248


To: amelyachtowners@...
From: no_reply@...
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 06:26:56 -0700
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

 

 

Hello,

 

Looks like our electric systems on Super Maramu 2000 #350 are currently ungrounded.

 

We spent a most wonderful afternoon yesterday exploring our bilge or sea chest in the engine compartment.  Here is what we found hanging or attached to the forward bulkhead and usually hidden by the bilge pump float+switch cylinder we removed:

 

1.  Grounding wires meld/union

Hangs from about 8 grounding wires coming from port and starboard near the top of the bilge pump’s high water mark.

 

2.  Grounding strap joint to the wires

Hangs from the meld or union

 

3.  Grounding strap loop

The strap does not immediately hang to the bottom of the bilge.  Instead, it hangs loosely from the above structures 1. and 2., and then loops back to the forward bulkhead.

 

4.  Grounding strap attachment to the forward bulkhead

This is well below the bilge pump’s high water mark, and therefore is submerged most of the time.  Covered in muck, we did not see what does this attachment consist of.

 

5.  Grounding strap extension to the bottom of the bilge

The strap hangs from the above structure 4. and ends an estimated 20 centimetres (8 inches) before it reaches the bottom of the bilge.  The end does not look like a clean cut and instead looks ragged.

 

We tried to fully evacuate the bilge but were unable to remove the final 2 centimetres of water (1 inch) to see if we could spot the keel bolt at the bottom.  As the water is pitch dark, we were unable to see the bottom of the bilge.  We used two different manual pumps, but no matter what we did, a bit of extremely dark water/muck remained.  We dropped a gallon of vinegar and left it overnight, and plan to use other chemicals and brushes to see if it is possible to see the bottom.

 

Cheerio,

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

Mark Erdos
 

Francisco and Odette,

 

I did exactly what Bill describes below. Thanks to his measurement and instructions, I was able to prefabricate the replacement copper and then install later. The installation will only take a couple of hours. You will find the existing copper is attached at the keel bolt, about half way up with a screw that is inconveniently located just out of arms reach and a screw at the top.

 

In addition, I also trimmed and replaced the lugs on the ground wires attached to the copper. I did this to ensure a nice tight fit onto the new bolts I installed in the replacement copper. I also added heat shrink tubing to waterproof the lugs.

 

Thanks to Bill’s previous posting on this topic, I was able to detect that the grounding strap was breaking before it was completely in two parts.

 

Best regards,

 

Mark

 

SM2K #275

www.creampuff.us

 

 

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Bill & Judy Rouse
Sent: Friday, April 11, 2014 10:10 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

 

 

Francisco and Odette,

  1. You need to review the photos here: https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/photos/albums/138287824
  2. You should have a wet vacuum aboard...in the US we call these wet/dry shop vac. This is about the only efficient was to completely clean out the bilge sump. You will also find it handy when opening any water line or changing impellers. It can be used to suck the impeller blades from the heat exchangers.
  3. The issue with the ground strap installed by Amel is that it is susceptible to any/all chemicals that end up in the bilge. Some of these things will deteriorate the braided copper that Amel used. 

I suggest a 1/8 inch or about 3mm solid copper strap as shown in the photo. You will also need a 30mm socket and socket drive extensions totaling about 80cm to 1 meter. With all of the bends and measurements included this is not a hard job.

 

Email me if you have more questions

 

Bill

BeBe 387 

 

On Fri, Apr 11, 2014 at 1:26 PM, svperegrinus <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Hello,

 

Looks like our electric systems on Super Maramu 2000 #350 are currently ungrounded.

 

We spent a most wonderful afternoon yesterday exploring our bilge or sea chest in the engine compartment.  Here is what we found hanging or attached to the forward bulkhead and usually hidden by the bilge pump float+switch cylinder we removed:

 

1.  Grounding wires meld/union

Hangs from about 8 grounding wires coming from port and starboard near the top of the bilge pump’s high water mark.

 

2.  Grounding strap joint to the wires

Hangs from the meld or union

 

3.  Grounding strap loop

The strap does not immediately hang to the bottom of the bilge.  Instead, it hangs loosely from the above structures 1. and 2., and then loops back to the forward bulkhead.

 

4.  Grounding strap attachment to the forward bulkhead

This is well below the bilge pump’s high water mark, and therefore is submerged most of the time.  Covered in muck, we did not see what does this attachment consist of.

 

5.  Grounding strap extension to the bottom of the bilge

The strap hangs from the above structure 4. and ends an estimated 20 centimetres (8 inches) before it reaches the bottom of the bilge.  The end does not look like a clean cut and instead looks ragged.

 

We tried to fully evacuate the bilge but were unable to remove the final 2 centimetres of water (1 inch) to see if we could spot the keel bolt at the bottom.  As the water is pitch dark, we were unable to see the bottom of the bilge.  We used two different manual pumps, but no matter what we did, a bit of extremely dark water/muck remained.  We dropped a gallon of vinegar and left it overnight, and plan to use other chemicals and brushes to see if it is possible to see the bottom.

 

Cheerio,

 

 

 

 


Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

svperegrinus <no_reply@...>
 

Many thanks Bill and Kent for the information and tutorial.  What would we do without you?

This is now our new #1 top priority project.

Best,


Re: Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

john martin <symoondog@...>
 

There are 2 items that are a must on an Amel. A wet dry vac. and a pressure washer. The pressure washer can be bought any where and fits on the end of your regular hose. This 3 foot long pipe goes to the bottom of the bilge and blast all the crud from the sides and bottom of the bilge. Take  the filter off the wet dry vacuum and tape a plastic 3 foot long pipe on the end of the hose to reach the bottom. With numerous fill ups and washing, the bilge will be like new. I found a great pressure washer(haven't bought it yet). It even has a container for soap and can go from heavy to light washing. Great for the engine room. Its only $35.00 @ Hyde tools.com Phone 800-8724933  John  "Moon DOG" SM248


To: amelyachtowners@...
From: no_reply@...
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 06:26:56 -0700
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

 

Hello,


Looks like our electric systems on Super Maramu 2000 #350 are currently ungrounded.


We spent a most wonderful afternoon yesterday exploring our bilge or sea chest in the engine compartment.  Here is what we found hanging or attached to the forward bulkhead and usually hidden by the bilge pump float+switch cylinder we removed:


1.  Grounding wires meld/union

Hangs from about 8 grounding wires coming from port and starboard near the top of the bilge pump’s high water mark.


2.  Grounding strap joint to the wires

Hangs from the meld or union


3.  Grounding strap loop

The strap does not immediately hang to the bottom of the bilge.  Instead, it hangs loosely from the above structures 1. and 2., and then loops back to the forward bulkhead.


4.  Grounding strap attachment to the forward bulkhead

This is well below the bilge pump’s high water mark, and therefore is submerged most of the time.  Covered in muck, we did not see what does this attachment consist of.


5.  Grounding strap extension to the bottom of the bilge

The strap hangs from the above structure 4. and ends an estimated 20 centimetres (8 inches) before it reaches the bottom of the bilge.  The end does not look like a clean cut and instead looks ragged.


We tried to fully evacuate the bilge but were unable to remove the final 2 centimetres of water (1 inch) to see if we could spot the keel bolt at the bottom.  As the water is pitch dark, we were unable to see the bottom of the bilge.  We used two different manual pumps, but no matter what we did, a bit of extremely dark water/muck remained.  We dropped a gallon of vinegar and left it overnight, and plan to use other chemicals and brushes to see if it is possible to see the bottom.


Cheerio,






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] RE: [Amel] Battery Plan for Amel 54

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Andrew,

Thanks...I assume that you are referring to the blog at www.svbebe.com.

My wife Judy, who writes that blog, will be happy to hear that she has another fan.

Thanks,

Bill
BeBe 387


On Thu, Apr 10, 2014 at 3:24 PM, <andrewbarron0484@...> wrote:
 

Thank you, Bill. Proves to me that sailors are the best people, and it appears Amel Owners cap that list as well. Joel has SM#477 available now, unfortunately that is about 14 months earlier than I will be buying. Thank you for the info on the charging. I am sure you will be reporting to the group on your empirical findings once you get going. I would love to look at the excel file, but really, it would be so much hieroglyphics right now until I get hands on. But thank you.

I am enjoying reading your Blog. Very good writing! Thank you.  It is blogs like yours that keep me going. Sometimes, sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic, I actually feel like I am drowning! Like a fish out of water. Thank God I live in Vancouver and the water is never more than a few minutes drive! Just seeing it makes me feel better.
Thank you, and fair winds!



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

karkauai
 

Try using a wet-dry vacuum to get the last bit of water out.  I had to replace mine a few years ago, as the bonding strap had completely corroded away.  With my new electrolytic prop shaft damage that is the first place I will look for improper bonding problem.
Kent
SM243 Kristy


On Apr 11, 2014, at 9:26 AM, svperegrinus <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Hello,


Looks like our electric systems on Super Maramu 2000 #350 are currently ungrounded.


We spent a most wonderful afternoon yesterday exploring our bilge or sea chest in the engine compartment.  Here is what we found hanging or attached to the forward bulkhead and usually hidden by the bilge pump float+switch cylinder we removed:


1.  Grounding wires meld/union

Hangs from about 8 grounding wires coming from port and starboard near the top of the bilge pump’s high water mark.


2.  Grounding strap joint to the wires

Hangs from the meld or union


3.  Grounding strap loop

The strap does not immediately hang to the bottom of the bilge.  Instead, it hangs loosely from the above structures 1. and 2., and then loops back to the forward bulkhead.


4.  Grounding strap attachment to the forward bulkhead

This is well below the bilge pump’s high water mark, and therefore is submerged most of the time.  Covered in muck, we did not see what does this attachment consist of.


5.  Grounding strap extension to the bottom of the bilge

The strap hangs from the above structure 4. and ends an estimated 20 centimetres (8 inches) before it reaches the bottom of the bilge.  The end does not look like a clean cut and instead looks ragged.


We tried to fully evacuate the bilge but were unable to remove the final 2 centimetres of water (1 inch) to see if we could spot the keel bolt at the bottom.  As the water is pitch dark, we were unable to see the bottom of the bilge.  We used two different manual pumps, but no matter what we did, a bit of extremely dark water/muck remained.  We dropped a gallon of vinegar and left it overnight, and plan to use other chemicals and brushes to see if it is possible to see the bottom.


Cheerio,





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Francisco and Odette,
  1. You need to review the photos here: https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/photos/albums/138287824
  2. You should have a wet vacuum aboard...in the US we call these wet/dry shop vac. This is about the only efficient was to completely clean out the bilge sump. You will also find it handy when opening any water line or changing impellers. It can be used to suck the impeller blades from the heat exchangers.
  3. The issue with the ground strap installed by Amel is that it is susceptible to any/all chemicals that end up in the bilge. Some of these things will deteriorate the braided copper that Amel used. 
I suggest a 1/8 inch or about 3mm solid copper strap as shown in the photo. You will also need a 30mm socket and socket drive extensions totaling about 80cm to 1 meter. With all of the bends and measurements included this is not a hard job.

Email me if you have more questions

Bill
BeBe 387 


On Fri, Apr 11, 2014 at 1:26 PM, svperegrinus <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Hello,


Looks like our electric systems on Super Maramu 2000 #350 are currently ungrounded.


We spent a most wonderful afternoon yesterday exploring our bilge or sea chest in the engine compartment.  Here is what we found hanging or attached to the forward bulkhead and usually hidden by the bilge pump float+switch cylinder we removed:


1.  Grounding wires meld/union

Hangs from about 8 grounding wires coming from port and starboard near the top of the bilge pump’s high water mark.


2.  Grounding strap joint to the wires

Hangs from the meld or union


3.  Grounding strap loop

The strap does not immediately hang to the bottom of the bilge.  Instead, it hangs loosely from the above structures 1. and 2., and then loops back to the forward bulkhead.


4.  Grounding strap attachment to the forward bulkhead

This is well below the bilge pump’s high water mark, and therefore is submerged most of the time.  Covered in muck, we did not see what does this attachment consist of.


5.  Grounding strap extension to the bottom of the bilge

The strap hangs from the above structure 4. and ends an estimated 20 centimetres (8 inches) before it reaches the bottom of the bilge.  The end does not look like a clean cut and instead looks ragged.


We tried to fully evacuate the bilge but were unable to remove the final 2 centimetres of water (1 inch) to see if we could spot the keel bolt at the bottom.  As the water is pitch dark, we were unable to see the bottom of the bilge.  We used two different manual pumps, but no matter what we did, a bit of extremely dark water/muck remained.  We dropped a gallon of vinegar and left it overnight, and plan to use other chemicals and brushes to see if it is possible to see the bottom.


Cheerio,






Grounding Strap Status - Super Maramu 2000 #350

svperegrinus <no_reply@...>
 

Hello,


Looks like our electric systems on Super Maramu 2000 #350 are currently ungrounded.


We spent a most wonderful afternoon yesterday exploring our bilge or sea chest in the engine compartment.  Here is what we found hanging or attached to the forward bulkhead and usually hidden by the bilge pump float+switch cylinder we removed:


1.  Grounding wires meld/union

Hangs from about 8 grounding wires coming from port and starboard near the top of the bilge pump’s high water mark.


2.  Grounding strap joint to the wires

Hangs from the meld or union


3.  Grounding strap loop

The strap does not immediately hang to the bottom of the bilge.  Instead, it hangs loosely from the above structures 1. and 2., and then loops back to the forward bulkhead.


4.  Grounding strap attachment to the forward bulkhead

This is well below the bilge pump’s high water mark, and therefore is submerged most of the time.  Covered in muck, we did not see what does this attachment consist of.


5.  Grounding strap extension to the bottom of the bilge

The strap hangs from the above structure 4. and ends an estimated 20 centimetres (8 inches) before it reaches the bottom of the bilge.  The end does not look like a clean cut and instead looks ragged.


We tried to fully evacuate the bilge but were unable to remove the final 2 centimetres of water (1 inch) to see if we could spot the keel bolt at the bottom.  As the water is pitch dark, we were unable to see the bottom of the bilge.  We used two different manual pumps, but no matter what we did, a bit of extremely dark water/muck remained.  We dropped a gallon of vinegar and left it overnight, and plan to use other chemicals and brushes to see if it is possible to see the bottom.


Cheerio,





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Solar panels for Amel Super Maramu 53

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Drew,

You are very correct. 

I think the biggest variable among Super Maramus is consumption.  Second to that is how much an owner discharges the battey bank before charging using the generator and battery charger, or the engine and 24v alternator.

Bill Rouse
BeBe 387
sent from my tablet


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Solar panels for Amel Super Maramu 53

Siviero Attilio <attilio.siviero@...>
 

Hi Rainer,

partly agree with you on the need to allow the propeller to be always free to turn when you want to have power from the shaft generator. 

I have the same on my Santorin. I have to change the "bague d'usure" this year for this reason.

I was wondering if it is possible to stop the propeller, maybe with the reverse gear on? For a mysterious law of physics, it seems also that the advancement resistance is less when the propeller is not turning.

Fair winds

Attilio & Maria Siviero 
Amel Santorin#84 "Sisila"


Il giorno 11/apr/2014, alle ore 11:58, Rainer Huthmacher <thelastoneever@...> ha scritto:


Hi Jean Pierre,
A shaft alternator has some big disadvantage: the Amel udrive constantly has to run with it (a very expensive device to change),the gearbox turns constantly and last not least you can't use a folding prop, which will slow you down by almost a not. It also would wear out the brushing ring on the prop shaft much faster with the risk of seawater entering the udrive...
The Duogen is a nice device, I switch it from wind to water mode in less than a minute, I can't notice a drop in speed. Nevertheless as I mentioned I would not buy it again.
To run a diesel generator for many hours a day is for me as a live aboard person a no go, the maintenance ( impeller, oil change, filters, timing belts, exhaust,etc.) cost and noise is too much for me.
For me, solar panels are the way to go: pretty cheep, silent and absolutely maintenance free. They fill the battery to 100% which I would never do with my generator, 
On my boat the electric system is balanced with the 2x200w solar panels and the Duogen. Neither one of the devices looks good on the boat but form follows function...
Fair winds
Rainer
SM#69 Yin Yang

On 11.04.2014, at 10:55, Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...> wrote:

 

Hello Drew,


I seem to recall that Bill (SV Bebe) did install solar panels...  
I had a single small solar panel on my last yacht and it kept my charging to once every 2 days.
As an opinion, as I do not own an Amel, I would have solar panels and a shaft generator.  Wind vanes are too noisy, perhaps dangerous to have on a sail boat and towing a water generator is not an option if you can get equal or better results with a shaft generator.

Jean-Pierre (No Amel.. but an SM or SM2k in the future)



On 11 Apr 2014, at 10:10, Gaffney, Drew <drew.gaffney@...> wrote:

 

Dear all,
The discussion about power consumption among different Amel Super Maramu's has been very interesting.  There is a wide range of differences in terms of how often and how long owners typically run their generators.  Even though there is substantial consistency in terms of SM2K equipment, electrical power generation is highly variable
Most of the SM2K's have the Onan MDKAV generator or similar.  The Dolphin chargers have been replaced by many owners with different brands and capacities.  Most appear to have followed the original Amel arrangement of both high (100A) and low (30A) chargers.  The former to be used with the generator, the latter whilst being used with shore power.
Battery types also vary-deep cycle lead acid, AGM, etc.
Finally, some Amels have installed solar power and/or wind generators.  Bill on Bebe has done extensive calculations regarding ROI for both solar and wind/water and sees little economic advantage to adding either.
Given the differences in both power management and recharging batteries, it's not surprising that generator use might vary by >100% among Amel owners, ranging from 2.5-6hr daily.
On that background, I would note that on Revelation, our SM#390, we have new Trojan T105 batteries, but our charging time hasn't changed much between the old and the new batteries.  We have a KISS wind generator mounted on a 3m pole on the stern and 2 12V 100w monochrystaline solar panels mounted on our davits, wired in series.  These solar panels give us 24V 100W.  Finally, we have a towable Ampair water generator,  We use it only on passages and not for shorter hops.
We have tried to reduce power consumption by replacing all halogen lights with LED's.  
At anchorage with minimal sun or wind, we usually require 1.5hr of generator time twice daily.  Sailing in fairly rough seas (busy autopilot) with wind <12-15kts, and some clouds during the day,  we'll charge 1.5hr every 12hrs.
With wind >15k, lots of sunshine, and towing the Ampair, we get by with even less time on the generator.
Our consumption is typically, 2 fridges and 1 freezer, a laptop with 220V power via a Xantrex inverter,  AIS Mode B, VHF receiver, GPS, sailing instruments, and misc lights, at night, nav lights, intermittent radar.  We try to charge whenever our batteries are between 75-80%.
Like many owners, we run the generator, not only to charge batteries, but also to wash clothes, to make water, play music, and monitor our instruments, check radar, etc.  As others have noted, paying attention to current flow with charging allows these additional activities during charging if careful.
Sorry for the long reply, but I think it necessary to consider all the variables to answer the question asked.
Drew Gaffney
SM #390







Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Solar panels for Amel Super Maramu 53

Rainer Huthmacher <thelastoneever@...>
 

Hi Jean Pierre,
A shaft alternator has some big disadvantage: the Amel udrive constantly has to run with it (a very expensive device to change),the gearbox turns constantly and last not least you can't use a folding prop, which will slow you down by almost a not. It also would wear out the brushing ring on the prop shaft much faster with the risk of seawater entering the udrive...
The Duogen is a nice device, I switch it from wind to water mode in less than a minute, I can't notice a drop in speed. Nevertheless as I mentioned I would not buy it again.
To run a diesel generator for many hours a day is for me as a live aboard person a no go, the maintenance ( impeller, oil change, filters, timing belts, exhaust,etc.) cost and noise is too much for me.
For me, solar panels are the way to go: pretty cheep, silent and absolutely maintenance free. They fill the battery to 100% which I would never do with my generator, 
On my boat the electric system is balanced with the 2x200w solar panels and the Duogen. Neither one of the devices looks good on the boat but form follows function...
Fair winds
Rainer
SM#69 Yin Yang

On 11.04.2014, at 10:55, Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...> wrote:

 

Hello Drew,


I seem to recall that Bill (SV Bebe) did install solar panels...  
I had a single small solar panel on my last yacht and it kept my charging to once every 2 days.
As an opinion, as I do not own an Amel, I would have solar panels and a shaft generator.  Wind vanes are too noisy, perhaps dangerous to have on a sail boat and towing a water generator is not an option if you can get equal or better results with a shaft generator.

Jean-Pierre (No Amel.. but an SM or SM2k in the future)



On 11 Apr 2014, at 10:10, Gaffney, Drew <drew.gaffney@...> wrote:

 

Dear all,
The discussion about power consumption among different Amel Super Maramu's has been very interesting.  There is a wide range of differences in terms of how often and how long owners typically run their generators.  Even though there is substantial consistency in terms of SM2K equipment, electrical power generation is highly variable
Most of the SM2K's have the Onan MDKAV generator or similar.  The Dolphin chargers have been replaced by many owners with different brands and capacities.  Most appear to have followed the original Amel arrangement of both high (100A) and low (30A) chargers.  The former to be used with the generator, the latter whilst being used with shore power.
Battery types also vary-deep cycle lead acid, AGM, etc.
Finally, some Amels have installed solar power and/or wind generators.  Bill on Bebe has done extensive calculations regarding ROI for both solar and wind/water and sees little economic advantage to adding either.
Given the differences in both power management and recharging batteries, it's not surprising that generator use might vary by >100% among Amel owners, ranging from 2.5-6hr daily.
On that background, I would note that on Revelation, our SM#390, we have new Trojan T105 batteries, but our charging time hasn't changed much between the old and the new batteries.  We have a KISS wind generator mounted on a 3m pole on the stern and 2 12V 100w monochrystaline solar panels mounted on our davits, wired in series.  These solar panels give us 24V 100W.  Finally, we have a towable Ampair water generator,  We use it only on passages and not for shorter hops.
We have tried to reduce power consumption by replacing all halogen lights with LED's.  
At anchorage with minimal sun or wind, we usually require 1.5hr of generator time twice daily.  Sailing in fairly rough seas (busy autopilot) with wind <12-15kts, and some clouds during the day,  we'll charge 1.5hr every 12hrs.
With wind >15k, lots of sunshine, and towing the Ampair, we get by with even less time on the generator.
Our consumption is typically, 2 fridges and 1 freezer, a laptop with 220V power via a Xantrex inverter,  AIS Mode B, VHF receiver, GPS, sailing instruments, and misc lights, at night, nav lights, intermittent radar.  We try to charge whenever our batteries are between 75-80%.
Like many owners, we run the generator, not only to charge batteries, but also to wash clothes, to make water, play music, and monitor our instruments, check radar, etc.  As others have noted, paying attention to current flow with charging allows these additional activities during charging if careful.
Sorry for the long reply, but I think it necessary to consider all the variables to answer the question asked.
Drew Gaffney
SM #390




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Solar panels for Amel Super Maramu 53

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Hello Drew,

I seem to recall that Bill (SV Bebe) did install solar panels...  
I had a single small solar panel on my last yacht and it kept my charging to once every 2 days.
As an opinion, as I do not own an Amel, I would have solar panels and a shaft generator.  Wind vanes are too noisy, perhaps dangerous to have on a sail boat and towing a water generator is not an option if you can get equal or better results with a shaft generator.

Jean-Pierre (No Amel.. but an SM or SM2k in the future)



On 11 Apr 2014, at 10:10, Gaffney, Drew <drew.gaffney@...> wrote:

 

Dear all,
The discussion about power consumption among different Amel Super Maramu's has been very interesting.  There is a wide range of differences in terms of how often and how long owners typically run their generators.  Even though there is substantial consistency in terms of SM2K equipment, electrical power generation is highly variable
Most of the SM2K's have the Onan MDKAV generator or similar.  The Dolphin chargers have been replaced by many owners with different brands and capacities.  Most appear to have followed the original Amel arrangement of both high (100A) and low (30A) chargers.  The former to be used with the generator, the latter whilst being used with shore power.
Battery types also vary-deep cycle lead acid, AGM, etc.
Finally, some Amels have installed solar power and/or wind generators.  Bill on Bebe has done extensive calculations regarding ROI for both solar and wind/water and sees little economic advantage to adding either.
Given the differences in both power management and recharging batteries, it's not surprising that generator use might vary by >100% among Amel owners, ranging from 2.5-6hr daily.
On that background, I would note that on Revelation, our SM#390, we have new Trojan T105 batteries, but our charging time hasn't changed much between the old and the new batteries.  We have a KISS wind generator mounted on a 3m pole on the stern and 2 12V 100w monochrystaline solar panels mounted on our davits, wired in series.  These solar panels give us 24V 100W.  Finally, we have a towable Ampair water generator,  We use it only on passages and not for shorter hops.
We have tried to reduce power consumption by replacing all halogen lights with LED's.  
At anchorage with minimal sun or wind, we usually require 1.5hr of generator time twice daily.  Sailing in fairly rough seas (busy autopilot) with wind <12-15kts, and some clouds during the day,  we'll charge 1.5hr every 12hrs.
With wind >15k, lots of sunshine, and towing the Ampair, we get by with even less time on the generator.
Our consumption is typically, 2 fridges and 1 freezer, a laptop with 220V power via a Xantrex inverter,  AIS Mode B, VHF receiver, GPS, sailing instruments, and misc lights, at night, nav lights, intermittent radar.  We try to charge whenever our batteries are between 75-80%.
Like many owners, we run the generator, not only to charge batteries, but also to wash clothes, to make water, play music, and monitor our instruments, check radar, etc.  As others have noted, paying attention to current flow with charging allows these additional activities during charging if careful.
Sorry for the long reply, but I think it necessary to consider all the variables to answer the question asked.
Drew Gaffney
SM #390




Re: Solar panels for Amel Super Maramu 53

Gaffney, Drew <drew.gaffney@...>
 

Dear all,
The discussion about power consumption among different Amel Super Maramu's has been very interesting.  There is a wide range of differences in terms of how often and how long owners typically run their generators.  Even though there is substantial consistency in terms of SM2K equipment, electrical power generation is highly variable
Most of the SM2K's have the Onan MDKAV generator or similar.  The Dolphin chargers have been replaced by many owners with different brands and capacities.  Most appear to have followed the original Amel arrangement of both high (100A) and low (30A) chargers.  The former to be used with the generator, the latter whilst being used with shore power.
Battery types also vary-deep cycle lead acid, AGM, etc.
Finally, some Amels have installed solar power and/or wind generators.  Bill on Bebe has done extensive calculations regarding ROI for both solar and wind/water and sees little economic advantage to adding either.
Given the differences in both power management and recharging batteries, it's not surprising that generator use might vary by >100% among Amel owners, ranging from 2.5-6hr daily.
On that background, I would note that on Revelation, our SM#390, we have new Trojan T105 batteries, but our charging time hasn't changed much between the old and the new batteries.  We have a KISS wind generator mounted on a 3m pole on the stern and 2 12V 100w monochrystaline solar panels mounted on our davits, wired in series.  These solar panels give us 24V 100W.  Finally, we have a towable Ampair water generator,  We use it only on passages and not for shorter hops.
We have tried to reduce power consumption by replacing all halogen lights with LED's.  
At anchorage with minimal sun or wind, we usually require 1.5hr of generator time twice daily.  Sailing in fairly rough seas (busy autopilot) with wind <12-15kts, and some clouds during the day,  we'll charge 1.5hr every 12hrs.
With wind >15k, lots of sunshine, and towing the Ampair, we get by with even less time on the generator.
Our consumption is typically, 2 fridges and 1 freezer, a laptop with 220V power via a Xantrex inverter,  AIS Mode B, VHF receiver, GPS, sailing instruments, and misc lights, at night, nav lights, intermittent radar.  We try to charge whenever our batteries are between 75-80%.
Like many owners, we run the generator, not only to charge batteries, but also to wash clothes, to make water, play music, and monitor our instruments, check radar, etc.  As others have noted, paying attention to current flow with charging allows these additional activities during charging if careful.
Sorry for the long reply, but I think it necessary to consider all the variables to answer the question asked.
Drew Gaffney
SM #390


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Solar panels .... Energy Solor hot water

Rainer Huthmacher <thelastoneever@...>
 

Hi Eric
When sailing I use my Duogen all the time in hydro mode. When I do more than 7 knots it takes care of the whole boat, including freezer. It is a fantastic device when it works, but it is a peace of high maintenance. In wind mode it does not produce a lot of electricity under 25 knots of wind. 
I hade a blade at 40 knots of wind breaking and shooting with deadly force trough the boat, the main bearing broke, the attachment hardware is very flimsy etc.
So after all I do not recommend the device, it is too expensive and to much maintenance, I would not by it again.
Fair winds
Rainer Huthmacher 
SM#69 Yin Yang

On 11.04.2014, at 01:53, ericmeury@... wrote:

 

Hey Rainer.

Did you use the Duo Gen in hydro mode as well.  We have a santorin and the previous owner took great car of her but did not use the Shaft Alternator.  It needs a new regulator (we have but just not hooked up yet).  I'm also trying to figure out a way to have my hot water tank heated by the sun.  I think I found the panels and I will install two on the bimini.  The owner of the company thinks that i might be able to bypass the engine completely and use the heat exchanger loop for the solar  I don't really want to hook the two loops together even with bypass valves  ...another idea is that Torrid Marine will make me a tank that has two loops plus the 110 (or 220) element.  (but the price tag is $995).   I looked at the ISOTemp 40 but it is too big for the santorin.

I do have 4 panels that were on the boat from the original owner in 1993 so it probably isn't using the new mppt regulators, but i do find that it keeps up pretty well if we are diligent with out power usage.   When i leave the boat at the marina i never plug in and the batteries are always at 100%. 

I may at some point change the solar to newer more efficient panels but i also have an amp air on the mizzen and i do have a new unused four winds sitting in my garage and a windbugger with pole that was installed on the boat from the original owner.  (The wind bugger is for sale).  I think with the combination of all these sources i won't need to run the generator or the engine to have hot water either.

Eric
SV Omorfi Thea


Re: [Amel] Battery Plan for Amel 54

andrewbarron0484@...
 

Thank you, Bill. Proves to me that sailors are the best people, and it appears Amel Owners cap that list as well. Joel has SM#477 available now, unfortunately that is about 14 months earlier than I will be buying. Thank you for the info on the charging. I am sure you will be reporting to the group on your empirical findings once you get going. I would love to look at the excel file, but really, it would be so much hieroglyphics right now until I get hands on. But thank you.

I am enjoying reading your Blog. Very good writing! Thank you.  It is blogs like yours that keep me going. Sometimes, sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic, I actually feel like I am drowning! Like a fish out of water. Thank God I live in Vancouver and the water is never more than a few minutes drive! Just seeing it makes me feel better.
Thank you, and fair winds!